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  • 1.
    Almers, Ellen
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Askerlund, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Kjellström, Sofia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Why forest gardening for children? Swedish forest gardeneducators' ideas, purposes, and experiences2018In: The Journal of Environmental Education, ISSN 0095-8964, E-ISSN 1940-1892, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 242-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Utilizing forest gardens as urban settings for outdoor environmental education in Sweden is a new practice. These forest gardens combine qualities of a forest, e.g., multi-layered polyculture vegetation, with those of a school garden, such as accessibility and food production. The study explores both the perceived qualities of forest gardens in comparison to other outdoor settings and forest garden educators’ ideas, purposes, and experiences of activities in a three-year forest gardening project with primary school children. The data were collected through interviews and observations and analyzed qualitatively. Four reported ideas were to give children opportunities to: feel a sense of belonging to a whole; experience self-regulation and systemic dependence; experience that they can co-create with non-human organisms; and imagine possible transformation of places. Four pedagogical forest garden features are discussed.

  • 2.
    Askerlund, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Almers, Ellen
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Hur fungerar ekosystemtjänster som verktyg för hållbarhetsarbete på förskolor?2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Avery, Helen
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER). Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Nordén, Birgitta
    Faculty of Education and Society, University of Malmö, Malmö, Sweden.
    Working with the divides: Two critical axes in development for transformative professional practices2017In: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, ISSN 1467-6370, E-ISSN 1758-6739, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 666-680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The paper aims to provide a conceptual map of how to mediate between sustainability theory and practice in higher education and how disciplinary divides can be bridged. It further looks at issues linked to knowledge views and drivers for institutional change that affect opportunities for whole institution development promoting action preparedness.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Taking its point of departure in the University Educators for Sustainable Development report UE4SD (2014, 2015), the paper discusses ways that ideas and interaction can be mediated in higher education settings, to connect sustainability research with vocational programmes. Different options are considered and compared.

    Findings

    Although the literature stresses both action orientation and the need for holistic transdisciplinary approaches, many institutional drivers limit opportunities for more integrating approaches.

    Research limitations/implications

    However, while conclusions may hold for universities at an overarching level, it is likely that certain research and teaching environments have been able to transcend such barriers.

    Practical implications

    Conceptually mapping the different forms that dialogue, interaction and flows of ideas take within higher education institutions has relevance for whole institution development for sustainability.

    Social implications

    Importantly, producing sustainability science with relevance to practice in various professions is a fundamental condition to support accelerated transitions to sustainability at societal levels.

    Originality/value

    The paper makes a significant contribution by focusing on concrete institutional pathways for knowledge exchange and negotiation that can support education for sustainability in higher education.

  • 4.
    Edwards-Jones, Andrew
    et al.
    Faculty of Arts & Humanities, Plymouth Institute of Education, Plymouth University, Plymouth, United Kingdom.
    Waite, Sue
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER). Faculty of Arts & Humanities, Plymouth Institute of Education, Plymouth University, Plymouth, United Kingdom.
    Passy, Rowena
    Falling into LINE: school strategies for overcoming challenges associated with learning in natural environments (LINE)2018In: Education 3-13, ISSN 0300-4279, E-ISSN 1475-7575, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 49-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the benefits of outdoor learning have become of increasing interest to the education sector, so the importance of understanding and overcoming challenges associated with this pedagogy has gained greater significance. The Natural Connections Demonstration Project recruited primary, secondary, and special schools across south-west England with a view to stimulating and supporting ‘learning in the natural environment’ across the region. This research paper examines qualitative data obtained from case study visits to 12 of these schools. The results from teaching staff interviews and focus groups show that schools face many and varied challenges to embedding outdoor learning, and a raft of strategies are presented for tackling these challenges and integrating learning in the natural environment into much of the current curriculum. 

  • 5. Golino, Hudson
    et al.
    Hamer, Rebecca
    Almers, Ellen
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Kjellström, Sofia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Measuring epistemological development – a uni- or multidimensional structure?2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6. Halimeh, Mahmoud
    et al.
    Avery, Helen
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER). Centre for Middle Eastern Studies, Lund University.
    Halimeh, Nihal
    Sustainable camps: self-organising design in community centres2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Palestinian refugee camps were formed in Lebanon after 1948, and are today home to approximately half a million inhabitants. Estimates are highly uncertain, since many refugees live in Lebanon informally, due to stringent Lebanese residency regulations and the massive crisis in neighbouring Syria. Besides the Palestinians newly arriving from Syria, camp populations have been swollen by the general crisis, pushing migrant workers and poor Lebanese to seek the cheapest possible accommodation. 

    Camp conditions were difficult already before the recent war, but have dramatically worsened. The pressure on infrastructure and housing has multiplied, due to the sudden increase in population. Conditions are further affected by the pressures on power and water supplies outside the camps. At the same time, restricted livelihoods and skyrocketing prices of materials leave little resources to proceed with necessary upgrades and maintenance of facilities and the built environment. Desperate homeless families are prepared to live in buildings that are compromised and unsafe, since they have no other options. At the same time, poor infrastructure leads to a vicious circle, since local workshops that could provide livelihoods also depend on access to transport, power supplies, water, and effective management of wastewater, waste and fumes to minimise environmental impacts.Sustainable camps is a project initiated by the Centre for Middle Eastern Studies at Lund University in collaboration with community centres at Beddawi and Bourj-el-Barajneh, aiming to address the dual need for education and improved living conditions in the camps in Lebanon. Existing community centres will be used as hubs for learning, training and innovation. Young people living in the camps will collaborate with students in Lebanon and abroad to develop low-cost and environmentally friendly solutions to the local infrastructure challenges, in the context of carrying out necessary repairs and upgrades. Interconnecting centres in different camps allows sharing knowledge and know-how.

  • 7. Halimeh, Nihal
    et al.
    Halimeh, Mahmoud
    Avery, Helen
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER). Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Lund University.
    Crafting futures in a Lebanese refugee camp: the Burj el Barajneh Souk2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Hammarsten, Maria
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Almers, Ellen
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Askerlund, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Avery, Helen
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Samuelsson, Tobias
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Plats, Identitet, Lärande (PIL).
    The Forest Garden from Children's Perspectives2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Hammarsten, Maria
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Askerlund, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Almers, Ellen
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Avery, Helen
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Samuelsson, Tobias
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Plats, Identitet, Lärande (PIL).
    Barns perspektiv på att vistas i en skogsträdgård2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Hammarsten, Maria
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Askerlund, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Almers, Ellen
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Avery, Helen
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Samuelsson, Tobias
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Plats, Identitet, Lärande (PIL).
    Developing ecological literacy in a forest garden: children’s perspectives2018In: Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, ISSN 1472-9679, E-ISSN 1754-0402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, cities become more dense, green spaces disappear and children spend less time outdoors. Research suggests that these conditions create health problems and lack of ecological literacy. To reverse such trends, localities are creating urban green spaces for children to visit during school time. Drawing on ideas in ecological literacy, this study investigates school children’s perspectives on a forest garden, a type of outdoor educational setting previously only scarcely researched. Data were collected through walk-and-talk conversations and informal interviews with 28 children aged 7 to 9. Many children in the study expressed strong positive feelings about the forest garden, the organized and spontaneous activities there, and caring for the organisms living there. We observed three aspects of learning in the data, potentially beneficial for the development of children’s ecological literacy: practical competence, learning how to co-exist and care, and biological knowledge and ecological understanding.

  • 11.
    Lecusay, Robert
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Praktiknära utbildningsforskning (PUF), Preschool Education research. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Mrak, Lina
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Praktiknära utbildningsforskning (PUF), Preschool Education research.
    Nilsson, Monica
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Praktiknära utbildningsforskning (PUF), Preschool Education research.
    Teachers Making Sense of Children’s Sense-making: Negotiating Pretense, Exploration, and Teaching in Sustainable, Multi-functional Preschool Environments.2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preschool teachers in Sweden are currently coping with growing curricular demands to engage in a more formal instruction, and to further develop education for sustainable development (ESD). A consequence of this is that teachers feel pressure to organize activities for very young children that privilege ”knowing that” over ”knowing how,” and to do so in the service of an interdisciplinary project – ESD – that can be challenging to organize in early childhood. As teachers adapt to these new challenges they negotiate tensions consequential to preschool children’s learning and develop- ment. The pressure to reorient to disciplinary learning can detract from arrangements of activities involving pretend and exploratory play. This is because the learning outcomes of these activities can be unpredictable and difficult to define. However, these activities are also associated with the kinds of outcomes (e.g. creativity, innovation, empathy, counterfactual thinking) and ethics (e.g. cultures of collaborative learning) of concern in ESD.

    In this paper we consider how preschool teachers in Sweden are negotiating the demands of engag- ing in more formal instruction and ESD, while cultivating local idiocultures that support children’s pretend and exploratory play. Our examination is based on case studies of teacher teams in three preschools that participated in a series of regional government-sponsored workshops organized to support teachers’ efforts to design their preschools’ outdoor spaces as sustainable, multifunctional environments. The case studies were based on field observations at the participating preschools and teacher interviews conducted prior to, during, and following the said workshops.

    Drawing on cultural-historical concepts of disruptive and productive tensions, we characterize how the participating teachers conceived of pretend play, exploration, teaching, and sustainability in relation to children’s engagement in preschool activities. We focus in particular on how teachers considered examples of activities in which the interaction of children and the material environment afforded pretend and exploratory play; how the teachers and children made sense of their activities through pretense and exploration; and if/how the teachers remediated these activities in ways intended to make the children’s learning visible. How and for whom this learning becomes visible is a central question of concern for us.

  • 12. Nordén, Birgitta
    et al.
    Avery, Helen
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Sustainability dilemmas in preschool teacher training: Engaging students' experience in the local place2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Samuelsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Plats, Identitet, Lärande (PIL).
    Almers, Ellen
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Askerlund, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Children's ideas on the desirable future school yard.: Using envisioning workshops as research method for complex conversations with children2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Waite, Sue
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER). Plymouth University, Plymouth, UK.
    Outdoor learning research: Insight into forms and functions2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From publisher's website:

    The term ‘outdoor learning’ covers many forms of practice outside the classroom, including Forest School and outdoor play. Outdoor learning has been rapidly growing as a topic of interest for educators and parents over the last ten years and research published in this field is also increasing. Despite the fact that we are inextricably part of the natural world, there is concern that contemporary children have become disconnected from nature and that their opportunities to access natural environments are declining. Given compelling evidence that time spent in natural places has multiple benefits for human health and wellbeing and pro-environmental behaviour (Bourn et al., 2016), there is an impetus to find ways to increase children’s exposure to and attachment to nature through their education.

    The chapters in this book were originally peer reviewed articles published in Education 3–13: International Journal of Primary, Elementary and Early Years Education. They are amongst the most popular in the journal, reflecting the demand for more evidence of outcomes and high-quality information about how best to implement outdoor learning for children in this age group. The authors report qualitative and quantitative studies and consider implications of the findings for children and their development, and for the integration (or not) of natural environment contexts within school practices. Gathering this body of evidence together in a single volume enables important messages about outdoor learning’s various purposes, processes and outcomes to be more readily accessed by practitioners, policy makers and researchers.

  • 15.
    Waite, Sue
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER). University of Plymouth, Plymouth, UK.
    Goodenough, Alice
    University of Plymouth, Plymouth, UK.
    What is different about Forest School?: Creating a space for an alternative pedagogy in England2018In: Journal of Outdoor and Environmental Education, ISSN 2522-879X, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 25-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forest School in the UK has arguably provided a space of pedagogical ‘difference’ whilst wider structural pressures have reduced the room for novelty and diversity in delivery of state education. This article explores how perceived ‘differences’ between everyday educational contexts can benefit the wellbeing of participants in Forest Education across different ages. It calls into question the application of play-based learning theory to underpin English Forest School as advocated by Leather in this issue. Drawing on Forest School principles, empirical evidence and the theory of cultural density, we examine how Forest School can present important cultural and material contrasts in English young people’s experience and argue for the importance of this function within this context. We critique aspects of the dilution of Forest School principles, arguing that in England, and perhaps other cultures where outdoor experiences have become relatively rare, it is important that Forest School is valued as a site of divergence from more common learning spaces and situations.

  • 16.
    Waite, Sue
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER). Faculty of Arts & Humanities, Plymouth Institute of Education, Plymouth University, Plymouth, United Kingdom.
    Quay, J.
    In Place(s): dwelling on culture, materiality and affect2019In: Research handbook on childhood nature: Assemblages of childhood and nature research / [ed] A. Cutter-Mackenzie, K. Malone, E. Barratt Hacking, Cham: Springer, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Westermark, Åsa
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Global Studies. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Plats, Identitet, Lärande (PIL). Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Gender and feminist geography: A time-geographic teaching approach to encourage situated learning in everyday life2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are many feminisms and there are many geographies. This is a presentation of a time-geographic teaching model which was used to present a diversity of feminisms and geographies in an upper level university course. The purpose was to provide a structured historical overview of how research on women and gender in general, and particularly with respect to geographic inquiry, has raised questions and focused on aspects of the physical environment and identity, and how the two are related to each other in time and space. Gender identities and gender roles are expressions of geographical context, biographic past and aspirations for the future. With this framework as a reference, students were asked to reflect on their everyday lives, identities and gender expressions in daily settings. With a time-geographic approach situated learning was encouraged both to understand self with respect to personal experiences and everyday contexts, and to see that gender inquiry necessarily is grounded in processes in time and space. Students’ reading responses are analyzed and illustrate how gender research approaches may be applied to reflect on personal biographies, geographic context, and identity.

  • 18.
    Westermark, Åsa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Global Studies. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Plats, Identitet, Lärande (PIL). Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Jansund, Bodil
    Erfarenheter av undervisning och lärande om globalisering, produktionskedjor, vardagsliv och hållbarhet med tidsgeografi som didaktiskt perspektiv och verktyg2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Att leva i en globaliserad värld med hållbar utveckling som övergripande samhällsmål ställer krav på medborgares förmågor att greppa mångdimensionella samband. Det kan t. ex. vara att förstå hur handlingar i vardagslivet och levnadsvillkor i närmiljön är länkade till andra platser, andra människor och verksamheter samt andra samhällsstrukturer. Utbildningen av samhällsmedborgare måste inkludera resonemang och uppgifter som tränar oss i denna förmåga. Tidsgeografin har en inneboende grundstruktur som möjliggör sådana resonemang och kontextuellt lärande. Med utgångspunkt i erfarenheter av undervisning i tidsgeografi för geografistudenter och blivande geografilärare analyserar vi frågeställningar som beaktar denna utmaning och drar slutsatser om lärande för hållbar utveckling. Vi utgår från frågeställningar som studenterna arbetat med i examinationsuppgifter och resonerar om hur de tillämpat det tidsgeografiska perspektivet och analyserat faktorer bakom geografiskt utfall av multinationella företags produktionskedjor, hållbarhetsutmaningar och förändrings/påverkansfaktorer i vardagslivet och omvärlden.

1 - 18 of 18
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