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  • 1.
    Ahlberg, Jakob
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Successful Methods of Viral Marketing2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 2.
    Akor, Petrina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Bulic, Zlata
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Complexity of Air Freight Networks: A Regional focus on Jönköping2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Companies face competition that comes at them from different directions in the current environment of globalization, deregulation and the push for greater mass customization of products, which still can be differentiated from other products and services. A large number of companies have outsourced a large percentage of their non-core activities in order to concentrate on their core competencies with transportation of their goods being one of the aspects that they have outsourced. Companies are faced with shorter lead times, inaccurate forecasts, unexpected delays in production and need to seek out alternative transportation modes in order to get their goods to market on time. Transportation by air ends up being the best choice to handle requirements of time sensitivity and the transportation of high value goods.

    The purpose of this thesis was to investigate how the air freight supply chain and network that is in place in the Jönkoping region is constructed; in addition to seeking out information in regards to the type of air freight goods being transported into and out of the region; along with the buying behavior and promotion strategies utilized in the promotion of air freight within the region of Jonkoping.

    The conclusions from this thesis show that there are a number of key actors (integrators and freight forwarders) involved in the air freight network within the Jönköping region. A number of them indicated that the actors they mainly interacted with, in terms of activity links and resource ties, were limited to the airports that were outside of the Jönköping region. There were a few of the actors in terms of integrators that did interact with the Jönköping airport in a capacity that was greater than other actors. In terms of the type of air freight goods that were transported into and out of the region spare parts made up a major portion of the goods transported, followed by clothing and textiles, and other mechanical industry products. The promotion of air freight mostly performed by integrators to their customers is done in terms of emphasizing reliability, punctuality, regularity and security to their customers.

  • 3.
    Ali, Majid
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Significant Attributes and Challenges Related to Cross-Functional Team Communications2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of the research work is to investigate the importance of the communication in the cross-functional teams and in what which communicational tools provide better convenience of communication in cross-functional team members.

    Methodology

    An empirical study including the data collection from the interviews conducted from the participants working in cross-functional teams. Qualitative approach has been adopted to understand the communicational attributes in the cross-functional teams. For the analysis both deductive and abductive approach has been used. With the help of theoretical framework and empirical data, conclusions drown for better understanding of the concept.

    Findings

    The author has divided the search in two main segments, communicational effects on cross-functional team performance and effectiveness of particular communicational tools used by team members and team leaders. Empirical findings shows that without proper communication, cross-functional team are less tend to perform well to achieve set goals as well as face to face communications are more effective than other communicational tools. 

    Research limitations

    The research work is limited to Scandinavian countries. Organizational communicational structures are not studied due to time factor. Other limitation of this research work is effect of cultural differences on communication.

    Implications

    The research work provides deep understanding of the different communicational effects on cross-functional team performance. The choice of communicational tool and proportional importance for the team members will help managers while selecting the tools of communication with the team members.

    Originality / value

    During the literature studies, author determined that there is potential of research for the communicational tools used in cross-functional team communications. The social media is taking over the traditional communicational tools which provide value for findings. 

  • 4.
    Anderson, Helén
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Centaurs and Managers: – stories from two national contexts Bulgarian and the UK.2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Anderson, Helén
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Customized Careers: a lattice replacing the traditional ladder2011In: Innovationmanagement.seArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Anderson, Helén
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Learning from Practicing Mass Customization and Open Innovation2011In: innovation management.seArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Anderson, Helén
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Reflection on the Critical Role of Stakeholders in Mergers and Acquisitions2013In: Mergers and Acquisitions: The Critical Role of Stakeholders / [ed] Anderson, Helén, Havila, Virpi, Nilsson, Fredrik, New York: Routledge, 2013, p. 269-280Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Anderson, Helén
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Studenter och lärare vid Högskoleutbildning i Vaggeryds Kommun2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Dahlin, Peter
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Havila, Virpi
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Holström, Johan
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lunds Universitet.
    Corporate Restructuring and Customers and Suppliers2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Havila, Virpi
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Nilsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala Universitet.
    A Stakeholder Approach to Mergers and Acquisitions2013In: Mergers and Acquisitions: The Critical Role of Stakeholders / [ed] Anderson, Helén, Havila, Virpi and Nilsson, Fredrik, New York: Routledge, 2013, p. 1-14Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Havila, VirpiUppsala Universitet.Nilsson, FredrikUppsala Universitet.
    Mergers and Acquisitions: The Critical Role of Stakeholders2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Holtström, Johan
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lunds Universitet.
    Connectedness in acquisitions: - Effects on customers and suppliers2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Holtström, Johan
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lunds universitet.
    Do competition authorities consider business relationships?2012In: Journal of Business-to-Business Marketing, ISSN 1051-712X, E-ISSN 1547-0628, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 67-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Companies engage in business relationships for a variety of reasons, including specialization, product development, and building competitive networks. Research has demonstrated that mergers and acquisitions (M&As) may challenge ongoing business relationships. The purpose of this article is to investigate whether and how competition authorities consider business relationships when evaluating M&As.

    Methodology: The article uses the documentation from 450 M&As reported to the Swedish competition authority to capture the way in which an authority evaluates M&As. The Swedish competition authority evaluation corresponds to other national and international evaluation procedures.

    Findings: The findings indicate that the competition authorities neglect an important aspect of business life, namely companies forming business relationships. The competition authorities evaluate M&As on the basis of risk for price increases, and consequently disregard such issues as heterogeneity in demand and offerings, and values built into existing business relationships.

    Originality/Value/Contribution: The article contributes to research on business relationships through exploring how a public authority deals with such relationships. It also contributes to research on mergers and acquisitions through examining how these activities are evaluated by competition authorities. Furthermore, the article contributes to competition research by reflecting on competition law concerning M&A regulations in relation to business relationships.

  • 14.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Leander, BoJönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Crossing Borders – Expanding Markets: An outlook from Sweden.2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Sasinovskaya, Olga
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Innovation Communities and New Product Development: SME's perspective2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Andersson, Karolina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Ring, Izabelle
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Sjöstrand, Emma
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Managing Customer Relationships: In the Swedish pre-packed grocery bag industry2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The electronic grocery market in Sweden is growing because; more actors enter the market, increased digitalisation and greater consumer interest. Therefore, companies must adapt their products and services, while building and maintaining customer relationships.  Customer relationship is one of the most important strategic tools a company can use, without satisfied customers the company is not as successful. Mass marketing and mass communication are no longer crucial to success, instead a firm must identify the customer’s needs and wants and build a customer relationship strategy.

    Purpose: The purpose of this thesis is to explore what variables influence customer relationships in the pre-packed grocery bag industry and how these variables should be used in the context of developing customer relationships in the pre-packed grocery bag industry in Sweden. The theoretical contribution of this thesis will be to propose which product and service attributes are necessary for developing customer relationships in the pre-packed grocery bag industry.

     

    Method: This thesis utilises an explorative approach with qualitative studies employed. Data was collected through a literature study from existing literature, interviews with consumers and interviews with representatives from companies within the e-grocery industry.

    Conclusion: Inspiration and variation are influencing factors for the development and retention of customer relationships; a mass customisation process should be implemented.

     

    Keywords: Electronic grocery, customer relationships, Pre-packed grocery bags, grocery retailing, electronic commerce 

  • 17.
    Andersson, Lisa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Rosén, Ida
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Dark Humour: and its use in advertising: perceptions of generation Y2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 18.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Fredriksson, Martin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Open or Delete: Decision-makers’ Attitudes Toward E-mail Marketing Messages2014In: Advances in Social Sciences Research Journal, ISSN 2055-0286, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 133-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organisations make use of e-mail marketing messages, with Swedish companies spending SEK40 million on this form of marketing communication. The purpose of this paper was to examine the attitudes of decision-makers in the Swedish manufacturing industry regarding e-mail marketing messages received.

     

    The authors used a quantitative research approach with an online-survey in order to collect the necessary data. The population was decision-makers within the manufacturing industry in Sweden and 1 777 responses from decision-makers were received and analysed.

     

    The majority of decision-makers tend to have negative attitudes toward e-mail marketing messages. Differences in attitudes exist between those of different ages and positions within companies. While respondents indicated that they check their e-mail frequently, no significant differences in attitudes to e-mail marketing messages could be identified. Marketers can attempt to improve attitudes among recipients by building relationships with the recipients prior to sending e-mail marketing messages, and paying attention to the layout and content of the e-mails.

  • 19.
    Angelopoulos, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Leivo, Piia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Drivers and barriers for relocation of freight operators to smaller airports - A case study at Jönköping airport (Axamo)2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Air freight sector has been a growing market worldwide for many years. The rapid growth of scheduled freight aircraft services in particular has been a remarkable feature of the international airline industry during the past decades. Air freight traffic has grown faster than passenger traffic and the production of goods has become more dependent upon air freight services that link global supply chains together. Air transportation is useful when the goods must be delivered quickly and it also allows for more flexible hub-and-spoke networking structures, which are able to offset some of the problems of indirect flows. The concept of developing regional air-cargo centres can be seen from many different perspectives. The most important factors in airport location selection are connectivity to existing road and rail transport networks and current or potential freight traffic volumes. Right location allows firms to develop their own resources, consolidate their competitive position and nurture their growth. Once the company has located it is hard to relocate, so that is why the location decision has to be made carefully.

    Purpose: The main purpose of this thesis was to reveal the key factors, either positive or negative, which can affect the decision of air freight operators to relocate their express services to smaller airports.

     

    Methodology: The chosen method for this thesis was the mono method because the data collection technique was qualitative. Based on that interviews, the authors finalized their topic and their research questions and built question lists, one for the Jönköping airport (Axamo), one for the companies that already operate in Jönköping airport and one for companies that do not operate there. The authors decided to have semi-structured interviews with all the interviewees in order to cover the different themes of their research.

     

    Findings: The main findings from analysing the empirical data revealed that there are many different positive and negative factors that can affect the decision making for relocation of freight operators. The most important that were identified concern the airport’s infrastructure, location, quality of provided services, number of passenger flights and price policy. Moreover, the weather conditions at the region, the customers’ demand and connectivity with road and rail networks are also very influential.

  • 20.
    Arnaud, Alexandre
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Kollman, Alexandra
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Generation Y: The Development and Use of Shopping Lists2015In: Advances in Social Sciences Research, ISSN 2055-0286, Vol. 2, no 9, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Grocery shopping is one of the most basic elements of consumer behaviour and is a part of everyday life. For consumers to achieve their goals and make their grocery shopping trip efficient, many plan their shopping trip, as seen in the development and use of a shopping list. Previous studies have taken a general view of consumers and not investigated any one specific cohort. Generation Y is regarded as an important and knowledge cohort, with greater access to information and resources yet the development and use of shopping lists among this cohort is largely unknown. The purpose of this study is thus to understand the development and usage of shopping lists by Generation Y consumers.

    Use was made of a qualitative method to understand the development, usage and outcomes associated with list usage among this cohort. In total, 29 personal semi-structured interviews were conducted with interviews in supermarkets, the university or at the participants’ house.

    The findings show that the majority of Generation Y consumers develop and use shopping lists, and use both paper and electronic lists. The purpose for their development is for reminding, planning and saving money. The respondents believe that lists help reduce unplanned purchases, as well as reducing the time spent and cost in store.

  • 21.
    Arnaud, Alexandre
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Kollman, Alexandra
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    The use of shopping lists by Generation Y consumers in grocery shopping2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Grocery shopping is one of the most an important part of daily life. According to a Market Brief by the Swedish Chambers, in 2009 Swedish consumers spent about 20% of their household budget on food and beverages (Swedish Chambers, 2011). Not only does grocery shopping require financial resources, it also takes time and effort. To assist consumers to achieve their goals and make their grocery shopping trip efficient, they plan their shopping trip prior to undertaking it. Part of planning may result in creating a shopping list that helps to direct the actual grocery purchase. Previous research has been conducted into the use of shopping lists in New Zealand (Thomas & Garland, 2004; Thomas & Garland, 1996; Thomas & Garland, 1993) and the USA (Block & Morwitz, 1999; Spiggle, 1987) and Denmark (Schmidt, 2012) but despite the importance of planning and shopping lists there is

    Previous research has been conducted into the use of shopping lists in New Zealand (Thomas & Garland, 2004; Thomas & Garland, 1996; Thomas & Garland, 1993) and the USA (Block & Morwitz, 1999; Spiggle, 1987) and Denmark (Schmidt, 2012) but despite the importance of planning and shopping lists there is little published research into their use. Their use among Generation Y consumers is also largely unknown and has not been researched. Generation Y’s members are driven by different values than the other generations (Noble, Haytko & Phillips, 2009). Generation Y is considered to be highly active in the marketplace as they are the current and future consumers (Noble et al. 2009). Generation Y frequently shops for groceries. A U.S. national survey of 1,251 Gen

    Generation Y’s members are driven by different values than the other generations (Noble, Haytko & Phillips, 2009). Generation Y is considered to be highly active in the marketplace as they are the current and future consumers (Noble et al. 2009). Generation Y frequently shops for groceries. A U.S. national survey of 1,251 Gen Y’ers showed that 6 percent makes daily grocery purchases, 25 percent goes twice a week to the grocery store and 40 percent goes at least weekly (Lachman & Brett, 2013). The weekly shopping trip for Generation Y is a mix of trips to farmers’ markets and specialty food stores where they buy their groceries at mass retailers, drug stores and, increasingly, online retailers (Orsini, 2012). Hoffman (2012) explains that Generation Y prefers to purchase cheaper food but at the same time Generation Y is also more willing to pay for fresh and healthy food. Shopping lists can serve a number of purposes. They can act as a script so as to make efficient use of the time in the store (Thomas & Garland, 1996; Iyer & Ahlawat, 1987). They can also serve as memory aids, specifically an external memory aid to remind the consumer to purchase items (Thomas & Garland, 2004; Block & Morwitz, 1999). A shopping list is also an indication of pre-shopping planning (Thomas & Garland, 2004; Thomas & Garland, 1996; Polegato & Zaichkowsky, 1994). It has been suggested that consumers use a shopping list to control their expenditure and to make sure that they do not buy more items than planned, and in so doing, do not exceed their budget (Thomas & Garland, 2004; Block & Morwitz, 1999). For families, a shopping list can be a way for the family to function efficiently, making it a management tool (Polegato & Zaichkowsky, 1994). It also serves as a simplification strategy for grocery

    Shopping lists can serve a number of purposes. They can act as a script so as to make efficient use of the time in the store (Thomas & Garland, 1996; Iyer & Ahlawat, 1987). They can also serve as memory aids, specifically an external memory aid to remind the consumer to purchase items (Thomas & Garland, 2004; Block & Morwitz, 1999). A shopping list is also an indication of pre-shopping planning (Thomas & Garland, 2004; Thomas & Garland, 1996; Polegato & Zaichkowsky, 1994). It has been suggested that consumers use a shopping list to control their expenditure and to make sure that they do not buy more items than planned, and in so doing, do not exceed their budget (Thomas & Garland, 2004; Block & Morwitz, 1999). For families, a shopping list can be a way for the family to function efficiently, making it a management tool (Polegato & Zaichkowsky, 1994). It also serves as a simplification strategy for grocery purchasers, giving shopping activities an order (Arnould et al., 2000, cited in Thomas & Garland, 2004). Finally, a list can also assist consumers to stay within their shopping plans, and not be distracted by anything that could interfere, giving the list a goal achievement purpose (Inman, Winer & Ferraro, 2009). The purpose of this study is to understand and explain the reasons behind the usage of shopping lists by Generation Y consumers and the

    The purpose of this study is to understand and explain the reasons behind the usage of shopping lists by Generation Y consumers and the affect it has on Generation Y consumers in store. Use was made of a qualitative approach in this research which enabled the researchers to find insight information with regard to the shopping behaviours of Generation Y. In total, the authors conducted 29 personal semi-structured interviews with Generation Y consumers. The interviews were held at the supermarkets, university or at the participants’ house. The findings show that Generation Y consumers use shopping lists to remind, plan and save money. While Generation Y consumers are

    Use was made of a qualitative approach in this research which enabled the researchers to find insight information with regard to the shopping behaviours of Generation Y. In total, the authors conducted 29 personal semi-structured interviews with Generation Y consumers. The interviews were held at the supermarkets, university or at the participants’ house. The findings show that Generation Y consumers use shopping lists to remind, plan and save money. While Generation Y consumers are

    The findings show that Generation Y consumers use shopping lists to remind, plan and save money. While Generation Y consumers are technologically-savvy it enhances the ease of using shopping lists through mobile applications, yet the majority continue to use paper-based shopping lists. The shopping list enables Generation Y consumers to reduce unplanned purchase, time and cost in store. They use the list as a map to structure their shopping trip and therefore do not waste time going back and forth to the same section of the store; while some others use it only to pick up the items they need and not losing time thinking of what to purchase in the store. The outcome of shopping list usage is similar to shoppers who were the focus of previous studies, which leads the authors to conclude that Generation Y consumers are similar to any other shoppers. This research can affect the way in which retailers encourage Generation Y shoppers to formulate their lists (through brochures and mobile applications) as well as the way in which the lists are used in the store (through the use of in-store cues) to encourage Generation Y consumers to spend more time in store.

  • 22.
    Arévalo, Erika
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    ¡Dime qué marcas usas y te diré quién eres!: Cosificación de los tweens por el marketing de marca2011Book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Bengtsson, Helena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Björk, Elin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Danielsson, Annie
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Seeing is Believing: A Study of Swedish Cultural Perception of Printed Cosmetics Advertisements2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study aims to understand patterns of cultural influence on perception of printed cosmetics advertisements among Swedish women.

    Background: Nowadays, international companies must decide on the degree of standardization and adaption in advertising campaigns. As cultural differences exist, coming to grip with people’s cultural perceptions will enable international marketers to better adapt their advertising to the Swedish market. We found a gap in previous research on Swedish consumers’ perception of advertisements and saw the opportunity to investigate this topic.   

    Method: Since the topic requires deep understanding of perception, a qualitative method is used to gather empirical material through focus group sessions with a sample of consumers. By the use of questions connected to the attributes: language, symbols, color and structure, the participants were asked to evaluate different adverts and give their opinions on various elements.

    Conclusion: According to our study, patterns show that Swedish preferences in cosmetics adverts are simplicity, naturalness, calm color setting and words describing feelings, yet clearly stating and showing the effect of using the product. Clear and direct messages are preferred in all attributes except for language, where emotional expressions are favored.

  • 24.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Applied Strategic Marketing2012In: Applied Strategic Marketing / [ed] Jooste, CJ., Strydom, JW., Berndt,AD., and du Plessis, PJ, Cape Town: Pearson Education Academic Publisher, 2012, 4th, p. 342-362Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Building customer relationships and loyalty2014In: Services marketing: A contemporary approach / [ed] Christo Boshoff, Cape Town: Juta Publishers, 2014, 2, p. 343-368Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Business-to-Business Marketing (B2B)2014In: Relationship Marketing and Customer Relationship Management B2B marketing / [ed] Adele Berndt and Madele Tait, Cape Town, South Africa: Juta Publishers, 2014, 3, p. 135-152Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Business-to-Business Marketing (B2B)2012In: Relationship Marketing and Customer Relationship Management B2B marketing / [ed] Adele Berndt and Madele Tait, Cape Town, South Africa: Juta , 2012, 2nd, p. 123-136Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Data Collection2012In: Marketing Research / [ed] Adele Berndt and Danie Petzer, Cape Town: Pearson Education , 2012, p. 201-214Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Implementing CRM in an organisation2014In: Relationship Marketing and Customer Relationship Management / [ed] Adele Berndt and Madele Tait, Cape Town, South Africa: Juta Publishers, 2014, 3, p. 195-2210Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Implementing CRM in an organisation2012In: Relationship Marketing and Customer Relationship Management / [ed] Adele Berndt and Madele Tait, Cape Town: Juta , 2012, 2nd, p. 175-187Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Introduction to Marketing Research2012In: Marketing Research / [ed] Adele Berndt & Danie Petzer, Cape Town: Heinemann , 2012, 1st, p. 1-20Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Relationship Marketing and Customer Relationship Management2012In: Relationship Marketing and Customer Relationship Management / [ed] Berndt, A and Tait, M, Cape Town: Juta , 2012, 2ndChapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Stakeholders in relationship marketing2014In: Relationship Marketing and Customer Relationship Management / [ed] Adele Berndt & Madele Tait, Cape Town, South Africa: Juta Publishers, 2014, 3, p. 153-168Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Stakeholders in relationship marketing2012In: Relationship Marketing and Customer Relationship Management / [ed] Adele Berndt & Madele Tait, Cape Town, South Africa: Juta , 2012, 2nd, p. 139-151Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Your best Buddy: The case of Toyota South Africa2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Gikonyo, Lucy
    Strathmore University.
    Environmental Concern Behaviours in Africa: An Exploratory Study2012In: Journal of Management and Sustainability, ISSN 1925-4725, E-ISSN 1925-4733, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental concern, including environmental behaviour continues to receive attention in both the public media and academic research. The purpose of the paper is to investigate environmental behaviour (both purchasing and non-purchasing behaviour) in an African context. Use was made of a quantitative study among a convenience sample of selected African residents. Statements reflecting non-purchasing indicated lower mean scores when compared to the purchasing behaviour statements. Statistically significant differences were found between the age groups with respect to both purchasing and non-purchasing behaviour as well as between the nationalities with regard to their purchasing behaviour. The findings have the potential of impacting the strategies of organisations operating on the continent. The major contribution of this paper is that is provides insight in the behavioural aspects as seen in an African context, and consequently provides detail on both purchasing and non-purchasing behaviour and the role of marketing aspects (such as price) in purchase behaviour.

  • 37.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Klopper, HB
    Monash South Africa.
    Niemann-Struweg, Ilse
    Monash South Africa.
    Meintjes, Corne
    Monash South Africa.
    Resident co-creation: the case of the 2010 Soccer World Cup2013In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 336-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the involvement and actions (co-creation) of residents of South Africa prior to the commencement of the 2010 Soccer World Cup, which was held in South Africa during June and July 2010.

    Quantitative research was conducted in the three major metropolitan centres in South Africa, using a self-completion questionnaire among residents in South Africa, using purposive sampling. The questionnaire consisted of two sections. Data collection was supervised by trained fieldworkers.

    The responses of 1 352 respondents who took part indicate significant differences between the involvement of the genders, language groups and nationalities, while in the case of actions, significant differences were found between genders and income groups. The study also found an association between the involvement and actions in the case of this mega-event.

    The research was conducted one month prior to the event, and those who had exhibited actions may have been predisposed to taking part in the event. Research was limited to three major centres in South Africa.

    This has implications for the marketing of mega-events in other countries as well as events other than sports events, specifically in the development of the marketing strategy associated with the event and more specifically the marketing communication strategy, focussed on attracting residents.

    The importance of the study can be found in the scarcity of the literature that primarily investigates the role of residents in the co-creation associated with a mega-event.

  • 38.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Klopper, HB
    Niemann´-Struweg, Ilse
    Meintjes, Corne
    Resident Involvement: The case of the 2010 World Cup in South Africa.2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Klopper, HB
    Niemann-Struweg, Ilse
    Meintjes, Corne
    Resident Involvement: The case of the 2010 World Cup in South Africa2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Koekemoer, Michel
    University of South Africa.
    Online Customer Complaints and Defamation2012In: Journal of Digital Marketing, ISSN 2229-595X, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 21-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Customer dissatisfaction occurs when a customer believes that their expectations are not met by the organisation, resulting in a service failure. Some customers' response to this is to ignore it, others seek to communicate this to the organisation,while others engage in negative word-of-mouth (WOM) or revenge behaviour. These responses may also occur using digital media. When engaging in WOM or revenge behaviours, defamation may come about, either intentionally or through negligence. The purpose of the study was to examine a number of online complaints on a third-party website, made concerning a motor manufacturer to determine whether they amounted to defamation. Analysis of twenty-nine comments indicated that while the majority could not be regarded as defamatory, fivecontained elements of defamation. This is an area of law that must still develop in line with the demands of technology in the South African society

  • 41.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Petzer, DanieNorthwest University.
    Marketing Research2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Petzer, Daniel
    Environmental concern of South African cohorts: an exploratory study2011In: African Journal of Business Management, ISSN 1993-8233, E-ISSN 1993-8233, Vol. 5, no 19, p. 7899-7910Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental issues receive ever increasing attention in society and a general level of concern is expressed in society, yet specific action-related programmes (such as recycling campaigns) do not experience the success that could be expected, given the level of attention and concern. This poses questions regarding the awareness and actions towards environmental issues. These are however, influenced by attitudes, making them critical. The focus of this quantitative study was to investigate the attitudes (and their components) of South Africans towards environmental and recycling issues. The study was conducted among a convenience sample of 139 respondents using a self administered paper-based survey. The findings show that respondents exhibited relatively positive attitudes towards environmental issues. No significant differences were, however, found between groups based upon gender or income, while significant differences were found between older and younger respondents. This paper indicates that organisations involved in environmental issues (including recycling) can harness positive attitudes to increase the success of programmes that are introduced.

  • 43.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Petzer, Daniel
    North West University, South Africa.
    Wayland, Jane P.
    University of Arkansas, Little Rock.
    Comprehension of marketing research textbooks among South African students: An investigation2014In: South African Journal of Higher Education, ISSN 1011-3487, E-ISSN 1753-5913, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 28-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reading is a skill people require in order to operate successfully in all spheres of life.  Mastering this skill is even more critical when pursuing academic studies. This study investigated the reading comprehension of final year undergraduate marketing students at a South African higher education institution (HEI) relating to their comprehension of marketing research textbooks. Two measurement instruments were used to test their reading comprehension. One instrument contained two passages from the respondents’ prescribed marketing research textbook and the other two passages from a comparative international textbook. Following the Cloze procedure, every 9th word was removed from the passages and respondents were subsequently required to complete the non-subject related words in one of the instruments fielded on a random basis. The results indicated that the majority of respondents exhibited a reading comprehension that is at the frustration reading level. A further evaluation that allowed for synonyms (Semantically Acceptable Scoring Method or SEMAC) to be included, did not impact meaningfully on the classification of respondents. Significant differences in reading comprehension could also not be uncovered based upon the respondents’ gender and home language. The results furthermore presented challenges for all those involved in higher education (HE), more specifically impacting on textbook choice as well as assessment and performance practices.

  • 44.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Saunders, Stephen
    Monash University.
    Petzer, Daniel J
    North West University.
    Readiness for banking technologies in developing countries2010In: Southern African Business Review, ISSN 1998-8125, E-ISSN 1998-8125, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 47-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Banks in developing countries are increasingly relying on innovative technologies such as cellphone banking, landline telephone banking, internet banking and automated teller machine (ATM) banking to penetrate existing markets and to create new markets. The banking industry in South Africa, as a developing economy, is regarded as sophisticated, but providing banking facilities to the ‘unbanked’ in South Africa remains a challenge. Consumers are not equally ready to adopt technology-based products, with technology readiness defi ned as “people’s propensity to embrace and use new technologies for accomplishing goals in home life and at work”. In the developing economy examined, a Technology Readiness Index (TRI) score of 2.53 for urban consumers was calculated. Such a TRI score is well below that of a developed economy such as the USA, whose score is 2.88. This could imply that consumers are not as ready to adopt technology, which needs to be taken into account by banks when doing product development and investing resources to increase customer satisfaction.

  • 45.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Tait, MadeleNelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth, South Africa.
    Relationship Marketing and Customer Relationship Management2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Tait, MadeleNelson Mandela Metropolitan University, South Africa.
    Relationship Marketing and Customer Relationship Management2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Wayland, Jane
    University of Arkansas, Little Rock.
    Evaluating the readability of marketing research textbooks: an international comparison2014In: Journal of International Business Education, ISSN 1649-4946, E-ISSN 2044-4575, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 47-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Locally authored textbooks are used at tertiary South African institutions to assist in marketing research studies. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the readability of locally authored marketing research textbooks in South Africa and compare them with international (USA) texts.

    Design/methodology/approach: South African marketing research textbooks (authored locally) used at South African institutions were identified. Electronic versions of the textbooks were used and analysed using accepted readability formulae. The same procedure was used with texts produced in the USA and the findings of each were compared.

    Findings: The South Africa texts scored higher on the Flesch Reading Ease score than US texts, which links to the target audience of these books (undergraduate students), while also being cognisant of the reading skills of the target audience but their score still describes them as “difficult”.

    Research limitations/implications: The original formulae and theory tend to be dated, though there are recent studies into readability in other areas of business studies. There are also those that question the applicability of readability formulae in the tertiary environment.

    Practical implications: Instructors need to ensure that material is at a suitable reading level to maximise the student’s learning. For publishers and authors, this means that the examples and illustrations used need to be linked to the context in which the student lives and functions, and not just focus on the English used in the text.

    Originality/value: While studies have been conducted into the readability of US textbooks, there is little published research into the readability of regional marketing research textbooks in other contexts to facilitate comparison.

  • 48.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Reflexive construction of industrial marketing problems: Transparency as reflection and reflexion2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Enacting outsourcing: An innovation process perspective2010In: Journal of Transport and Supply Chain Management, ISSN 1995-5235, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much research has been done on outsourcing. However, we still know little about outsourcing based on a social process view on innovation. Outsourcing is an innovation as a logistics-related process that is perceived as new by the adopter. We will explore and analyse an outsourcing idea, its development and implementation, from an innovation perspective. The development is studied in a qualitative, long-term process study. The analysis draws on Hoholm’s (2009) model of innovation processes. It extends the applicability of this innovation model and its methodology of following the action into logistics and supply chain management (SCM) research. The outsourcing process is an innovation that develops in a rational way based on the incremental process because of its actor-network and simultaneous reflection. Interactions and confrontations come about because of involved contrary forces such as competing objectives. The model explains the practice of SCM innovation and increases the understanding of dynamics and complexity. The process study brings insights to cause-effect relations in the development of outsourcing that are consequential to innovative logistics and SCM.

  • 50.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Outsourcing as an innovation process: A critical evaluation2010Conference paper (Other academic)
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