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  • 1.
    Aaby Orellana, Tanja
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Kirkegaard, Betina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Sjuksköterskors upplevelser av att implementera personcentrerad omvårdnad i slutenvården: -         En Empirisk Studie2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Person-centred care (PCC) is when the person seeking care get’s involved in their care and are seen as more then their illness or ailment. PCC as a concept began in dementia care, but is now the approach that most healthcare institutions strive after. To achieve the improved care that PCC can bring, there is need for a well- planned and clear implementation plan from the management.

    Aim: To describe the nursing staffs experience of implementing person-centred care as a work procedure in inpatient care.

    Method: An inductive qualitative study where eleven interviews was completed. Eight interviews were strategically chosen and a content analysis was carried out.

    Result: There is hope among the participants that implementation will bring a better and safer care, but also concerns about fear of change among the healthcare staff and increased workloads. Participants experience that PCC will place higher demans on the healthcare staff, especially nurses, regarding time, knowledge and communication skills.

    Conclusion: To provide the best care, there has to be dedicated and competent staff who also have the support and understanding from the management. Despite the obstacles that seem to exist, there is a positive spirit among the nurses in relation to the implementation of person-centred care.  There is hope that person-centred care, among other things, will increase participation that could lead to shorter hospital stays and risk of needing to seek care again short after being discharged from the hospital. Ultimately it provides a better care in the whole for the individual person seeking care.

  • 2.
    Aakula, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    "Det där med delaktighet - det är nog lite begränsat det": Professionellas perspektiv på kognitivt funktionshindrades delaktighet vid flytt till egen bostad.2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Studiens syfte är att ur professionellas perspektiv undersöka hur personer med kognitiva funktionshinder är delaktiga i beslut gällande flytt till egen bostad samt hur professionellas handlingsutrymme påverkar besluten. Studien genomfördes som en kvalitativ intervjustudie med hermeneutisk ansats och kvalitativ innehållsanalys som bearbetningsmetod. Intervjuer gjordes med fem anställda, de flesta av dem socionomer inom en offentlig organisation som producerar tjänster för personer med kognitiva funktionshinder. Resultatet visar att personer med kognitivt funktionshinder har begränsad delaktighet och få valmöjligheter i beslut gällande flytt till egen bostad. Delaktigheten påverkas av klientens och socialarbetarens förmåga att kommunicera med varandra men trots det användes inga kommunikationshjälpmedel i utredningen. Anhöriga antar ofta rollen som klientens tolkningsföreträdare och när det gäller beslut om flytt till egen bostad är det anhöriga som tar beslutet oberoende klientens grad av funktionshinder. Socialarbetarna upplever sig styrda av överordnade men det hindrar dem inte från att ibland överskrida det formella handlingsutrymmet för att göra det som de anser vara det bästa för klienten.

  • 3.
    Abbas, Päivi Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Stockholms stad.
    Kommunala riktlinjer för anhöriganställningar: En kvalitativ innehållsanalys med feministisk teoriansats2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim was to investigate municipal guidelines for paid dependent care which were available online, i.e. documents regarding situations where a relative is hired to care for a next-to-kin. The overall aim has been built on the following three research questions regarding how municipalities describe: 1) which situations qualify for paid dependent care, 2) how the elderly person’s needs are met in case of paid dependent care and 3) how the dependent caregivers’ rights and well-being are ensured?

    There is no legal basis for demanding cash-for-care setting, and the local self-government determines whether the municipality offers this form of care. Recently, paid dependent care has been restricted and banned in several Swedish municipalities, and according to some statistics paid dependent care is allowed in 55–65 % of the Swedish municipalities. It is mostly women of foreign origin who are dependent caregivers nowadays, and feminist care research and the media lift up cash-for-care settings as a trap for women and for migrant integration.

    The study included guidelines from a total of 21 municipalities, which were analyzed using qualitative content analysis according to Elo & Kyngäs (2007). The guidelines analysed were found from the websites of Sweden's 121 medium and large municipalities (more than 20 000 inhabitants). The results were processed using feminist theory (Hirdman 2012).

    The results show that overall there are few guidelines available in Sweden's municipalities and that the regulations differ in the different municipalities’ guidelines. The guidelines that are available often contain general or vague descriptions. One conclusion is therefore that many municipalities ensure their own discretion and prevail through vague and general rules in their guidelines. From a feminist perspective, these different municipal policies create unfair structures and differences in conditions and terms for the elderly and their family caregivers regarding cash-for-care settings. Finally, the result shows that the few detailed descriptions prioritize elder people's rights over their caregivers'. Ensuring the paid dependent caregivers’ rights is mainly described to be done by checking and controlling them. In other words, the paid dependent caregivers are often invisible in the guidelines, are often regarded as pseudo-employees and therefore fall between the cracks in terms of their need for support (Sand 2010).

  • 4.
    Abbass Nagim, Tony
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Molin, Jonas
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Psychopaths in the media: Criminals, madmen or hidden among us?2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    When society is viewed in a social constructive manner, the social worker is as affected as the general population by the media and the image it portrays. A prejudice or bias social worker will not be as effective in his work as his intentions are.

    The purpose of this thesis was to discover if there are any visible cultural differences in the usage and description of the concept of psychopathy or a psychopath himself in the media, more specifically, daily newspapers. There are three American newspapers and three Swedish newspapers examined in this study.

    The study is based on a quantiative content analysis of articles published between 1st of January 2008 and 1st of July 2012. The collected data is categorized where the articles can fall under one or more of five available categories. Even though no clear results occurred, some interesting indications are visible between American newspapers and Swedish newspapers, but more so between different American newspapers. Psychopaths, people with an Antisocial Personality Disorder, are most frequently mentioned as criminals or maniacs/madmen in both countries with a modestly higher percentage for the United States of America.

  • 5.
    Abellan, Antonio
    et al.
    Centre for Human and Social Sciences, Spanish National Research Council, Madrid, Spain.
    Perez, Julio
    Centre for Human and Social Sciences, Spanish National Research Council, Madrid, Spain.
    Pujol, Rogelio
    Centre for Human and Social Sciences, Spanish National Research Council, Madrid, Spain.
    Sundström, Gerdt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Jegermalm, Magnus
    School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Partner care, gender equality, and ageing in Spain and Sweden2017In: International Journal of Ageing and Later Life, ISSN 1652-8670, E-ISSN 1652-8670, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 69-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used national surveys to study how older persons’ changing household patterns influence the gender balance of caregiving in two countries with distinct household structures and cultures, Spain and Sweden. In both countries, men and women provide care equally often for their partner in couple-only households. This has become the most common household type among older persons in Spain and prevails altogether in Sweden. This challenges the traditional dominance of young or middle-aged women as primary caregivers in Spain. In Sweden, many caregivers are old themselves. We focus attention to partners as caregivers and the consequences of changing household structures for caregiving, which may be on the way to gender equality in both countries, with implications for families and for the public services.

  • 6. Abellán, Antonio
    et al.
    Ayala, Alba
    Pérez, Julio
    Pujol, Rogelio
    Sundström, Gerdt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Ramos, María
    The new carers2018In: Ageing and care: How will we live and care for ourselves when we get old?, Palma: Observatorio Sociale de "la caxia" , 2018, p. 25-31Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Usually it is women who take care of family members in the home, but with age, gender differences become less pronounced and, from 80 years onwards, there are more men caring for a family member – generally their partner – than women. Social and demographic changes are presenting new challenges for public services. In particular, in two-person households with elderly inhabitants, one of whom is dependent, it is necessary to tackle not only the needs of the dependent partner but also those of the carer partner. For this reason, carer support programmes are needed.

  • 7.
    Abelsson, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Being responsible for the life of another human being2017In: Disaster and Emergency Medicine Journal, ISSN 2451–4691, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 164-166Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A common feature of prehospital emergency care are short and fragmentary patient encounters with in­creased demands for efficient and rapid treatment. Crucial decisions are often made, based on the premise of the ambulance staff`s ability to capture the situation instantaneously. The assessment is, therefore, a pre-requisite for decisions about appropriate actions. However, a low exposure to severe trauma cases leads to vulnerability for the ambulance staff, which makes the assessment more difficult. Assessment of severe trauma patients at the scene of accident is difficult and complicated. No trauma scenarios are alike and practical skills, training, and feedback are therefore necessary.

  • 8.
    Abelsson, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Bringing your simulation into an attractive scientific program - Without the need for research data2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Abelsson, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    First response emergency care - experiences described by firefighters2018In: International Journal of Emergency Services, ISSN 2047-0894, E-ISSN 2047-0908Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper was to describe firefighters’ experiences of First Response Emergency Care.

    Design/methodology/approach – An explorative descriptive design with a qualitative approach. Data was collected through group interviews of 35 firefighters and subjected to qualitative content analysis.

    Findings – The results showed that the firefighters’ professional role and their uniform serve as protection against mentally strenuous situations. It is important to protect the dignity of the injured or dead, as well as to protect and safeguard colleagues from the experience of the tragedy of an accident. Having a solid and sterling medical education gives a sense of security when providing emergency care, as well as when caring for the relatives. Debriefing brings thoughts and feelings to the surface for processing and closure. The sense of sadness lingers for those they were unable to save, or the ones that had been dead on arrival or were forgotten.

    Originality/value – A firefighter’s work situation is exposed and stressful. The firefighter’s uniform as a mental barrier, colleagues, time to mentally prepare and being allowed to show feelings are factors all needed to cope. It is therefore important to encourage, promote and strengthen the protective role of camaraderie for the firefighter, which can likely be emphasized for other uniform-wearing professions such as police, military and ambulance personell. Being acknowledged for their contribution to other peoples’ lives and wellbeing can confirm the firefighters’ importance.

  • 10.
    Abelsson, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Kan man se blod i mörkret?2017Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Appelgren, Jari
    Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Christer
    Prehospen – Centre for Prehospital Research, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Low-dose, high-frequency CPR training with feedback for firefighters2018In: International Journal of Emergency Services, ISSN 2047-0894, E-ISSN 2047-0908Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of the intervention of low-dose, high-frequency cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training with feedback for firefighters for one month.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The study had a quantitative approach. Data were collected through an intervention by means of simulation. The data collection consisted of a pre- and post-assessment of 38 firefighter’s CPR performance.

    Findings

    There was a statistically significant improvement from pre- to post-assessment regarding participants’ compression rates. Compression depth increased statistically significantly to average 2 mm too deep in the group. Recoil decreased in the group with an average of 1 mm for the better. There was a statistically significant improvement in participants’ ventilation volume from pre- to post-assessment.

    Originality/value

    Prehospital staff such as firefighters, police, and ambulance perform CPR under less than optimal circumstances. It is therefore of the utmost importance that these professionals are trained in the best possible way. The result of this study shows that low-dose, high-frequency CPR training with an average of six training sessions per month improves ventilation volume, compression depth, rate, and recoil. This study concludes that objective feedback during training enhances the firefighters’ CPR skills which in turn also could be applied to police and ambulance CPR training.

  • 12.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Ethical dilemmas in prehospital emergency care – from the perspective of specialist ambulance nurse students2018In: International Journal of Ethics Education, ISSN 2363-9997, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 181-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe specialist ambulance nurse students’ experiences of ethical conflicts and dilemmas in prehospital emergency care. In the autumn of 2015, after participating in a mandatory lecture on ethics, 24 specialist ambulance nurse (SAN) students reported experiences and interpretations concerning conflicts and ethical dilemmas from prehospital emergency care. The text consisted of 24 written critical incidents which were interpreted using hermeneutic text interpretation. The text revealed three themes: Not safeguarding a patient’s body and identity; Not agreeing on the care actions; and Not treating the patient with dignity. The SANs experiences ethical dilemmas and conflict of values when they witness how others violate a patient’s dignity. Discussion and reflection is based on ethical conflicts and dilemmas experienced when students see how caregivers do not safeguard the patient’s body or identity. When caregivers have a conflicting will, it results in patients not being treated in an ethical manner. Also, seeing how caregivers put themselves in a power position over patients is described as an ethical dilemma that students experience when they choose not to intervene.

  • 13.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, PreHospen-Centre for Prehospital Research, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Rystedt, Ingrid
    Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Ambulance nurses’ competence and perception of competence in prehospital trauma care2018In: Emergency Medicine International, ISSN 2090-2840, E-ISSN 2090-2859, Vol. 2018, article id 5910342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. We focus on trauma care conducted in the context of a simulated traumatic event. This is in this study defined as a four-meter fall onto a hard surface, resulting in severe injuries to extremities in the form of bilateral open femur fractures, an open tibia fracture, and a closed pelvic fracture, all fractures bleeding extensively. 

    Methods. The simulated trauma care competence of 63 ambulance nurses in prehospital emergency care was quantitatively evaluated along with their perception of their sufficiency. Data was collected by means of simulated trauma care and a questionnaire. 

    Results. Life-saving interventions were not consistently performed. Time to perform interventions could be considered long due to the life-threatening situation. In comparison, the ambulance nurses’ perception of the sufficiency of their theoretical and practical knowledge and skills for trauma care scored high. In contrast, the perception of having sufficient ethical training for trauma care scored low. 

    Discussion. This study suggests there is no guarantee that the ambulance nurses’ perception of theoretical and practical knowledge and skill level corresponds with their performed knowledge and skill. The ambulance nurses rated themselves having sufficient theoretical and practical knowledge and skills while the score of trauma care can be considered quite low.

  • 14.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Lundberg, Lars
    Centre for Defence Medicine, Swedish Armed Forces, Sweden.
    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality during CPR practice versus during a simulated life-saving event2018In: International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics, ISSN 1080-3548, E-ISSN 2376-9130, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 652-655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. As a part of the emergency medical services, the Swedish fire brigade can increase the survival rate in out-of-hospital cardiac arrests.

    Aim. To compare the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performed by firefighters at a routine CPR practice versus when involved in a simulated life-saving event.

    Methods. In this study, 80 firefighters divided into two groups performed CPR according to guidelines: one group indoors during a routine training session; the other group outdoors during a smoke diving exercise wearing personal protective clothing and self-contained breathing apparatus. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data.

    Results. The results showed a tendency for the outdoor group to perform CPR with better ventilation and compression quality, as compared to the indoor group. The ventilation of the manikin was not hampered by the firefighters wearing personal protective clothes and self-contained breathing apparatus, as the Swedish firefighters remove their facial mask and ventilate the patient with their mouth using a pocket mask.

    Conclusions. Overall, the results in both groups showed a high quality of CPR which can be related to the fire brigade training and education traditions. CPR training is regularly performed, which in turn helps to maintain CPR skills.

  • 15.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Lundberg, Lars
    Swedish Armed Forces Centre for Defence Medicine, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Trauma simulation in prehospital emergency care2018In: Journal of Trauma Nursing, ISSN 1078-7496, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 201-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Well-educated ambulance staff is a prerequisite for high-quality prehospital trauma care. The aim of this study was to examine how nurses in the ambulance service experienced participation in trauma simulation. Sixty-one nurses, working in an emergency ambulance service, performed simulated trauma care on four different occasions and afterward rated three statements on a 5-point Likert scale. A descriptive and inferential analysis was conducted. There are statistically significant increases between the pre- and posttests regarding all three statements: I think simulation of severe trauma with manikins is realistic (0.23 or 6% increase), Simulation is a suitable method for learning severe trauma care (1.3 or 38% increase), and I am comfortable in the situation learning severe trauma care through simulation (0.74 or 19% increase). With the experience of realism in simulation, participants become more motivated to learn and prepare for future events. If the participants instead feel uncomfortable during simulation training, they focus on their own feelings instead of learning. In a realistic simulated environment, participants are prepared to understand and manage the emergency care situation in clinical work. Participants learn during simulation when they are outside their comfort zone but without being uncomfortable or experiencing anxiety.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-04-01 00:00
  • 16.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Rystedt, Ingrid
    Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, PreHospen - Centre for prehospital Research, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Learning high-energy trauma care through simulation2018In: Clinical Simulation in Nursing, ISSN 1876-1399, E-ISSN 1876-1402, Vol. 17, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation provides the opportunity to learn how to care for patients in complex situations, such as when patients are exposed to high-energy trauma such as motor vehicle accidents. The aim of the study was to describe nurses' perceptions of high-energy trauma care through simulation in prehospital emergency care. The study had a qualitative design. Interviews were conducted with 20 nurses after performing a simulated training series. Data were analyzed using a phenomenographic method. The result indicates that simulation establishes, corrects, and confirms knowledge and skills related to trauma care in prehosp ital emergency settings. Trauma knowledge is readily available in memory and can be quickly retrieved in a future trauma situation. 

  • 17. Aberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Sidenvall, Birgitta
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Hepworth, Mike
    O'Reilly, Karen
    Lithell, Hans
    On loss of activity and independence, adaptation improves life satisfaction in old age: a qualitative study of patients' perceptions.2005In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 1111-1125Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Abiib, Mulki
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Cvetkovic, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Utvärdering av instrumentet UF-5000 för automatiserad urinpartikelanalys i en metodjämförelse med manuell mikroskopering av urinsediment2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Microscopy is gold standard for urine sediment analysis, although the method is often insufficiently standardized. Several automated instruments, such as UF-5000, are commercially available on the market. Urine sediment analysis is crucial for diagnosis of kidney and urinary tract diseases where elements such as erythrocytes, leukocytes, epithelial cells, casts and crystals can be identified. Aim: The aim was to evaluate the performance of UF-5000 and compare the method with manual microscopic analysis of urine sediment. Method: Analysis with UF-5000 and microscopy was conducted on 69 samples. Data were processed with Passing Bablok-regression, Bland-Altman bias plot and Spearman's rank order correlation. Result: Comparison showed statistical significance between the two methods. Performance evaluation showed high accuracy apart from the coefficient of variation for low concentration of leukocytes and systematic error for linearity. Discussion: Since microscopy of urine sediment is an insufficiently standardized method, differences were acknowledged caused by discrepancies in the reference method. Further studies where UF-5000 is compared to a more standardized manual microscopy with a larger amount of pathological urine samples is of great importance. Reduction for cut-off may also be relevant. For further analysis of linearity, an additional instrument should be used as a complement.

  • 19.
    Aboutouk, Rana
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Forsberg, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Erfarenheter av egenvård hos personer med diabetes typ 22017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Sammanfattning

    Bakgrund: Antalet personer med diabetes Mellitus typ 2 växer snabbt i världen. Egenvård krävs för att bromsa progressionen av DMT2 och förhindra eller fördröja komplikationer. Många personer med DMT2 sköter emellertid inte sin egenvård enligt rekommendationer.

    Syftet: Att beskriva erfarenheter av egenvård hos personer med DMT2.

    Metod: Med hjälp av Fribergs femstegsmodell gjordes en litteraturöversikt av elva kvalitativa studier om erfarenheter av egenvård hos personer med DMT2.

    Resultat: Att integrera egenvården i vardagen är en utmaning. Familjen och vårdpersonalen har en nyckelroll och kan utgöra såväl ett hinder som ett stöd för egenvården. Andra personer med diabetes upplevs som ett entydigt positivt stöd. Att acceptera sjukdomen är en förutsättning för att kunna bedriva egenvården. Brist på förståelse och okunskap kring DMT2 utgör ett hinder mot egenvård. Personliga mål och feedback är avgörande för motivationen.

    Slutsatser: Socialt stöd, acceptans av sjukdomen, positiv feedback och individualiserad information upplevs underlätta egenvård.

  • 20.
    Abrahamsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare. University College of Kristianstad,Kristianstad.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Gerdner, Arne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Sense of coherence of reindeer herders and other Samis in comparison to other Swedish citizens2013In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 2242-3982, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 72, p. -20633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Samis are indigenous people in north Europe. In the territory called Sa´pmi (Lapland), reindeer herding is the traditional base for the Sami economy. The relation between living conditions and positive health of the Swedish Samis has been sparsely studied. As health is closely linked to sense of coherence (SOC), an understanding of the background factors to SOC may contribute knowledge that might be useful in promoting living conditions and health.

    Methods. The study examines relations between the level of SOC and background factors from surveys in a Sami population (n=613) in comparison to a non-Sami population (n=525) in Sweden, and in comparison between 2 subsamples of Samis, that is, herders and non-herders.

    Results. There are more similarities than differences between the Sami and non-Sami populations. However, dividing the Sami population, reindeer herders had significantly lower SOC, and in specific the subcomponent manageability, that is, less ability to use available resources to meet different demands in life, compared to non-herders.

    Conclusions. In addition to age and health, predictors of SOC are related to the life form of reindeer husbandry and the belonging to the herding community

  • 21. Abrahamsson, K H
    et al.
    Berggren, U
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Carlsson, S G
    Phobic avoidance and regular dental care in fearful dental patients: a comparative study.2001In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 59, no 5, p. 273-279Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22. Abrahamsson, K H
    et al.
    Stenman, J
    Ohrn, K
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Attitudes to dental hygienists: evaluation of the Dental Hygienist Beliefs Survey in a Swedish population of patients and students.2007In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 95-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to evaluate and test the psychometric properties of the Dental Hygienist Beliefs Survey (DHBS) in a Swedish sample of different patient groups and students. It was hypothesized that negative dental hygienist beliefs would discriminate between fearful and non-fearful study groups. The DHBS was distributed together with the revised Dental Beliefs Survey (DBS-R) and the Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS). The study sample included 394 subjects (130 students, 144 general dental patients, 90 periodontal patients and 30 patients on a waiting list for dental fear treatment). The results verified that the DHBS discriminates well between dentally fearful and non-fearful study groups. The DHBS had high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.96-0.98) in all the groups. The correlation between the DHBS and the DBS-R was high (rho = 0.82, P < 0.001). Furthermore, the DHBS correlated significantly with the DAS, as well as with a low but significant correlation to age (more negative attitudes in younger age groups) and gender (more negative attitudes amongst women). Regression analysis showed that gender and the DHBS items: 23, 16 and 28, i.e. items related to feeling helpless, worries/fears not being taken seriously and fear about 'bad news' possibly preventing treatment, were the most important predictors of dental fear. The results suggest that the DHBS may be a valid and reliable scale to use in order to assess patient's specific attitudes to dental hygienists. However, the psychometric properties including test-retest analysis and the underlying factor structure of the DHBS need to be further explored.

  • 23. Abrahamsson, Kajsa H
    et al.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Stenman, Jane
    Ohrn, Kerstin
    Dental beliefs: evaluation of the Swedish version of the revised Dental Beliefs Survey in different patient groups and in a non-clinical student sample.2006In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 114, no 3, p. 209-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and to test the psychometric properties of a Swedish version of the revised Dental Beliefs Survey (DBS-R) in different patient groups and in a non-clinical sample of students. It was hypothesized that negative dental beliefs, assessed using the DBS-R, would discriminate between fearful and non-fearful study groups. The questionnaire was distributed together with the Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS). The sample included 550 adults who responded to the questionnaires (206 students, 177 general dental patients, 105 periodontal patients and 62 patients at a waiting list for dental-fear treatment). The internal drop-out rate was low. The results confirmed that the DBS-R discriminates well between fearful patients and the other study groups. The DBS-R had a high internal consistency in all the study groups. Furthermore, the DBS-R correlated significantly with age (higher values in younger age groups) and the DAS. Regression analyses showed that the DBS-R subdimensions of 'communication' and 'control'/or 'trust', respectively, were significant predictors for dental fear. The results suggest that the DBS-R is a reliable and valid instrument for use in different Swedish patient- and non-clinical population groups in order to assess attitudes to dentists. However, the underlying factor structure of the DBS-R needs to be further explored and established.

  • 24. Abrahamsson, Kajsa Henning
    et al.
    Berggren, Ulf
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Carlsson, Sven G
    The importance of dental beliefs for the outcome of dental-fear treatment.2003In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 111, no 2, p. 99-105Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Abrahamsson, Sara
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Palmberg, Hampus
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Children with Intellectual Disabilities and Their Perceived Participation in Everyday Life Activities: A descriptive study conducted in Addis Abeba, Ethiopia2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Children with intellectual disabilities living in developing countries are vulnerable to participation restrictions. Few studies have been made regarding their own perspectives. Aim: To describe how children in a low income country aged 13-17 with an intellectual disability perceive their participation in everyday life activities. Method: This bachelor thesis was conducted as a descriptive study and had a quantitative approach. Participants were collected through a non-probability, goal-oriented consecutive sampling. Data were collected by using “Picture my Participation”, an instrument designed as a structured interview with quantitative questions. The data were analyzed with IBM SPSS Statistics 21. Tables and diagrams were made in Microsoft Excel 2013. Result: The activity that the children participated in most frequently was “Daily routines at home for personal care (dressing, choosing clothing, hair care, brushing teeth)”. The activity that most children prioritized as most important, and they were most involved in was “Organised leisure activities”. “Services and policies” and “Social environment” were the factors seen as “Facilitators” to participation, whereas “Family attitudes” was seen as a “Barrier” to participation. Conclusion: The children perceived their participation in the prioritized activities as high and experienced few barriers in the context of participation.

  • 26.
    Abyan, Luul
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Gustavsson, Ellinor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Unga vuxnas upplevelser av att leva med diabetes typ-12016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Summary

    Background: Diabetes type-1 is an autoimmune disease and one of the most common chronic diseases in Sweden. Diabetes type-1 can be developed at any age, but usually appears during childhood and adolescence. Living with the disease implicates being responsible for their self-care.

    Aim: The aim of the study was to describe the young adult’s experiences of living with diabetes type-1, based on Orem’s self-care deficit nursing theory.

    Method: This study is a qualitative study with deductive approach. The study is based on three blogs. Orem’s self-care deficit nursing theory was used in this study.

    Results: The relationship with family and other diabetics are perceived to be a great support and can serve as an aid in self-care. Self-care can be difficult to achieve and sometimes they can experience that planning and structure be in vain. According to the individuals, it is important not to let the disease limit the social life. There is a major ignorance of diabetes type-1 in the society which leads to insecurity and lack of trust. Despite an environment of supportive people, individuals with diabetes type-1 can experience loneliness.

    Conclusion: An insight of young adult’s experiences of living with diabetes type-1 is important for the nurse because of the ability to reduce conflicts between nurse and patient and thereby improve conditions for a successful self-care.

  • 27.
    Acheampong, Faustina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Information Technology and Information Systems (CenITIS). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Innovating healthcare through remote monitoring: Effects and business model2017In: Health Care Delivery and Clinical Science: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications, IGI Global, 2017, p. 247-268Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Information technology has been suggested to improve patient health outcomes and reduce healthcare cost. This study explored the business model and effects of collaborative innovation between caregivers and patients on healthcare delivery through remote patient monitoring by interviewing caregivers and surveying atrial fibrillation patients. Findings indicate that remote monitoring enhanced early detection of potential risks and quality of clinical decision-making with patients feeling more empowered and involved in their own care. The remote monitoring system which consisted of a home-based ECG and a web-based service and was offered free to patients, brought together caregivers, patients, service provider and the government as actors. The introduction of remote monitoring increased the workload of caregivers and facilitation of timely diagnostics and decision-making were not realized. IT is an enabler of innovation in healthcare, but it must be integrated into work processes with a viable business model to realize potential benefits and sustain it. 

  • 28.
    Adair, Brooke
    et al.
    School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Keen, Deb
    Autism Centre of Excellence, Griffith University, Mt Gravatt, Qld, Australia.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Imms, Christine
    School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia.
    The effect of interventions aimed at improving participation outcomes for children with disabilities: a systematic review2015In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 57, no 12, p. 1093-1104Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    Enhancement of participation has been described as the ultimate outcome for health and educational interventions. The goal of this systematic review was to identify and critically appraise studies that aimed to improve the participation outcomes of children with disabilities.

    Method

    Nine databases that index literature from the fields of health, psychology, and education were searched to retrieve information on research conducted with children with disabilities aged between 5 years and 18 years. Articles were included if the author(s) reported that participation was an intended outcome of the intervention. The articles included were limited to those reporting high-level primary research, as defined by Australia's National Health and Medical Research Council evidence hierarchy guidelines. No restrictions were placed on the type of intervention being investigated.

    Results

    Seven randomized controlled or pseudo-randomized studies were included. Only three of these studies identified participation as a primary outcome. Both individualized and group-based approaches to enhancing participation outcomes appeared to be effective. Studies of interventions with a primary focus on body function or activity level outcomes did not demonstrate an effect on participation outcomes.

    Intepretation

    Few intervention studies have focused on participation as a primary outcome measure. Approaches using individually tailored education and mentoring programmes were found to enhance participation outcomes, while exercise programmes, where participation was a secondary outcome, generally demonstrated little effect.

  • 29.
    Adair, Brooke
    et al.
    Centre for Disability and Development Research, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    Physiotherapy Department, Mälardalens University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Rosenbaum, Peter
    McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Keen, Deb
    Autism Centre of Excellence, Griffith University, Mt Gravatt, Qld, Australia.
    Imms, Christine
    Centre for Disability and Development Research, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia.
    Measures used to quantify participation in childhood disability and their alignment with the family of participation-related constructs: a systematic review2018In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 60, no 11, p. 1101-1116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    We aimed to identify measures used to assess the participation of disabled children and to map the measures' content to the family of participation-related constructs (fPRC) to inform future research and practice.

    METHOD:

    Six databases were searched to identify measures used to assess participation in health, psychology, and education research. Included studies involved children aged 0 to 18 years with a permanent impairment or developmental disability and reported use of a quantitative measure of participation. A second search sought relevant literature about each identified measure (including published manuals) to allow a comprehensive understanding of the measure. Measurement constructs of frequently reported measures were then mapped to the fPRC.

    RESULTS:

    From an initial yield of 32 767 articles, 578 reported one or more of 118 participation measures. Of these, 51 measures were reported in more than one article (our criterion) and were therefore eligible for mapping to the fPRC. Twenty-one measures quantified aspects of participation attendance, 10 quantified aspects of involvement as discrete scales, and four quantified attendance and involvement in a manner that could not be separated.

    INTERPRETATION:

    Improved understanding of participation and its related constructs is developing rapidly; thoughtful selection of measures in research is critical to further our knowledge base.

    WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS:

    The fPRC can support our rapidly evolving and expanding understanding of participation. Instruments selected to measure participation do not always align with emerging concepts. Matching research aims to a chosen measure's content will improve understanding of participation. Opportunities exist to develop validated participation measures, especially self-reported measures of involvement.

  • 30.
    Adam, Davey
    et al.
    Department of Public Health, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
    Takagi, Emiko
    Department of Health Science, Linthicum, Towson University, Towson, MD, USA.
    Sundström, Gerdt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    (In)Formal Support and Unmet Needs in the National Long-Term care Survey2013In: Journal of Comparative Family Studies, ISSN 0047-2328, E-ISSN 1929-9850, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 437-453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We linked individual-level data from the 2004 wave of the National Long-Term Care Survey with state-level data from the National Aging Program Information Systems (NAPIS) State Program Reports to predict care mix and unmet need for assistance. Our sample consisted of 2422 community-dwelling individuals aged 65 and older (69% women, 8% nonwhite) who reported at least one limitation in an instrumental or basic activity of daily living. We used the data to predict the mix of formal and informal support received, and the probability of having at least one unmet need from individual (predisposing, enabling, and need) characteristics with state-level home help coverage rates, intensity of home help services, and proportion of population aged 60+ residing in institutional settings. Consistent with past research, a majority (52.6%) of the disabled sample reported unmet need. At the individual level, enabling (availability of kin support) and need (number of basic and instrumental activity of daily living impairments, BADLs and IADLs) were most strongly associated with care mix and unmet need. State-level services were not associated with receipt of informal supports. In states providing home help services to a higher proportion of elders, women were more likely to receive formal help. In states providing more intensive services, women were less likely and individuals living alone more likely to receive formal supports. In states where a higher proportion of elders lived in nursing homes, individuals living alone were more likely to receive formal assistance, less likely overall to report unmet needs, but the oldest-old were more likely to report unmet need.

  • 31.
    Adams, Mary
    et al.
    King’s College London, UK.
    Maben, Jill
    King’s College London, UK.
    Robert, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). King’s College London, UK.
    ‘It’s sometimes hard to tell what patients are playing at’: How healthcare professionals make sense of why patients and families complain about care2018In: Health, ISSN 1363-4593, E-ISSN 1461-7196, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 603-623Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article draws from sociological and socio-legal studies of dispute between patients and doctors to examine how healthcare professionals made sense of patients’ complaints about healthcare. We analyse 41 discursive interviews with professional healthcare staff working in eight different English National Health Service settings to explore how they made sense of events of complaint and of patients’ (including families’) motives for complaining. We find that for our interviewees, events of patients’ complaining about care were perceived as a breach in fundamental relationships involving patients’ trust or patients’ recognition of their work efforts. We find that interviewees rationalised patients’ motives for complaining in ways that marginalised the content of their concerns. Complaints were most often discussed as coming from patients who were inexpert, distressed or advantage-seeking; accordingly, care professionals hearing their concerns about care positioned themselves as informed decision-makers, empathic listeners or service gate-keepers. We find differences in our interviewees’ rationalisation of patients’ complaining about care to be related to local service contingences rather than to fixed professional differences. We note that it was rare for interviewees to describe complaints raised by patients as grounds for improving the quality of care. Our findings indicate that recent health policy directives promoting a view of complaints as learning opportunities from critical patient/consumers must account for sociological factors that inform both how the agency of patients is envisaged and how professionalism exercised contemporary healthcare work.

  • 32. Adiels, Anne-Marie
    et al.
    Helkimo, Martti
    Magnusson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Tactile stimulation as a complementary treatment of temporomandibular disorders in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome: A pilot study.2005In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 17-25Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Pless, M
    ICF-CY based forms for use in problem-solving for children with disabilities2007In: The 10 years anniversary research conference of Nordic Network on Disability Research (NNDR, Göteborg, Sweden, 10-12th May, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Pless, M
    ICF-CY based forms for use in problem-solving for children with disabilities2007In: 7th International Scientific Conference Research in Education an Rehabilitation Sciences: Zagreb, June 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Is ICF a valid tool for structuring health information?2007In: 5th Scandinavian Conference on Health Informatics and 11th Swedish National Term Conference: Kalmar, October 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Ibragimova, Nina
    Pless, Mia
    Exploring changes over time in habilitation professionals' perceptions and applications of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, version for children and youth (ICF-CY)2010In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 42, no 7, p. 670-678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:This study explored how professionals in interdisciplinary teams perceived the implementation of the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, version for Children and Youth (ICF-CY) in Swedish habilitation services.

    Design:Descriptive longitudinal mixed-methods design.

    Methods:Following participation in a 2-day in-service training on the ICF-CY, 113 professionals from 14 interdisciplinary teams described their perceptions of the implementation of the ICF-CY at 3 consecutive time-points: during in-service training, after 1 year, and after 2.5 years.

    Results:Implementation of the ICF-CY in daily work focused on assessment and habilitation planning and required adaptations of routines and materials. The ICF-CY was perceived as useful in supporting analyses and in communication about children’s needs. Professionals also perceived it as contributing to new perspectives on problems and a sharpened focus on participation.

    Conclusion:Professionals indicated that the ICF-CY enhanced their awareness of families’ views of child participation, which corresponded to organizational goals for habilitation services. An implementation finding was a lack of tools fitting the comprehensive ICF-CY perspective. The study points to the need for ICF-CY-based assessment and intervention methods focusing on child participation.

  • 37.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Pless, Mia
    Uppsala universitet.
    Professionals' views of children's everyday life situations and the relation to participation2012In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 581-592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim was to determine professionals’ views of everyday life situations (ELS) of importance for children and to explore how ELS correlate with the construct ‘Participation’. This study was part of a larger work to develop a structured tool with code sets to identify child participation and support children with disabilities to describe what matters most for them in intervention planning.

    Method: The study had a concurrent mixed methods design. Information from one open-ended question and questionnaires were linked to the ICF-CY component Activities and Participation. Two concurrent data sets were compared.

    Results: Proposed ELS were distributed across ICF-CY categories from low to high level of complexity and context specificity. The correlation with participation became stronger for the later chapters of the component (d7-d9). Differences between respondents due to working field, country, and children’s ages were explored. Acts and tasks seemed most important for the youngest children whereas ELS shifted towards societal involvement for adolescents.

    Conclusion: Eleven categories related to ICF-CY chapters d3-d9 emerged as ELS. Two age groups (infants/preschoolers and adolescents) are required to develop code sets for the new tool. The results need triangulation with other concurrent studies to provide corroborating evidence and add a family perspective.

  • 38.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Klang, Nina
    School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen university.
    Maxwell, Gregor
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Ståhl, Ylva
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Participation as the Focus of Intervention:  Cultural Diversity and Universal Characteristics2011In: / [ed] Michael Guralnick, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Participation as a construct can be applied on all ecological levels from participation for individual children in their everyday life to participation for all as a societal goal. It is defined in the ICF-CY as involvement in a life situation. Participation is occurring at the nodal point between children and their environments. Contexts vary with socio-economical standards, culture and geographical characteristics and thus also the expressions of participation. This presentation will discuss cultural diversity in children’s participation in relation to the universal characteristics of participation defined as “being there” and participation defined as “degree of engagement while being there”. The utility of the ICF-CY as a tool to analyze universal characteristics and cultural diversity in conditions for, and actual experiences of, participation are examined in findings from five studies: 1) Maxwell et al. have analyzed national, regional and local educational policy documents in Scotland and Sweden regarding children in need of special support  in relation to conditions for participation and participation; 2) Ståhl et al. have linked and compared ICF-CY codes to information regarding children’s health in Child Health Care and School Health Care and analyzed whether biomedical or participation information is the focus of the information; 3) Adolfsson et al. have collected and compared data from respondents in Sweden, the USA, and Portugal concerning what professionals consider to be important everyday situations for child participation; 4) Klang et al. has studied domains of participation and environment related to child and caregiver interaction in a Russian context to identify factors related to participation; and 5) Ullenhag et al. have studied participation in  leisure activities and  leisure activity preferences  of Swedish children and compared with data from the Netherlands and Canada using the same questionnaire.

  • 39.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Pless, Mia
    Uppsala universitet.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Identifying Child Functioning from an ICF-CY Perspective: Everyday Life Situations Explored in Measures of Participation2011In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 33, no 13-14, p. 1230-1244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. This study was part of a larger work to develop an authentic measure consisting of code sets for self- or proxy-report of child participation. The aim was to identify common everyday life situations of children and youth based on measures of participation.

    Method. The study was descriptive in nature and involved several stages: systematic search of literature to find articles presenting measures for children and youth with disabilities, identifying measures in selected articles, linking items in included measures to the ICF-CY, analysing content in measures presented as performance and participation and identifying aggregations of ICF-CY codes across these measures.

    Results. A large number of measures for children and youth with disabilities were identified but only 12 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A slight distinction in content and age appropriateness appeared. Measures presented as performance covered all the ICF-CY Activities and Participation chapters, whereas measures presented as participation covered five of nine chapters. Three common everyday life situations emerged from the measures: Moving around, Engagement in play and Recreation and leisure.

    Conclusion. Only a small number of life situations for children and youth emerged from items in selected measures, thus, other sources are needed to identify more everyday life situations.

  • 40.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Pless, M
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Ibragimova, N
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    WHO:s Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health in Child- and Youth Habilitation2007In: Presentation at The 5th conference on International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Oslo, June 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Pless, Mia
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Ibragimova, Nina
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Användbarhet av ICF/ICF-CY inom Barn- och ungdomshabilitering2007In: / [ed] Högskolan i Jönköping och Mälardalens högskola, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Pless, Mia
    Ibragimova, Nina
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Införande av ICF-CY i habiliteringsverksamhet2008In: Att använda ICF-CY: Västerås,  sept 2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Pless, Mia
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala universitet.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Everyday Life Situations for Child Participation2011In: / [ed] Michael Guralnick, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Child Participation is defined by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health forChildren and Youth (ICF-CY) as involvement in life situations but knowledge on children´s specific everydaylife situations (EDLs) is lacking. Professionals in early intervention services need a structured tool to identifyand assess child participation in everyday life situations. It should support children with disabilities indescribing what matters most for them in intervention planning. With the long term goal to create ICF-CY codesets, EDLs were identified by a systematic literature search for measures of performance or participation andby collecting professional opinions on EDL and participation. Information was linked to the ICF-CY andtriangulated with research exploring family opinions. Most items in measures were linked to moving around,play, and recreation and leisure. The six measures of performance and six of participation differed regardingcontent and content dependent on age group.Descriptions on EDLs from 297 professionals were linked to ICF-CY codes. Frequent linkages were Self-care,such as eating and hygiene; Major life areas, such as play and education; and Relationships, but also sleep. Byrelating EDLs directly to predefined ICF-CY categories in the ICF-CY component Activities and Participation,five EDLs across categories were identified based on responses from 207 professionals. These concernedsleep, communication, dressing, family relationships and play. Some differences emerged dependent onparticipants’ culture and on age group. A triangulation between professional and family opinions concerningEDL’s revealed relatively high agreement. As a final result, a set of approximately 12-15 everyday lifesituations is expected to be identified in this study to be used for development of code sets.

  • 44.
    Adolfsson, P.
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Disability and Habilitation, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindstedt, H.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Disability and Habilitation, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pettersson, I.
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hermansson, L. N.
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Janeslätt, G.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Disability and Habilitation, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Perception of the influence of environmental factors in the use of electronic planning devices in adults with cognitive disabilities2016In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 493-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Adults with cognitive disabilities often have difficulties in dealing with the complexity of everyday life. With cognitive assistive technology (e.g. electronic planning devices [EPDs] and individual support), they can bring order to their often chaotic life. Assumptions are that environmental factors influence with non-use of EPDs.

    Objective: To explore how adults with cognitive disabilities perceive the influence of environmental factors in the use of EPDs.

    Methods: A reference group with experience of use of EPDs assisted the researchers. Twelve adults with cognitive disabilities and experience of using EPDs participated. An interview guide was implemented covering environmental factors according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Qualitative content analysis was applied in the analyses.

    Results: Five categories and two themes emerged, which were integrated into a model of facilitating factors influencing the use of EPDs. Measures to prevent or eliminate negative influences of the device use are important to be taken.

    Conclusions: Professionals need more knowledge about EPDs, while users need individual adaption of the EPDs. EPDs need to be user-friendly, manageable and work in any seasons.

    Implications for Rehabilitation: The users should have access to specially trained prescribers. There is a need for development of user-friendly and manageable products to function in any climate. Knowledge is lacking on how to implement the users in all stages of the prescribing process. Prescribers should increase knowledge in the use of EPDs to influence the attitudes of the social environment.

  • 45.
    Adolfsson, Vendela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics.
    Karlsson, Evelina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics.
    Effekten av ToeOFF på infallsvinkeln mellan kroppsmasscentrum och belastningscentrum hos patienter med droppfot2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 46.
    Agahi, Neda
    et al.
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kelfve, Susanne
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Sociology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Alcohol consumption in very old age and its association with survival: a matter of health and physical function2016In: Drug And Alcohol Dependence, ISSN 0376-8716, E-ISSN 1879-0046, Vol. 159, p. 240-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Alcohol consumption in very old age is increasing; yet, little is known about the personal and health-related characteristics associated with different levels of alcohol consumption and the association between alcohol consumption and survival among the oldest old.

    Methods

    Nationally representative data from the Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old (SWEOLD, ages 76-101; n = 863) collected in 2010/2011 were used. Mortality was analyzed until 2014. Alcohol consumption was measured with questions about frequency and amount. Drinks per month were calculated and categorized as abstainer, light-to-moderate drinker (0.5–30 drinks/month) and heavy drinker (>30 drinks/month). Multinomial logistic regressions and Laplace regressions were performed.

    Results

    Compared to light-to-moderate drinkers, abstainers had lower levels of education and more functional health problems, while heavy drinkers were more often men, had higher levels of education, and no serious health or functional problems. In models adjusted only for age and sex, abstainers died earlier than drinkers. Among light-to-moderate drinkers, each additional drink/month was associated with longer survival, while among heavy drinkers, each additional drink/month was associated with shorter survival. However, after adjusting for personal and health-related factors, estimates were lower and no longer statistically significant.

    Conclusions

    The association between alcohol consumption and survival in very old age seems to have an inverse J-shape; abstention and heavy use is associated with shorter survival compared to light-to-moderate drinking. To a large extent, differences in survival are due to differences in baseline health and physical function.

    Graphical abstract

  • 47.
    Agahi, Neda
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Karolinska Institutet.
    Shaw, Benjamin A.
    School of Public Health, University at Albany, Rensselaer, NY, USA.
    Trajectories of social activities from middle age to old age and late-life disability: a 36-year follow-up2013In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 790-793Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: to examine the association between 34-year trajectories of social activity, from middle age to old age and late-life disability.

    METHODS: data from the Swedish Level of Living Survey (LNU) and the Swedish Panel Study of the Oldest Old (SWEOLD) were used. LNU data from 1968, 1981, 1991 and 2000 were merged with SWEOLD data from 1992, 2002 and 2004 to create a longitudinal data set with five observation periods. Trajectories of social activities covered 1968-2002, and late-life disability was measured in 2004. The sample consisted of 729 individuals aged 33-61 at baseline (1968), who participated in at least four observation periods and who were free from mobility limitations at baseline. Four trajectories of social activity were identified and used as predictors of late-life disability.

    RESULTS: reporting low/medium levels of social activity from mid-life to old age was the most common trajectory group. Persons reporting continuously low/medium or decreasing levels of social activity had higher odds ratios for late-life disability (OR = 2.33 and OR = 2.15, respectively) compared with those having continuously high levels of activity, even when adjusting for age, sex and mobility limitations, and excluding persons with baseline mobility limitations.

    CONCLUSIONS: results suggest that the disability risk associated with social activities is related to recent levels of activity, but also that risk may accumulate over time, as indicated by the higher disability risk associated with the continuously low/medium level social activity trajectory.

  • 48. Agahi, Neda
    et al.
    Shaw, Ben
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Trajectories of social activities and mobility problems from middle to old age2012In: The 21st Nordic Congress of Gerontology, Dilemmas in Ageing Societies, Abstracts and Program, Copenhagen, Denmark, June 10th - 13th, 2012, 2012, p. 207-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate how trajectories of social activities, suchas spending time with family and friends, observed during a34-year period (from middle age to old age) were associated withtrajectories of mobility problems during the same time periodamong men and women.Methods: Nationally representative data from the Swedish Levelof Living Survey (LNU) and the Swedish Panel Study of the OldestOld (SWEOLD) were used. LNU data from 1968, 1981, 1991 and2000 were merged with SWEOLD data from 1992 and 2002 tocreate a longitudinal dataset with four observation periodscovering the period 1968-2002. The sample consisted of thoseaged 40-60 years at baseline who survived through the period,and participated in at least three observation periods (n=698).Trajectories of social activity were identified through clusteranalysis, and then used as predictors of mobility trajectories inmultilevel regression models.Results: Most people had a socially active life as they moved frommiddle age into old age. Five trajectories of social activity wereidentified: continuously very active, continuously active,increasing social activity, decreasing social activity, and continuouslyinactive. Upholding a very active social life was morecommon among women than men.Mobility problems increased significantly over time for bothwomen and men. Among men, decreasing activity levels overtime were associated with a faster increase in mobility problems.Among women, those who were continuously inactive or whodecreased their activity levels had higher levels of mobilityproblems, but the increase in mobility problems with age wassimilar across trajectories of social activity.Conclusions: Most men and women had high levels of socialactivity in midlife, and continued their high activity levels into latelife. Decreasing social activity was related to worse mobility inboth men and women. The nature and direction of theseassociations need to be explored further.

  • 49.
    Agid, Nyroz
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Sjöqvist, Evelina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Prevalence of hookworm infection evaluated with Willis flotation and Formal Ethyl Acetate concentration: A field study in Da Nang, Vietnam2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Hookworm infection can cause nausea, stomach pain and anemia, with the most harmful effect being found among women of reproductive age and children. The infection rates is high in poor parts of the world with a high number of infected in Asia. The infection is many times neglected since it rarely causes mortality, however the morbidity can be destructive. In Vietnam the prevalence of hookworm is largely unknown, but there is believed to be a 29-80 % infection rate in the country. Through a field study in Da Nang, Vietnam, the prevalence of hookworm was identified using two methods, Willis flotation and formal ethyl acetate concentration. Any correlation between hookworm infection and individuals’ gender, age and geographic area was evaluated. A total of 101 consecutive selected samples from hospitals and communities in rural and urban parts of the city were obtained from both gender ranging between 1-72 years in age. No quantitative differences were found between the two methods nor any correlation between genders (p-value 0,143). The overall prevalence was 16,8%. The rural part of the city showed a higher infection rate in contrast to the urban districts (p-value 0,001). Individuals in the age group 25-48 showed a higher infection rate in contrast to the other age groups (p-value 0,035). 

  • 50.
    Agren, Susanna
    et al.
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping, Sweden and Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Bodil
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, 221 85 Lund, Sweden and Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery/THAI, Sk˚ane University Hospital and Medical Services, 221 85 Lund, Sweden.
    Rönning, Helén
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    The Unsteady Mainstay of the Family: Now Adult Children's Retrospective View on Social Support in Relation to Their Parent's Heart Transplantation.2014In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The needs for support among children with a seriously ill parent, who is waiting for heart transplantation, are unknown today. The aim was to describe now adult children's experiences of social support in relation to a parent's heart transplant during childhood. Nine females and four males were interviewed. The median age for the children was 18 at the transplantation and their parents had been ill before for 18 months (median) and on waiting list for 161 days (mean). Three categories emerged: health care professionals' approaches, family and friends' approaches, and society approaches. Our results show that there was lack of support for children of heart transplantation patients. Support in the shape of information was in most cases provided by the sick or healthy parent. It is of great clinical importance to develop psychosocial support programs for children with a seriously ill parent waiting for heart transplantation (before, during, and after surgery).

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