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  • 1.
    Anaimuthu, Bettu
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Industrial design.
    Concept Design of Inflatable Roof box usingDrop Stitch Fabric2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis project is about concept design of roof box. The roof box is targeted towards urban users who live in compact houses and are limited by space to store the conventional hard roof boxes. The project explores the idea of transforming the roof box into a compact size to be stored in a duffel bag. 

    The project incorporates several methods like Bootcamp Bootleg, Double Diamond, Mockups and Prototyping. The project involved making several mockups to ideate, build, test and verify if it works. The result of which is a roof box which folds into a compact size to be stored and transforms into its full size adding additional cargo space to your vehicle.

    This thesis project was done together with Swaroop Rajagopal, while the design and implementation is carried out by me, the material research and the testing is carried out by him in his master thesis project. This Master Thesis project is done in collaboration with Thule Sweden AB.The project is still in its conceptual phase and further development is required before it is ready to hit the market.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Filip
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Industrial design.
    Development of a visual brand language and a mobility aid2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Medical technology is a field of work with connection to prevention, diagnosis, monitoring, treatment and care. The company Human care is a well-established company in Sweden with red rollators seen all over Sweden. The product family of Human care has four different units of mobility aid solutions. These are lifting devices, rollators, healthcare beds, and convertible chairs. In common they share the same brand, but they do not have any clear connection to each other when it comes to form, colour and texture.

    In this thesis a visual brand language is developed and created for the company. At the same time, it is implemented and developed on a lifting solution for patient mobility in the healthcare. To find a brand language which should be easier to implement on the products investigations into the brand and products has been done. By trying to find a common ground in the current products the step from creation to implementation of a guideline will be smaller. Further, research has been done in colour psychology, ergonomics, surface textures and forms.

    The result of this thesis is a guideline which the company can use as a base when developing new products. In this thesis, it has been implemented on a lifting device for patient transportation.

  • 3.
    André, Samuel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    The Design Platform Approach –Enabling platform-based development in the engineer-to-order industry2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing companies are continuously faced with requirements regarding technology novelty, shorter time to market, a higher level of functionality, and lower prices on their products. This is especially the case for companies developing and manufacturing highly customized products, also known as engineer-to-order (ETO) companies. The traditional view of the product lifecycle introduces the customer only at the sale and distribution phase, which is often concerned with identifying and transferring customer needs into fixed specifications that guide the development of end-consumer products. In the ETO industry, however, the customer is involved already at the scoping and quotation stage, and a significant amount of engineering needs to be performed for every customer order. Thus, ETO companies cannot work according to the traditional model described above since specific requirements are set directly by the customer, or a detailed requirements specification is missing and must be developed in cooperation with the customer. It is not uncommon that products are developed in joint ventures with the customer and run for several years, during which requirements change.

    Product platform approaches have been generally accepted in the industry to serve a wide product variety while maintaining business efficiency. However, how to apply a product platform approach in ETO companies that face the reality described above is a challenge. Product platform approaches tend to require focused development of the platform, which, in turn, requires some knowledge about the future variants to be derived from the platform. The research presented in this thesis investigates the state of art and practice in the industry regarding the challenges, needs, and current use of product platforms. To respond to the identified need, a product platform approach is proposed that expands the scope of what a product platform has traditionally contained. The purpose of this proposal is to aid the development of highly customized products when physical modules or component scalability do not suffice. The resulting approach, the Design Platform Approach (DPA), provides a coherent model and methodology for heterogeneous engineering assets to be used in product development, supporting the activity of designing and existing solutions. The approach is based on identifying and modelling generic product and process items, which are the generic building blocks of the product, its structure, and the process of designing them. The generic product and process items are associated with the generic assets governing their design. By describing engineering assets that are the outcome of technology and product development, such as finished designs, design guidelines, constraints etc., in a standardized format, the DPA successively evolves.

    This thesis outlines the DPA in detail and presents cases of applications that have focused on different aspects of the approach. Tools to support the DPA are presented and evaluated in different kinds of industries along with the specific methods used and literature summarization.

  • 4.
    André, Samuel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Modeling of transdisciplinary engineering assets using the design platform approach for improved customization ability2018In: Advanced Engineering Informatics, ISSN 1474-0346, E-ISSN 1873-5320, Vol. 38, p. 277-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Original equipment suppliers (OES) that develop unique products are continuously faced with changing requirements during both the quotation and product development processes. This challenge is a different reality from companies that develop off-the-shelf products for the end consumer, which use fixed specifications and where product platforms have been a strong enabler for efficient mass customization. However, product platforms cannot adequately support companies working as OES. The reason is that a high level of customization is required which means that interfaces cannot be standardized, the performance is not negotiable, requirements are not initially fixed, and the specific system interacts with, is affected by, or affects other systems that are simultaneously developed in a transdisciplinary environment. The design platform (DP) approach provides a coherent environment for heterogeneous and transdisciplinary design resources to be used in product development by supporting both designing and off-the-shelf solutions. This research describes the introduction, application and further development of the DP approach at an automotive supplier to support the development of customized solutions when traditional modularity or platform scalability do not suffice. A computer tool called Design Platform Manager has been developed to support the creation and visualization of the DP. The support tool has a connection to a product data management database to link the platform model to the various kinds of engineering assets needed or intended to support variant creation. Finally, the support tool was evaluated by the case company representatives showing promising results. 

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-08-08 00:00
  • 5.
    André, Samuel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Supporting the modelling and managing of relations in the design platform2019In: Proceedings of the 22th International Conference on Engineering Design (ICED), 5-8 August, Delft, The Netherlands, Cambridge University Press, 2019, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 3001-3010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common strategy which has in many cases become a necessity in product developing companies is to apply platform thinking to some extent. Engineer-to-order (ETO) companies are firms that need to invest in a significant amount engineering time in each product ordered by customers. These companies have in the past been known to not be fully able to apply platform strategies. An area of concern to product development is the design and manufacture of machine tools aimed for part manufacturing which is a large investment and a critical bottle neck. As a response to these challenges the design platform (DP) concept was developed which is founded on the re-use of company assets. This paper aims to investigate the application of the DP in a company designing and producing unique high-pressure die casting tools for different applications and customers. To enable companies of this character to utilize platform thinking to a higher degree and thus increase the efficiency in product development, a focus is set on modelling and managing relations within the DP. In addition, a PDM system setup is proposed together with an integrated support application for the realisation in industry.

  • 6.
    André, Samuel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Exploring the design platform in industrialized housing for efficient design and production of customized houses2019In: Transdisciplinary engineering for complex socio-technical systems: Proceedings of the 26th ISTE International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering, July 30 – August 1, 2019 / [ed] K. Hiekata, B. Moser, M. Inoue, J. Stjepandić & N. Wognum, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2019, p. 125-134Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrialized house-building (IHB) is a sector offering unique products by adopting an engineer-to-order (ETO) strategy. Customer satisfaction is achieved by adaptation of product solutions and the fast-paced introduction of new technology in combination with short lead-times and cost-efficient production. Product platforms is acknowledged as a strategic enabler for mass customization and increased competitiveness. The strategy has been a necessity in the mechanical industry for several decades. However, for IHB, platforms have only gained interest in recent years. In general, ETO companies struggle with adopting the common product platform approach, set by pre-defined modules and components. Predefinitions require standardization of the product offer which reduces the customization ability which is regarded as a competitive edge. The Design Platform (DP) approach was developed aimed to support ETO companies by utilizing different types of engineering assets in a coherent transdisciplinary model enabling efficient customization. The long-term aim of this work is to investigate and support the DP applicability in IHB to increase efficiency in development and delivery. For this article, data were gathered from a single case study, including workshops with company representatives combined with interviews and document analysis. Based on the data analysis, engineering assets were identified and characterized. Further, a conceptual PLM solution is proposed and outlined to support the DP application combined with the assets. The results suggest that a PLM system can host parts of the DP and that it is applicable in IHB.

  • 7.
    André, Samuel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    PLM support for the Design Platform in industrialized housing for efficient design and production of customized housesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Bengtsson, Erik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Concept Development of Stroller Wheel2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 9.
    Bergström, Adam
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Jödicke, Luisa
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Reconfigurability Assessment Model: Assessment of a Manufacturing System's Current State2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s global market and growing competition set an increasing strain to manufacturing companies. Shorter product lifecycles automatically lead to shorter production ramp up periods and, therefore, set a higher strain on the manufacturing systems. The concept of reconfigurable manufacturing systems (RMS) was developed in the early 1990s and has now gained more interest than ever. An RMS is designed to quickly respond to changes in market demand, by adapting its functionality as well as its capacity to the current market requirements. In order to achieve this, an RMS is characterised by six core characteristics: modularity, integrability, diagnosability, convertibility, scalability and customisation. By complying with these characteristics, the manufacturing system can meet the required responsiveness to functionality and capacity changes. Academia has been focusing on the development and design of new RMSs, however, there is a lack in research on converting existing manufacturing systems towards reconfigurability. Additionally, few models assessing a manufacturing system’s current state in terms of reconfigurability are available in literature. The existing reconfigurability assessment models were proven to be rather theoretical and difficult to use by practitioners in industry. Therefore, the need for a reconfigurability assessment model applicable in industry arose. This study focuses on the analysis of enablers of a reconfigurability manufacturing systems as well as on assessing the reconfigurability of an existing manufacturing system in an industrial setting. For this purpose, a detailed reconfigurability assessment model has been developed, based on literature studies and a case study at a case company. A focus of the development of the model has been set on usability in industry. The outcome was an assessment model developed in Microsoft Excel that gives an overview on the reconfigurability of each characteristic as well as the manufacturing system’s overall reconfigurability. The model was subsequently tested and verified at the case company. The final reconfigurability assessment model is presented and explained at the end of this study. This study shows, that through the use of theory about RMS and input from industry it was possible to develop a current state assessment model regarding reconfigurability. To make the model generalisable and adaptable to different industrial settings, further testing in different manufacturing fields and research within RMS is required.

  • 10.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Raudberget, Dag
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Organising for knowledge and learning – a balancing act between divergent forces2018In: Human resource management: A Nordic perspective / [ed] H. Ahl, I. Bergmo Prvulovic & K. Kilhammar, London, UK: Routledge, 2018, p. 42-55Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research and development is a knowledge-intense activity where HR departments must balance many internal tensions, such as that between development versus project management, or research versus product standardisation. The first issue may ensure long-term survival and the second, short-term profitability. Another contrasting pair of issues is technical knowledge vs. administrative knowledge. Forging a career path in a manufacturing business often entails abandoning the technical work for the benefit of completing administrative or management work. The chapter discusses how HR departments can handle knowledge management and provide new ways to benefit both the individual and the company.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-04-10 00:00
  • 11.
    Brkic, Marina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Koncept för hjul och handtag till en resväska2019Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This degree project has been carried at the Technical University, Jönköping in collaboration with Science Park and the Carlobolaget.

     

    In this project we have focused on I: handles and II: wheels, to find new possible solutions. One challenge is how to get wheels to give themselves less noise but still be sustainable and stable. It will also take time to get a unique on a telescopic handle that differs from existing products on market.

     

    The Travel industry is constantly growing market, where travel and transportation are increasing every day. The suitcase has been around for several years but has not progressed in the development. Current products do not differ and the vision was to develop the product into something innovative. The person the bag is focused on is a ’’ big city person ’’ with a very active life.

     

    The study chosen for the project is a conceptual study and the method of the product development process has been used to produce a result. The product development process is a process used to develop and improve already existing products. When companies need to improve a product, they need to plan the project strategically in order to be able to go through the different steps that are included in the process with understanding.

     

    The project began with a market analysis, interviews and discussions with several people. Under market analysis, a survey was made to find out what the market wants and what is considered to be problematic when a suitcase comes to use. From the competitor analysis that was done, we got an overview of ’’market gaps’’ . Furthermore, a concept development has been carried out in the project where three concepts were generated.

     

    With a commonly decision we came up with the idea three-in-one concept. The idea is based on a chassis where different modules can be assemble to the frame to change the bag's function, which will make it adaptable for all kinds of situations and users.

     

    The final concept became a trolley with two large wheels and a third ’’circular’’ wheel. The trolley consist of the wheels and the telescopic handle resulted in a unique and attractive design.

  • 12.
    Broman, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Morad, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Utveckling av värmeelement på Husqvarna AB 2019: Utveckling av värmeelement för handtagen på bensindrivna motorsågar.2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Throughout Jönköpings University has a bachelor thesis at Husqvarna AB been done, were the main focus is to develop the existing heating element. On the existing front and rear handle is where the heating element are placed and the material the handles are made of is aluminum respectively plastic. These handle are also called the reference at Husqvarna AB.

     

    To be able to have different type of concepts was a method called concept generating, where these concepts were developed and later on eliminate nonrealistic ideas. During the project there was a lot of visits at several companies to be able to see the production and have a meeting with them. PTC-technology was the chosen heating element for this project and stands for “Positive Temperature Coefficient” and is a self-regulating heating element. PTC has a low inner resistance until it reaches the temperature that it is manufactured for to maintain a more stable heating level. Tests were made on the concepts that was given against the reference to see which concept that is most suitable for further development. Different methods and theories was used to be able to create tools for embossing the front handle, which later on got heat-treated.

     

    The existing heating element is based on the amount of rounds per minute the flywheel rotates which result in different heating levels for the consumer. PTC technology gives a more stable heating level for such system with various rotational speed. Husqvarna AB’s purpose with this thesis is to develop a more stable heating element on the XPG chainsaws.

     

    This thesis ended with a result of two different winning concepts which was given recommendations for how they could further be developed to be possible to replace the existing heating element.

  • 13.
    CALVIN LINARES, PABLO
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Industrial design.
    CONCEPT FOR A PORTABLE ASSISTIVE LIFTING SEAT2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project consists of the design of a concept for a portable assistive seat in collaboration with IKEA. The aim of the project is to create a solution that fits within the Omtänksam family of products and shares the company’s values of what is so-called Democratic Design:

    Form - Quality - Low Price - Function – Sustainability

    The Omtänksam Family is focused on products that can help the elderly to have a more comfortable life while blending with the home environment. A portable assistive Lifting Seat is a real need for many people that require some extra help when standing up or sitting down. The main goal of this project is to design a cheap, safe, simple and light product that can assist people for reducing the effort that is required from them. The product must be comfortable, easy to transport and friendly to interact with. Considering a mass manufacturing perspective is very important to meet the previously formulated requirements. The force that the assistive seat releases must keep performing efficiently during the product service life. A locking system must be provided for avoiding the lifting force to act when the user is sitting, assisting only when it is demanded. This Thesis describes the process of designing a concept for a Portable AssistiveLifting Seat involving different areas such as ergonomics, semantics, manufacturing, mechanical engineering and materials science. The design approach in this case is driven by the Democratic Design Principles combining the human-centered design with a market perspective. The result takes advantage of form and material for avoiding the need for any extra lifting mechanism. This solution is way simpler than any other one existing in the market and it integrates the solution for many different problems in one single piece. This simplification of the problem allows reducing the production cost and helps to meet the intended requirements creating an innovative product for the market.

  • 14.
    Chandrashekar, Sharath
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Sawalekar, Vishal
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Forecast and Context Driven Sales & Operations Planning2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 15.
    De Goey, Heleen
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Industrial design.
    Design-driven innovation: a systematic literature review2019In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 92-114Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The concept design-driven innovation focuses on innovating product meanings. It has been studied from a variety of perspectives and contexts since the early 2000s. However, a complete overview of the literature published in this area is currently missing. The purpose of this study is to provide a comprehensive understanding of how design-driven innovation contributes to value creation in product development.

    Design/methodology/approach

    In this systematic literature review, 57 papers and book chapters that cover design-driven innovation were identified and analyzed. An iterative coding process was followed to derive five facets of design-driven innovation that contribute to value creation.

    Findings

    Design-driven innovation creates value by focusing on the intangible values of products. The following five facets of design-driven innovation that contribute to value creation were identified: development of new product meanings, knowledge generation, actors and collaborations, capabilities and process. These facets and their interrelations are presented in a theoretical framework.

    Practical implications

    The main practical implication of this study is that it is now clear that the five facets of design-driven innovation are interrelated and reinforce each other. Therefore, companies need to approach design-driven innovation from a holistic perspective.

    Originality/value

    This paper contributes to theory by presenting the theoretical framework that provides an overview of available knowledge and that creates a context for future research.

  • 16.
    Devarakonda, Rakesh Raghavendra
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Ramachandrareddy, Sumanth
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Production System waste reduction using Value stream mapping: An Industrial case study2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid rise in global population and market demands have mandated industries to introduce better and quality products to meet up their rushing needs. However, achiev-ing such goals need optimal production system and robust strategies. Exploring in depth it can be visualized that most of the manufacturing set ups suffers losses or relatively lower benefits due to improper and high wastages. Hence it is very important for man-ufacturing industries to explore the techniques which help them to improve their pro-duction system. The key techniques from Lean Manufacturing (LM) such as Value Stream Mapping (VSM) and Ishikawa diagram were explored in this work for enhanc-ing production capacity, reducing rework, reducing wastages and arriving to a well-defined optimal process flow which in turn help in achieving higher productivity. How-ever, the implementation of Lean and Value stream mapping depends on the production scale and has its own significance to different manufacturing setup. With that motive, in this thesis work the emphasis was made on exploring VSM technique for better pro-duction optimization in manufacturing sector.

  • 17.
    Dickèr, Jonathan
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Industrial design.
    Beach Chair Inspired Seating Furniture2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 18.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Poorkiany, Morteza
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Raudberget, Dag
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Traceability of decisions in product realization processes of custom engineered products2018In: DS92: Proceedings of the DESIGN 2018 15th International Design Conference / [ed] Marjanović D., Štorga M., Škec S., Bojčetić N., Pavković N., The Design Society, 2018, p. 249-260Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Custom engineered products require an engineer-to-order approach in development, quotation preparation and order processing. This work reports the result of a three-and-a-half-year project were the objective was to develop means for implementation and management of computer support for engineering design and production engineering of customized products. Efficient re-use is essential for success and decision is identified as the core concept to trace tasks executed, knowledge used, design rationale and artefacts developed throughout the product realization process.

  • 19.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Heikkinen, Tim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Raudberget, Dag
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Platform Models for Agile Customization – What's Beyond Modularization?2018In: Transdisciplinary Engineering Methods for Social Innovation of Industry 4.0: Proceedings of the 25th ISPE Inc. International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering / [ed] Margherita Peruzzini, Marcello Pellicciari, Cees Bil, Josip Stjepandić, Nel Wognum, IOS Press, 2018, p. 371-380Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many manufacturing companies are suppliers that deliver unique solutions to different business customers. Intense quotation work, with a high demand on accuracy and quick response, and development projects executed in close collaboration with customers and other actors characterize these companies. The projects can run for years or a few weeks depending on the business. Changes of requirements are frequent and technology development required for improved functionality, sustainability and competitiveness. The use of a product platform has been acknowledged as a strategic enabler for product family development and mass customization. However, companies struggle with adopting the common platform approach building upon pre-defined modules and components as it constraints the fulfilment of unique customer requirements and the introduction of new technology at high pace. This work reports the results from case studies conducted in collaboration with four companies. They are in many ways different but face the same challenges when it comes to customization, fluctuating requirements and need of high pace in technology advancement. The focus of this paper is on their initial states; including how they work with their product concept before the customer entry point, the work that is initiated when an order is accepted, the character of requirements and the adoption of product platforms. Criteria on, and identification of, new platforms models, termed Design Assets, are presented followed by a mapping to the Design Platform concept pointing out areas upcoming work, both scientifically and at the companies.

  • 20.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Barry, Daved
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Sollander, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Edh Mirzaei, Nina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Johansson, Anette
    Embracing the unplanned: Organizational ambidexterity within manufacturing SMEs2019In: Academy of Management Proceedings, Academy of Management , 2019, article id 14906Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizational Ambidexterity (OA)–the ability to simultaneously pursue exploration and exploitation–is increasingly being advocated as a way to gain competitive advantage. Most of the work on OA has focused on large, multi-divisional organizations, resulting in frameworks and prescriptions that have little utility for small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). With this in mind, we report on the first year of an exploratory, quasi-experimental study of ambidexterity within six small-to-medium manufacturing enterprises in Sweden. The research is characterized by an emic, ‘invented here’ approach, where companies closely examine their current exploration and exploitation practices, use their findings to formulate more advanced OA approaches uniquely suited to their values and circumstances, and iteratively apply and refine these over a four year period. It appears that the construct of ‘unplanned’ and associated sub-constructs such as ‘disturbance, crashes, and interruption’ could be an important key to framing and improving OA within these SMEs and perhaps more generally.

  • 21.
    Eriksson, Gustav
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Norlin, Daniel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Ergonomic improvement on Husqvarna trimmer2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Injuries caused by vibrations are a common problem that can emerge from daily exposure when using handheld power tools like grass trimmers. These are often permanent and can’t be cured. Rotations caused by the motor create vibrations where unbalance of the trimmer line can create high amplitudes of vibrations. This report studies how these vibrations affect the trimmer and what solutions that can dampen them with the help of material and mechanical design. By using experimental tests and theoretical evidence it is possible to show how vibrations emerge. These tests proved to be useful when concepts and prototypes were created.

  • 22.
    Eriksson, Gusten
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Persson, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Organisational ambidexterity in manufacturing SMEs: An empirical study of managers’ and workers’ perceptions of ambidextrous elements2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Organisational ambidexterity is considered a key to company survival and performance. Despite this, organisational ambidexterity is still a poorly understood phenomenon, especially in an SME context. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate how the compliance with ambidextrous elements is perceived at different levels in manufacturing SMEs, to increase the understanding of organisational ambidexterity in this context. The empirical data was collected through a combination of questionnaire and interview. The case companies in this report perceive that they comply stronger with contextual elements than with structural elements. The strong compliance with contextual elements is motivated by the lack of hierarchies, flexibility in the company, different management structure and low number of employees. This allows employees to perform the contextual elements such as initiative-taking, cooperating, brokering and multitasking. The structural elements including e.g. vision, values, strategies, senior team responsibility and alignment are perceived differently at different  hierarchal levels, indicating that there are subcultures within the hierarchal levels within a company. The biggest difference can be found between the middle managers and the top managers,. Workers perceive that they are not included in explorationb within the company, and that the exploration occur more sporadically than those for exploitation. The definitions of exploration and exploitation vary between the companies which results in a lack of consensus. This makes it difficult for the companies to perform the changes necessary in order to develop and achieve long-term sustainable growth i.e. economical sustainability. The managerial implication of this report concerns four actions: (1) create a common definition for exploration, (2) develop goals for exploration, (3) communicate for buy-in and (4) involve all employees.

  • 23.
    Eriksson, Lars
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. Halmstad University, Functional Surfaces Research Group, Sweden.
    Bergman, Martin
    Halmstad University, Functional Surfaces Research Group, Sweden.
    Affective surface engineering- using soft and hard metrologhy to measure the sensation and perception in surface properties2018In: Proceedings of NordDesign: Design in the Era of Digitalization, NordDesign 2018, Linköping: The Design Society, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New surface treatments, novel material developments, and improved quality control procedures and advanced metrology instrumentation create a possibility to further develop competitiveness by the selection of “optimal” surface features”, to a product. The customers first apprehension of a product and the creation of desire is a very complex, but tempting process to learn more about. The interaction between the added quantitative- and the qualitative direct impressions with the customers known and unknown functional demands, social background, and expectations results in sensation and perception, partly possible to quantify and to great extent impossible to pin-down as numbers. Customer sensation and perception are much about psychological factors. There has been a strong industrial- and academic need and interest for methods and tools to quantify and linking product properties to the human response but a lack of studies of the impact of surfaces. This paper aims to introduce a novel approach to develop and join a human sensoric inspired metrology frame-work with qualitative gradings of apprehended impressions of products with varying surface properties. The aim is to establish the metrology framework to link measurable- and unmeasurable impressions of product surfaces to customer FEELING as exemplified by a set of industrial applications. In conclusions of the study, future research in Soft metrology is proposed to allow understanding and modelling of product perception and sensations in combination with a development of the Kansei Surface Engineering methodology and software tools.

  • 24.
    Fermér, Arvid
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Sliwa, Petrus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Utveckling av tillbehör till batteriprodukter2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 25.
    Ferreira, Ana Cristina
    et al.
    Federal University of Lavras, Lavras, Brazil.
    Pimenta, Márcio Lopes
    Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia, Brazil.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Antecedents of cross-functional integration level and their organizational impact2019In: Journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop a model to predict the antecedents of the integration level among marketing, logistics and production, considering the influence of formal and informal factors that generate integration and the existence of conflicts.

    Design/methodology/approach: A survey of 179 participants from all regions of Brazil was conducted. A parsimonious model including four dimensions and 34 variables was developed through confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling.

    Findings: The field data corroborate studies dealing with the impact of various formal and informal integration factors on the cross-functional integration level as a construct. Furthermore, this paper concludes that the level of cross-functional can be defined as: the intensity of the relationship among internal functions which can be measured by the mutual existence of formal and informal factors and the absence of manifest conflicts.

    Research limitations/implications: The findings of this paper cannot be generalized because of the convenience sampling. Future research could apply a probabilistic sampling and try to explore other geographical settings in both national and international contexts.

    Practical implications: The proposed model can generate important information for managers by pointing out variables that can predict the integration level and their impacts on the organizational performance. The paper concludes with examples about how the model could be useful in several practical situations.

    Originality/value: This paper proposes a model with reasonable accuracy to predict the integration level and overcomes prior research limitations with respect to models to predict the antecedents of the integration level, particularly the role of conflicts in the integration processes. 

  • 26.
    Granlund, Anna
    et al.
    Division of Product Realization, School of Innovation Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Division of Product Realization, School of Innovation Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter E.
    Division of Innovation Management, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Lead factory operationalisation and challenges2019In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 30, no 2-3, p. 96-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deepens the understanding of the lead factory concept by examining how the lead factory role is operationalised and what challenges are associated with it. The research is based on an explorative case study of eight Swedish lead factories in the manufacturing industry. The empirical findings suggest that the understanding of the lead factory concept should be extended as it is not restricted to one type of set-up. The findings show a spectrum ranging from an entire manufacturing plant, parts of a plant, to a virtual plant considered to be the lead factory. The research also shows a broad range of challenges experienced by lead factories. Several of these are related to and originate from unclear role, responsibility and mandate of the lead factory. The lack of dedicated resources for lead factory activities, specifically long-term development and difficulties in measuring the benefits of the role, were other challenges faced. 

  • 27.
    Hansen, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Industrial design.
    A Friendly Product: A Kansei engineering study2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This master thesis is about exploring the possibility to concisely and deliberately apply a feeling on a product medium. The report features the process and results of using the kansei engineering methodology to develop and evaluate a friendly vibrator (pleasure product). The thesis is performed at a master level in the program of Industrial Design at Jönköping University.   

  • 28.
    HASSAN, INAMUL
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Effects of Austempering Process on Mechanical Behavior Properties of Compacted Graphite Iron2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis paper here focuses on the effects of the austempering temperature (TA) and the austempering time (tA) on the unalloyed fully ferrite Compacted Graphite Iron (CGI), to obtain improve in mechanical properties and the study of the microstructure. The unalloyed CGI samples were austenitised at 850oC for 60 and 90 min and were then heat treated at 275, 325 and 375oC with different holding times at 30,60,90, and 120 mins. Mechanical properties like the tensile strength, yield strength, young’s modulus, Brinell and Vickers harness were conducted to perform the analysis on the samples. LOM was used for the study of the microstructure and SEM was used for the study of fractography of the fractured tensile bar.

  • 29.
    Heikkinen, Tim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Multidisciplinary design automation: Working with product model extensions2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Being able to efficiently and effectively provide custom products has been identified as a competitive advantage for manufacturing organizations. Product configuration has been shown to be an effective way of achieving this through a modularization, product platform and product family development approach. A core assumption behind product configuration is that the module variants and their constraints can be explicitly defined as product knowledge in terms of geometry and configuration rules. This is not always the case, however. Many companies require extensive engineering to develop each module variant and cannot afford to do so in order to meet potential customer requirements within a predictable future. Instead, they try to implicitly define the module variants in terms of the process for how they can be realized. In this way they can realize module variants on demand efficiently and effectively when the customer requirements are better defined, and the development can be justified by the increased probability of profiting from the outcome.

    Design automation, in its broadest definition, deals with computerized engineering support by effectively and efficiently utilizing pre-planned reusable assets to progress the design process. There have been several successful implementations reported in the literature, but a widespread use is yet to be seen. It deals with the explicit definition of engineering process knowledge, which results in a collection of methods and models that can come in the form of computer scripts, parametric CADmodels, template spreadsheets, etc. These methods and models are developed using various computer tools and maintained within the different disciplines involved, such as geometric modeling, simulation, or manufacturing, and are dependent on each other through the product model. To be able to implement, utilize, and manage design automation systems in or across multiple disciplines, it is important to first understand how the disciplinary methods and models are dependent on each other through the product model and then how these relations should be constructed to support the users without negatively affecting other aspects, such as modeling flexibility, minimum documentation, and software tool independence.

    To support the successful implementation and management of design automation systems the work presented here has focused on understanding how some digital product model constituents are, can, and, to some extent, should be extended to concretize relations between methods and models from different tools and disciplines. It has been carried out by interviewing Swedish industrial companies, performing technical reviews, performing literature reviews, and developing prototypes, which has resulted in an increased understanding and the consequent development of a conceptual framework that highlights aspects relating to the choice of extension techniques.

  • 30.
    Heikkinen, Tim
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Extended design assets enabling automated tool development as a part of a product platform approach2018In: DS92: Proceedings of the DESIGN 2018 15th International Design Conference / [ed] Marjanović D., Štorga M., Škec S., Bojčetić N., Pavković N., The Design Society, 2018, p. 757-768Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product platform development is a well-established approach for reusing product knowledge in the form of geometry and its configuration rules and constraints. Explicitly defining all platform components is not always possible however. This is why a product platform approach where the processes of realising platform components also are supported is needed, instead of exclusively relying on their results. The work presented here works toward this, with a focus on automated tool development enabled by extending design assets from different tools.

  • 31.
    Heikkinen, Tim
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Review of CAD-model Capabilities and Restrictions for Multidisciplinary use2018In: Computer-Aided Design and Applications, ISSN 1686-4360, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 509-519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product development is an iterative process, partially due to changes in both company internal and external product requirements, resulting in changes to the product under development. These changes might require recapitulation of design rationale and result in re-doing assessments and syntheses of different kinds. One way to support this work is to proactively model in such a way that as much as possible of the previous work can be re-used. Not only within one product development project but also across and to future ones. Modelling for re-use can be done by documenting design rationale and formalising performed activities as design guidelines or computer scripts. To be able to find and re-use this information it could be attached to the product features which it relates to. Since geometry is such a core product characteristic, especially within the mechanical industry, and is often modelled as CAD-models, this paper presents a review of CAD-model capabilities and restrictions to serve as a carrier of multidisciplinary information. This is done by; enquiring three Swedish companies, exploring an automated Finite Element Analysis method utilising the CAD-model as a carrier of information, and reviewing different CAD software capabilities. Results show that there are at least seven extension techniques, out of which all are currently being used or considered to be in the future, by at least one company. Further, depending on the extension technique, extendibility and human-comprehension of the added information differ.

  • 32.
    Heikkinen, Tim
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Incorporating Design for Additive Manufacturing in Multidisciplinary Design Automation – Challenges Identified2019In: Proceedings of CAD'19, 2019, p. 372-376Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Helin, Jonathan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Hellberg, Gustav
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Fäste mellan två metallytor: Sammanfogning av två aluminiumytor2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The degree project has been carried out in collaboration with Husqvarna, a world-leading manufacturer of products for gardening, park and forest management. An ever-evolving industry where innovation and creativity are required to be at the top. With constant demands from customers on performance and quality, a constant mechanical and design developments are required.

    Husqvarna's chainsaws use two-stroke engines where the scavenging channel are covered by a lid which in turn is fastened with screw joints. The channel through which the fuel mixture is pumped is open and a lid is needed to seal the channel. The channel is closed by screw joints, which in turn has a cost related to articles and materials. The lid that is fastened with screw joints has, one step in the production, articles concerning screws and fastening functions in the cylinder. The screw towers located on the cylinder could be an opportunity for improvement regarding weight in order to optimize the product.

    The aim of investigating new fastening methods is to see what possible improvements are available compared to the current method. These include weight reduction, which is very significant for these products. With a thorough literature study on attachment methods, a Pugh-matrix with its own values ​​has been utilized. It has helped to see which concepts are best suited within the weighting framework. The theories are built from scientific manuals within mechanics, strength and joints. With this basis, conclusions have been made regarding the functions that have been investigated and whether they are positive or negative in relation to the current method. The work is meant as a basic basis for Husqvarna, which can facilitate the use of alternative fastening methods for the channel cover.

  • 34.
    Hjertberg, Tim
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    A tool for obtaining transparency and traceability in heterogeneous design automation environments2018In: Computer-Aided Design and Applications, ISSN 1686-4360, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 488-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, CAD-system are used for much more than just geometric modeling. They are complemented by various software and information sources forming a complete environment for handling all life-cycle aspects of the product. In such systems, the CAD-system works as a central hub. The software and information sources may be of various types making the system highly heterogenous. This presents problems with transparency and traceability in the system making long term management difficult. In this paper, a novel tool is presented to keep track of the dependencies between the various parts of such systems providing an overview and making it possible to predict the effect of proposed changes and facilitating long term management. The tool is tested in a highly heterogeneous environment at a manufacturer of aerospace components, with the result that the traceability is expected to increase at the expense of that time must be spent on defining dependencies and meta-information as the system is evolving.

  • 35.
    Jammula, Chaitanya Krishna
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Correlating the microstructure with wear properties of aluminium silicon carbides2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Aluminium is one of the metals playing a prominent role in automobile industry after cast iron. Because of its light weight property and good mechanical properties. When aluminium reinforced with silicon carbide showing good tribological properties and improved strength. Aluminium silicon carbide needs some good wear and frictional properties to use it as break disc. Aluminium reinforced with 15% and 20% silicon carbide and casted in two different ways, liquid casting and stir casting. Four different composites are compared in this paper. Hardness test was carried out on the samples. Increase in the Vickers hardness with increase in silicon carbide reinforcement for both the castings is observed. Rockwell C hardness is showing decreasing trend with increase in SiC reinforcement. The scratch resistance of the surface under micro level was analysed with the help of nano scratch test. The SiC particles in the aluminium matrix are resisting the indenter from deep deformation of the surface. Frictional forces are dropped whenever the indenter met the SiC particles. In other cases, SiC particles are deforming the aluminium matrix in the form of broken particles. The plastic deformation of aluminium is observed, and material is piled up on sideways of groove at high load.Sliding wear behaviour of the composites are investigated by means of reciprocating pin on plate wear rig. The test was carried out at load of 20N for five different sliding duration. Aluminium with 20% silicon carbide of liquid casting is used as a base metal. The worn-out surface of the samples is analysed in SEM. The metallography of the worn-out samples is showing some deep grooves and abrasion of the material. Wear debris from both the surfaces are forming into a cluster of layers. These layers are protecting the surface from wear in some areas were observed. Composition of tribo layer formed during the test was investigated with the help of EDS analysis. The tribo layer are rich in aluminium and silicon elements because both the samples are made of aluminium silicon carbide.

  • 36. Jansson, Gustav
    et al.
    Mukkavaara, Jani
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Breakdown Structure in the Digitalization of Design Work for Industrialized House-Building: A Case Study of Systems Building Using Predefinition Levels of Product Platforms2019In: ICCREM 2019: Innovative Construction Project Management and Construction Industrialization / [ed] Yaowu Wang, Ph.D., Mohamed Al-Hussein, Ph.D., and Geoffrey Q. P. Shen, Ph.D., 2019, p. 49-57Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrialized house-building companies predefine parameters in platforms. In the strive to identify efficient information flow with automation and configuration, the design process requires a breakdown of the product structure of a building to digitally communicate between information systems. The level of predefinitions varies between industrialized house-builders according to market position, type of building processes, and maturity in business. The client decoupling point according to the predefinitions of house-building as a product is central for how and when production information is created. Bill of materials is a breakdown structure that visualize relations and the transformation between engineering, preparation, and production processes from a life cycle perspective. A case study at eight house-building companies was chosen with the aim to identify relations between the level of predefinitions and breakdown structures. House-building platforms with a high level of predefinition on layouts, components, and interfaces show a tendency to use less time in BIM-tools for engineering work and a high level of parameters in manufacturing configuration systems to prepare for production. Meanwhile, the opposite with low levels of predefinitions on components and interfaces focus on BIM-tools for engineering work with longer lead times. An interesting outcome is those with a high level of predefinitions in interfaces but lower levels on component dimensions. These companies have the ability to position their offer to a wide market with flexibility in the engineering work and need to communicate the high levels of interface parameters for the manufacturing sequence with a breakdown of the product together with architects.

  • 37.
    Jansson, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Gustafsson, T.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
    Salomonsson, Kent
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Olofsson, Jakob
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Appelsved, P.
    Kongsberg Automotive AB, Mullsjö, Sweden.
    Palm, M.
    Husqvarna AB, Huskvarna, Sweden.
    An anisotropic non-linear material model for glass fibre reinforced plastics2018In: Composite structures, ISSN 0263-8223, E-ISSN 1879-1085, Vol. 195, p. 93-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to present a methodology to predict the anisotropic and non-linear behaviour of glass fibre reinforced plastics using finite element methods. A material model is implemented in order to remedy the need of multiple material definitions, and to control the local plastic behaviour as a function of the fibre orientation. Injection moulding simulations traditionally provide second order orientation tensors, which are considered together with a homogenization scheme to compute local material properties. However, in the present study, fourth order tensors are used in combination with traditional methods to provide more accurate material properties. The elastic and plastic response of the material model is optimized to fit experimental test data, until simulations and experiments overlap. The proposed material model can support design engineers in making more informed decisions, allowing them to create smarter products without the need of excessive safety factors, leading to reduced component weight and environmental impact. 

  • 38.
    Jarque Antolí, Carlos
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Industrial design.
    The new generation of Smart Home Device: Health Monitoring system for Smart Homes2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis project was conveyed in collaboration with Block Zero, a strategic Design Studio in Malmö, Sweden, with the purpose to design a product that develops a new type of interaction within the Smart Home.

    This design project will primarily focus on the research, exploration and definition of possible solutions, and the resulting design and development of the final product, a Smart Home Health Hub.

    From a global perspective, throughout the following document is covered a description of the design process from initial research to the final prototype. The project is defined in this approach and establishes the mentioned principles to guide the execution of the project through a deductive method, synthesising until the final result.

  • 39.
    Johansson, Joel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Contero, M.
    Universitat Politècnicade València, Spain.
    Company, P.
    Universitat Jaume I, Spain.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Supporting connectivism in knowledge based engineering with graph theory, filtering techniques and model quality assurance2018In: Advanced Engineering Informatics, ISSN 1474-0346, E-ISSN 1873-5320, Vol. 38, p. 252-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mass-customization has forced manufacturing companies to put significant efforts to digitize and automate their engineering and production processes. When new products are to be developed and introduced the production is not alone to be automated. The application of knowledge regarding how the product should be designed and produced based on customer requirements also must be automated. One big academic challenge is helping industry to make sure that the background knowledge of the automated engineering processes still can be understood by its stakeholders throughout the product life cycle. The research presented in this paper aims to build an infrastructure to support a connectivistic view on knowledge in knowledge based engineering. Fundamental concepts in connectivism include network formation and contextualization, which are here addressed by using graph theory together with information filtering techniques and quality assurance of CAD-models. The paper shows how engineering knowledge contained in spreadsheets, knowledge-bases and CAD-models can be penetrated and represented as filtered graphs to support a connectivistic working approach. Three software demonstrators developed to extract filtered graphs are presented and discussed in the paper.

  • 40.
    Johansson, Joel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Knowledge objects enable mass-individualization2019In: Evolutionary and Deterministic Methods for Design Optimization and Control With Applications to Industrial and Societal Problems. / [ed] Andrés-Pérez E., González L., Periaux J., Gauger N., Quagliarella D., Giannakoglou K., Cham: Springer , 2019, p. 371-386Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mass customization and product individualization are driving factors behind design automation, which in turn are enabled through the formalization and automation of engineering work. The goal is to offer customers optimized solutions to their needs timely and as profitable as possible. The path to achieve such a remarkable goal can be very winding and tricky for many companies, or even non-existing at the moment being. To succeed requires three essential parts: formally represented product knowledge, facilities to automatically apply the product knowledge, and optimization algorithms. This paper shows how these three parts can be supported in engineer-to-order businesses through the concept of knowledge objects. Knowledge Objects are human readable descriptions of formalized knowledge bundled with corresponding computer routines for the automation of that knowledge. One case example is given at the end of the paper to demonstrate the use of knowledge objects. © 2019, Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature.

  • 41.
    Johansson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    En jämförande studie av två metoder för produktutveckling: För tillverkande företag inom metallindustrin2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    It is becoming increasingly important for today's companies to diversify themselves from competitors and demonstrate a good ability to satisfy customer requirements and requests. This requires high internal efficiency and a well-structured organization. The purpose of the study is based on this and analyzes already existing literature in the field of product development to demonstrate the possibilities for an effective product development methodology in manufacturing companies in the metal industry.

    The accumulated theory forms the foundation for this literature study, which presents two different strategies for lighting into a product development project. The strategies presented are PBE and SBCE, both of which are active in the manufacturing industry today. The big difference between the strategies is the decision-making around the generated concepts. PBE includes an early conceptual choice which then is developed through a number of iterations until requirements and requests in the specification sheet, for the specific development project, is met. Within SBCE, several concepts are developed simultaneously with the ambition to acquire new, important knowledge while optimizing the concepts before making a final decision.

    Establishing some kind of strategy offers the business a way to work systematically and rationally. This brings awareness to the problem solving and that the final result is positively affected. Furthermore, the analysis of the accumulated theory shows that a company’s flexibility is important from a market perspective and that the management of human capital is essential to today's business, which is possible through SBCE.

    SBCE is the most effective strategy seen from a lead time perspective when the rate of iteration is high. The strategy also meets the needs for flexibility in the organization, as well as the management and development of human capital, making it the best way to light into a development project.

  • 42.
    Jonsson Egeman, Mathilda
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Adapting the lead time tree model to include immaterial activities: Extending the lead time tree model to enable mapping, efficiency evaluation and waste identification in order fulfillment processes2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Much research regarding efficiency in manufacturing industry has historically been focused on the material activities of the shop floor. However, companies that merely focus on material activities when trying to improve lead times, risk losing potential for improvements within immaterial activities such as planning, engineering, design, and purchasing, which often constitute the most time consuming parts of the order fulfillment processes. Engineer to order (ETO) products are particularly time consuming regarding their immaterial activities, and the customer is waiting for the products from the very beginning of the order fulfillment process. Shortening the lead time to customer for ETO products is therefore important for customer satisfaction.

    The aim of this study is to adapt an existing lead time tree model currently focused on material activities to also include immaterial activities, enabling a full visualization of all activities contained in order fulfillment processes. The lead time tree model would thereby be able to use as a tool when working on shortening the lead time to customer. A further aim of the study is to investigate how the adapted lead time tree model can be used in further areas as well, in addition to visualizing immaterial activities.

    The adaption of the lead time tree model has been based on the original literary source of the lead time tree model. The original lead time tree model has been analyzed towards theoretical data from a literature study, and towards empirical data about immaterial activities in order fulfillment processes for ETO products, from the case company Kongsberg Maritime Sweden AB (previously Rolls-Royce AB). The result of this has been an adapted lead time tree model that can visualize immaterial activities.

    Several adaptions of the original lead time tree model have been made for it to be able to visualize immaterial activities, while still keeping the basics of the original model. The adapted lead time tree model comprises information that is normally kept separated and that is important when planning and improving a process. Additional information that is needed for each specific case can also easily be included in the lead time tree. The adapted lead time tree model has proven to have additional areas of use within project planning, improvement work regarding lead time reduction and root-cause analysis, and as a boundary object for communication between internal actors and between internal and external actors.

    The adapted lead time tree model is presumably able to map and visualize immaterial activities in other fields of business as well, other than manufacturing, as the nature of immaterial activities remains the same across business environments.

  • 43.
    Karlsen, Joakim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Omkonstruktion av vapenfäste till additiv tillverkning2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis project has been carried out in collaboration with Saab training and simulation in Huskvarna, which manufactures military training products. The aim of the project was to investigate the possibility of using additive manufacturing as the method for future manufacturing for the small arms transmitter bracket (SAT-bracket, a bracket for gun) to reduce lead time, cost and weight. A physical product has been developed through the Selective Laser Melting technique (SLM), where the least possible amount of support structures has been achieved for the selected build orientation. To be able to optimize the design with the help of lattice structures, knowledge of the technology has been acquired through information searched on scientific texts and websites. Identification of strengths and weaknesses in the development process and the possibility of using a more favorable material for the application were documented to be evaluated against a traditionally manufactured component.

    The final designs have been modeled using two different design methods, both in which had reduced the weight between 28-44% where the stiffness is in the likes of the reference product. The conclusion drawn from the work is that additive manufacturing is a manufacturing method   that for the SAT-bracket is a favorable alternative for smaller production volume.

  • 44.
    Kebede, Rehel Zeleke
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Developing Information Exchange Requirements for BIM-based Lighting Simulation in the Design Stage2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Easy and reliable exchange of data between BIM tools constitutes an important part of BIM-baseddesign processes. This is especially important for performance-based design as most performance simulationtools are evolving separately as a standalone simulation software package. IFC is a standard data model widelyused by the construction industry for digital data exchanges between BIM tools. However, IFC is developed tocapture a comprehensive data for all stages of the project lifecycle and carries a wide range of informationwhich are not of interest for performance-based simulations as well as lacks important required information.Consequently, there is a need to precisely define the required information and the responsible actors in eachexchange. The aim of this research was, therefore, to develop information exchange requirements with thecorresponding responsible actors for lighting simulations in the design stage. Developing information Exchangerequirements for lighting simulations requires experts. Accordingly, a qualitative research setup in the form ofa semi-structured interviews supported by a literature study and document analysis was conducted. The resultsshowed that lighting simulation is conducted in the two key parts of the design stage iteratively to optimize theanalysis result. This study has limitations concerning the absence of definition of technical terms, level of importanceof information and mere focus on the design stage. However, considering the audience of this studyto be experts in the area, and most information exchanges happen during the design stage, the findings promisepartial generalization to BIM-based lighting analysis in the design stage.

  • 45.
    Larsson, Tom
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Industrial design.
    Development of a new type of bike stand2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 46.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Exploring Product Development in Industrialized Housing to Facilitate a Platform Strategy2018In: Proceedings of 26th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction / [ed] González, V.A., Chennai, India: The International Group for Lean Construction , 2018, p. 538-548Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrialized house-building companies are offering unique products by adopting an engineer-to-order (ETO) strategy. Client satisfaction is achieved by adaptation of product solutions and swift introduction of new technology in combination with cost-efficient production and short lead-time for completion. Product development is executed in collaboration with the clients and changes in requirements are frequent. The use of product platforms, where external and internal efficiency are well-balanced, has been acknowledged as a strategic enabler for mass customization and increased competitiveness. However, ETO-companies struggle with adopting the common product platform approach, set by pre-defined modules and components. Predefinitions may cause an imbalance between product development and a lean production system. The aim of this work was to analyse current strategies and support to master the balance of external and internal efficiency in product development within industrialized housebuilding to facilitate the development of a product platform strategy. Data were gathered from a single case study and an on-going product platform development and includes interviews and document analysis. The findings show that product development is guided by a technical platform, but there is an imbalance where external efficiency is prioritized over the internal efficiency.

  • 47.
    Linde, Jens
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Gille, Ludwig
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Produktutveckling av bärskena för pendlade armaturer2019Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this thesis was to follow up and further develop an existing product at Fagerhult AB. The product is a support rail for pendant luminaires. The support rail facilitates the positioning of the luminaire when mounted in the ceiling. The problem with today’s support rail is that it doesn’t meet the requirements set by Fagerhult AB according to aesthetics and flexibility. The request is instead a support rail that takes less space, more aesthetically appealing and more flexible.

    Methodology – The thesis has followed a product development process, from pilot study until prototype. First thing was a time planning to establish milestones to see when different parts of the project were supposed to be done. Then a pilot study was made in terms of market research and a competitor analysis to get a more complete picture of the today’s market and also what the market wanted. From the pilot study a complete requirement specification was made together with the customer. By the requirement specification a concept generation started in terms of brainstorming and morphologic matrix. The concepts were screened through elimination matrices and together with Fagerhult AB. The final concept was chosen from four more worked through concepts. Those concepts have all been made in a CAD-environment, Solid Edge, and physical prototypes have partially been made to be evaluated in different areas. The prototypes were evaluated in aesthetics, installation friendliness and manufacturing cost. The final concept was developed into a working prototype.

    Results – Already from the beginning the final result was divided into three different areas, T-clips, rail and sliding block. The final prototype consisted of a T-clips which was made in two pieces, spring steel and sheet metal. This was to offer an installation friendly support rail and also to make an opportunity to hide the T-clips which was previously exposed. The rail was designed with integrated covers on the ends and the opportunity to fit the sliding block inside, this was made to make the support rail more aesthetic appealing and to make sure that focus was not taken from the luminaire. The sliding block was then developed to fit inside the rail and suspension was offered for the wire loop. That way the wire loop, which is attached to the sliding block, could be hidden inside the rail. This resulted in an even more hidden supporting rail.

    To maintain the target value for the supporting rail the material was kept in standard and to some extent the construction had elements of already existing functions.

    Restrictions – Because of the lack of time the thesis only dealt with the product development process until prototype. The prototype was partially made by the writers themselves because Fagerhult AB:s prototype workshop had been busy. Neither FEM-calculations nor simulations was made to verify and optimize functions on the prototype, also this because of time constraints.

  • 48.
    Lundberg, Olof
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Industrial design.
    CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT OF CARGO MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR PRIVATE CARS2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This master thesis deals with concept development of a cargo management system for private cars. It has been carried out at the master program of industrial design at Jönköping University in collaboration with the design consultancy Dacat located in Gothenburg.

    When storing cargo in car trunks a common problem is that the cargo falls over, causing it to break or create disturbance by moving around. Existing solutions are often complicated because they require several steps to secure the cargo and take up much space when not used. Many of the solutions are made as original equipment for specific cars.

    The aim of this thesis has been to work around the standards of specific car brands or models in order to find a solution that can be used for different brands. Furthermore, the ambition has been to come up with a solution that does not require any extra steps in the cargo securing process and does not take up space when not used.

    The work has been carried out using the Bootcamp Bootleg method for design processes. Following this method, the report describes research in the Empathize stage, moving on to Define, Ideate and finally Prototype.

    The result is a concept fulfilling the aims of the project as described earlier and is presented as a full scale prototype.

  • 49.
    Nafisi, Mariam
    et al.
    School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Granlund, Anna
    School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Manufacturing engineering requirements in the early stages of new product development — A case study in two assembly plants2019In: Advanced applications in manufacturing engineering / [ed] M. Ram & J. P. Davim, Elsevier, 2019, p. 141-167Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interface between the product development function and the manufacturing function is one key dimension in new product development (NPD) projects. Hard and soft requirements for manufacturability are defined and communicated to product development teams early in the NPD project to ensure the new products are fit for the manufacturing system. In this chapter, we determined what requirements are important for a manufacturing system and how these requirements are handled during an NPD project by analyzing two industrial cases. The results showed that requirements communicated from the manufacturing function to the design function had different sources and effects on different aspects of the manufacturing system. They were communicated and integrated to various degrees and through various mechanisms. There was a tendency to rely on the personal and verbal communication of requirements, as opposed to using more formal structured methods. This way of working was sufficient when product change was incremental and not radical. The case studies showed that the manufacturing function needed to employ more efficient methods to define and communicate their requirements in large and complex NPD projects.

  • 50.
    Odicho, Marwa
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Polymerutvärdering med hänsyn till genomsläpplighet av radiofrekvensvågor2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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