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  • 1.
    Adlemo, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Tarasov, Vladimir
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Fuzzy logic based decision-support for reshoring decisions2018In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Operations and Supply Chain Management, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Adlemo, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Tarasov, Vladimir
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Knowledge intensive decision support for reshoring decisions2018In: Proceedings of the 30th Annual NOFOMA Conference: Relevant Logistics and Supply Chain Management Research, Kolding, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Adlemo, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Tarasov, Vladimir
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Reshoring decision support in a Swedish context2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a decision-support system for reshoring decision-making based on fuzzy logic. The construction and functionality of the decision-support system are described, and the functionality is evaluated in a high cost environment exemplified through a Swedish context. Ten different reshoring scenarios, provided by Swedish reshoring experts, are entered into the decision-support system and the decision recommendations provided by the system are presented. The confidence that can be put on the recommendations is demonstrated by comparing them with those of the reshoring experts. The positive results obtained indicate that fuzzy logic is both feasible and that the quality of the results are sufficiently good for reshoring decision-making.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Bridi, Eduardo
    Department of Production Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Santa Catarina, Brazil.
    Baez, Yinef Pardillo
    Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, San Buenaventura University, Cali, Colombia.
    Maldonado, Mauricio Uriona
    Department of Production Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Santa Catarina, Brazil.
    Forcellini, Fernando Antônio
    Department of Production Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Santa Catarina, Brazil.
    Moraes, Fabio Cesar
    Municipality of São José, Santa Catarina, Brazil.
    Improvement in public administration services: a case of business registration process[Poboljšanje usluga javne uprave: Studija slucaja za registracije preduzeca]2018In: International Journal of Industrial Engineering and Management, ISSN 2217-2661, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 109-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work addresses the process of opening enterprises (grant of license) in a municipality. The purpose is to perform the identification, analysis and redesign of the process of granting permits to private companies, then making a proposal for improvement. The chosen method was a case study, using a qualitative approach according to the BPM methodology to respond: how to improve and accelerate the grant of a license? As a result, the proposed model used the best practices for business registration to reduce the time to 70%, and using half of the involved sectors. The conclusion is that it is possible to reduce bureaucracy and increase the efficiency of public administration with the applied methodology. 

  • 5.
    Anisimova, Tatiana Anatolevena
    et al.
    Linneuniversitet Ekonomihögskolan, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Weiss, Jan Frederic
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Mavondo, Felix T.
    Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    The influence of corporate brand perceptions on consumer satisfaction and loyalty via controlled and uncontrolled communications: a multiple mediation analysis2019In: Journal of Consumer Marketing, ISSN 0736-3761, E-ISSN 2052-1200, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 33-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Drawing on the stimulus–organism–response (S-O-R) model, the purpose of this study is to investigate mediating effects of controlled and uncontrolled communications of corporate brand perceptions on consumer satisfaction and loyalty.

    Design/methodology/approach: Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test the hypotheses on a sample of 271 Australian automobile consumers.

    Findings: The authors find that while consumer satisfaction is indirectly influenced by corporate-level attributes via controlled and uncontrolled communication, the authors did not find an indirect effect between consumer benefits on consumer satisfaction via controlled and uncontrolled communication. By contrast, the authors find highly significant indirect effects – via controlled and uncontrolled communication as well as consumer satisfaction – for the relationship between, on the one hand, corporate-level attributes and consumer benefits and consumer brand loyalty on the other. Uncontrolled communication was significantly associated with consumer loyalty, a relevant finding that indicates an importance of tracking media coverage and maintaining favorable relationships with the media.

    Research limitations/implications: The cross-sectional method limits data collection to one point in time.

    Practical implications: This study adds to a better understanding of how to leverage corporate brand through communications in ways that it positively resonates with consumers. A fine-grained analysis of corporate brand attributes and consumer-perceived benefits can aid managers in developing specific and more effective marketing strategies.

    Originality/value: The overall thrust of this empirical study, which is to investigate how corporate brand perceptions influence short term (satisfaction) and long term (loyalty) via controlled and uncontrolled communications is original. This study comprehensively conceptualizes and operationalizes the corporate brand as a multidimensional construct consisting of corporate-level attributes and brand-level attributes such as perceived consumer benefits. To examine the hypothesized relationships between and among our constructs, the authors go beyond the commonly studied single mediator model and test a multiple mediator model instead.

  • 6.
    Anisimova, Tatiana
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Mavondo, Felix T.
    Monash University, Department of Marketing, Melbourne, Australia.
    Weiss, Jan Frederic
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Controlled and uncontrolled communication stimuli and organic food purchases: The mediating role of perceived communication clarity, perceived health benefits, and trust2019In: Journal of Marketing Communications, ISSN 1352-7266, E-ISSN 1466-4445, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 180-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite a growing demand worldwide, organic food remains a niche category, with consumers only purchasing it some of the time. This study examines the mediating effects of consumers’ perceived clarity of organic food-related communication, trust for, and perceived health benefits of organic foods in the relationship between controlled and uncontrolled communication stimuli and organic food purchases. We test our hypotheses on a sample of 1011 Australian organic food consumers using Structural Equation Modeling. We find that all mediators except perceived communication clarity perform as hypothesized, with the latter not mediating the relationship between uncontrolled communications and perceived health benefits of organic foods. The results suggest that marketers should ensure clarity in controlled organic food communications, signal health benefits of organic food and build consumer trust to generate organic purchases. 

  • 7.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    A Lewinian approach to managing barriers to university–industry collaboration2019In: Higher Education Policy, ISSN 0952-8733, E-ISSN 1740-3863, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 129-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Calls are made by governments, university management and industry to increase university–industry (U–I) collaboration to find solutions for societal and economic problems that are too complex to be tackled within one sector alone. Researchers are often expected to realise these ideas, but when it comes to everyday research and knowledge development, individuals may encounter barriers to accomplishing this. The paper presents an empirical study of researchers’ view on U–I collaboration. Our focus in the analysis, inspired by the Lewinian field theory, is on the hindering forces that might create barriers to collaboration from a researcher’s perspective. Contrary to the previously used approaches taken in force field analysis, we perform a qualitative study, which might be better suited for this framework. In the literature on U–I collaboration, ‘orientation-related’ and ‘transaction-related’ barriers have been identified. In our analysis, we discuss hindering forces on the individual, intra- and interorganisational levels. In total, we find 18 key areas to identify possible hinders for collaboration and based on a Lewinian perspective, we suggest that removing hindering forces can benefit U–I collaboration. The paper recognises the need to regard universities as equal partners in U–I collaboration for sustainable knowledge production.

  • 8.
    Björhag, Albin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
    Skärin, Filip
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Statliga incitaments påverkan på svenska företags reshoringbeslut2018In: Proceedings of the Plan Research Conference, Jönköping, 23-24 oktober, 2018, Plan , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Fredriksson, A.
    The potential of Supplier – Contractor information sharing to improve supply chain efficiency in construction projects2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Gosling, J.
    Naim, M.
    Collaborative research in practice: articulating the realities of engagement2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Halldórsson, Á.
    Engaged Scholarship: Creative tension or squeezed in the middle of rigor and relevance?2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Customizations vs. Platforms: A Conceptual Approach to COSI2018In: Advances in Production Management Systems. Production Management for Data-Driven, Intelligent, Collaborative, and Sustainable Manufacturing. APMS 2018. / [ed] I. Moon, G. Lee, J. Park, D. Kiritsis & G. von Cieminski, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 116-123Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, many manufacturers have experienced an increased demand for customized products and services, which requires the manufacturer to simultaneously offer both standardized and customized products. Consequently, several manufacturing strategies must be efficiently employed. These companies do not express the same prerequisites as ‘pure’ ETO companies since they need to be able to differentiate customized orders from standard orders, but also be able to differentiate between the manufacturing dimension and the engineering dimension of customization. Whereas standard orders can be processed with a platform approach, the customized orders contain specific requirements and information represented by ‘customer-order specific information’ (COSI). This paper defines and presents competitive scenarios where platform constraints are combined with COSI for efficient customizations. Implications for the approach and a path forward is discussed.

  • 13.
    Demartini, Melissa
    et al.
    Universita degli Studi di Genova, Department of Mechanical Engineering (DIME), Genoa, Italy.
    Pinna, Claudia
    Politecnico di Milano, Economics and Industrial Engineering, Milan, Italy.
    Tonelli, Flavio
    Universita degli Studi di Genova, Department of Mechanical Engineering (DIME), Genoa, Italy.
    Terzi, Sergio
    Politecnico di Milano, Department of Management, Milan, Italy.
    Sansone, Cinzia
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Testa, Chiara
    Siemens Italy S.p.A., Genoa, Italy.
    Food industry digitalization: from challenges and trends to opportunities and solutions2018In: IFAC-PapersOnLine, ISSN 2405-8963, Vol. 51, no 11, p. 1371-1378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last years, manufacturing companies have to face several challenges, mainly related to the volatility of the demand and to the continuously changing requirements, both from the customers and suppliers. In the meantime, new technological roadmaps and suggested interventions in manufacturing systems have been implemented. These solutions aim to exploit the high innovation and economic potential resulting from the continuing impact of rapidly advancing information and communication technology (ICT) in industry. This paper explores these topics focusing on the food sector. Indeed, companies belonging to this industry are facing global challenges, which can be met with the support of the information technologies (IT). The overall goal of this study is to help food companies toward digitalization, with a particular focus on the design and manufacturing processes. From the methodological point of view, Case Study has been used as research method. Furthermore, a questionnaire characterized by the different elements of the Manufacturing Value Modelling Methodology (MVMM) has been developed and used to gather information from companies. A framework for the digitalization process in the food industry has been developed basing on the results of a preliminary literature review and of different focus groups. On completion of the aforementioned framework, a list of enabling technologies has been discussed. These represent the technological solutions for the specific food issues highlighted by the framework. Finally, a case study has been accomplished in order to test and validate the contents’ framework.

  • 14.
    Engelseth, Per
    et al.
    Molde University College.
    Jafari, Hamid
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Marketing Complex Product Designs in the Contemporary Value Chain2018In: International journal of value chain management, ISSN 1741-5357, E-ISSN 1741-5365, ISSN 1741-5357, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 311-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Theory on supply postponement and speculation has gained widespread use in industry to mitigate risk and improve customer value. We suggest alternative conceptualisation of product customisation focusing in the emergent properties of production in a value chain context. Based on the transvection model, servitisation theory, contingency theory focusing on interdependencies and complexity, we discuss how a variety of goods, information and service deliverables may be timed in relation to each other to customise in relation to customer value objectives. Through a single case study of retail distribution practices, an alternative modelling of supply timing is empirically grounded. The ‘supply palette model’ is introduced based on a fundamental view on products as technically fragmented entities, as well as the fact that production includes product design as emergent through complex supplier-customer interaction. This model serves as a marketing tool founded inoperations practices by exposing the complexity of deliverables provided to customers associated with operational decision-making events. This study also exposes how marketing and supply chain management necessarily are, when supplying postponed products, integrated business functions.

  • 15.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Effective interaction in organisations2018In: Human resource management: A Nordic perspective / [ed] H. Ahl, I. Bergmo Prvulovic & K. Kilhammar, London, UK: Routledge, 2018, p. 30-41Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Creating effective interaction and ‘organisational learning’ is a skill that must be developed. Research from work meetings in a manufacturing company found that meetings for well-defined, technical assignments often went smoothly and produced the desired results, but there was a lack of forums to discuss developmental issues, especially those concerning work organisation. Furthermore, there was a lack of communication between the different work groups. Discrepancies were swept under the carpet, which is unfortunate, since they provide opportunities for learning and development. To achieve this, a goal-directed meeting structure and proper leadership and communications skills are needed.

  • 16.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Käkelä, Nikolas
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Early steps in learning about organizational learning in customization settings: A communication perspective2019In: Learning Organization, ISSN 0969-6474, E-ISSN 1758-7905, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 27-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study aims to empirically investigate the role of learning for suppliers of individualized customizations from a communication perspective.

    Design/methodology/approach: Five companies providing individualized customizations are investigated through an in-depth qualitative approach. The empirical material is based on data from five presentations in one workshop and seven interviews.

    Findings: Four important categories of communication processes between suppliers and customers that stimulate learning were identified: the identification and confirmation of existing knowledge, the identification of knowledge gaps and the creation of new knowledge, the definition of relations and procedures and evaluation and learning.

    Practical implications: These findings can help suppliers of individualized customizations become aware of the important role of organizational learning in their day-to-day operations and the value of improving as a learning organization.

    Originality/value: This cross-disciplinary study brings together organizational learning and customization research. It is a study that focuses on communication in customization tasks as a base for learning. 

  • 17.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Käkelä, Nikolas
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Learning to make a difference in customization settings2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Lundin, Mona
    Personalvetenskapliga perspektiv på kommunikation2018Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Engström, Gabriella
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Sollander, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Drivers and barriers of reshoring in the Swedish manufacturing industry2018In: World Review of Intermodal Transportation Research (WRITR), ISSN 1749-4729, E-ISSN 1749-4737, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 195-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to explore reshoring drivers and barriers in the Swedish manufacturing industry. The research is based on case research including five case companies from the Swedish manufacturing industry with experience of manufacturing reshoring. The empirical findings are compared to the existing literature to identify any potential gaps between the existing literature and the Swedish manufacturing context. The findings suggest that quality related issues, an increased degree of automation, and improved cost performance at the home base are the strongest reshoring drivers for Swedish manufacturing companies. The identified drivers and barriers are transferable and have the potential to be building blocks for researchers and practitioners to better understand the reshoring phenomena. The findings also show that further research should focus on reshoring drivers and barriers in relation to specific reshoring characteristics (e.g., ownership, scale of production being reshored, and position in the supply chain).

  • 20.
    Engström, Gabriella
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Sollander, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Reshoring drivers and barriers in the Swedish manufacturing industry2018In: Journal of Global Operations and Strategic Sourcing, ISSN 2398-5364, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 174-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this study is to explore reshoring drivers and barriers from a Swedish manufacturing perspective.

    Design/methodology/approach

    This paper is a case study, including four Swedish manufacturing companies, with focus on drivers and barriers from the context of the Swedish manufacturing industry. A literature review of previously established drivers and barriers is used to map out the empirical findings and thereby identify potential gaps between the current body of literature and drivers and barriers from a Swedish manufacturing context.

    Findings

    The findings of the study suggest that quality issues continue to be one of the strongest reshoring drivers. Except for product quality, quality is also connected to host country’s infrastructure, communication and service. The supply chain perspective is a source of several drivers and is identified as a perspective often overlooked in offshoring decisions. Barriers related to firm specifics were more elaborately discussed by the companies, especially concerning calculation of location decision and the need to invest in resources, which allows for a higher level of capacity at the home country facility.

    Research limitations/implications

    The study develops a structured table of reshoring drivers and barriers which can serve as a base for future research. Future research on the calculation of location decisions is deemed as a crucial step to further understand reshoring and aid companies in the decision-making process.

    Practical implications

    The drivers and barriers identified in the study can give practitioners insight into reshoring from the perspective of the Swedish manufacturing industry and thus aid in future manufacturing location decisions. The table of drivers and barriers can also be important to understand how Sweden can strengthen its competitive advantage and motivate more companies to reshore manufacturing.

    Originality/value

    This is one of only few papers from the Nordic countries and also one of few case studies examining reshoring in manufacturing companies.

  • 21.
    Eriksson, David
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Ellram, L.M.
    Miami University in Oxford, Oh, USA.
    Sansone, Cinzia
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    To offshore or reshore: The battle of data points2018In: Supply Chain Management Review, ISSN 1521-9747, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 42-46Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [...]our research shows that not all offshoring decisions are based on the best methods or information. [...]a series of incorrect decisions made offshoring look like a great decision when it was not. [...]after years of outsourcing, Plant A was still the same size and unable to trim its overhead despite lower production levels. [...]one product became so expensive to produce internally that it was priced too high and failed in the market while lower-cost competitors thrive today.

  • 22.
    Eriksson, David
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Högskolan i Gävle, Industriell ekonomi.
    Svensson, Göran
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    Högskolan i Gävle, Industriell ekonomi.
    Exploring opportunities for moral disengagement in codes of conduct from the textile industry2018In: World Review of Intermodal Transportation Research (WRITR), ISSN 1749-4729, E-ISSN 1749-4737, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 371-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this research is to assess how codes of conducts are outlined and formulated in relation to moral disengagement along the supply chain. The research is focused on the idea that supply chain structure may reduce the actors' sense of moral responsibility for the actions and impacts of the supply chain on workers and environment. The research has been conducted as a case study including Swedish firms in the textile industry. The research has used secondary data from codes of conducts. The findings show that codes of conduct do not cover all supply chain practices linked with moral disengagement. This does not cause immoral behaviour as such, but might cause moral disengagement. Supply chain research needs to focus on what should be included in codes of conduct and other ethical guidelines, so as to reduce the risk of immoral behaviour. In order to reduce the likelihood for moral disengagement, there are several supply chain practices that should be included in codes of conduct, such as power asymmetry, managerial support, and incentives.

  • 23.
    Eriksson, David
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Svensson, Göran
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Managers’ psychological challenges in implementing corporate responsibility in supply chains2018In: Corporate Governance : The International Journal of Effective Board Performance, ISSN 1472-0701, E-ISSN 1758-6054, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 564-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This paper aims to conceptualize managers’ psychological challenges with respect to implementing corporate responsibility throughout supply chains.

    Design/methodology/approach: Four areas of psychological theory are introduced to expand the understanding of the challenges involved in implementing corporate responsibility in supply chains, namely, relationship and humanization theory; the number-of-people-suffering theory; superficial-identification theory; and the bystander effect theory.

    Findings: The common denominator between the introduced areas of psychological theory is that all consider the expected degree of corporate responsibility in supply chains to extend beyond managers’ ability to cope so that failure is probable.

    Research limitations/implications: Supply chain management research needs to consider various psychological challenges to effectively address corporate responsibility in supply chains. This research shows that it is important to include theory from psychology to truly understand the challenges faced by managers, although only a few theories are presented here. More comprehensive reviews are needed in the future.

    Practical implications: Managers require guidelines based on psychological theory to assist them in overcoming their inabilities in this context.

    Originality/value: SCM research advocates responsibility for all those affected by this phenomenon, but the lack of theoretical grounding to meet the prevailing psychological challenges hampers the efficacy of putting the current recommendations into business practice. The paper is one of only a few to address managers’ psychological challenges in dealing with corporate responsibility across organizational borders and judicial boundaries in supply chains. 

  • 24.
    Fathi, Masood
    et al.
    Department of Production and Automation Engineering, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Fontes, Dalila B. M. M.
    Faculty of Economics, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Moris, Matias U.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Division of Industrial Engineering and Management, Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ghobakhloo, Morteza
    Assembly line balancing problem: A comparative evaluation of heuristics and a computational assessment of objectives2018In: Journal of Modelling in Management, ISSN 1746-5664, E-ISSN 1746-5672, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 455-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this study is to first investigate the efficiency of the most commonly used performance measures for minimizing the number of workstations (NWs) in approaches addressing simple assembly line balancing problem (SALBP) for both straight and U-shaped line, and second to provide a comparative evaluation of 20 constructive heuristics to find solutions to the SALBP-1.

    Design/methodology/approach

    A total of 200 problems are solved by 20 different constructive heuristics for both straight and U-shaped assembly line. Moreover, several comparisons have been made to evaluate the performance of constructive heuristics.

    Findings

    Minimizing the smoothness index is not necessarily equivalent to minimizing the NWs; therefore, it should not be used as the fitness function in approaches addressing the SALBP-1. Line efficiency and the idle time are indeed reliable performance measures for minimizing the NWs. The most promising heuristics for straight and U-shaped line configurations for SALBP-1 are also ranked and introduced.

    Practical implications

    Results are expected to help scholars and industrial practitioners to better design effective solution methods for having the most balanced assembly line. This study will further help with choosing the most proper heuristic with regard to the problem specifications and line configuration.

    Originality/value

    There is limited research assessing the efficiency of the common objectives for SALBP-1. This study is among the first to prove that minimizing the workload smoothness is not equivalent to minimizing the NWs in SALBP-1 studies. This work is also one of the first attempts for evaluating the constructive heuristics for both straight and U-shaped line configurations.

  • 25. Freitas, M.R.
    et al.
    Pimenta, M.L.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Demand Management: The Role of Cross-Functional Integration in a Context of Political Turbulence2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Hedvall, Lisa
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Buffers in capacity management: A multiple case study2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A competitive delivery capability is dependent on a balance between supply and demand, a challenge that increase due to variations. This inevitably leads to a need for proper management of buffers. The purpose of this research is to investigate buffers utilized in practice in relation to a framework of buffers for capacity management. Twelve different kinds of buffers from the conceptual framework are identified in the multiple case study. The experiences from eleven respondents highlights the purposes and procedures of buffer capacity management (BCM).

  • 27.
    Hedvall, Lisa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Mattsson, Stig-Arne
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Orsaker till variationer och åtgärder för att minska behovet av buffertar2018In: Proceedings of the Plan Research Conference, Jönköping, 23-24 oktober, 2018., 2018, p. 95-110Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Variationer i efterfrågan, i internt genererade kapacitetsbehov, i tillgång på kapacitet och i leveranstider från leverantörer medför utmaningar för företag att uppnå kostnadseffektiva materialflöden och en konkurrenskraftig leveransförmåga. För att hantera sådana variationer finns det två principiellt olika angreppssätt. Det ena innebär att man använder sig av olika buffertar i form av extra material, extra kapacitet och extra tid för att absorbera variationerna och utgår från att förekomst av variationer accepteras. Buffertar förorsakar emellertid kostnader och kapitalbindning som måste vägas mot de fördelar som kan uppnås. Det andra angreppssättet innebär att man först försöker reducera variationerna genom att angripa orsakerna till att de förekommer med olika typer av åtgärder och genom att reducera dem kunna använda sig av mindre buffertar. Syftet med den här studien är att med utgångspunkt från detta angreppssätt utveckla ett ramverk av orsaker till att variationer förekommer och för varje orsak redovisa olika möjliga åtgärder för att begränsa dem. Avsikten är att skapa en bättre förståelse för vad det är som skapar variationer som är påverkbara i företag och ett hjälpmedel för att i praktiken identifiera möjliga åtgärder för att på ett systematiskt sätt kunna genomföra variationsreducerande aktiviteter. Syftet är också att med hjälp av ramverket studera i vilken utsträckning ett antal företag tillämpar de olika ingående åtgärderna.

    Underlag till utvecklingen av olika orsaker till variationer och åtgärder för att reducera dem i ramverket har hämtats från litteraturen inom de områden som berörs. I de fall litteraturstödet varit otillräckligt eller helt saknats har i stället underlag baserats på egna erfarenheter från tillverkningsindustrin och konceptuella logiska resonemang. Studien har resulterat i ett ramverk uppdelat på fyra olika typer av variationer och bestående av sammanlagt 22 olika variationsorsaker och 61 olika slag av åtgärder. Via fallstudien har studien också bidragit med en bild av i vilken utsträckning de olika möjliga åtgärderna används i företag i praktiken för att reducera förekomst av variationer.

  • 28.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Reitsma, Ewout
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Coordination of new product development and supply chain management2018In: Innovation and Supply Chain Management: Relationship, Collaboration and Strategies / [ed] Moreira, António Carrizo, Ferreira, Luís Miguel D. F., Zimmermann, Ricardo A., Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 33-50Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New product development (NPD) and supply chain management (SCM) enable companies to respond to new demands in a responsive manner. The scarcity of research addressing the coordination of NPD and SCM is notable. The purpose of this research is to identify and examine linkages between NPD and SCM through a case study that includes a Swedish furniture wholesaler. Several linkages that stress the need of using an integrative NPD process where the design functions are aligned with other main functions of the company were identified. For example, it was observed that a strong focus on the demand side (NPD) has induced high demands on the supply side (SCM) of the case company. Therefore, the NPD process to a larger extend needs to incorporate main supply functions and other sales-related functions that support the commercialization of the product. This promises to create a consumer-oriented business, especially needed in markets where products have short life cycles and where having a short time to market is crucial. Within future research, it will be interesting to expand this research to companies that operate in different markets and/or have different objectives and to provide an inclusive description of the consumer-oriented business model.

  • 29.
    Høgevold, Nils M.
    et al.
    Department of Marketing, Kristiania University College, Oslo, Norway.
    Svensson, Göran
    Kristiania University College, Oslo, Norway.
    Rodriguez, Rocío
    Kristiania University College, Oslo, Norway.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Relative importance and priority of TBL elements on the corporate performance2018In: Management of environmental quality, ISSN 1477-7835, E-ISSN 1758-6119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine to what extent that a selection of economic, social and environmental factors is taken into corporate consideration (importance and priority) the longitudinal aspects of sustainable business practices.

    Design/methodology/approach: This study is based on an inductive approach taking into account the longitudinal aspects and an in-depth case study of a Scandinavian manufacturer recognized for its initiatives and achievements of sustainable business practices.

    Findings: The key informants indicated that economic factors are always important when it comes to sustainable business practices, social factors are to some extent important, and the environmental factors are generally important.

    Research limitations/implications: The planning, implementation and follow-up of sustainable business practices and related efforts require a consideration of economic, social and environmental factors.

    Practical implications: The framework of a triple bottom line (TBL) dominant logic for business sustainability applied may guide the corporate assessment to plan, implement and follow-up the importance and priority of the longitudinal aspects of sustainable business practices.

    Originality/value: A TBL dominant logic for sustainable business practices adequately frames corporate efforts regarding importance and priority making a relevant contribution addressing the longitudinal aspects to complement existing theory and previous studies. 

  • 30.
    Jafari, Hamid
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    E-Commerce Logistics - Contemporary Literature2018In: IEEE International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management, IEEE, 2018, p. 1196-1200Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This manuscript provides a general review of the contemporary literature on e-commerce logistics. The review is carried out systematically on the articles published in academic journals from 2015 up to 2018. A total of 77 manuscripts were reviewed and analyzed using this method regarding the journals, level of analysis, and scientific methods used. Moreover, coding of the findings of the papers was carried out to identify the research themes in contemporary e-commerce logistics literature. As a result, six themes were identified; namely, Distribution, Channel Design, Sustainability, Performance, Pricing, and Innovation. The results show a shift of scholarly focus over the past years. 

  • 31.
    Jugend, Daniel
    et al.
    São Paulo State University, Brazil.
    De Araujo, Tiago Ribeiro
    São Paulo State University, Brazil.
    Pimenta, Márcio Lopes
    Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia, Brazil.
    Gobbo Jr, José Alcides
    São Paulo State University, Brazil.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. University of Gävle, Sweden.
    The role of cross-functional integration in new product development: Differences between incremental and radical innovation projects2018In: Innovation: Organization & Management, ISSN 1447-9338, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 42-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature on new product development (NPD) contains several studies of management practices involved in different types of innovation. However, few studies focus on how cross-functional integration affects incremental and radical innovation product projects. The purpose of this study is to explore this aspect, from a qualitative perspective, through case studies of four high-tech firms in Brazil. Eight NPD projects were studied. The findings suggest that radical and incremental innovation NPD projects require different management practices in the studied cases. In incremental NPD projects, greater integration efforts may not be necessary. However, the following practices should be adopted in projects involving radical innovation product projects: intense involvement of technical teams, flexibility in the early stages of NPD, and geographical separation between the development team and other departments of the firm. Moreover, the application of these same practices in projects of incremental innovation in NPD may not bring positive results.

  • 32.
    Karltun, Anette
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Karltun, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Benefits of the Human-Technology-Organization Concept in Teaching Ergonomics – Students Perspective2018In: Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing / [ed] Sebastiano Bagnara, Riccardo Tartaglia, Sara Albolino, Thomas Alexander, Yushi Fujita, Springer, 2018, Vol. 821, p. 627-636Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The human-technology-organization (HTO) concept has been used for creating systems understanding of ergonomics in three engineering educations at the School of Engineering in Jönköping. Students from courses given in two undergraduate and one graduate program (n = 122) participated in the study, which involved a course evaluation questionnaire to assess the understanding of ergonomics as discipline and HTO as a means for creating systems understanding. The questionnaire included both ranking and personal comments to the questions. The results show that the students in general considered knowledge of ergonomics and HTO as beneficial for their future work and that the HTO concept did contribute to their understanding of workplace ergonomics. However, there was a significant difference between undergraduate and graduate students in all these aspects where undergraduates ranked all these aspects lower than graduates. This was also reflected in personal comments on the questions. Conclusions that can be drawn are that understanding systems is generally difficult and the HTO concept can assist in helping students to overcome these difficulties. However, the differences between the student groups must be explicitly considered as well as increasing students’ awareness of the relevance of ergonomics for engineers. 

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-08-05 00:00
  • 33.
    Käkelä, Nikolas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Defining solution spaces for customizations2018In: Advances in Production Management Systems. Production Management for Data-Driven, Intelligent, Collaborative, and Sustainable Manufacturing. APMS 2018 / [ed] Ilkyeong Moon, Gyu M. Lee, Jinwoo Park, Dimitris Kiritsis, Gregor von Cieminski, Cham: Springer, 2018, Vol. 535, p. 95-100Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Customization in different flavors have been identified as an important differentiator if low-cost competitiveness is not viable. To provide a customer unique solution is however not the same as providing a solution that is designed and individualized for a particular delivery to a customer. These two cases are illustrations of how customer requirements may be fulfilled differently depending on the match between stated requirements and the solution offered. The range of solutions that can be offered is represented by a solution space consisting of either predefined or postdefined solutions. Predefined refers to solutions that are defined before commitment to a customer and postdefined refers to solutions that are defined after commitment to a customer. Both cases are constrained by a boundary of possible solutions but the postdefined solutions provide opportunities for bounded innovation beyond what the predefined solutions can provide. Combining the properties of the different solution spaces provides not only an operational definition of customization but also supports in identifying strategic opportunities for extending the solutions and types of customizations a business provides. 

  • 34.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Getting the most out of a collaborative research project – Cross industry design for a holistic view and increased learning2018In: Proceedings of the 34th Annual ARCOM Conference, 3-5 September 2018, Belfast, UK / [ed] C. Gorse, & C. J. Neilson, Association of Researchers in Construction Management (ARCOM), 2018, p. 526-535Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lately, collaborative research has gained recognition. The balance between scientific rigour and practical relevance is a continuing issue within construction management research. The purpose of this paper it to describe a cross-industry and cross disciplinary approach to co-creation of knowledge through a collaborative research approach. A collaborative research project on the topic communication regarding customer specific demands is presented using a model with two interacting cycles for knowledge creation. Two construction companies, a housing company with off-site manufacturing and a small subcontractor manufacturing street doors and front doors, are participating. Four other companies within mechanical manufacture, telecom and consultancy are involved. To engage the companies, the project emphasizes activities not adding any contribution to academic production. Networking, industrial education, publications in trade journals, participation in trade fairs etc. might be essential to convince the industry of the practical relevance. The findings prove that applied research does not need to be isolated to specific industries or disciplines, as the collected data are applicable to the different participating companies' despite of their differences. 

  • 35.
    Linnéusson, Gary
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science, Skövde, Sweden.
    Ng, Amos H. C.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Aslam, Tehseen
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science, Skövde, Sweden.
    Relating strategic time horizons and proactiveness in equipment maintenance: A simulation-based optimization study2018In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier, 2018, p. 1293-1298Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying sustainable strategies to develop maintenance performance within the short-termism framework is indeed challenging. It requires reinforcing long-term capabilities while managing short-term requirements. This study explores differently applied time horizons when optimizing the tradeoff between conflicting objectives, in maintenance performance, which are: maximize availability, minimize maintenance costs, and minimize maintenance consequence costs. The study has applied multi-objective optimization on a maintenance performance system dynamics model that contains feedback structures that explains reactive and proactive maintenance behavior on a general level. The quantified results provide insights on how different time frames are conditional to enable more or less proactive maintenance behavior in servicing production.

  • 36.
    Nyström, M. E.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden and Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Karltun, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Keller, Christina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Andersson Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Collaborative and partnership research for improvement of health and social services: researcher’s experiences from 20 projects2018In: Health Research Policy and Systems, ISSN 1478-4505, E-ISSN 1478-4505, Vol. 16, article id 46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Getting research into policy and practice in healthcare is a recognised, world-wide concern. As an attempt to bridge the gap between research and practice, research funders are requesting more interdisciplinary and collaborative research, while actual experiences of such processes have been less studied. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to gain more knowledge on the interdisciplinary, collaborative and partnership research process by investigating researchers’ experiences of and approaches to the process, based on their participation in an inventive national research programme. The programme aimed to boost collaborative and partnership research and build learning structures, while improving ways to lead, manage and develop practices in Swedish health and social services.

    Methods

    Interviews conducted with project leaders and/or lead researchers and documentation from 20 projects were analysed using directed and conventional content analysis.

    Results

    Collaborative approaches were achieved by design, e.g. action research, or by involving practitioners from several levels of the healthcare system in various parts of the research process. The use of dual roles as researcher/clinician or practitioner/PhD student or the use of education designed especially for practitioners or ‘student researchers’ were other approaches. The collaborative process constituted the area for the main lessons learned as well as the main problems. Difficulties concerned handling complexity and conflicts between different expectations and demands in the practitioner’s and researcher’s contexts, and dealing with human resource issues and group interactions when forming collaborative and interdisciplinary research teams. The handling of such challenges required time, resources, knowledge, interactive learning and skilled project management.

    Conclusions

    Collaborative approaches are important in the study of complex phenomena. Results from this study show that allocated time, arenas for interactions and skills in project management and communication are needed during research collaboration to ensure support and build trust and understanding with involved practitioners at several levels in the healthcare system. For researchers, dealing with this complexity takes time and energy from the scientific process. For practitioners, this puts demands on understanding a research process and how it fits with on-going organisational agendas and activities and allocating time. Some of the identified factors may be overlooked by funders and involved stakeholders when designing, performing and evaluating interdisciplinary, collaborative and partnership research.

  • 37.
    Pahlberg, Tobias
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Campus Skellefteå, Skellefteå, Sweden.
    Thurley, Matthew
    Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Popovic, Djordje
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Hagman, Olle
    Luleå University of Technology, Campus Skellefteå, Skellefteå, Sweden.
    Crack detection in oak flooring lamellae using ultrasound-excited thermography2018In: Infrared physics & technology, ISSN 1350-4495, E-ISSN 1879-0275, Vol. 88, p. 57-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, a large number of people are manually grading and detecting defects in wooden lamellae in the parquet flooring industry. This paper investigates the possibility of using the ensemble methods random forests and boosting to automatically detect cracks using ultrasound-excited thermography and a variety of predictor variables. When friction occurs in thin cracks, they become warm and thus visible to a thermographic camera. Several image processing techniques have been used to suppress the noise and enhance probable cracks in the images. The most successful predictor variables captured the upper part of the heat distribution, such as the maximum temperature, kurtosis and percentile values 92–100 of the edge pixels. The texture in the images was captured by Completed Local Binary Pattern histograms and cracks were also segmented by background suppression and thresholding. The classification accuracy was significantly improved from previous research through added image processing, introduction of more predictors, and by using automated machine learning. The best ensemble methods reach an average classification accuracy of 0.8, which is very close to the authors’ own manual attempt at separating the images (0.83).

  • 38.
    Panova, Yulia
    et al.
    Department of E-Commerce, Luoyang Normal University, Luoyang, China.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Managing supply chain risks and delays in construction project2018In: Industrial management + data systems, ISSN 0263-5577, E-ISSN 1758-5783, Vol. 118, no 7, p. 1413-1431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate models and methods for managing supply chain risks and delays in construction projects.

    Design/methodology/approach: The study mainly employs quantitative analysis in order to identify disruptions in construction supply chains. It also uses paradigms of simulation modeling, which are suitable for risk assessment and management. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected through a literature review and details of specific construction projects, respectively. A dynamic modeling method was used, and the model was provided with an event-based simulation. Simulation modeling was used to measure the performance of the system.

    Findings: The study shows the benefits of applying the dynamic modeling method to a construction project. Using event-based simulation, it was found that construction delays influence both the magnitude and the probability of disruption. This method contributes to the existing theoretical foundations of risk management practices, since it also considers the time factor. This method supplements the Monte Carlo statistical simulation method, which has no time representation. Using empirical analysis, the study proposes increasing the safety stock of construction materials at the distribution center, so as to mitigate risks in the construction supply chain.

    Research limitations/implications: The research considers a single case of a hypothetical construction project. The simulation models represent a simple supply chain with only one supplier. The calculations are based on the current economic scenario, which will of course change over time.

    Practical implications: The outcomes of the study show that the introduction of a safety stock of construction materials at the distribution center can prevent supply chain disruption. Since the consideration of risks at all stages of construction supply chain is essential to investors, entrepreneurs and regulatory bodies, the adoption of new approaches for their management during strategic planning of the investment projects is essential.

    Originality/value: This dynamic modeling method is used in combination with the Monte Carlo simulation, thus, providing an explicit cause-and-effect dependency over time, as well as a distributed value of outcomes. 

  • 39.
    Panova, Yulia
    et al.
    Department of E-Commerce, Luoyang Normal University, China.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Krasinskaya, Julia
    Department of Logistics and Commerce, Faculty of Railway Operation and Logistics, Emperor Alexander i St. Petersburg State Transport University, Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation.
    Mitigating the break-of-gauge problem in international transportation corridors2018In: World Review of Intermodal Transportation Research (WRITR), ISSN 1749-4729, E-ISSN 1749-4737, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 124-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to investigate technologies for mitigating the break-of-gauge problem at the border crossing points in international transportation corridors. This issue has been examined through a literature review. The research revealed three technologies for mitigating the break-of-gauge problem, including trans-shipment operations, removable coach bogies and variable bogie axles. The medium-term solution would be more rapid trans-shipment operations in the railway container terminals while the long-term solution would be adjustable bogie axles. This could reduce lead-time and improve the overall productivity and competitiveness of international corridors and in turn lead to reduced logistics costs for companies using this transportation alternative.

  • 40.
    Popovic, Djordje
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Off-site manufacturing systems development in timber house building: Towards mass customization-oriented manufacturing2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for housing in Sweden has been showing a constant increase over the past couple of years. However, this situation might change in 2018 since there are indications that the increase in demand will reach its peak. On the other hand, the use of timber as a load bearing structure has become more popular in the multi-family house building sector. It is competing with concrete and steel frames, and its market share might even reach 50% by the year of 2025. Adding the involvement of customers in house design decisions and a high level of customization, the conclusion is that timber house building must continue the development towards mass customization. There is a lack of knowledge on how mass customization is developed and implemented regarding off-site manufacturing systems. In this thesis, a contribution is made to manufacturing system development in timber house building by proposing a novel approach to aligning off-site manufacturing systems to the requirements of production strategy, market needs, product design, and manufacturing processes. The proposed conceptual framework is a synthesis of the knowledge gained from three empirical studies and different methods found in theories of changeable manufacturing systems, mass customization, and manufacturing system development. The research purpose addressed by the presented work, is to increase the knowledge on how the development potential of off-site manufacturing systems can be identified in mass customization-oriented timber house building. Case study research was applied to gather the empirical data. The data collection and analysis methods used in the empirical studies can be useful when discussing the potential improvements. However, these data are not comprehensive enough in terms of presenting a holistic view of off-site manufacturing and consideration of the market as well as variation in product and processes. Therefore, a comprehensive set of requirements is proposed in the conceptual framework together with a step by step description of how the development potential of off-site manufacturing systems can be identified.

  • 41. Pulles, N.
    et al.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Idling, P.
    Akdemir, O.
    Reputational value: how buyer status and supplier awards affect supplier performance2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Reitsma, Ewout
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Critical success factors for ERP system implementation: A user perspective2018In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 285-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate critical success factors (CSFs) for the implementation of an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system from a user perspective.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The research was conducted in two successive steps. First, a literature review was conducted to derive CSFs for ERP system implementation. Second, a survey was conducted to evaluate the importance of these CSFs from a user perspective. Data were collected through a questionnaire that was distributed within a German manufacturer and was developed based on the CSFs found in the literature. Gray relational analysis (GRA) was used to rank the CSFs in order of importance from a user perspective.

    Findings

    The findings reveal that users regard 11 of the 13 CSFs found in the literature as important for ERP system implementation. Seven of the CFSs were classified as the most important from a user perspective, namely, project team, technical possibilities, strategic decision-making, training and education, minimum customization, software testing and performance measurement. Users regarded 2 of the 13 CSFs as not important when implementing an ERP system, including organizational change management and top management involvement.

    Research limitations/implications

    One limitation of this study is that the respondents originate from one organization, industry and country. The findings may differ in other contexts, and thus, future research should be expanded to include more organizations, industries and countries. Another limitation is that this study only evaluates existing CSFs from a user perspective rather than identifying new ones and/or the underlying reasons using more qualitative research.

    Practical implications

    A better understanding of the user perspective toward CSFs for ERP system implementation promises to contribute to the design of more effective ERP systems, a more successful implementation and a more effective operation. When trying to successfully implement an ERP system, the project team may use the insights from the user perspective.

    Originality/value

    Even though researchers highlight the important role users play during ERP system implementation, their perspective toward the widely discussed CSFs for ERP system implementation has not been investigated comprehensively. This study aims to fill this gap by evaluating CSFs derived from the literature from a user perspective.

  • 43.
    Reitsma, Ewout
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Mukhtar, U.
    Department of Management Sciences, GIFT University, Punjab, Pakistan.
    Implementation of enterprise resource planning systems: A user perspective2018In: IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering / [ed] N. Kurniati, R. S. Dewi, D. S. Dewi, D. Hartanto, N. I. Arvitrida, P. D. Karningsih, Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP), 2018, Vol. 337, no 1, article id UNSP 012049Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate critical success factors (CSFs) for the implementation of an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system from a user perspective. Users play a vital role when implementing an ERP system, but their perspective has been neglected in the literature. A better understanding of their perspective promises to contribute to the design of more effective ERP systems, its implementation, and management. In order to identify the user perspective, a survey was conducted within three Pakistani companies that recently have implemented a new ERP system. The questionnaire was developed based on thirteen CSFs deduced from literature. Based on each CSF's level of importance, they are ranked in order of importance and divided into three groups: most important, important and not important. Findings reveal that users believe that management should prioritize the following four CSFs when implementing an ERP system: education and training, strategic decision-making, communication, and business process alignment. 

  • 44.
    Reitsma, Ewout
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Mukhtar, Umer
    GIFT University, Pakistan.
    Enterprise resource planning system implementation: A user perspective2018In: Operations and Supply Chain Management, ISSN 1979-3561, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 110-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate critical success factors (CSFs) for the implementation of an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system from a user perspective. Users play a vital role when implementing an ERP system, but their perspective has been neglected in the literature. A better understanding of their perspective promises to contribute to the design of more effective ERP systems, its implementation, and management. In order to identify the user perspective, a survey was conducted within three organizations from Pakistan that have recently implemented an ERP system. The questionnaire was developed based on thirteen CSFs deduced from literature. Based on each CSF’s level of importance, they are ranked in order of importance and divided into three groups: most important, important and not important. Findings reveal that users of the three organizations in Pakistan believe that the implementing organization should prioritize the following four CSFs when implementing an ERP system: education and training, strategic decision-making, communication, and business process alignment.

  • 45.
    Rodriguez, Rocio
    et al.
    Kristiania University College, Oslo, Norway.
    Svensson, G.
    Kristiania University College, Oslo, Norway.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Organizational logic to prioritize between the elements of triple bottom line2018In: Benchmarking: An International Journal, ISSN 1463-5771, E-ISSN 1758-4094, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 1626-1640Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to assess both private and public organizations in order to compare the similarities and differences between the organizational priority logic of TBL elements. The research objective is, therefore, to describe the organizational logic, so as to prioritize between economic, social and environmental elements of the triple bottom line (TBL). The approach is also to describe the common denominators and differentiators between private and public organizations.

    Design/methodology/approach: Based on judgmental sampling and in-depth interviews of executives at private and public hospitals in Spain. Data were collected from the directors of communication of private hospitals, and from the executive in charge of corporate social responsibility of public hospitals.

    Findings: The organizational logic for prioritizing the elements of TBL differs between private and public hospitals. The economic element of TBL is crucial to survival for private hospitals. Compliance with the legal requirements and certifications of the environmental element is the major concern for public hospitals. Private and public hospitals would both pay considerably greater attention to the social element of TBL, if there were no judicial and economic restrictions. Research limitations/implications: This study differs from previous ones in terms of exploring the interfaces and relationships between TBL elements, which focus on the organizational logic to prioritize between the elements of TBL. There are both common denominators and differentiators between private and public hospitals, when it comes to the priority logic of TBL elements.

    Practical implications: The priority logic of determining the most important TBL element it is mainly about satisfying organizational needs and societal demands. Determining the second most important TBL element is mostly about organizational preferences and what it wants to achieve. Determining the least important TBL element it is about the organizational mindset for and with respect to the future.

    Originality/value: This study contributes to determining the appropriate organizational priority logic of the TBL elements, as well as common denominators and differentiators between private and public organizations. It also contributes to explaining the organizational reasoning as to why one TBL element may be prioritized over another, an issue which has not been addressed in existing theory and previous studies. 

  • 46.
    Rodriguez, Rocio
    et al.
    Kristiania University College, Oslo, Norway.
    Svensson, Göran
    Kristiania University College, Oslo, Norway.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Organizational positioning and planning of sustainability initiatives: Logic and differentiators2018In: International Journal of Public Sector Management, ISSN 0951-3558, E-ISSN 1758-6666, Vol. 31, no 7, p. 755-774Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the logic and differentiators of organizational positioning and planning of sustainability initiatives between private and public organizations in the healthcare industry. Sustainability initiatives refer to organizations’ economic, social and environmental actions.

    Design/methodology/approach: This study is based on an inductive approach judgmental sampling and in-depth interviews of executives at private and public hospitals in Spain have been used. Data were collected from the directors of communication at private hospitals, and from the executive in charge of corporate social responsibility in public hospitals. An empirical discourse analysis is used.

    Findings: The positioning and planning of sustainability initiatives differs between private and public hospitals. The former consider sustainability as an option that is required mainly for social reasons, a bottom-up positioning and planning. It emerges merely spontaneously within the organization, while the sustainability initiatives in public hospitals are compulsory. They are imposed by the healthcare system within which the public hospital, operates and constitutes a top-down positioning and planning that is structured to accomplish set sustainability goals.

    Research limitations/implications: A limitation of this study is that it is undertaken exclusively in Spanish organizations from one industry. This study differs from previous ones in terms of exploring the positioning and planning of the sustainability initiatives, which focus on the organizational logic of such sustainability initiatives. There are both common denominators and differentiators between private and public hospitals.

    Practical implications: The logic of determining the positioning and planning of the sustainability initiatives is mainly about satisfying organizational needs and societal demands. Nowadays, organizations tend to engage in sustainability initiatives, so it is essential to understand the logic of how organizations position and plan such efforts.

    Originality/value: This study investigates the path that follows sustainability initiatives in public and private organizations. It reports mainly differentiators between private and public organizations. It also contributes to explaining the organizational reasoning as to why companies make decisions about sustainability initiatives, an issue which has not been addressed sufficiently in existing theory studies. 

  • 47.
    Rodriguez, Rocío
    et al.
    Kristiania University College, Oslo, Norway.
    Svensson, Göran
    Kristiania University College, Oslo, Norway.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Comparing and contrasting the evolution through time of organizational sustainability initiatives2018In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 296-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare private and public hospitals’ sustainability actions, as well as to contrast their organizational evolution over time (i.e. past, present and expected future) in the Spanish health-care sector. Sustainability initiatives refer to organizations’ economic, social and environmental actions.

    Design/methodology/approach: This study applies an inductive approach based on judgmental sampling and in-depth interviews of key informants at private and public hospitals in the Spanish health-care sector. Data were gathered from the executive in charge of corporate social responsibility in public hospitals and the directors of communication at private hospitals.

    Findings: Although the private and public hospitals studied are in the same health-care industry and run similar operations, their organizational sustainability initiatives in the past, present and expected future differ. The scope of sustainability initiatives between private and public hospitals is different, compared through time. Who was and who is promoting, as well as who is going to promote sustainability initiatives, also differs between private and public hospitals.

    Research limitations/implications: One limitation of this study is that it was undertaken exclusively in Spanish organizations from one industry, but this is also a benefit, as it enables a comparison and contrast of the evolution between private and public hospitals. Future research could focus on the evolution of organizational sustainability initiatives in other industries and countries.

    Practical implications: The reported comparison of empirical findings between private and public hospitals, as well as the subsequent discussion contrasting these findings, yields various managerial implications in terms of the scope and promotor of sustainable actions.

    Originality/value: This study differs from previous ones by exploring the evolutionary details of the organizational sustainability initiatives through time in both private and public hospitals. This study also makes a contribution by revealing common denominators and differentiators between private and public hospitals that operate in the same health-care industry. 

  • 48.
    Ryrlén, Gunnar
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Andersson, Patric
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Produktionsplanering – En fallstudie om effektivisering av resurser2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 49.
    Sandberg, Erik
    et al.
    Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Jafari, Hamid
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Retail supply chain responsiveness: Towards a retail-specific framework and a future research agenda2018In: International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, ISSN 1741-0401, E-ISSN 1758-6658, Vol. 67, no 9, p. 1977-1993Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to review existing research on retail supply chain responsiveness, develop categories to be included in a retail-specific responsiveness framework, and identify future research areas within the scope of retail supply chain responsiveness.

    Design/methodology/approach

    This paper presents an inductive systematic literature review of 46 academic, peer-reviewed articles. Based around the two major review questions on retailers’ role in the creation of supply chain responsiveness and future research areas, an inductive, qualitative, content analysis was conducted. Further analysis was conducted by using the software NVivo 11.

    Findings

    Existing research are grouped into a framework of four categories that together span the existing research. The categories are labelled supply chain orchestration, market orientation, supply chain operations and supply management. Two to three subthemes in each category are presented. Thereafter, promising future research areas are outlined, covering methodological issues, theoretical underpinnings, inclusion of context variables and outcomes of retail supply chain responsiveness.

    Research limitations/implications

    The conducted systematic literature review has been limited to academic, peer-reviewed articles.

    Practical implications

    The findings of the paper constitute a promising initial step towards a retail-specific framework on retail supply chain responsiveness.

    Originality/value

    The paper questions the comprehensiveness of established models in responsiveness, and argues that existing “general” literature on supply chain responsiveness gives little guidance and structure to retailers’ specific role and involvement in supply chain responsiveness. In particular, the paper focusses on the retailers’ role for creation of supply chain responsiveness, which has not previously been addressed in research.

  • 50.
    Sansone, Cinzia
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Critical operations capabilities in a high cost environment2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many manufacturing firms, driven by the goal of beating the competition, have relocated their manufacturing operations from a high to a low cost environment, creating issues for the western social welfare. In order to maintain manufacturing in high cost environments, firms located in such environments must improve their competitiveness.

    Research has shown that firms need to be able to identify, develop and improve the operations capabilities that have the highest impact on the competitiveness. However, there is presently no coherent and contemporary framework of operations capabilities in the literature. There is also a lack of knowledge about operations capabilities in a high-cost environment. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to investigate critical operations capabilities in a high-cost environment.

    This purpose has been addressed through two studies. The first investigated critical operations capabilities in a general environment, and was conducted through a systematic literature review (Paper I). The second study investigated critical operations capabilities in a high cost environment and was conducted through a focus group (Paper II) and a multiple case study (Paper III).

    The result of this research is a framework of operations capabilities in a high cost environment. The framework includes seven dimensions and 23 operations capabilities. Specifically, the dimensions are: cost, quality, delivery, flexibility, service, innovation and environment. The findings revealed that quality is considered as the most critical dimension in a high cost environment, while environment is considered as the least critical in a high cost environment. The findings also revealed two additional operations capabilities in the empirical data, which are 'flow efficiency' and 'employee flexibility'.

    This research contributes to the current body of knowledge by introducing a novel perspective and original thinking about operations capabilities in a high cost environment. The framework of operations capabilities could support both practitioners and researchers in the identification and development of critical operations capabilities for winning strategies in a high cost environment.

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