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  • 1.
    Alpfält, Tina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Johansson, Börje
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Johansson, Sara
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Scope of export varieties and innovation milieu of local economies2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation by firms and industries requires that the individual firm can combine internal and external knowledge resources. This paper studies product innovations as they are reflected by product varieties and destination markets, combined into observations of firms’ destination-specific varieties(variety pairs). The number of varieties (identified in this way) measuresthe extensive margin of exportflows from industries in local economies, reflecting past product and market (destination) innovations made by industries in each local economy. The empirical analysis identifies for each industry and local economy (i) the intra-industry knowledge resources, (ii) the local access to the supply knowledge-intensive producer services, and (iii) the access to the supply of knowledge-intensive producer servicesoutside the local economy. Thepapercontributes to existing knowledgein several ways. First, it introduces a knowledge-supply accessibility measure to model the local innovation milieu. Second, it shows the joint contribution to product innovation from internal and external knowledge sources. The estimation results supports the hypothesis that innovations are generated in the conjunction of internal and external knowledge.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Lunds Universitet, Department of Industrial, Lund, Sweden.
    Bjerke, Lina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Institutet för näringslivsanalys. Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Introduction2017In: Geographies of Growth: Innovations, Networks and Collaborations, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2017, p. 1-15Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Johansson, Sara
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Lööf, Hans
    KTH.
    Firm performance and international trade: Evidence from a small open economy2012In: The Regional Economics Of Knowledge And Talent / [ed] Charlie Karlsson, Börje Johansson and Roger R. Stough, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2012, p. 320-342Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite a growing interest in firm-level analyses of international trade from both theorists and empiricists, papers providing thorough analyses of firms' trading activities and their relation to firm performance are rare. The literature is dominated by stylized facts from the USA, a large country with a significant share of the world market. This chapter resolves this imbalance and presents a comprehensive analysis of Swedish firms' trade. Sweden is a small open economy with a limited domestic market. Its neighbour countries have similar traits (language, culture, formal and informal institutions) and Swedish firms presumably face low entry costs not only to the rest of Scandinavia but also the Baltic countries. Sweden thus constitutes an interesting case. The chapter makes a twofold contribution: (1) based on detailed data on Swedish firms over a sequence of periods, we present stylized facts about their engagement in international trade and contrast them to findings from other countries, the USA in particular. Our data cover information on both export and import activities across products and markets for each and every firm, such that we can provide a complete picture of the firms' international trading activities and their variation across products and markets; (2) we extend previous analyses by examining the elasticity of productivity with respect to both export and import activities, respectively. Moreover, we perform static panel estimations (ordinary fixed effects) and dynamic estimations using the Arellano-Bond estimation procedure. We find evidence of both 'learning by exporting' and 'learning by importing', the former being stronger than the latter. Our findings on 'learning by importing' are consistent with previous research pointing to trade in intermediate capital goods being a significant vehicle for international technology diffusion.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS). Centre for Innovation, Research and Competence in the Learning Economy (CIRCLE), Lund University.
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Larsson, Johan P.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    How local are spatial density externalities? Neighbourhood effects in agglomeration economies2016In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 1082-1095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The geographic scale at which density externalities operate is analysed in this paper. Using geocoded high-resolution data, the analysis is focused on exogenously determined within-city squares (‘neighbourhoods’) of 1 km2. The analysis confirms a city-wide employment density–wage elasticity and an economically significant density–wage elasticity at the neighbourhood level that attenuate sharply with distance. Panel estimates over 20 years suggest a neighbourhood density–wage elasticity of about 3%, while the city-wide elasticity is about 1%. It is argued that the neighbourhood level is more prone to capture learning, e.g. through knowledge and information spillovers. This interpretation is supported by (1) significantly larger neighbourhood elasticities for university educated workers and (2) sharper attenuation with distance of the effect for such workers.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Centre for Innovation, Research and Competence in the Learning Economy (CIRCLE), Lund University.
    Larsson, Johan P.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Local entrepreneurship clusters in cities2016In: Journal of Economic Geography, ISSN 1468-2702, E-ISSN 1468-2710, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 39-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We show that entrepreneurs are co-located within cities. One plausible source of such spatial clustering is local social interactions, where individuals' decisions to become entrepreneurs are influenced by entrepreneurial neighbors. Using geo-coded matched employer-employee data for Sweden, we find that sharing residential neighborhood with established entrepreneurs has a statistically significant and robust influence on the probability that an individual leaves employment for entrepreneurship. An otherwise average neighborhood with a 5% point higher entrepreneurial intensity, all else equal, produces between six and seven additional entrepreneurs per square kilometer, each year. Our estimates suggest a local feedback-effect in which the presence of established entrepreneurs in a neighborhood influences the emergence of new local entrepreneurs. Our analysis supports the conjecture that social interaction effects constitute a mechanism by which local entrepreneurship clusters in cities develop and persist over time.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Martin O.
    et al.
    Umeå Universitet, Department of Occupational & Environmental Medicine, Umeå, Sweden.
    Larsson, Johan P.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). Swedish Entrepreneurship Forum, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wernberg, Joakim
    Lunds Universitet, Centre for Innovation, Lund, Sweden.
    Urban preferences, amenities and age: Exploring the spatial distribution of age in Stockholm from 1991 to 20112018In: Regional Science Policy & Practice, E-ISSN 1757-7802, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 367-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cities exhibit a rich and complex heterogeneity in people and activities. This poses a sizable challenge for planners when planning new neighbourhoods or the reconstruction of old ones as well as when considering the allocation of supply of and demand for amenities, e.g. kindergartens or health facilities. However, individual preferences may also exhibit common denominators that may provide structure to this heterogeneity. One such denominator is age. In this paper we introduce the concept of neighbourhood age, defined as the mean age of people living in exogenously defined squares of 1km2 in a city. We use highly disaggregated geocoded data to map how the spatial distribution of neighbourhood age changes over a 20-year period from 1991 to 2011 in the city of Stockholm, Sweden. We then test the correlation between neighbourhood age and two categories of urban amenities: supply of local consumption amenities and distance to the city's central business district (CBD). The paper presents three main findings: First, neighbourhood age changes and polarizes significantly over the observed period, suggesting that different age groups are concentrating in different parts of the city. Second, there is a rejuvenation in the central parts of the city but also in more distant clusters of amenities. Third, over a long-term perspective, the results suggest that local clusters of consumption amenities outside the inner city may become increasingly attractive to younger people. Our conclusion is that neighbourhood age and age-related patterns over time provides a tool for planners to better understand the spatial distribution of age-related demand. 

  • 7.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Bjerke, Lina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Johansson, Sara
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Norman, Therese
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Wallin, Tina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Wixe, Sofia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Tillgänglighet, innovationsprocesser och tillväxt2015Report (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Hjalager, A.-M.
    Wikhamn, W.
    Hur ser morgondagens hotell ut? Forskningsprojekt om innovationer inom hotellbranschen2017Report (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS). Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Determinants of self-employment among commuters and non-commuters2016In: Papers in regional science (Print), ISSN 1056-8190, E-ISSN 1435-5957, Vol. 95, no 4, p. 755-774Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyse the determinants of self-employment and focus on the contextual environment. By distinguishing between commuters and non-commuters we are able to analyse the influence from the work and home environment, respectively. Our results indicate a significant difference between non-commuters and commuters in terms of the role of networks for becoming self-employed. Our results indicate that it is the business networks where people work, rather than where they live that exerts a positive influence on the probability of becoming self-employed. These effects are further robust over educational and occupational categories.

  • 10.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Entrepreneurship and age across time and space2018In: Tijdschrift voor economische en sociale geografie, ISSN 0040-747X, E-ISSN 1467-9663, Vol. 109, no 3, p. 371-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies confirm an inverted U-shaped relationship between age and entrepreneurship. This paper deepens the understanding of this relationship by analysing how the relationship varies across time and across different types of regions, aspects often overlooked in the current literature. An individual perspective is taken, and the probability of starting a firm is expected to increase as individuals' age but at a decreasing rate. The results show significant differences in the relationship between the age of individuals and the rate of entrepreneurship across time and space. The age-entrepreneurship profile has shifted to the left over time such that individuals are younger when they start firms. 

  • 11.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Location of New Firms: Influence of Commuting Behaviour2017In: Growth and Change, ISSN 0017-4815, E-ISSN 1468-2257, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 682-699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the entrepreneurship literature, it is generally assumed that an individual establishes a new firm in a location in which they have strong ties, normally in the municipality of residence or employment. We scrutinise this general assumption and show that firm location depends on individual characteristics, such as the commuting experience. Our results show that commuting influences the firm location choice. The probability of establishing a firm in the work municipality increases if the entrepreneur is a commuter, holding constant the type of region and unobservable and observable individual features. 

  • 12.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Öner, Özge
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Innovation in the hospitality industry: Firm or location?2017In: Tourism Economics, ISSN 1354-8166, E-ISSN 2044-0375, Vol. 23, no 8, p. 1591-1614Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hospitality industry is a rapidly growing revenue generator in many countries and is becoming economically important for generating employment and for integrating of immigrants into the labor market. As an industry where firms face fierce competition, it is important for the firms to maintain their competitiveness by distinguishing themselves from others through continuous improvements and innovations. In this article, we investigate the determinants of innovation in the hospitality industry by analyzing survey data gathered from over 900 firms in Sweden. In the analysis, we differentiate between firm-specific and location-specific features. We conclude that the most important characteristics that explain innovation lie within the firm itself, not the location. These results provide important insights regarding firm- versus location-placed innovation policies.

  • 13.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Öner, Özge
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Innovationer inom besöksnäringen2017Report (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Lööf, Hans
    KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    The geography of innovation and entrepreneurship2015In: The annals of regional science, ISSN 0570-1864, E-ISSN 1432-0592, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This introduction to the special issue “The Geography of Innovation and Entrepreneurship” in the Annals of Regional Science surveys a collection of nine papers which consider agglomeration economies and spatial heterogeneity of regions and firms through the lenses of innovation and entrepreneurship. They all make use of extensive and detailed data sources that enable models to provide a richer picture of how firms, industries and regions are affected by innovation and entrepreneurship but also how these entities shape and foster renewal. These factors include spatial concentration, industry composition, labor market characteristics, immigration, firm characteristics, R&D activities and R&D collaboration. The papers add to the understanding of the geography of innovation and entrepreneurship by suggesting alternative ways of identifying spillovers, combing and integrating internal and external knowledge sources, and by estimating the impact on innovation, new firm formation and growth.

  • 15.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, The Prosperity Institute of Scandinavia (PIS).
    Gabe, Todd
    University of Maine, USA.
    Effects of human Capital on the growth and survival of Swedish businesses2016In: Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, ISSN 1090-4999, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 22-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the effects of human capital on the growth and survival of a large sample of Swedish businesses. Human capital is represented by conventional measures of the educational attainment and experience of an establishment’s workers and skills-based measures of the types of occupations present in the company. Controlling for an establishment’s size and age, as well as its industry and region of location, we find that the human capital embodied in a company’s workers affects its performance. The specific effects, however, depend on how human capital is measured and whether the analysis focuses on growth or survival.

  • 16.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Nilsson, Pia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    The role of cultural heritage in attracting skilled individuals2018In: Journal of Cultural Economics, ISSN 0885-2545, E-ISSN 1573-6997, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 111-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the role played by built heritages and cultural environments, alongside other locational factors, in explaining the growth of human capital in Sweden. We distinguish between urban, natural and cultural qualities as different sources of regional attractiveness and estimate their influence on the observed growth of individuals with at least three years of higher education during 2001–2010. Neighborhood-level data are used, and unobserved heterogeneity and spatial dependencies are modeled by employing random effects estimations and an instrumental variable approach. Our findings indicate that the local supply of built heritages and cultural environments explain a significant part of human capital growth in Sweden. Results suggest that these types of cultural heritages are important place-based resources with a potential to contribute to improved regional attractiveness and growth.

  • 17.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Nilsson, Pia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Strömberg, Carl-Johan
    Jämställdhet, integration och konkurrenskraft: En empirisk studie med fokus påsvenska jordbruksföretag2015Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Nilsson, Pia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Westlund, Hans
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Rickardsson, Jonna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Wassen, Lisa
    Utvärdering av Landsbygdsprogrammet 2007-2013 (Axel 1)2016Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Palmberg, Johanna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Contextualizing small family firms: How does the urban-rural context affect firm employment growth?2015In: The Journal of Family Business Strategy, ISSN 1877-8585, E-ISSN 1877-8593, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 247-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies the effects of family governance and ownership on firm employment growth, extending existing knowledge by including in the analysis the regional context in which firms are located. We create a regional taxonomy to capture the urban–rural dimension and combine this with the corporate governance structure of the firm. Our results show that, being a family firm per se does not influence employment growth. However, when corporate governance structure and regional context are combined, the urban–rural context influences family firm and nonfamily firm employment growth differently, with family firms exhibiting greater employment growth, compared with nonfamily firms, in rural areas.

  • 20.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Wallin, Tina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Access to banks and external capital acquisition: Perceived innovation obstacles2018In: The annals of regional science, ISSN 0570-1864, E-ISSN 1432-0592, Vol. 61, no 1, p. 161-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine whether low access to banks is perceived as problematic when obtaining financial capital for innovation activities. Data on innovation obstacles from the Swedish Community Innovation Survey are combined with geo-coded data at the firm level, which allows us to proxy access to external capital by the Euclidian distance from each firm to its nearest bank and the supply within a radius of five kilometres. The results indicate that both a longer distance to the nearest bank and fewer banks in the vicinity are related to experiencing greater difficulties in obtaining external financial capital for innovations.

  • 21.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Wallin, Tina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Access to financial intermediaries and external capital acquisition2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine whether low access to financial intermediaries works as an obstacle acquiring financial capital for Swedish firms by using information from the Community Innovation Survey indicating whether firms perceive the acquisition of external capital to be difficult. This perception is explained by the distance to the firms’ nearest financial intermediaries and their total local supply. The results indicate that the distance to banks is related to a larger problem of obtaining external financial capital in rural areas.

  • 22.
    Bagley, Mark
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). Centre for Innovation, Research and Competence in the Learning Economy (CIRCLE), Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Small worlds, inheritance networks and industrial clusters2018In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The performance of firms within industrial clusters has been the subject of a multitude of studies. The organizational attributes inherited by spinoffs from parent firms is one explanation behind performance premiums. This paper examines the relationship between a spinoff’s network and its geographic location in an industrial cluster. We hypothesize that there is a negative relationship between a spinoff’s network efficiency and its distance from the cluster’s centroid. Although recent literature infers that the transmission of knowledge in industrial clusters is accomplished via inherited network ties, this has not been directly measured. This paper aims to fill that research gap. We find that, after controlling for firm size, parent size and age, there is indeed a statistically significant and negative relationship between network efficiency and geographic distance to a cluster’s core. 

  • 23.
    Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Pittino, Daniel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Backman, Mikaela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Roots to grow: Family firms and local embeddedness in rural and urban contexts2018In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Bjerke, Lina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). Jonkoping Int Business Sch, Box 1026 551 11, Jonkoping, Sweden.;Swedish Board Agr, Box 1026 551 11, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Knowledge in agriculture: a micro data assessment of the role of internal and external knowledge in farm productivity in Sweden2016In: Studies in Agricultural Economics, ISSN 1418-2106, E-ISSN 2063-0476, Vol. 118, no 2, p. 68-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the impact of internal and external knowledge on firm productivity in the Swedish agricultural sector. It combines theories from regional economics about the geographical aspects of knowledge with traditional theories on the role of knowledge in productivity in agriculture. The study is a firm-level analysis using an unbalanced panel between the years 2002 and 2011 in Sweden. The results show that these firms are positively affected by employees with formal education related to the sector. Higher knowledge levels have a greater impact than lower levels. External knowledge, such as localised spillovers, is also important, but the results on this factor are more ambiguous.

  • 25.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Backman, Mikaela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Karlsson, M.
    Pittino, Daniel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    No Firm is an Island: Local Embeddedness and Rural-Urban Contexts for Business Growth in Family versus non-Family Firms.2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Eklund, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Entreprenörskapsforum.
    Pettersson, Lars
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Högskola i otakt2017Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Sverige har aldrig haft så många högutbildade i arbetskraften som idag, men arbetsmarknaden fungerar allt sämre. Frågan är vilka ekonomiska utfall högskoleexpansionen har bidragit till.

    Slutsatser är att högre utbildning i Sverige inte främjar ekonomisk utveckling och välfärd. Det som bestämmer studenternas val och lärosätenas utformning av utbildningar anpassas inte efter behoven på arbetsmarknaden.

    Utbildning är kostnadsfri för studerande och finansieras via skatteuttag, samtidigt som utbildningspremien och den privatekonomiska avkastningen, tillhör världens lägsta.

    Detta bidrar inte till att lösa matchningsproblem på arbetsmarknaden. Istället finns en risk att utbildning ses som konsumtion snarare än investering i kunskap.

    Resultatet riskerar bli en högskola som går i otakt med det omgivande samhället och framförallt näringslivet.

  • 27.
    Farrell, Kyle
    et al.
    Urban and Regional Studies, Department of Urban Planning and Environment, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westlund, Hans
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    China’s rapid urban ascent: an examination into the components of urban growth2018In: Asian Geographer, ISSN 1022-5706, E-ISSN 2158-1762, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 85-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Having gone from 11.8% of its population inhabiting urban areas in 1950 to 49.2% by 2010, China represents the most dramatic urban transformation the world has seen. With the contemporary urban narrative presenting new challenges, particularly in terms of its unprecedented pace and scale, this paper conducts an inquiry into the nature and causes of China’s rapid urban ascent. Making use of a new analytical framework, this paper maps out the changing stages of China’s urban transition and examines the components of urban growth underpinning it. It arrives at several notable findings. Rural to urban migration has been the dominant component of urban growth, followed by urban natural population increase and reclassification. Although China’s urban growth rates were high, it is the reduction in rural growth rates that underpinned China’s particularly rapid urbanization rates. China is currently in the latter part of the accelerated stage of its urban transition, and is expected to enter the terminal stage by 2030. In light of China’s ongoing urban transition, this paper concludes with reflections on China’s New-Type Urbanization Plan 2014–2020. 

  • 28.
    Haas, Tigran
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Centre for the Future of Places (CFP), KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westlund, HansJönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    In the post-urban world: Emergent transformation of cities and regions in the innovative global economy2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last few decades, many global cities and towns have experienced unprecedented economic, social, and spatial structural change. Today, we find ourselves at the juncture between entering a post-urban and a post-political world, both presenting new challenges to our metropolitan regions, municipalities, and cities. Many megacities, declining regions and towns are experiencing an increase in the number of complex problems regarding internal relationships, governance, and external connections. In particular, a growing disparity exists between citizens that are socially excluded within declining physical and economic realms and those situated in thriving geographic areas. This book conveys how forces of structural change shape the urban landscape.

    In The Post-Urban World is divided into three main sections: Spatial Transformations and the New Geography of Cities and Regions; Urbanization, Knowledge Economies, and Social Structuration; and New Cultures in a Post-Political and Post-Resilient World. One important subject covered in this book, in addition to the spatial and economic forces that shape our regions, cities, and neighbourhoods, is the social, cultural, ecological, and psychological aspects which are also critically involved. Additionally, the urban transformation occurring throughout cities is thoroughly discussed. Written by today’s leading experts in urban studies, this book discusses subjects from different theoretical standpoints, as well as various methodological approaches and perspectives; this is alongside the challenges and new solutions for cities and regions in an interconnected world of global economies.

    This book is aimed at both academic researchers interested in regional development, economic geography and urban studies, as well as practitioners and policy makers in urban development.

  • 29.
    Heshmati, Almas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Department of Economics, Sogang University, Seoul, Korea.
    Rashidghalam, Masoomeh
    Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz, Iran.
    Nilsson, Pia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Measurement and analysis of multidimensional well-being in Rwanda2018In: Rwanda Handbook of Economic and Social Policy: Volume 1 / [ed] A. Heshmati, Jönköping: Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School , 2018, p. 291-325Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The well-being of families and their children is given high priority in development goals. Children’s well-being in Africa is important since the growing number of children is the greatest resource of this continent. Rwanda was one of the first countries that ratified the Convention on the Rights of the Child. The country, despite its very low GDP per capita, also has one of the best child well-being indicators in Africa. In the recent past the country has also had two important achievements: protection of children by establishing the National Commission for Children and launching a Strategy for National Child Care Reform. The measures aim to protect children’s rights and integrate children into families that are supported to provide needed care to them. These achievements are largely the result of strong laws and policies many of which have been developed with support from UNICEF. Investments in children’s well-being will help in addressing many persistent difficulties that society may have to face in the future. What happens during the early years is of crucial importance for every child’s development. This period offers great opportunities, but children are also vulnerable to negative influences. The objective of this research is to estimate multidimensional well-being of children and their families in Rwanda. The aim is to compute an overall well-being index decomposed into its underlying main components. The households are ranked by the level of well-being and by various household and community characteristics. The results shed light on the state and changes in the well-being of children and their families in Rwanda indicating which provinces and districts offer relatively better conditions for them. This can serve as a model for public policies aimed at improving general well-being in the country.

  • 30.
    Heshmati, Almas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Department of Economics, Sogang University, Seoul, Korea.
    Rashidghalam, Masoomeh
    Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz, Iran.
    Nilsson, Pia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Measurement and analysis of multidimensional well-being in Rwanda2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Holgersson, Thomas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Statistics. Centre for Data Intensive Sciences and Applications, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Kekezi, Orsa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Towards a multivariate innovation index2018In: Economics of Innovation and New Technology, ISSN 1043-8599, E-ISSN 1476-8364, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 254-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper argues that traditional measures of innovation as a univariate phenomenon may not be dynamic enough to adequately describe the complex nature of innovation. Consequently, the purpose is to develop a multidimensional index of innovation that is able to reflect innovation enablers and outputs. The index may then be used (i) to assess and quantify temporal changes of innovation, (ii) to describe regional differences and similarities of innovation, and (iii) serve as exogenous variables to analyze the importance of innovation for other economic phenomena. Our index is defined in a four-dimensional space of orthogonal axes. An empirical case study is used for demonstration of the index, where 44 variables are collected for all municipalities in Sweden. The index spanning the four-dimensional innovation comprises size, accessibility, firm performance, and agglomeration. The proposed index offers a new way of defining and analyzing innovation and should have a wide range of important applications in a world where innovation is receiving a great deal of recognition.

  • 32.
    Johansson, Mats
    et al.
    Department of Urban and Rural Studies, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Pia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Westlund, Hans
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). KTH, Urbana och regionala studier.
    Demographic and rural trends in Europe2015In: Social capital and development trends in rural areas: Vol. 10 / [ed] Yvonne von Friedrichs, Hans Westlund, Kiyoshi Kobayashi, Kyoto: MARG Kyoto University , 2015, p. 129-158Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Johansson, Sara
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    The influence of knowledge on firms export decisions2014In: Knowledge, Innovation and Space, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014, p. 103-138Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid growth in international trade flows implies that domestic market shares are shrinking as foreign firms increasingly penetrate domestic markets. Consequently, the globalization process stimulates more and more firms to enter foreign markets to explore business opportunities abroad and to compensate for reduced domestic sales. Despite many push and pull factors, many firms still do not participate in international markets, and of the majority of firms that do, only a few export products to a limited number of foreign markets (Andersson et al., 2008; Bernard et al., 2003). The fact that not all firms explore business opportunities abroad can be explained by a fixed investment required to establish an export link. A growing vein of theoretical and empirical literature focuses on the effects of fixed export market entry costs on firms’ export behavior (Bernard and Jensen, 1995; 1999; 2004; Girma et al., 2004; Greenaway and Kneller, 2005; Helpman et al., 2004; Melitz, 2003; Roberts and Tybout, 1997; Sjoholm, 1999; among others). Theoretical and empirical work in this field suggests that only the most productive firms can overcome the fixed cost of export market entry. Consequently, the most productive firms self-select into export market participation. Studies on firm-level export behavior find that firm characteristics such as size, productivity, human capital, R & D investments, and age are important determinants of firms’ export status (Baldwin and Gu, 2003; Bernard and Jensen, 1995, 1999, 2004; Clerides et al., 1998; Roberts and Tybout, 1997).

  • 34.
    Johansson, Sara
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    R&D Accessibility and Regional Export Diversity2007In: The annals of regional science, ISSN 0570-1864, E-ISSN 1432-0592, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 501-523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the influences of accessibility to R&D on the export diversity in Swedish regions. A theoretical model with fixed R&D cost predicts that spatial knowledge spillovers generate external economies of scale in R&D activities. These external effects are presumed to increase regions' innovative capacity. Moreover, the model implies that the effects of R&D on regional export performance are reflected by the size of the export base rather than by the export volumes. The empirical analysis focuses on three different indicators of export diversity: the number of exported goods, the number of exporting firms and the number of export destinations. The hypothesis that regional accessibility to R&D facilities in the private business sector, on the one hand, and university research departments on the other hand, increases the export diversity in regions is tested in a spatial cross-regressive model. Since knowledge cannot be regarded as a spatially trapped resource the empirical analysis includes two measures of R&D accessibility: intra-regional and inter-regional. The empirical results indicate that the three indicators of regional export diversity are positively affected by the intra-regional accessibility to company R&D in commodity groups that have a relatively high R&D-intensity in production. Inter-regional accessibility to company R&D has significant positive impacts on the number of export goods and the number of export destinations also in less R&D-intensive industries. In the case of university R&D, the empirical results are weaker, in particular in the case of intra-regional accessibility. Yet, the inter-regional accessibility to university R&D has a significant positive impact on the number of export goods and the number of export destinations in the majority of commodity groups.

  • 35.
    Johansson, Sara
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Pettersson, Lars
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Small-scale food production and location of gourmet restaurants in rural Sweden2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explore the location pattern of gourmet restaurants in Sweden by using information about restaurant quality from the White Guide. The purpose of the paper is to analyze which factors that influence the location pattern of gourmet restaurants, with particular focus on the influence of small-scale food producers. This variable can be expected to be of substantial importance in creating comparative advantages related to geographical location. Econometric estimates of a zero-inflated Poisson regression show that the number of small-scale food producers in a location significantly increases the number of gourmet restaurants in locations with non-zero count. Moreover, factors related to the demand side, such as market size and tourism significantly increases the number of gourmet restaurants in a municipality once the probability of a non-zero count is accounted for. The tourism sector appears to be of particular strong importance in rural areas where the size of the permanently residing population is insufficient for creating business opportunities for restaurateurs striving for the upper quality segment.

  • 36.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Andersson, MartinJönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Centre for Innovation, Research and Competence in the Learning Economy (CIRCLE), Lund University.Bjerke, LinaJönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Geographies of growth: innovations, networks and collaborations2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today we can observe an increasing spatial divide as some large urban regions and many more medium-sized and small regions face growing problems such as decreasing labour demand, increasing unemployment and an ageing population. In view of these trends, this book offers a better understanding of the general characteristics and specific drivers of the geographies of growth. It shows how these may vary in different spatial contexts, how hurdles and barriers to growth in different types of regions can be dealt with, how and to what extent resources in different areas can develop and how the potential of these resources to stimulate growth can be realized. This book presents a collection of chapters, divided into four main parts, that together deal with these issues. The expert contributions provide numerous different perspectives on a new regional divide as well as exploring the inter-regional accessibility to human capital and its effects on productivity on both sides of the border. The book also investigates the speed of convergence and the fact that, when incorporating structural change, it is often quicker at the regional level compared to both the country and industry level. Other topics covered include institutional foundations and their influence on local social acceptance of entrepreneurship, the role of global value chains on bilateral trade and the determinants of cross-border innovation cooperation focusing on partner selection and location. Students, researchers and scholars will find this an important resource that fills numerous knowledge gaps and opens new avenues for research. It will also appeal to consultants, practitioners and planners at the international, regional and local level. Today we can observe an increasing spatial divide as some large urban regions and many more medium-sized and small regions face growing problems such as decreasing labour demand, increasing unemployment and an ageing population. In view of these trends, this book offers a better understanding of the general characteristics and specific drivers of the geographies of growth. It shows how these may vary in different spatial contexts, how hurdles and barriers to growth in different types of regions can be dealt with, how and to what extent resources in different areas can develop and how the potential of these resources to stimulate growth can be realized. This book presents a collection of chapters, divided into four main parts, that together deal with these issues. The expert contributions provide numerous different perspectives on a new regional divide as well as exploring the inter-regional accessibility to human capital and its effects on productivity on both sides of the border. The book also investigates the speed of convergence and the fact that, when incorporating structural change, it is often quicker at the regional level compared to both the country and industry level. Other topics covered include institutional foundations and their influence on local social acceptance of entrepreneurship, the role of global value chains on bilateral trade and the determinants of cross-border innovation cooperation focusing on partner selection and location. Students, researchers and scholars will find this an important resource that fills numerous knowledge gaps and opens new avenues for research. It will also appeal to consultants, practitioners and planners at the international, regional and local level.

  • 37.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Andersson, MartinJönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).Norman, ThereseJönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Handbook of Research Methods and Applications in Economic Geography2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main purpose of this Handbook is to provide overviews and assessments of the state-of-the-art regarding research methods, approaches and applications central to economic geography. The chapters are written by distinguished researchers from a variety of scholarly traditions and with a background in different academic disciplines including economics, economic, human and cultural geography, and economic history. The resulting handbook covers a broad spectrum of methodologies and approaches applicable in analyses pertaining to the geography of economic activities and economic outcomes.

  • 38.
    Kekezi, Orsa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Agglomeration of economic activity and the performance of knowledge intensive business services2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Kekezi, Orsa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Agglomeration of economic activity and the performance of knowledge intensive business services2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Dossier on the geography of ageing and the economy2018In: Tijdschrift voor economische en sociale geografie, ISSN 0040-747X, E-ISSN 1467-9663, Vol. 109, no 3, p. 329-331Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Klaesson, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). Research Institute of Industrial Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lopez, Esteban
    Center for Economics and Regional Policy, Business School, Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez, Chile.
    Öner, Özge
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Who works longer - and why?: Regional and individual characteristics in the timing of retirement2018In: Tijdschrift voor economische en sociale geografie, ISSN 0040-747X, E-ISSN 1467-9663, Vol. 109, no 3, p. 350-370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Who works longer - and why? This paper investigates the characteristics of people that stay longer in the workforce, even beyond the time they are eligible to retire. In our regional analysis, we use an 11-year balanced panel of 290 Swedish regions. In the individual analysis, we use a large individual level panel to apply Cox proportional hazard estimates on 'risk' of entering retirement. Our results show a large gender difference: women tend to retire earlier than men. Between employees and entrepreneurs, entrepreneurs retire later. People in larger regions tend to retire later. Higher house prices, and the share of small firms in a region correlate with a lower likelihood of retirement. The local tax rate and the share of blue-collar workers in a region is significantly related to lower retirement age. A high average wage, commuting intensity, and high human capital in a region is associated with later retirement.

  • 42.
    Klaesson, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Norman, Therese
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Market potential and the employment growth of knowledge-intensive services: comparing different geographical resolutions2015In: The annals of regional science, ISSN 0570-1864, E-ISSN 1432-0592, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 157-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to empirically understand the geographical reach of different markets, it is vital to use an appropriate geographical resolution. Using too large observational units risks hiding the interesting relationships within the regional boundaries. In this study, we aim to investigate and compare similar analyses performed on different geographical levels, with a special focus on innovative industries. Accessibility to markets, services and infrastructure is thought to be major determinants of the potential for economic development and welfare of a region. Earlier empirical research establishing the relationship between agglomeration forces and regional growth typically includes a measure for accessibility or market potential as an explanatory factor. The geographical scale that conventional accessibility measures operate on is usually on the level of municipalities or similar, even when theory suggests that a more disaggregated scale is desirable. Most often the reason for this is limitations in available data. In many cases, the researcher is left with a geographical level based on administrative borders. Analyses on more disaggregated levels allow the researcher to better pinpoint the actual accessibility that each firm faces. In order to shed light on the importance of these issues, this paper utilizes an exploratory approach to investigate the relationship between the spatial distribution and growth of knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and the accessibility to economic activity (market potential). We use regional employment growth in KIS as a proxy for regional innovativeness. The relationship is estimated on two different geographical levels using Swedish data. The more conventional model is estimated with the 290 municipalities in Sweden as the units of analysis. In the Swedish context, this represents the geographically smallest administrative level. In the more novel model, we use the 298 so-called SAMS areas of Jönköping County in Sweden. Our results show that the detailed level is particularly important for the analysis of the growth of the more advanced sectors of the economy, in our setting, the high-tech knowledge-intensive services.

  • 43.
    Klaesson, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Norman, Therese
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Tillgänglighet och innovationer på fin geografisk nivå: Utveckling av DYNLOK-modellen2014Report (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Larsson, Johan P.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    The Jack of all Trades entrepreneur - Diversity of experience and the self-employment transition2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Larsson, Johan P.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). Department of Land Economy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Thulin, Per
    Swedish Entrepreneurship Forum, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Independent by necessity?: The life satisfaction of necessity and opportunity entrepreneurs in 70 countries2018In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between self-employment and subjective well-being (SWB) is contingent on the heterogeneity observed among entrepreneurs. We argue that independence and job control, two commonly suggested sources of entrepreneurs’ higher SWB, are likely to disproportionately benefit opportunity entrepreneurs who were pulled into their occupation choice. A review of the psychological literature on the determinants of well-being further supports the view that more dynamic and impactful entrepreneurship should lead to higher SWB. Analysis of Global Entrepreneurship Monitor data from 70 countries (N = 111,589) confirm this proposition. We show that entrepreneurs, all else equal, rate their life satisfaction substantially higher than employees and, further, that this effect is entirely driven by opportunity entrepreneurs.

  • 46.
    Lundgren, Anna
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Westlund, Hans
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    The openness buzz in the knowledge economy: Towards taxonomy2017In: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, ISSN 2399-6544, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 975-989Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the networked information and knowledge-based economy and society, the notions of ‘open’ and ‘openness’ are used in a variety of contexts; open source, open access, open economy, open government, open innovation – just to name a few. This paper aims at discussing openness and developing a taxonomy that may be used to analyse the concept of openness. Are there different qualities of openness? How are these qualities interrelated? What analytical tools may be used to understand openness? In this paper four qualities of openness recurrent in literature and debate are explored: accessibility, transparency, participation and sharing. To further analyse openness new institutional theory as interpreted by Williamson (2000) is used, encompassing four different institutional levels; cultural embeddedness, institutional environment, governance structure and resource allocations. At what institutional levels is openness supported and/or constrained? Accessibility as a quality of openness seems to have a particularly strong relation to the other qualities of openness, whereas the notions of sharing and collaborative economics seem to be the most complex and contested quality of openness in the knowledge-based economy. This research contributes to academia, policy and governance, as handling of challenges with regard to openness vs. closure in different contexts, territorial, institutional and/or organizational, demand not only a better understanding of the concept, but also tools for analysis.

  • 47.
    Maniriho, Aristide
    et al.
    School of Economics, University of Rwanda, Kigali, Rwanda.
    Nilsson, Pia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Determinants of livelihood diversification among Rwandan households: The role of education, ICT and urbanization2018In: Rwanda Handbook of Economic and Social Policy: Volume 1 / [ed] A. Heshmati, Jönköping: Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School , 2018, p. 377-395Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rural households in many different contexts have been found to diversify their income sources allowing them to spread their risks and to smoothen consumption. Generating diversified incomes for a majority of the rural poor is an essential component of a successful rural development strategy. This paper identifies the determinants of income diversification among Rwandan households using unique panel data obtained from the Integrated Households Living Conditions Surveys of 2011 and 2014. It applies a binary logit panel model to a representative sample of 3,839 households across Rwanda controlling for latent household specific factors. It also conducts a Hausman test the results of which show that the random effect estimates were more efficient than fixed effect estimates (Chi2=20.73 and Prob>Chi2=0.1891). The results reveal that education, access to ICT and urban areas were among the most important factors that influenced livelihood diversification given that p <0.05. We also found that other measures of household specific factors were important (for example, the age and gender of the household head along with asset endowments). From these results, it is recommended that professional training, internet access through phones and wireless and urbanization should be enhanced so as to enable households to diversify their sources of income and thus improve food security for their family members.

  • 48.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Bjerke, Lina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    De ungas flykt till staden2017In: Att äga framtiden: Perspektiv på kommunal utveckling / [ed] Josefina Syssner, Sören Häggroth & Ulf Ramberg, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2017, p. 195-201Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Florida, Richard
    Martin Prosperity Institute, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
    Rentfrow, Peter J.
    Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Potter, Jeff
    Atof Inc., Cambridge, MA, United States.
    The geography of music preferences2018In: Journal of Cultural Economics, ISSN 0885-2545, E-ISSN 1573-6997, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 593-618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Considerable attention has been paid to America’s political and economic divides. These divides revolve around class and location, with more affluent, more educated and denser places leaning more open-minded and liberal and less affluent, less educated and less dense places leaning more conservative. We contend that such divides are also reflected and reinforced by preferences, attitudes and predispositions for culture. More specifically we argue that Americans’ preferences for music will reflect dimensions of these political and economic divides. To test this proposition, our research examines the geographic variation of five key categories of music preferences across 95 of the largest US metropolitan areas. We use factor analysis to identify and map geographic variation of musical preferences, and we use both bivariate correlation analyses and regression analysis to examine the associations between metro-level musical preferences and key economic, demographic, political, and psychological variables. We find that musical preferences generally reflect and reinforce America’s broader economic and political divides.

  • 50.
    Nilsson, Pia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Assessing the role of land use consolidation for consumption growth in Rwanda2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies the effects of land use consolidation on consumption growth of farm households in Rwanda. Data on 1 920 households, observed in two time periods, are used to estimate a first-differenced model using an instrumental variables estimator, which allow the analysis to account for selection bias and placement effects. Results show no significant effect of land use consolidation on consumption growth and the results are robust to changes in model specification and estimation method. Rather, the results point to the importance of factors such as education, rural infrastructure and market linkages in the consumption growth process. These results highlight the need to consider that alternative public investments, that reduce households’ transaction costs, may be better able to target rural farmers that operate under conditions such as land scarcity, high population pressure and high risk linked to rapidly changing climate conditions.

123 1 - 50 of 101
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