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  • 751.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Law.
    A Game-Theoretic Approach to Strategic Decision Making in Intergenerational successions of Small and Medium Sized Enterprises1999Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 752.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Law.
    Family Owned Limited Close Corporation and Protection of Ownership2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 753.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Commercial Law. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Organization of Successions of Small- and Medium- Sized Enterprises within the Family2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 754.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Law.
    Organization of Successions of SMEs within the Family2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 755.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Commercial Law.
    Skydd av ägarpositioner i familjeägda små och medelstora aktiebolag: En studie i familje- och associationsrätt2008Book (Other academic)
  • 756.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Andersson, Jan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Commercial and Tax Law.
    Haag, Kajsa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Share transfer restrictions and family business: The minority shareholder perspective2015In: European Business Law Review, ISSN 0959-6941, E-ISSN 1875-841X, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 437-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small- and medium-sized enterprises (SME's), of which most are family owned businesses (FOB's), play a crucial role in upholding many of the topics at the heart of the International Conference on Applied Business Research. They are especially noteworthy in relation to economic development, growth and innovation, sustainable development and rural development. The practice of FOBs is quite different from large companies with scattered ownership (Nordqvist, Hall & Melin, 2009). The practice turn in social science, well embraced in management studies (Vaara & Whittington, 2012), is relevant to develop new knowledge in the field of business law. We study the practice of shareholder protection and aim to narrow the gap between theory and practice regarding business law and FOBs. An entrepreneurially friendly and inspiring environment presupposes that business owners can protect their ownership positions against unwanted acquisitions of shares, as well as that they are not unwillingly locked-in in a position as minority owners. In addition, this requires legal rules that are not unnecessarily costly, time and energy consuming to comply with, administer and uphold. Legislators should, if possible, thus provide a set of rules that facilitates for owners to effectively avoid both unwanted acquisitions of shares and locked-in positions. We conclude that default rules in the form of e. g. a right of first refusal should be included in the articles, since the lack of an open market place anyhow makes it highly difficult to sell the shares. Furthermore, we find it important to allow also clauses that enhance the possibility to avoid locked-in positions in the articles whereas most national legislations today permit only clauses that contribute to the protection of ownership positions. Key words: family business development, small-medium sized enterprises (SME), business law, share transfer restrictions, minority shareholders, articles of association, shareholder's agreement, practical implications.

  • 757.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Andersson, Jan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Law.
    Haag, Kajsa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Share transfer restrictions and family businesses: the minority shareholder perspective2013In: Proceedings from VIII. international conference on applied business research, ICABR 2013, April 22 - April 26, 2013, East London - South Africa, Brno: Mendel University , 2013, p. 524-533Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 758.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Law. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Andersson, Jan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Law.
    Humphreys, Edward
    A European Private Company and Share Transfer Restrictions.2012In: European Business Law Review, ISSN 0959-6941, E-ISSN 1875-841X, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 483-496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Restrictions on the transfer of shares, in the articles of association and shareholders' agreement are of crucial importance for SMEs. Associates running a business together are dependent on a fragile balance in ownership positions, as well as the expertise of each shareholder and manager of the business. We criticize the EU approach to transfer restrictions, as presented in the Commission's proposal for a "Statute for a European private company" (2008). Not all of the suggested restrictions are suitable under all circumstances in the articles of association. One example is a prohibitive clause, which must be limited both in time and to transfers (not transmission) of shares. Further, other options, such as a mandatory buy-sell agreement, are not considered. Such a clause can be of the utmost importance in the case of some transmissions, e.g. upon intestate succession.

  • 759.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Bjuggren, Per-Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Family-owned, limited close corporations and protection of ownership2007In: European Journal of Law and Economics, ISSN 0929-1261, E-ISSN 1572-9990, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 273-283Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 760.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Law. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Bjuggren, Per-Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    No Gift and Inheritance Tax: No problems left for succession of family-owned businesses?2013In: European Business Law Review, ISSN 0959-6941, E-ISSN 1875-841X, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 149-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden abandoned the gift and inheritance tax in late 2004. One reason was that the government wished to enhance transfer of ownership of shares in family-owned businesses from the older to the younger generation and within the family. Anticipated outcomes of amendments in tax law are, however, not always fulfilled. This paper reports on a survey study of 143 Swedish small to medium-sized family businesses. The study is focused on companies and families that have carried out an intergenerational succession (some partly) during the lifetime of the older generation (127). Only in a few instances was the transfer of shares made in another way, i.e. six intestate inheritances and ten sales to an external person. According to the survey results abandoning the gift and inheritance tax is no quick .x. A succession within the family has still to be prepared and planned. Further, a transfer of the shares, for example to a daughter during the life time of the incumbent cannot always be made through a gift. The older generation may still require financial compensation in order to uphold their standard of living or compensate siblings who do not receive shares. A sale to a child at less than market value is still partly capital gains taxed. Even though having no gift and inheritance tax can be beneficial it nonetheless cannot produce miracles.

    We conclude that more efforts should be made concerning taxation of intergenerational transfer of family-owned businesses, in order to smooth the process, which hopefully will also be recognized by the EU Commission in its recommendations.

  • 761.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Law.
    Bjuggren, Per-Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    No gift and inheritance tax: No problems upon successions of family owned businesses?2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 762.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Commercial Law. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Bjuggren, Per-Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Ownership restrictions, risk and team considerations in family-owned businesses2010In: Proceedings of Regional Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research 2010: 7th International Australian Graduate School of Entrepreneurship (AGSE) Research Exchange, University of the Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia, 02-05 February 2010, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 763.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Bjuggren, Per-Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Protection of ownership in family firms: Post-sale purchase clauses and management perspective2012In: European Journal of Law and Economics, ISSN 0929-1261, E-ISSN 1572-9990, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 359-370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many small and medium sized family firms of corporate form there is a desire to protect ownership structure through restrictions on transferability of shares. At first sight this can appear strange as one often mentioned advantage of the corporate form is that it provides for high transferability of shares whereby a large amount of equity easily can be accumulated. But looking around in the real world, most family firms are not listed and have an interest in the control of changes in ownership structure through clauses that restrict transferability of shares. In this paper this interest of control of ownership is taken for granted. The focus is instead on providing a contractual analysis of the pros and cons of different clauses that restrict transferability. What do the spectra of restricting clauses look like? In what transferability situation can it be more efficient to use a certain clause? Does it matter if a person controlling the use of the firm’s assets has a majority ownership and/or is the manager of the firm? We further focus on the impact on management of post-sale purchase clauses, which are common only in the Nordic countries and thereby provide an indigenous perspective. How do succession matters enter into the picture? These are the type of questions that this paper aims to provide answers to. In the description of clauses the Swedish situation is the base case with a short discussion on how Sweden differs in this respect or is similar to the rest of the world.

  • 764.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Law.
    Bjuggren, Per-Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Small and medium sized enterprises as heirlooms1998Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 765.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Commercial Law. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Bjuggren, Per-Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Wiberg, Daniel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Ownership, Succession and Entrepreneurship in an Aging Society: Is there a Transition Problem?2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 766.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Commercial Law. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Danielsson, Hand
    Familjeägda aktiebolag och generationsskiften: - En översikt med empiriska data2010 (ed. 3)Book (Other academic)
  • 767.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Haag, Kajsa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Linhard, Anneli
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Law.
    Impact of divorce on family business: the legal aspects2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 768.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Ljungström, Divesh
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Ägarskiften i familjeföretag: En kartläggning av framgångsfaktorer m.m.2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Ägandets villkor är grundläggande för svenska företag och den ekonomiska utvecklingen i stort. Möjligheterna till smidiga ägarskiften i företag har under de senaste åren påverkats av ett flertal faktorer. Ett exempel är avskaffandet av arvs- och gåvoskatten i slutet av 2004.

    Denna bok behandlar ägarskiften ur olika aspekter, främst förhållanden som underlättar eller försvårar generationsskiften av familjeägda aktiebolag inom familjen, dvs. när nästa generation tar över. Resultaten stöds av en empiriskundersökning.

    Svenskt Näringsliv är en viktig aktör i samhällsdiskussionen och arrangerade bl.a. en internationell ägarskifteskonferens 2010. Samarbetet mellan Internationella Handelshögskolan och Svenskt Näringsliv har på senare år ökat vilket bl.a. lagt grunden till denna bok.

  • 769.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Law.
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Family Businesses and the EU Recommendation on the Transfer of Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 770.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Family Businesses and the EU Recommendation on the Transfer of Small and Medium-sized Enterprises2008In: European Business Law Review, ISSN 0959-6941, E-ISSN 1875-841X, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 279-291Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 771.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Intergenerational ownership succession: a stakeholder perspective2013In: European Business Law Review, ISSN 0959-6941, E-ISSN 1875-841X, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 407-429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The key to a successful transfer, of ownership of family-owned and headed businesses, to the younger generation is in most cases the incumbent. However, there are close and non-close stakeholders who wish to protect their interests. The main purpose of this article is to map the stakeholders in two models, as well as to analyze their interests and possible legal tools when intervening in an ownership succession process. Our reasoning is supported by descriptive data from a recent empirical study. Incumbents are presumed to be aware of the conflicting interests and their potential impacts. It is no wonder, that they hesitate to take the necessary initiative in a succession process! We analyze how consultants can provide a helping hand.

  • 772.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Haag, Kajsa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Intergenerational ownership succession: Shifting the focus from outcome measurements to preparatory requirements2015In: The Journal of Family Business Strategy, ISSN 1877-8585, E-ISSN 1877-8593, ISSN 1877-8585, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 166-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contributes to the family business succession literature by (1) addressing ownership succession rather than management succession, (2) recommending a combination of legal and psychological perspectives on ownership to advance our understanding and (3) suggesting a preparatory approach to succession. Measuring the success of management succession has mainly been undertaken by assessing outcomes. Learning retrospectively why a succession was (un)successful may deepen our understanding of the process, but it is not particularly helpful to the business in question. We propose an alternative method for ownership succession: a preparatory approach that establishes requirements to fulfill before the succession takes place. These requirements are presented in a model that considers both the legal/financial and the psychological aspects of ownership and are formulated to improve intergenerational ownership succession and the post-succession prosperity of the firm.

  • 773.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Law.
    Runhede, Hanna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Commercial Law. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Family-owned SMEs and Unexpected Events among shareholders2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 774.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Commercial Law.
    Smyrnios, Kosmas
    Striving for Happiness and Its Impact on Family Stability: An Exploration of the Aristotelian Conception of Happiness2005In: Family Business Review, ISSN 0894-4865, E-ISSN 1741-6248, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 155-170Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 775.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Law.
    Smyrnios, Kosmas X
    RMIT University - School of Marketing .
    Striving for happiness and its impact on family stability2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 776.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Commercial and Tax Law. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Vackermo, Marie
    Mid Sweden University.
    The interest theory, children’s rights and social authorities2015In: The International Journal of Children's Rights, ISSN 0927-5568, E-ISSN 1571-8182, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 752-768Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The principle of ‘the best interests of the child’ (art. 3 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child) is sometimes put forward as being the leading guide, i.e. it will in the long run – via, e.g. court cases and legal writing – give accurate and detailed information on the scope of children’s rights and the responsibilities of, e.g., parents. We claim that this principle does not provide us with the necessary analytical tools to enhance the legal rights of children. To this end it is more efficient to accept the explanatory power and apply the elements of the Interest theory, i.e. the chain of children’s interests and rights, obligations of e.g. parents and sanctions against failures. In this context we also illustrate that rights can have different strengths by briefly examining the role of social authorities in relation to the rights of children.

  • 777.
    Symeonidou, Noni E.
    et al.
    Warwick Business School, UK.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    DeTienne, Dawn R.
    Colorado State University, USA.
    The Perseverance of Family Firms: Performance Threshold and Firm Survival2015In: Academy of Management Proceedings, January 2015 (Meeting Abstract Supplement) 14997, 2015 / [ed] John Humphreys, Academy of Management , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on family firm survival has been mixed as studies provide evidence both for a positive and negative effect of family ownership on firm survival. Drawing upon threshold theory and socioemotional wealth we develop hypotheses which link family owners’ socio-emotional wealth and performance threshold to entrepreneurial exit. Using the longitudinal Kauffman Firm Survey we find that family firms are less likely to exit compared to non-family firms and that this relationship is mediated by owners’ threshold of performance.

  • 778.
    van Helvert, Judith
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Entrepreneurship from a Family Business Perspective2017In: The SAGE Handbook of Small Business and Entrepreneurship / [ed] Robert Blackburn, Dirk De Clercq & Jarna Heinonen, Sage Publications, 2017, p. 7-123Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 779.
    Vassiliadis, Spyros
    et al.
    Patras Hellenic Open University, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Baboukardos, Diogenis
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Law. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Kotsovolos, Panagiotis
    Freelance Accountant.
    Is Basel III a Panacea? Lessons from the Greek Sovereign Fiscal Crisis2012In: South East European Journal of Economics and Business, ISSN 1840-118X, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 73-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the period 2007-2009 the global economy faced the most severe crisis after the Great Recession of 1929. Inthe aftermath of the crisis a substantially revised version of Basel II, named Basel III, was proposed, introducingnew, tighter capital adequacy and liquidity guidelines. Basel III constitutes the new basic embankment against apossible crisis in the future. The same period these discussions were taking place for the new global regulatoryframework, the most severe sovereign debt crisis the country ever faced burst out in Greece. One of the mainvictims of the crisis is the country’s banking sector which is sustaining great pressure in its profitability, volumeof deposits and credit growth, amongst others. Having as a starting point the Greek banking sector and theeffects of the fiscal crisis on it, this paper discusses the new Basel III guidelines and their possible implications intimes of turmoil. The new framework can play a crucial role in deterring a new financial crisis; however it shouldnot be regarded as a panacea for all the shortcomings of banking sectors.

  • 780.
    Villanueva, Jaume
    et al.
    Universitat Ramon Lull.
    Markowska, Magdalena
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Universitat Ramon Lull.
    Storytelling in the development of entrepreneurial identities2013In: 5th Conference on Rhetoric and Narratives, ESADE, Barcelona, 25-27 March, 2013., 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion that the development of an entrepreneurial identity in individuals has important consequences for their subsequent entrepreneurial intentions and behaviors has gained increased attention in the entrepreneurship literature (Fauchart & Gruber, 2011). Most of this emerging literature has hitherto focused on the relationship between an individual’s entrepreneurial identity, i.e. between people’s self-concepts based on some form of entrepreneurial role identity (Cardon et al., 2009), or an entrepreneurial social identity (Fauchart & Gruber, 2011), and a broad set of entrepreneurial processes and outcomes. The main idea is thus that if a person’s self- concept is aligned with what could be construed as an entrepreneurial identity, a set of predictions could be made regarding this person’s entrepreneurial motivations, intentions and behaviors, all of which has important consequences for the study of entrepreneurship.

    But how does an entrepreneurial role or social identity develop in an individual? The literature has so far been rather silent not only on the antecedents of entrepreneurial identities, but also on the processes by which such identities develop over time. Theories of narrative identity and the psychology of life stories (McAdams, 2001), which posit that a person’s identity is an internalized narrative of the self that evolves over time, provide relevant insights for understanding where entrepreneurial self-concepts may come from and how they may develop. People construe stories to imbue their life experiences with meaning, and to integrate what could be disparate life episodes and events into a coherent life trajectory that can be understood by themselves and by others.

    Hence, the development of an entrepreneurial identity could be conceptualized as a specific type of evolving self-narrative with a specific kind of meaning. This self-narrative should not only include the basic elements that would make it “entrepreneurial” in meaning, but it should also include the main elements that would make it a “story.” In this paper, we draw on narrative theories to make a number of propositions regarding what constitutes an entrepreneurial identity in terms of narrative structure, drawing on McAdams’ (2001) conceptualization of a life story as a narrative complete with setting, scenes, characters, plot and themes. We also draw on theories of entrepreneurship and develop propositions regarding what constitutes an identity with entrepreneurial meaning. Furthermore, we explain a number of mechanisms by which these elements may change over time, explaining why some individuals may develop entrepreneurial identities over the span of their life courses.

    According to McAdams’ life story model of identity (2001), a person’s identity can be conceptualized as an internalized and evolving self-story that provides meaning to one’s experience. In other words, an individual’s identity can be thought of as a psychosocial construction (a construction that is coauthored by the person and its cultural context) that takes the structural form of a story. But what constitutes a story? And, more specifically, what constitutes a life story in terms of narrative structure? Drawing on McAdams’ (2001) model, we conceptualize a life story as a canonical type of narrative structure that includes the following components: (1) a set of identifiable themes that weave together (2) a plot line that is projected on (3) a character (or focal actor) that is embedded in (4) a social and cultural setting

    Stories differ in their constitutive elements (i.e. themes, plot, characters and setting), so what is that makes a story an “entrepreneurial story? In terms of themes identified in the literature, a common thematic thread that weaves entrepreneurial stories is the creation and engagement with a new economic (and social) activity (Davidsson, 2004). This theme usually implies the arrangement of activities and motivations around identifying new means-ends frameworks and organizing and managing resources required for their execution (Chandler & Hanks, 1994). An entrepreneurial story can have many alternative plot lines. The plot line allows the storyteller to convey the significance of some events and not others, to elaborate on some events while omitting others, to draw connections between events that may not seem related, or to omit making connections between events that appear related. In short, the plot allows the storyteller to imbue meaning into a sequence of events and allows the audience to understand the significance of these specific events or, in other words, to make sense of the story. A narrative structure in the form of a story will thus contain “poetic tropes,” which are mechanisms aimed at linking the events of a story and to imbue them with meaning. Examples of these mechanisms are: attributions of causal connections, attributions of agency, attributions of responsibility, attributions of motives or attributions of emotion (Gabriel, 2004). A common plot line in an entrepreneurial story consists of the identification of a problem and the creation of a solution, resulting in a satisfactory outcome for both the entrepreneur and society (Bhave, 1994). This plot line represents a canonical type of cause-effect relationship expressed in the problem-solution dichotomy. The character of a life story consists obviously of the focal person in question and, in the case of an entrepreneurial story, the focal actor is the entrepreneur. Finally, an entrepreneurial story is embedded in a social and cultural setting that helps imbue it with meaning. An entrepreneurial story often invokes an individual’s human and social capital – the acquired knowledge and experience as well as social group membership (Stryker, 1980; Tajfel & Turner, 1985), as well as cultural norms that are proper and acceptable given a set of socially constructed system of norms, values, beliefs and definitions (Suchman, 1995).

    In short, in this paper we develop a series of propositions linking the key constitutive components of a life story to entrepreneurship constructs, thus offering a theoretical explanation of how an entrepreneurial identity, conceptualized as a specific type of story, comes into being. Furthermore, we theorize about how these elements may change over time and its impact on the emergence and development of an entrepreneurial identity over the life course.

  • 781.
    Visintin, Francesca
    et al.
    University of Udine, Italy.
    Pittino, DanielJönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Fast Growing Firms in a Slow Growth Economy: Institutional Conditions for Innovation2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Europe needs more innovative companies that grow quickly and end up big. This book examines SME growth, innovation and success, to suggest that fast growing firms could offer a major contribution to the recovery of a European economy. The contributors examine 11 case studies from Italian firms, breaking the book up into three parts: context, actors and strategy. The topics discussed include entrepreneurship and technological clusters, innovative start-ups and growth factors, and family firms as the incubators of new ventures.

  • 782.
    Visintin, Francesca
    et al.
    University of Udine, Italy.
    Pittino, Daniel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Minichilli, Allessandro
    Bocconi Universitt, Italy.
    Financial performance and non‐family CEO turnover in private family firms under different conditions of ownership and governance2017In: Corporate governance: An International Review, ISSN 0964-8410, E-ISSN 1467-8683, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 312-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manuscript Type: Empirical 

    Research Question/Issue

    Family firms, as insider-controlled companies, should be less likely to exhibit CEO turnover after poor performance and may thus promote enhanced focus on long-term goals. However, when a non-family CEO is in charge, the relatively limited empirical evidence is contrasting. Some studies find that only family CEOs are immune from the threat of dismissal following poor financial performance, while other studies show that family firms discipline their CEOs for poor financial performance regardless of their family status. In this work, we try to reconcile these contrasting findings and investigate what ownership and governance conditions influence the owners’ pressure on the CEO to achieve short-term financial results.

    Research findings/insights

    Drawing on a longitudinal dataset that covers the entire population of Italian medium and large family companies, we find that when family ownership is concentrated in the hands of few family shareholders or there is a low number of family members involved in the board of directors, non-family CEOs are less likely to be dismissed after poor performance.

    Theoretical/Academic Implications

    Our study, adopting the behavioral agency theory as the guiding framework, highlights the importance for governance decisions of the potential goal divergence among principals in closely held ownership structures. Our results also add to the still scant literature on the relationship between family owners and non-family CEOs.

    Practitioner/Policy Implications

    Our research suggests that, in the decision to hire a non-family CEO, family business owners should not only assess their gaps in managerial skills but also carefully consider the ownership structure and family involvement conditions. On the side of professional non-family managers, our results offer insights on ways to address the employment relationship with the controlling family.

  • 783.
    Waldkirch, Matthias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    From professional interactions to relational work: Investigating relationships around non-family CEOs in family firms2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Relationships constitute a central and significant part of our lives and form the very foundation on which organizations are built. They provide meaning to work, create connections, and ultimately shape organizations. This dissertation adds to the growing literature on workplace relationships by studying the chief executive officer (CEO) in an organizational form that is inherently built on relationships: the family firm. Focusing on the introduction of a non-family CEO in a family firm, this dissertation investigates the meaning of relationships for non-family CEOs, the work they perform, and the organizations they reside in. It builds on a diverse set of relational perspectives and uses conceptual approaches and in-depth longitudinal case research.

    The first paper reviews, organizes and extends the literature on non-family CEOs by using gap-spotting and assumption-challenging. The second paper outlines how relationships in the triad between a non-family CEO and members of the current and next generation family owners influence whether a CEO stays or leaves the family firm. The third paper investigates how family firms adopt professional practices and outlines four modes of professionalization, showing how family firms‘ overprofessionalize’. The fourth paper follows a CEO succession and reorganization in a family firm over 16 months and investigates how contesting processes of job design and crafting change and create job systems.

    This dissertation contributes by introducing relational work as a core aspect of a CEO’s work, by extending our knowledge about non-family CEOs in family firms and by challenging the understanding of professionalization in family firms. It also contributes to practice by providing guidelines for structuring relations between family owners and (prospective) non-family CEOs.

  • 784.
    Waldkirch, Matthias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Investigating the impact of non-family CEOs: A review and agenda for future researchManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As the field of family business matures, research has focused on actors outside the owner family. The most important non-family member a family firm can hire is arguably a non-family CEO. Given the limited pool of family members, family firms regularly hire such actors, but our knowledge of them is fragmented. Using a systematic literature review, this article collects, organizes and structures current knowledge on the impact of non-family CEOs in family firms. I then propose a research agenda by engaging in ‘gapspotting’ and ‘assumption-challenging’, first outlining gaps in the existing literatures and proposing research questions to fill them, then identifying and problematizing three underlying assumptions in the literature. Finally, I develop alternatives to stimulate new research about non-family CEOs.

  • 785.
    Waldkirch, Matthias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Pulled apart but held together: Job system change as a contestation processManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most prevalent elements shaping organizations is that of jobs and the systems they form. Building on the literature on job design, job crafting and their interplay, I investigate how job systems change during a reorganization. The findings show that job systems change through a contestation process between designing and crafting that undermines the existing job system while unintentionally creating a framework for an emerging job system. The emergent system stabilizes as employees increasingly accomplish work through that system. The article contributes to the literature on work design by investigating the interplay between job design and crafting and by outlining the consequences of crafting for job systems. The article further contributes to the understanding of the actors involved in job design and crafting, and it adds to the growing literature investigating the interplay of formal and informal structures.

  • 786.
    Waldkirch, Matthias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Social identity theory and the family business2015In: Theoretical Perspectives on Family Businesses / [ed] Mattias Nordqvist, Leif Melin, Matthias Waldkirch and Gershon Kumeto, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, p. 137-155Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social identity theory has given one of the most compelling answers to the question ‘who am I’ by linking identity to membership in social groups. After its adoption to organisational studies, where it has been used to understand, explain and forecast group behaviour, social identity theory has recently been adapted to family business research. After shortly briefly introducing social identity theory and its development, the chapter reviews how the theory has been used in family business research. As social identity theory in family business research has not been used to its fullest potential, the chapter then outlines several ways through which new insights into issues such as succession, non-family management and ownership could be created. In the conclusion, the chapter suggests a possible methodology for capturing social identity processes and proposes how family business research could offer new insights into social identity

  • 787.
    Waldkirch, Matthias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    What we do in the shadows: The formality of informal organizing2018In: 78th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2018, Academy of Management , 2018, Vol. 1, Academy of Management , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Formal and informal structures shape organizations and the interaction of actors within.Surprisingly, just recently organizational theorists have started focusing on studying the interplayof both structures. However, most studies focus on how formal influence informal structures,viewing formal changes as clear. Building on a 16-month case study of a reorganization and CEOsuccession in a family-owned company, the study investigates the interplay of formal and informalstructures. I find that informal structures can, in times of weak formal structures, partly substitutetasks of the formal organization through processes of encapsulation and rerouting, creating atemporal ‘shadow organization’. The study thus contributes to the literature on organizing andorganizational design by showing how informal structures can shape formal organizing.

  • 788.
    Waldkirch, Matthias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Tonic or toxin? Investigating the adoption of  ‘professional’ practices in family firmsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Family firms have long faced pressures to “professionalize” their business and even their owner family’s systems. However, how professionalization unfolds over time and what it means for the business and family systems are unclear. We combine literature on professionalization and practice adoption to investigate how family firms adopt professional practices and adapt them to the underlying family and business systems. Relying on a longitudinal single case study, we have followed the professionalization process in a family firm for over a decade. Our findings show how family firms utilize four distinct modes of professionalization to balance family and business needs with professional practice requirements. We observe and conceptualize how family firms “overprofessionalize” when they adopt practices with an excessive degree of extensiveness, fidelity, and synchrony and show how overprofessionalization can be especially harmful to the family system. Thus, our study contributes by critiquing professionalization and focusing on the systems for which practices are adopted.

  • 789.
    Waldkirch, Matthias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    When the cure turns counterproductive: Parallel professionalization in family firms2017In: 2017 Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2017, Academy of Management , 2017, p. 1-6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pressures to professionalize family firms increasingly encompass ownership practices. Relying on a 10-year single-case study, we show how the parallel professionalization of business and family governance interact over time and how conflicts of norms, introduced through professional practices, affect family and business. We thus cast an ambivalent picture of professionalization. © 

  • 790.
    Waldkirch, Matthias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Finding benevolence in family firms: The case of stewardship theory2017In: The Routledge companion to family business / [ed] Franz Kellermanns, Frank Hoy, New York: Routledge, 2017, p. 401-414Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 791.
    Waldkirch, Matthias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    CEO turnover in family firms: How social exchange relationships influence whether a non-family CEO stays or leaves2018In: Human Resource Management Review, ISSN 1053-4822, E-ISSN 1873-7889, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 56-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interpersonal relationships are an important factor in organizations, and a growing number of articles examine how such relationships affect why people stay or leave organizations. In this article, we investigate how affective attachment between actors influences the turnover and retention process of non-family CEOs in family firms. By employing a social exchange perspective, we reveal under which conditions affective attachment come into being. We focus on the relationship between a non-family CEO and two generations of the owner family. Conceptualizing their relationship as an exchange triad, we show how imbalances influence the affective attachment created in this triad and outline the implications for turnover. Our article contributes to the literature on family businesses and turnover by linking the affective side of interpersonal relationships to CEO retention and turnover.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-06-01 00:00
  • 792.
    Weiss, Jan Frederic
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Stephan, Andreas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Anisimova, Tatiana
    Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Well-designed environmental regulation and firm performance: Swedish evidence on the Porter hypothesis and the effect of regulatory time strategies2019In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 62, no 2, p. 342-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using recent data on a cross-section of Swedish chemical and pulp and paper firms, this paper provides novel empirical insights into the Porter hypothesis. Well-designed environmental regulation can stimulate firms’ innovative capabilities, while at the same time generating innovation offsets that may both offset net compliance costs and yield a competitive edge over those firms that are not affected by such regulations. In doing so, we also test the alleged effectiveness of regulatory time strategies in stimulating innovation activities of regulated firms. We find evidence for the effectiveness of such well-designed regulations: announced rather than existing regulation induces innovation and some innovation offsets. Our results imply that empirical tests of the Porter hypothesis that do not account for its dynamic nature, and that do not measure well-designed regulations, might provide misleading conclusions as to its validity.

  • 793.
    Wennberg, Karl
    et al.
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm .
    Delmar, Frederic
    Lunds universitet .
    Hellerstedt, Karin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Teknikintensivt nyföretagande och tillväxt i branscher och företag2012In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, no 6, p. 36-49Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hur olika typer av entreprenörskap stimulerar ekonomisk tillväxt är fortfarande en empiriskt outforskad fråga. Dessutom har teorier om relationen mellan entreprenörskap och tillväxt i mycket begränsad utsträckning beaktat branschstrukturens roll för tillväxt. I denna uppsats söker vi undersöka detta genom två forskningsfrågor: Bidrar teknikintensivt nyföretagande relativt mer till tillväxt i branscher med mer behov av ny teknik? Är tillväxten av nya teknikbaserade företag betingad av vissa branschstrukturers behov av ny teknik? Vi undersöker dessa frågor med hjälp av en mikro-meso modell av endogen tillväxt som testas på en totalräknad databas av kunskapsintensiva sektorer i Sverige mellan 1995–2002

  • 794. Wennberg, Karl
    et al.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Wiklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Hellerstedt, Karin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Implications of Intra-Family and External Ownership Transfer of Family Firm: short-term and long-term performance differences2011In: Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal, ISSN 1932-4391, E-ISSN 1932-443X, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 352-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We contrast the performance consequences of intra-family versus external ownership transfers. Investigating a sample of all private family firms in Sweden that went through ownership transfers during 10 years, we find that firms transferred to external owners outperform those transferred within the family, but that survival is higher among intra-family transfers. We attribute these performance differences to the long-term orientation of family firms passed on to the next generation and to the entrepreneurial willingness of acquirers to bear uncertainty. Based on distinct ownership transition routes and theoretical mechanisms explaining performance differences, we outline implications for family business and entrepreneurship research.

  • 795.
    Wielsma, Albertha
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Windesheim University of Applied Sciences, Netherlands.
    Corporate reputation and the family business2015In: Theoretical perspectives on family businesses / [ed] Mattias Nordqvist, Leif Melin, Matthias Waldkirch and Gershon Kumeto, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, p. 233-252Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corporate reputation is a largely neglected topic in the family firm literature. That neglect is surprising because corporate reputation is found to be an important source of competitive advantage and can therefore be an explanatory factor for firm performance and behaviour. The purpose of this chapter is to contribute to the field of family business by demonstrating the potential of the reputation research in this field. The chapter first introduces the corporate reputation construct and how this construct and the related constructs of image and reputation capital are approached in the literature from different disciplines. The second part of the chapter provides a review of the current family business literature on this topic. Three approaches of corporate reputation have been identified: 1. Reputation of family firms as an assessment by stakeholders. 2. Reputation as a managerial goal to preserve socioemotional wealth. 3. Reputation as a communication goal or strategy of family firms. The discussion of the literature identifies major gaps in our knowledge and in our methodological orientation that represent opportunities for future research.

  • 796.
    Wielsma, Albertha
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Windesheim University of Applied Sciences, Zwolle, Netherlands.
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    “Who am I? Who are we?”: Understanding the impact of family business identity on the development of individual and family identity in business families2019In: The Journal of Family Business Strategy, ISSN 1877-8585, E-ISSN 1877-8593, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 38-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Family firms incorporate two identities, namely the identity of the firm and the identity of the family. Previous literature assumes that the owning family influences the identity of the firm by transferring the values and beliefs of the owners to the firm. However, identity theory suggests that identity formation is a dynamic process, based on iterations with the environment and interpretations of the past identity. In family firms this means that identity of the family can also be influenced by the firm. In this longitudinal study of a multi-generational family firm, we draw from identity literature to explore how the interplay between the business and the family identity can take place in a family firm. Our observations suggest that the identity of the firm can influence identity processes on various levels and that this is not necessarily beneficial for the family. Our study thus contributes to the understanding of identity issues in family firms. 

  • 797.
    Wigren, Caroline
    et al.
    Department of Business Administration, Lund University.
    Hellerstedt, Karin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Aggestam, M.
    Stevenson, A.
    Brundin, Ethel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Disembeddedness, prior industry knowledge and opportunity creation processes2019In: Rigour and relevance in entrepreneurship research, resources and outcomes: Frontiers in European entrepreneurship research / [ed] E. Laveren, R. Blackburn, U. Hytti & H. Landström, Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 798.
    Wigren-Kristoferson, Caroline
    et al.
    Department of Business Administration, Lund University, Sweden.
    Aggestam, M.
    Alsos, G.
    Brundin, Ethel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Grande, J.
    Hellerstedt, Karin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Korsgaard, S.
    Ljunggren, E.
    Stevenson, A.
    Entrepreneurship and digital embeddedness: virtual opportunities or challenges?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 799.
    Wigren-Kristoferson, Caroline
    et al.
    Department of Business Administration, Lund University, Sweden.
    Brundin, Ethel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Hellerstedt, Karin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Stevenson, A.
    Aggestam, M.
    Disembeddedness, prior industry experience and opportunity creation processes2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 800.
    Wiklund, Johan
    et al.
    Whitman School of Management, Syracuse University.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Hellerstedt, Karin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Bird, Miriam
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Internal Versus External Ownership Transition in Family Firms: An Embeddedness Perspective2013In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 1319-1340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate factors that influence family business owners' choice between passing ownership within the family or to new external owners. Taking an embeddedness perspective focusing on owner-family structure and involvement, we hypothesize that ownership dispersion, number of potential heirs, multigenerational involvement, and whether the chief executive officer is a family member influence the choice of an internal or external transition of ownership. We build a longitudinal data set from a sample of 3,829 family firms and their ownership transitions. Our theorizing and findings regarding ownership transitions complements the abundant research on management succession and therefore constitutes an important contribution to the literature.

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