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  • 1.
    Andersson, Filip
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Industrial design.
    Development of a visual brand language and a mobility aid2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Medical technology is a field of work with connection to prevention, diagnosis, monitoring, treatment and care. The company Human care is a well-established company in Sweden with red rollators seen all over Sweden. The product family of Human care has four different units of mobility aid solutions. These are lifting devices, rollators, healthcare beds, and convertible chairs. In common they share the same brand, but they do not have any clear connection to each other when it comes to form, colour and texture.

    In this thesis a visual brand language is developed and created for the company. At the same time, it is implemented and developed on a lifting solution for patient mobility in the healthcare. To find a brand language which should be easier to implement on the products investigations into the brand and products has been done. By trying to find a common ground in the current products the step from creation to implementation of a guideline will be smaller. Further, research has been done in colour psychology, ergonomics, surface textures and forms.

    The result of this thesis is a guideline which the company can use as a base when developing new products. In this thesis, it has been implemented on a lifting device for patient transportation.

  • 2.
    André, Samuel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Modeling of transdisciplinary engineering assets using the design platform approach for improved customization ability2018In: Advanced Engineering Informatics, ISSN 1474-0346, E-ISSN 1873-5320, Vol. 38, p. 277-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Original equipment suppliers (OES) that develop unique products are continuously faced with changing requirements during both the quotation and product development processes. This challenge is a different reality from companies that develop off-the-shelf products for the end consumer, which use fixed specifications and where product platforms have been a strong enabler for efficient mass customization. However, product platforms cannot adequately support companies working as OES. The reason is that a high level of customization is required which means that interfaces cannot be standardized, the performance is not negotiable, requirements are not initially fixed, and the specific system interacts with, is affected by, or affects other systems that are simultaneously developed in a transdisciplinary environment. The design platform (DP) approach provides a coherent environment for heterogeneous and transdisciplinary design resources to be used in product development by supporting both designing and off-the-shelf solutions. This research describes the introduction, application and further development of the DP approach at an automotive supplier to support the development of customized solutions when traditional modularity or platform scalability do not suffice. A computer tool called Design Platform Manager has been developed to support the creation and visualization of the DP. The support tool has a connection to a product data management database to link the platform model to the various kinds of engineering assets needed or intended to support variant creation. Finally, the support tool was evaluated by the case company representatives showing promising results. 

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-08-08 00:00
  • 3.
    Bengtsson, Erik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Concept Development of Stroller Wheel2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 4.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Raudberget, Dag
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Organising for knowledge and learning – a balancing act between divergent forces2018In: Human resource management: A Nordic perspective / [ed] H. Ahl, I. Bergmo Prvulovic & K. Kilhammar, London, UK: Routledge, 2018, p. 42-55Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research and development is a knowledge-intense activity where HR departments must balance many internal tensions, such as that between development versus project management, or research versus product standardisation. The first issue may ensure long-term survival and the second, short-term profitability. Another contrasting pair of issues is technical knowledge vs. administrative knowledge. Forging a career path in a manufacturing business often entails abandoning the technical work for the benefit of completing administrative or management work. The chapter discusses how HR departments can handle knowledge management and provide new ways to benefit both the individual and the company.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-04-10 00:00
  • 5.
    Broman, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Morad, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Utveckling av värmeelement på Husqvarna AB 2019: Utveckling av värmeelement för handtagen på bensindrivna motorsågar.2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Throughout Jönköpings University has a bachelor thesis at Husqvarna AB been done, were the main focus is to develop the existing heating element. On the existing front and rear handle is where the heating element are placed and the material the handles are made of is aluminum respectively plastic. These handle are also called the reference at Husqvarna AB.

     

    To be able to have different type of concepts was a method called concept generating, where these concepts were developed and later on eliminate nonrealistic ideas. During the project there was a lot of visits at several companies to be able to see the production and have a meeting with them. PTC-technology was the chosen heating element for this project and stands for “Positive Temperature Coefficient” and is a self-regulating heating element. PTC has a low inner resistance until it reaches the temperature that it is manufactured for to maintain a more stable heating level. Tests were made on the concepts that was given against the reference to see which concept that is most suitable for further development. Different methods and theories was used to be able to create tools for embossing the front handle, which later on got heat-treated.

     

    The existing heating element is based on the amount of rounds per minute the flywheel rotates which result in different heating levels for the consumer. PTC technology gives a more stable heating level for such system with various rotational speed. Husqvarna AB’s purpose with this thesis is to develop a more stable heating element on the XPG chainsaws.

     

    This thesis ended with a result of two different winning concepts which was given recommendations for how they could further be developed to be possible to replace the existing heating element.

  • 6.
    CALVIN LINARES, PABLO
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Industrial design.
    CONCEPT FOR A PORTABLE ASSISTIVE LIFTING SEAT2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project consists of the design of a concept for a portable assistive seat in collaboration with IKEA. The aim of the project is to create a solution that fits within the Omtänksam family of products and shares the company’s values of what is so-called Democratic Design:

    Form - Quality - Low Price - Function – Sustainability

    The Omtänksam Family is focused on products that can help the elderly to have a more comfortable life while blending with the home environment. A portable assistive Lifting Seat is a real need for many people that require some extra help when standing up or sitting down. The main goal of this project is to design a cheap, safe, simple and light product that can assist people for reducing the effort that is required from them. The product must be comfortable, easy to transport and friendly to interact with. Considering a mass manufacturing perspective is very important to meet the previously formulated requirements. The force that the assistive seat releases must keep performing efficiently during the product service life. A locking system must be provided for avoiding the lifting force to act when the user is sitting, assisting only when it is demanded. This Thesis describes the process of designing a concept for a Portable AssistiveLifting Seat involving different areas such as ergonomics, semantics, manufacturing, mechanical engineering and materials science. The design approach in this case is driven by the Democratic Design Principles combining the human-centered design with a market perspective. The result takes advantage of form and material for avoiding the need for any extra lifting mechanism. This solution is way simpler than any other one existing in the market and it integrates the solution for many different problems in one single piece. This simplification of the problem allows reducing the production cost and helps to meet the intended requirements creating an innovative product for the market.

  • 7.
    De Goey, Heleen
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Industrial design.
    Design-driven innovation: a systematic literature review2019In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 92-114Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The concept design-driven innovation focuses on innovating product meanings. It has been studied from a variety of perspectives and contexts since the early 2000s. However, a complete overview of the literature published in this area is currently missing. The purpose of this study is to provide a comprehensive understanding of how design-driven innovation contributes to value creation in product development.

    Design/methodology/approach

    In this systematic literature review, 57 papers and book chapters that cover design-driven innovation were identified and analyzed. An iterative coding process was followed to derive five facets of design-driven innovation that contribute to value creation.

    Findings

    Design-driven innovation creates value by focusing on the intangible values of products. The following five facets of design-driven innovation that contribute to value creation were identified: development of new product meanings, knowledge generation, actors and collaborations, capabilities and process. These facets and their interrelations are presented in a theoretical framework.

    Practical implications

    The main practical implication of this study is that it is now clear that the five facets of design-driven innovation are interrelated and reinforce each other. Therefore, companies need to approach design-driven innovation from a holistic perspective.

    Originality/value

    This paper contributes to theory by presenting the theoretical framework that provides an overview of available knowledge and that creates a context for future research.

  • 8.
    Devarakonda, Rakesh Raghavendra
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Ramachandrareddy, Sumanth
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Production System waste reduction using Value stream mapping: An Industrial case study2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid rise in global population and market demands have mandated industries to introduce better and quality products to meet up their rushing needs. However, achiev-ing such goals need optimal production system and robust strategies. Exploring in depth it can be visualized that most of the manufacturing set ups suffers losses or relatively lower benefits due to improper and high wastages. Hence it is very important for man-ufacturing industries to explore the techniques which help them to improve their pro-duction system. The key techniques from Lean Manufacturing (LM) such as Value Stream Mapping (VSM) and Ishikawa diagram were explored in this work for enhanc-ing production capacity, reducing rework, reducing wastages and arriving to a well-defined optimal process flow which in turn help in achieving higher productivity. How-ever, the implementation of Lean and Value stream mapping depends on the production scale and has its own significance to different manufacturing setup. With that motive, in this thesis work the emphasis was made on exploring VSM technique for better pro-duction optimization in manufacturing sector.

  • 9.
    Dickèr, Jonathan
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Industrial design.
    Beach Chair Inspired Seating Furniture2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 10.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Poorkiany, Morteza
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Raudberget, Dag
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Traceability of decisions in product realization processes of custom engineered products2018In: DS92: Proceedings of the DESIGN 2018 15th International Design Conference / [ed] Marjanović D., Štorga M., Škec S., Bojčetić N., Pavković N., The Design Society, 2018, p. 249-260Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Custom engineered products require an engineer-to-order approach in development, quotation preparation and order processing. This work reports the result of a three-and-a-half-year project were the objective was to develop means for implementation and management of computer support for engineering design and production engineering of customized products. Efficient re-use is essential for success and decision is identified as the core concept to trace tasks executed, knowledge used, design rationale and artefacts developed throughout the product realization process.

  • 11.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Heikkinen, Tim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Raudberget, Dag
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Platform Models for Agile Customization – What's Beyond Modularization?2018In: Transdisciplinary Engineering Methods for Social Innovation of Industry 4.0: Proceedings of the 25th ISPE Inc. International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering / [ed] Margherita Peruzzini, Marcello Pellicciari, Cees Bil, Josip Stjepandić, Nel Wognum, IOS Press, 2018, p. 371-380Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many manufacturing companies are suppliers that deliver unique solutions to different business customers. Intense quotation work, with a high demand on accuracy and quick response, and development projects executed in close collaboration with customers and other actors characterize these companies. The projects can run for years or a few weeks depending on the business. Changes of requirements are frequent and technology development required for improved functionality, sustainability and competitiveness. The use of a product platform has been acknowledged as a strategic enabler for product family development and mass customization. However, companies struggle with adopting the common platform approach building upon pre-defined modules and components as it constraints the fulfilment of unique customer requirements and the introduction of new technology at high pace. This work reports the results from case studies conducted in collaboration with four companies. They are in many ways different but face the same challenges when it comes to customization, fluctuating requirements and need of high pace in technology advancement. The focus of this paper is on their initial states; including how they work with their product concept before the customer entry point, the work that is initiated when an order is accepted, the character of requirements and the adoption of product platforms. Criteria on, and identification of, new platforms models, termed Design Assets, are presented followed by a mapping to the Design Platform concept pointing out areas upcoming work, both scientifically and at the companies.

  • 12.
    Eriksson, Gustav
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Norlin, Daniel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Ergonomic improvement on Husqvarna trimmer2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Injuries caused by vibrations are a common problem that can emerge from daily exposure when using handheld power tools like grass trimmers. These are often permanent and can’t be cured. Rotations caused by the motor create vibrations where unbalance of the trimmer line can create high amplitudes of vibrations. This report studies how these vibrations affect the trimmer and what solutions that can dampen them with the help of material and mechanical design. By using experimental tests and theoretical evidence it is possible to show how vibrations emerge. These tests proved to be useful when concepts and prototypes were created.

  • 13.
    Eriksson, Lars
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. Halmstad University, Functional Surfaces Research Group, Sweden.
    Bergman, Martin
    Halmstad University, Functional Surfaces Research Group, Sweden.
    Affective surface engineering- using soft and hard metrologhy to measure the sensation and perception in surface properties2018In: Proceedings of NordDesign: Design in the Era of Digitalization, NordDesign 2018, Linköping: The Design Society, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New surface treatments, novel material developments, and improved quality control procedures and advanced metrology instrumentation create a possibility to further develop competitiveness by the selection of “optimal” surface features”, to a product. The customers first apprehension of a product and the creation of desire is a very complex, but tempting process to learn more about. The interaction between the added quantitative- and the qualitative direct impressions with the customers known and unknown functional demands, social background, and expectations results in sensation and perception, partly possible to quantify and to great extent impossible to pin-down as numbers. Customer sensation and perception are much about psychological factors. There has been a strong industrial- and academic need and interest for methods and tools to quantify and linking product properties to the human response but a lack of studies of the impact of surfaces. This paper aims to introduce a novel approach to develop and join a human sensoric inspired metrology frame-work with qualitative gradings of apprehended impressions of products with varying surface properties. The aim is to establish the metrology framework to link measurable- and unmeasurable impressions of product surfaces to customer FEELING as exemplified by a set of industrial applications. In conclusions of the study, future research in Soft metrology is proposed to allow understanding and modelling of product perception and sensations in combination with a development of the Kansei Surface Engineering methodology and software tools.

  • 14.
    Fermér, Arvid
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Sliwa, Petrus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Utveckling av tillbehör till batteriprodukter2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 15.
    Granlund, Anna
    et al.
    Division of Product Realization, School of Innovation Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Division of Product Realization, School of Innovation Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter E.
    Division of Innovation Management, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Lead factory operationalisation and challenges2019In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 30, no 2-3, p. 96-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deepens the understanding of the lead factory concept by examining how the lead factory role is operationalised and what challenges are associated with it. The research is based on an explorative case study of eight Swedish lead factories in the manufacturing industry. The empirical findings suggest that the understanding of the lead factory concept should be extended as it is not restricted to one type of set-up. The findings show a spectrum ranging from an entire manufacturing plant, parts of a plant, to a virtual plant considered to be the lead factory. The research also shows a broad range of challenges experienced by lead factories. Several of these are related to and originate from unclear role, responsibility and mandate of the lead factory. The lack of dedicated resources for lead factory activities, specifically long-term development and difficulties in measuring the benefits of the role, were other challenges faced. 

  • 16.
    Heikkinen, Tim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Multidisciplinary design automation: Working with product model extensions2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Being able to efficiently and effectively provide custom products has been identified as a competitive advantage for manufacturing organizations. Product configuration has been shown to be an effective way of achieving this through a modularization, product platform and product family development approach. A core assumption behind product configuration is that the module variants and their constraints can be explicitly defined as product knowledge in terms of geometry and configuration rules. This is not always the case, however. Many companies require extensive engineering to develop each module variant and cannot afford to do so in order to meet potential customer requirements within a predictable future. Instead, they try to implicitly define the module variants in terms of the process for how they can be realized. In this way they can realize module variants on demand efficiently and effectively when the customer requirements are better defined, and the development can be justified by the increased probability of profiting from the outcome.

    Design automation, in its broadest definition, deals with computerized engineering support by effectively and efficiently utilizing pre-planned reusable assets to progress the design process. There have been several successful implementations reported in the literature, but a widespread use is yet to be seen. It deals with the explicit definition of engineering process knowledge, which results in a collection of methods and models that can come in the form of computer scripts, parametric CADmodels, template spreadsheets, etc. These methods and models are developed using various computer tools and maintained within the different disciplines involved, such as geometric modeling, simulation, or manufacturing, and are dependent on each other through the product model. To be able to implement, utilize, and manage design automation systems in or across multiple disciplines, it is important to first understand how the disciplinary methods and models are dependent on each other through the product model and then how these relations should be constructed to support the users without negatively affecting other aspects, such as modeling flexibility, minimum documentation, and software tool independence.

    To support the successful implementation and management of design automation systems the work presented here has focused on understanding how some digital product model constituents are, can, and, to some extent, should be extended to concretize relations between methods and models from different tools and disciplines. It has been carried out by interviewing Swedish industrial companies, performing technical reviews, performing literature reviews, and developing prototypes, which has resulted in an increased understanding and the consequent development of a conceptual framework that highlights aspects relating to the choice of extension techniques.

  • 17.
    Heikkinen, Tim
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Extended design assets enabling automated tool development as a part of a product platform approach2018In: DS92: Proceedings of the DESIGN 2018 15th International Design Conference / [ed] Marjanović D., Štorga M., Škec S., Bojčetić N., Pavković N., The Design Society, 2018, p. 757-768Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product platform development is a well-established approach for reusing product knowledge in the form of geometry and its configuration rules and constraints. Explicitly defining all platform components is not always possible however. This is why a product platform approach where the processes of realising platform components also are supported is needed, instead of exclusively relying on their results. The work presented here works toward this, with a focus on automated tool development enabled by extending design assets from different tools.

  • 18.
    Heikkinen, Tim
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Review of CAD-model Capabilities and Restrictions for Multidisciplinary use2018In: Computer-Aided Design and Applications, ISSN 1686-4360, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 509-519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product development is an iterative process, partially due to changes in both company internal and external product requirements, resulting in changes to the product under development. These changes might require recapitulation of design rationale and result in re-doing assessments and syntheses of different kinds. One way to support this work is to proactively model in such a way that as much as possible of the previous work can be re-used. Not only within one product development project but also across and to future ones. Modelling for re-use can be done by documenting design rationale and formalising performed activities as design guidelines or computer scripts. To be able to find and re-use this information it could be attached to the product features which it relates to. Since geometry is such a core product characteristic, especially within the mechanical industry, and is often modelled as CAD-models, this paper presents a review of CAD-model capabilities and restrictions to serve as a carrier of multidisciplinary information. This is done by; enquiring three Swedish companies, exploring an automated Finite Element Analysis method utilising the CAD-model as a carrier of information, and reviewing different CAD software capabilities. Results show that there are at least seven extension techniques, out of which all are currently being used or considered to be in the future, by at least one company. Further, depending on the extension technique, extendibility and human-comprehension of the added information differ.

  • 19.
    Helin, Jonathan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Hellberg, Gustav
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Fäste mellan två metallytor: Sammanfogning av två aluminiumytor2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The degree project has been carried out in collaboration with Husqvarna, a world-leading manufacturer of products for gardening, park and forest management. An ever-evolving industry where innovation and creativity are required to be at the top. With constant demands from customers on performance and quality, a constant mechanical and design developments are required.

    Husqvarna's chainsaws use two-stroke engines where the scavenging channel are covered by a lid which in turn is fastened with screw joints. The channel through which the fuel mixture is pumped is open and a lid is needed to seal the channel. The channel is closed by screw joints, which in turn has a cost related to articles and materials. The lid that is fastened with screw joints has, one step in the production, articles concerning screws and fastening functions in the cylinder. The screw towers located on the cylinder could be an opportunity for improvement regarding weight in order to optimize the product.

    The aim of investigating new fastening methods is to see what possible improvements are available compared to the current method. These include weight reduction, which is very significant for these products. With a thorough literature study on attachment methods, a Pugh-matrix with its own values ​​has been utilized. It has helped to see which concepts are best suited within the weighting framework. The theories are built from scientific manuals within mechanics, strength and joints. With this basis, conclusions have been made regarding the functions that have been investigated and whether they are positive or negative in relation to the current method. The work is meant as a basic basis for Husqvarna, which can facilitate the use of alternative fastening methods for the channel cover.

  • 20.
    Hjertberg, Tim
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    A tool for obtaining transparency and traceability in heterogeneous design automation environments2018In: Computer-Aided Design and Applications, ISSN 1686-4360, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 488-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, CAD-system are used for much more than just geometric modeling. They are complemented by various software and information sources forming a complete environment for handling all life-cycle aspects of the product. In such systems, the CAD-system works as a central hub. The software and information sources may be of various types making the system highly heterogenous. This presents problems with transparency and traceability in the system making long term management difficult. In this paper, a novel tool is presented to keep track of the dependencies between the various parts of such systems providing an overview and making it possible to predict the effect of proposed changes and facilitating long term management. The tool is tested in a highly heterogeneous environment at a manufacturer of aerospace components, with the result that the traceability is expected to increase at the expense of that time must be spent on defining dependencies and meta-information as the system is evolving.

  • 21.
    Jansson, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Gustafsson, T.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
    Salomonsson, Kent
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Olofsson, Jakob
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Appelsved, P.
    Kongsberg Automotive AB, Mullsjö, Sweden.
    Palm, M.
    Husqvarna AB, Huskvarna, Sweden.
    An anisotropic non-linear material model for glass fibre reinforced plastics2018In: Composite structures, ISSN 0263-8223, E-ISSN 1879-1085, Vol. 195, p. 93-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to present a methodology to predict the anisotropic and non-linear behaviour of glass fibre reinforced plastics using finite element methods. A material model is implemented in order to remedy the need of multiple material definitions, and to control the local plastic behaviour as a function of the fibre orientation. Injection moulding simulations traditionally provide second order orientation tensors, which are considered together with a homogenization scheme to compute local material properties. However, in the present study, fourth order tensors are used in combination with traditional methods to provide more accurate material properties. The elastic and plastic response of the material model is optimized to fit experimental test data, until simulations and experiments overlap. The proposed material model can support design engineers in making more informed decisions, allowing them to create smarter products without the need of excessive safety factors, leading to reduced component weight and environmental impact. 

  • 22.
    Jarque Antolí, Carlos
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Industrial design.
    The new generation of Smart Home Device: Health Monitoring system for Smart Homes2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis project was conveyed in collaboration with Block Zero, a strategic Design Studio in Malmö, Sweden, with the purpose to design a product that develops a new type of interaction within the Smart Home.

    This design project will primarily focus on the research, exploration and definition of possible solutions, and the resulting design and development of the final product, a Smart Home Health Hub.

    From a global perspective, throughout the following document is covered a description of the design process from initial research to the final prototype. The project is defined in this approach and establishes the mentioned principles to guide the execution of the project through a deductive method, synthesising until the final result.

  • 23.
    Johansson, Joel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Contero, M.
    Universitat Politècnicade València, Spain.
    Company, P.
    Universitat Jaume I, Spain.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Supporting connectivism in knowledge based engineering with graph theory, filtering techniques and model quality assurance2018In: Advanced Engineering Informatics, ISSN 1474-0346, E-ISSN 1873-5320, Vol. 38, p. 252-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mass-customization has forced manufacturing companies to put significant efforts to digitize and automate their engineering and production processes. When new products are to be developed and introduced the production is not alone to be automated. The application of knowledge regarding how the product should be designed and produced based on customer requirements also must be automated. One big academic challenge is helping industry to make sure that the background knowledge of the automated engineering processes still can be understood by its stakeholders throughout the product life cycle. The research presented in this paper aims to build an infrastructure to support a connectivistic view on knowledge in knowledge based engineering. Fundamental concepts in connectivism include network formation and contextualization, which are here addressed by using graph theory together with information filtering techniques and quality assurance of CAD-models. The paper shows how engineering knowledge contained in spreadsheets, knowledge-bases and CAD-models can be penetrated and represented as filtered graphs to support a connectivistic working approach. Three software demonstrators developed to extract filtered graphs are presented and discussed in the paper.

  • 24.
    Johansson, Joel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Knowledge objects enable mass-individualization2019In: Evolutionary and Deterministic Methods for Design Optimization and Control With Applications to Industrial and Societal Problems. / [ed] Andrés-Pérez E., González L., Periaux J., Gauger N., Quagliarella D., Giannakoglou K., Cham: Springer , 2019, p. 371-386Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mass customization and product individualization are driving factors behind design automation, which in turn are enabled through the formalization and automation of engineering work. The goal is to offer customers optimized solutions to their needs timely and as profitable as possible. The path to achieve such a remarkable goal can be very winding and tricky for many companies, or even non-existing at the moment being. To succeed requires three essential parts: formally represented product knowledge, facilities to automatically apply the product knowledge, and optimization algorithms. This paper shows how these three parts can be supported in engineer-to-order businesses through the concept of knowledge objects. Knowledge Objects are human readable descriptions of formalized knowledge bundled with corresponding computer routines for the automation of that knowledge. One case example is given at the end of the paper to demonstrate the use of knowledge objects. © 2019, Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature.

  • 25.
    Johansson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    En jämförande studie av två metoder för produktutveckling: För tillverkande företag inom metallindustrin2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    It is becoming increasingly important for today's companies to diversify themselves from competitors and demonstrate a good ability to satisfy customer requirements and requests. This requires high internal efficiency and a well-structured organization. The purpose of the study is based on this and analyzes already existing literature in the field of product development to demonstrate the possibilities for an effective product development methodology in manufacturing companies in the metal industry.

    The accumulated theory forms the foundation for this literature study, which presents two different strategies for lighting into a product development project. The strategies presented are PBE and SBCE, both of which are active in the manufacturing industry today. The big difference between the strategies is the decision-making around the generated concepts. PBE includes an early conceptual choice which then is developed through a number of iterations until requirements and requests in the specification sheet, for the specific development project, is met. Within SBCE, several concepts are developed simultaneously with the ambition to acquire new, important knowledge while optimizing the concepts before making a final decision.

    Establishing some kind of strategy offers the business a way to work systematically and rationally. This brings awareness to the problem solving and that the final result is positively affected. Furthermore, the analysis of the accumulated theory shows that a company’s flexibility is important from a market perspective and that the management of human capital is essential to today's business, which is possible through SBCE.

    SBCE is the most effective strategy seen from a lead time perspective when the rate of iteration is high. The strategy also meets the needs for flexibility in the organization, as well as the management and development of human capital, making it the best way to light into a development project.

  • 26.
    Jonsson Egeman, Mathilda
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Adapting the lead time tree model to include immaterial activities: Extending the lead time tree model to enable mapping, efficiency evaluation and waste identification in order fulfillment processes2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Much research regarding efficiency in manufacturing industry has historically been focused on the material activities of the shop floor. However, companies that merely focus on material activities when trying to improve lead times, risk losing potential for improvements within immaterial activities such as planning, engineering, design, and purchasing, which often constitute the most time consuming parts of the order fulfillment processes. Engineer to order (ETO) products are particularly time consuming regarding their immaterial activities, and the customer is waiting for the products from the very beginning of the order fulfillment process. Shortening the lead time to customer for ETO products is therefore important for customer satisfaction.

    The aim of this study is to adapt an existing lead time tree model currently focused on material activities to also include immaterial activities, enabling a full visualization of all activities contained in order fulfillment processes. The lead time tree model would thereby be able to use as a tool when working on shortening the lead time to customer. A further aim of the study is to investigate how the adapted lead time tree model can be used in further areas as well, in addition to visualizing immaterial activities.

    The adaption of the lead time tree model has been based on the original literary source of the lead time tree model. The original lead time tree model has been analyzed towards theoretical data from a literature study, and towards empirical data about immaterial activities in order fulfillment processes for ETO products, from the case company Kongsberg Maritime Sweden AB (previously Rolls-Royce AB). The result of this has been an adapted lead time tree model that can visualize immaterial activities.

    Several adaptions of the original lead time tree model have been made for it to be able to visualize immaterial activities, while still keeping the basics of the original model. The adapted lead time tree model comprises information that is normally kept separated and that is important when planning and improving a process. Additional information that is needed for each specific case can also easily be included in the lead time tree. The adapted lead time tree model has proven to have additional areas of use within project planning, improvement work regarding lead time reduction and root-cause analysis, and as a boundary object for communication between internal actors and between internal and external actors.

    The adapted lead time tree model is presumably able to map and visualize immaterial activities in other fields of business as well, other than manufacturing, as the nature of immaterial activities remains the same across business environments.

  • 27.
    Karlsen, Joakim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Omkonstruktion av vapenfäste till additiv tillverkning2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis project has been carried out in collaboration with Saab training and simulation in Huskvarna, which manufactures military training products. The aim of the project was to investigate the possibility of using additive manufacturing as the method for future manufacturing for the small arms transmitter bracket (SAT-bracket, a bracket for gun) to reduce lead time, cost and weight. A physical product has been developed through the Selective Laser Melting technique (SLM), where the least possible amount of support structures has been achieved for the selected build orientation. To be able to optimize the design with the help of lattice structures, knowledge of the technology has been acquired through information searched on scientific texts and websites. Identification of strengths and weaknesses in the development process and the possibility of using a more favorable material for the application were documented to be evaluated against a traditionally manufactured component.

    The final designs have been modeled using two different design methods, both in which had reduced the weight between 28-44% where the stiffness is in the likes of the reference product. The conclusion drawn from the work is that additive manufacturing is a manufacturing method   that for the SAT-bracket is a favorable alternative for smaller production volume.

  • 28.
    Kebede, Rehel Zeleke
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Developing Information Exchange Requirements for BIM-based Lighting Simulation in the Design Stage2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Easy and reliable exchange of data between BIM tools constitutes an important part of BIM-baseddesign processes. This is especially important for performance-based design as most performance simulationtools are evolving separately as a standalone simulation software package. IFC is a standard data model widelyused by the construction industry for digital data exchanges between BIM tools. However, IFC is developed tocapture a comprehensive data for all stages of the project lifecycle and carries a wide range of informationwhich are not of interest for performance-based simulations as well as lacks important required information.Consequently, there is a need to precisely define the required information and the responsible actors in eachexchange. The aim of this research was, therefore, to develop information exchange requirements with thecorresponding responsible actors for lighting simulations in the design stage. Developing information Exchangerequirements for lighting simulations requires experts. Accordingly, a qualitative research setup in the form ofa semi-structured interviews supported by a literature study and document analysis was conducted. The resultsshowed that lighting simulation is conducted in the two key parts of the design stage iteratively to optimize theanalysis result. This study has limitations concerning the absence of definition of technical terms, level of importanceof information and mere focus on the design stage. However, considering the audience of this studyto be experts in the area, and most information exchanges happen during the design stage, the findings promisepartial generalization to BIM-based lighting analysis in the design stage.

  • 29.
    Larsson, Tom
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Industrial design.
    Development of a new type of bike stand2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 30.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Exploring Product Development in Industrialized Housing to Facilitate a Platform Strategy2018In: Proceedings of 26th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction / [ed] González, V.A., Chennai, India: The International Group for Lean Construction , 2018, p. 538-548Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrialized house-building companies are offering unique products by adopting an engineer-to-order (ETO) strategy. Client satisfaction is achieved by adaptation of product solutions and swift introduction of new technology in combination with cost-efficient production and short lead-time for completion. Product development is executed in collaboration with the clients and changes in requirements are frequent. The use of product platforms, where external and internal efficiency are well-balanced, has been acknowledged as a strategic enabler for mass customization and increased competitiveness. However, ETO-companies struggle with adopting the common product platform approach, set by pre-defined modules and components. Predefinitions may cause an imbalance between product development and a lean production system. The aim of this work was to analyse current strategies and support to master the balance of external and internal efficiency in product development within industrialized housebuilding to facilitate the development of a product platform strategy. Data were gathered from a single case study and an on-going product platform development and includes interviews and document analysis. The findings show that product development is guided by a technical platform, but there is an imbalance where external efficiency is prioritized over the internal efficiency.

  • 31.
    Linde, Jens
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Gille, Ludwig
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Produktutveckling av bärskena för pendlade armaturer2019Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this thesis was to follow up and further develop an existing product at Fagerhult AB. The product is a support rail for pendant luminaires. The support rail facilitates the positioning of the luminaire when mounted in the ceiling. The problem with today’s support rail is that it doesn’t meet the requirements set by Fagerhult AB according to aesthetics and flexibility. The request is instead a support rail that takes less space, more aesthetically appealing and more flexible.

    Methodology – The thesis has followed a product development process, from pilot study until prototype. First thing was a time planning to establish milestones to see when different parts of the project were supposed to be done. Then a pilot study was made in terms of market research and a competitor analysis to get a more complete picture of the today’s market and also what the market wanted. From the pilot study a complete requirement specification was made together with the customer. By the requirement specification a concept generation started in terms of brainstorming and morphologic matrix. The concepts were screened through elimination matrices and together with Fagerhult AB. The final concept was chosen from four more worked through concepts. Those concepts have all been made in a CAD-environment, Solid Edge, and physical prototypes have partially been made to be evaluated in different areas. The prototypes were evaluated in aesthetics, installation friendliness and manufacturing cost. The final concept was developed into a working prototype.

    Results – Already from the beginning the final result was divided into three different areas, T-clips, rail and sliding block. The final prototype consisted of a T-clips which was made in two pieces, spring steel and sheet metal. This was to offer an installation friendly support rail and also to make an opportunity to hide the T-clips which was previously exposed. The rail was designed with integrated covers on the ends and the opportunity to fit the sliding block inside, this was made to make the support rail more aesthetic appealing and to make sure that focus was not taken from the luminaire. The sliding block was then developed to fit inside the rail and suspension was offered for the wire loop. That way the wire loop, which is attached to the sliding block, could be hidden inside the rail. This resulted in an even more hidden supporting rail.

    To maintain the target value for the supporting rail the material was kept in standard and to some extent the construction had elements of already existing functions.

    Restrictions – Because of the lack of time the thesis only dealt with the product development process until prototype. The prototype was partially made by the writers themselves because Fagerhult AB:s prototype workshop had been busy. Neither FEM-calculations nor simulations was made to verify and optimize functions on the prototype, also this because of time constraints.

  • 32.
    Lundberg, Olof
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Industrial design.
    CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT OF CARGO MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR PRIVATE CARS2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This master thesis deals with concept development of a cargo management system for private cars. It has been carried out at the master program of industrial design at Jönköping University in collaboration with the design consultancy Dacat located in Gothenburg.

    When storing cargo in car trunks a common problem is that the cargo falls over, causing it to break or create disturbance by moving around. Existing solutions are often complicated because they require several steps to secure the cargo and take up much space when not used. Many of the solutions are made as original equipment for specific cars.

    The aim of this thesis has been to work around the standards of specific car brands or models in order to find a solution that can be used for different brands. Furthermore, the ambition has been to come up with a solution that does not require any extra steps in the cargo securing process and does not take up space when not used.

    The work has been carried out using the Bootcamp Bootleg method for design processes. Following this method, the report describes research in the Empathize stage, moving on to Define, Ideate and finally Prototype.

    The result is a concept fulfilling the aims of the project as described earlier and is presented as a full scale prototype.

  • 33.
    Nafisi, Mariam
    et al.
    School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Granlund, Anna
    School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Manufacturing engineering requirements in the early stages of new product development — A case study in two assembly plants2019In: Advanced applications in manufacturing engineering / [ed] M. Ram & J. P. Davim, Elsevier, 2019, p. 141-167Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interface between the product development function and the manufacturing function is one key dimension in new product development (NPD) projects. Hard and soft requirements for manufacturability are defined and communicated to product development teams early in the NPD project to ensure the new products are fit for the manufacturing system. In this chapter, we determined what requirements are important for a manufacturing system and how these requirements are handled during an NPD project by analyzing two industrial cases. The results showed that requirements communicated from the manufacturing function to the design function had different sources and effects on different aspects of the manufacturing system. They were communicated and integrated to various degrees and through various mechanisms. There was a tendency to rely on the personal and verbal communication of requirements, as opposed to using more formal structured methods. This way of working was sufficient when product change was incremental and not radical. The case studies showed that the manufacturing function needed to employ more efficient methods to define and communicate their requirements in large and complex NPD projects.

  • 34.
    Olofsson, Jakob
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Cenni, Riccardo
    Imola, Italy.
    Cova, Matteo
    Imola, Italy.
    Bertuzzi, Giacomo
    Imola, Italy.
    Salomonsson, Kent
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Multidisciplinary shape optimization of ductile iron castings by considering local microstructure and material behaviour2018In: Structural and multidisciplinary optimization (Print), ISSN 1615-147X, E-ISSN 1615-1488, Vol. 57, no 5, p. 1889-1903Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the casting process and solidification of ductile iron castings, a heterogeneous microstructure is formed throughout the casting. This distribution is strongly influenced by the item geometry and the process related factors, as chemical composition and local solidification conditions. Geometrical changes to the geometry of the casting thus alters the local mechanical behavior and properties, as well as the distribution of stresses and strains when the casting is subjected to load. In order to find an optimal geometry, e.g. with reduced weight and increased load-bearing capacity, this interdependency between geometry and local material behavior needs to be considered and integrated into the optimization method. In this contribution, recent developments in the multidisciplinary integration of casting process simulation, solidification and microstructure modelling, microstructure-based material characterization, finite element structural analyses with local material behavior and structural optimization techniques are presented and discussed. The effect and relevance of considering the local material behavior in shape optimization of ductile iron castings is discussed and evidenced by an industrial application. It is shown that by adopting a multidisciplinary optimization approach by integration of casting simulation and local material behavior into shape optimization, the potential of the casting process to obtain components with high performance and reliability can be enabled and utilized. 

  • 35.
    Pahlberg, Tobias
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Campus Skellefteå, Skellefteå, Sweden.
    Thurley, Matthew
    Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Popovic, Djordje
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Hagman, Olle
    Luleå University of Technology, Campus Skellefteå, Skellefteå, Sweden.
    Crack detection in oak flooring lamellae using ultrasound-excited thermography2018In: Infrared physics & technology, ISSN 1350-4495, E-ISSN 1879-0275, Vol. 88, p. 57-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, a large number of people are manually grading and detecting defects in wooden lamellae in the parquet flooring industry. This paper investigates the possibility of using the ensemble methods random forests and boosting to automatically detect cracks using ultrasound-excited thermography and a variety of predictor variables. When friction occurs in thin cracks, they become warm and thus visible to a thermographic camera. Several image processing techniques have been used to suppress the noise and enhance probable cracks in the images. The most successful predictor variables captured the upper part of the heat distribution, such as the maximum temperature, kurtosis and percentile values 92–100 of the edge pixels. The texture in the images was captured by Completed Local Binary Pattern histograms and cracks were also segmented by background suppression and thresholding. The classification accuracy was significantly improved from previous research through added image processing, introduction of more predictors, and by using automated machine learning. The best ensemble methods reach an average classification accuracy of 0.8, which is very close to the authors’ own manual attempt at separating the images (0.83).

  • 36.
    Petersson, Rickard
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Managing product family variance: Development of product family architecture and its realization in a PLM system2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 37.
    Poorkiany, Morteza
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Support reuse and maintenance of design information in a development process of custom engineered product2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper a method is introduced that supports reuse and maintenance of design information. The method allows sharing design information in different levels of details tailored for the stakeholders according to their needs. In addition, it is possible to share the information in multiple formats to suite different purposes. The results are demonstrated in an industrial partner which is a supplier of tooling for manufacturing industry.

  • 38.
    Popovic, Djordje
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Off-site manufacturing systems development in timber house building: Towards mass customization-oriented manufacturing2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for housing in Sweden has been showing a constant increase over the past couple of years. However, this situation might change in 2018 since there are indications that the increase in demand will reach its peak. On the other hand, the use of timber as a load bearing structure has become more popular in the multi-family house building sector. It is competing with concrete and steel frames, and its market share might even reach 50% by the year of 2025. Adding the involvement of customers in house design decisions and a high level of customization, the conclusion is that timber house building must continue the development towards mass customization. There is a lack of knowledge on how mass customization is developed and implemented regarding off-site manufacturing systems. In this thesis, a contribution is made to manufacturing system development in timber house building by proposing a novel approach to aligning off-site manufacturing systems to the requirements of production strategy, market needs, product design, and manufacturing processes. The proposed conceptual framework is a synthesis of the knowledge gained from three empirical studies and different methods found in theories of changeable manufacturing systems, mass customization, and manufacturing system development. The research purpose addressed by the presented work, is to increase the knowledge on how the development potential of off-site manufacturing systems can be identified in mass customization-oriented timber house building. Case study research was applied to gather the empirical data. The data collection and analysis methods used in the empirical studies can be useful when discussing the potential improvements. However, these data are not comprehensive enough in terms of presenting a holistic view of off-site manufacturing and consideration of the market as well as variation in product and processes. Therefore, a comprehensive set of requirements is proposed in the conceptual framework together with a step by step description of how the development potential of off-site manufacturing systems can be identified.

  • 39.
    Popovic, Djordje
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Product and manufacturing systems alignment: a case study in the timber house building industry2019In: 10th Nordic Conference on Construction Economics and Organization / [ed] Irene Lill & Emlyn Witt, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2019, p. 357-364Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the alignment between current product and manufacturing systems and how it could be achieved.

    Design/Methodology/Approach

    Case study research method was chosen for the collection and analysis of empirical data. The data was of qualitative nature and was collected using research techniques such as observations through video recordings of processes, documents and open and semi-structured interviews.

    Findings

    The variation of outer side sub-element of the exterior wall element was found to not be aligned with its corresponding assembly. A hybrid assembly of outer side sub-elements characterised by flexibility and reconfigurability can be developed.

    Research Limitations/Implications

    The study is limited to the exterior wall element and corresponding manufacturing system. Practical Implications The presented approach was formulated with the aim to be used both for the analysis of existing products and manufacturing systems as well as for the design of new manufacturing systems.

    Originality/Value

    So far, this is the first study in the context of timber house building where the alignment between product and manufacturing systems was investigated by considering product variety and flexibility of manufacturing systems.

  • 40.
    Popovic, Djordje
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Thajudeen, Shamnath
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Vestin, Alexander
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Smart manufacturing support to product platforms in industrialized house building2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish house building companies currently face many challenges in terms of fluctuating market demand, need for flexible product offering, non-uniform governmental regulations, high costs, and long lead times. These challenges affect both internal and external efficiency of companies. Product platforms have been used for more than a decade in this industry to improve both internal and external efficiency. However, the industry is still criticized for its inefficient and costly process. Smart manufacturing has emerged as means to improve the efficiency of internal processes and the question is if and how smart manufacturing can complement and support product platforms in industrialized house building. The aim of this study is to explore the potential of smart manufacturing to complement and support product platforms in theory and practice in the context of industrialized house building. A literature review and a multiple case study were chosen to fulfill the study objective. In total fourteen semi-structured interviews were conducted in two timber house building companies. The data was analyzed within and across cases using four platform assets for categorization: components, processes, knowledge and relationships. The results show that the smart manufacturing technologies are in both theory and practice mainly supporting the process platform asset through developing vertical and horizontal IT systems integration, definition and digitalization of flexible building systems, and transferring explicit drafting and engineering knowledge into parametric modelling tools.

  • 41.
    Raudberget, Dag
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    André, Samuel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Modularisation in two Global Product Developing Companies: Current State and Future Outlook2018In: Proceedings of NordDesign: Design in the Era of Digitalization, NordDesign 2018, Linköping: The Design Society, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modularisation and platform strategies enable efficient utilization of resources through economies of scale and are therefore increasingly important for manufacturing companies. On the product side, modules are often considered the basis of product platforms by enabling a variety of product variants by combining interchangeable modules into different products. On the process side, modularisation enables faster and cheaper development of new product variants by reusing physical components, interfaces, and production equipment.

    The benefits of product platforms and modularisation have led two global product developing and manufacturing companies to initiate research projects within this field. The companies have previously made unsuccessful attempts to implement modularisation founded on a componentbased approach and the firms are now searching for other methods to get the benefits of modularisation.

    This paper describes the initial state of practice in modularisation and product platforms in the two companies in their attempts to move from a purely physical approach to modularisation into the universal view that is presented in the Design Platform approach. Here, a platform is viewed as an evolutionary entity involving several company assets such as processes, knowledge, methods, and relationships which are essential to gain the benefits of platforms also in the development phase. The Design Platform contains various concrete resources such as the geometry of physical components, but also inhomogeneous resources such as design rules, processes, methods and design automation.

    The results point to specific barriers that the companies experience when trying to adopt a modularisation strategy. Several barriers are experienced by both companies while some are specific for one of the companies. Through several workshops, the concepts of the Design Platform and a flexible view on modularisation are introduced, and their possibilities are elaborated and appreciated by the workshop participants.

  • 42.
    Raudberget, Dag
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Improving Modularization in Industry by Introducing a New Model for Module Classification2019In: 2018 IEEE International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management, IEEE Computer Society, 2019, p. 1337-1341, article id 8607720Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modules are often considered the basis of product platforms by enabling a variety of product variants based on interchangeable modules. In this way, modules enable efficient utilization of resources through economies of scale. The purpose of this work is to improve the product realization process by introducing a new model for module classification that enable companies to structure their assets and formalizing them in the development system. The modules developed following this methodology contains both physical resources and non-physical resources that can be reused in a structured way, thereby improving the efficiency of the development process. 

  • 43.
    Raudberget, Dag
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Ström, Mikael
    Swerea IVF AB, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Supporting innovation and knowledge transfer from individual to corporate level2018In: Transdisciplinary Engineering Methods for Social Innovation of Industry 4.0: Proceedings of the 25th ISPE Inc. International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering / [ed] Margherita Peruzzini, Marcello Pellicciari, Cees Bil, Josip Stjepandić, Nel Wognum, IOS Press, 2018, p. 576-585Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In most development processes, there is an early phase dedicated to creative concept development aiming at finding solutions to the problem at hand. To arrive at a high-quality solution, several ideas may be conceived and evaluated. However, emerging information and knowledge about product concepts is often not shared on a corporate level since only the final result is documented. This can lead to a significant waste, especially in Set-based design. This paper presents a pragmatic way to structure emerging design information, transferring individual design knowledge to a corporate level. It introduces the Concept Dashboard to track the progress of the concept development and uses an industry standard project workflow system to store and retrieve emerging concept knowledge.

  • 44.
    Rosén, Sara
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Industrial design.
    Tool unit designed for equine dentistry2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Most people have experienced toothache and know how much it effects the health. It hurts to eat, it ́s hard to sleep and sometimes a small gesture as a smile is avoided because it pains to much. Of course animals have the same issue and feel pain but they can’t tell us how they feel, instead we have to look for signs from their behavior. The recommendation to regularly check the horse’s teeth does minimize the risk of pain. The knowledge within the field of equine dentistry is on the rise and educations and regulations is developing to give the best dental care possible. This has created a need of the right tools adopted to this specific field and this is where a company like Accesia has a chance to be at the forefront of this development. Accesia is a company that have developed tools and educations about the animal dental profession since 2009. Until now the focus has been on smaller animals like cats, dogs and rodents but now they are widening their customer field and develops for this new market, equine dentistry. To get a understanding of this new customers some field studies has been performed and needs that are separate from the previous customer needs has been identified. It ́s not only the size that differs from the dentist working with cats and dogs, it ́s also the working environment and the anatomic conditions that looks completely different.

    For this thesis the main goal has been to identify how a unit for the tools used by equine dentists should be structured and what parts that should be included to endure the transportation and environment where it will be used. To gain this information, several interviews were conducted with the main users and the experts working on Accesia. The gathered information where later analyzed, concretized and explored in a product concept.

    This report will go through the different stages in the design process that led to a final design concept which were presented with a prototype and posters at a thesis fair organized by Jönköping University.

  • 45.
    Rösiö, Carin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Aslam, Tehseen
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science, Högskolevägen, Skövde, Sweden.
    Srikanth, Karthik Banavara
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Shetty, Savin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Towards an assessment criterion of reconfigurable manufacturing systems within the automotive industry2019In: 7th International conference on Changeable, Agile, Reconfigurable and Virtual Production (CARV2018) / [ed] C. da Cunha, A. Bernard, M. Zäh, H. ElMaraghy, & W. ElMaraghy, Elsevier, 2019, Vol. 28, p. 76-82Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To increase changeability and reconfigurability of manufacturing systems, while maintaining cost-efficiency and environmental sustainability they need to be designed in accordance to the need for change. Since companies often need to convert existing manufacturing systems to handle variation, implementation of reconfigurable manufacturing systems calls for an analysis of the current system to understand to what extent they fulfil reconfigurability characteristics. This requires an assessment of the needs for reconfigurability as well as assessment of the existing ability to reconfigure the manufacturing system. Although a lot of reconfigurable manufacturing system assessment models are proposed in theory there is an evident knowledge gap pertaining to what extent the existing systems in the industry are in achieving reconfigurability. The purpose with this paper is to propose an assessment criterion for existing manufacturing systems to measure reconfigurability and their readiness to change with respect to products and volume variations. Based on a literature review of existing reconfigurability assessment models and a case study within the automotive industry, a criterion is developed and tested to analyze how reconfigurable a system is and to decide which parameters that need more attention to achieve higher degree of reconfigurability.

  • 46.
    Salim, Roaa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Automation decisions in investment projects: A study in the Swedish wood products industry2018In: Procedia Manufacturing, Elsevier, 2018, Vol. 25, p. 255-262Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to study which aspects are considered when automation decisions are being made in the wood products industry. The aspects were identified in several decision areas of manufacturing. The data collection was based on participation in meetings of an ongoing investment project. The findings demonstrate that in the first phases of an investment project, where the project idea is evaluated, the most critical aspect for decision makers is economic benefits. This paper will provide further insights on the underlying reasoning for decisions on automation of manufacturing in investment projects in the wood products industry. 

  • 47.
    Sege, Victoria
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Balta, Pelda
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Benefits & barriers of implementing reconfigurable jigs: A study in offsite manufacturing of unique house elements in Sweden2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to identify the enablers, barriers and benefits of implementing reconfigurable jigs in the off-site manufacturing of unique house elements. Due to de- mands on customization, volume and lowering the cost, there is a need to increase flex- ibility in the industry. The paper focuses on mainly two phases of implementation, which are manufacturing, design and engineering.

    The research questions are answered by applying a single case study method, taking place in a Swedish house manufacturing company. The study consists of four different techniques – interviews, time study, observations, and questionnaire which are sup- ported with an additional literature review. Hence, research questions are answered from a triangulation approach providing nuanced and dynamic perspectives.

    From observations and time study it is concluded that in current situation, changeover in manufacturing is time-consuming due to the difference in complexity of product var- iants, along with a complex and inefficient setup process that is not responsive to a changeable environment. Findings imply that the barriers in both phases include lack of knowledge about reconfigurability, communication, current capabilities of CAD sys- tems as well as training and education. Enablers are found to be awareness of the needs of improvements, long-term mindset and working with product platforms. The benefits of implementing reconfigurable jigs include a reduction of setup time in manufacturing, better storage and sharing of information along with a better interpretation of that in- formation, a better structure in the organisation.

  • 48.
    Sivasubramanian, Sriramkumar
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Optimization and simulation of formed suction cup to position aerospace CFRP parts during milling.2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 49.
    Stolt, Roland
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    André, Samuel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Introducing Inserts for Die Casting Manufactured by Selective Laser Sintering2018In: Global Integration of Intelligent Manufacturing and Smart Industry for Good of Humanity / [ed] Dušan Šormaz, Gürsel Süer, F. Frank Chen, Elsevier, 2018, p. 309-316Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The advances in additive manufacturing (AM) for high grade steels has in some cases made it possible to manufacture die inserts for demanding processes like high pressure die casting (HPDC). However, several challenges remain before this becomes commonplace. There is still a need of secondary manufacturing steps on the insert after printing. Also, extensive design changes must be made on the die inserts to fully utilize the advantages of AM. Further, the die insert is only one of many parts needed in the die assembly. Much of the die manufacturing will still be done by conventional methods. In this paper, several companies involved in the manufacturing and use of dies for HPDC have been interviewed on that they think is the future role of AM in their business. The result is that the effect of just printing the inserts would will be quite limited at present. Bringing down the time spent on die manufacture is important since that time then could be spent on improving the manufacturability of the parts.

  • 50.
    Stolt, Roland
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Heikkinen, Tim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Integrating Additive Manufacturing in the Design of Aerospace Components2018In: Transdisciplinary Engineering Methods for Social Innovation of Industry 4.0: Proceedings of the 25th ISPE Inc. International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering / [ed] Margherita Peruzzini, Marcello Pellicciari, Cees Bil, Josip Stjepandić, Nel Wognum, IOS Press, 2018, p. 145-154Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the aerospace industry, Additive Manufacturing (AM) is quickly gaining ground. When optimizing the design of an AM component, all life-cycle aspects need to be considered. It is by no means limited to the classic weight / stiffness optimization of the topology alone. The AM component design must comply with an array of requirements on for example assembly, maintenance and inspection. In addition, there are the manufacturability requirements and constraints of the printing procedure itself, including component orientation and support structures. In this paper, a proposal on how to integrate the AM design of components with the design of the complete engine structure is presented. To find how the current design process is conducted, an interview study involving design and manufacturing experts has been made at an aerospace company, forming a base for the proposal. The result is that a primary design procedure for the AM component must be made as a separate step involving a limited set of design considerations prior to making a multidisciplinary evaluation of the proposed engine structure.

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