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  • 6001. Cherfan, Pierre
    et al.
    Tompa, Andrea
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Wikby, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Löfgren, Sture
    Jonasson, Lena
    Effects of simvastatin on human T cells in vivo2007In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 193, no 1, p. 186-192Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6002. Chernov, Alexey
    et al.
    Hansbo, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Simulation and Optimization.
    An hp-Nitsche’s Method for Interface Problems with Nonconforming Unstructured Finite Element Meshes2011In: Spectral and High Order Methods for Partial Differential Equations / [ed] Jan S. Hesthaven and Einar M. Rønquist, 2011, p. 153-161Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we propose an hp-Nitsche’s method for the finite element solution of interface elliptic problems using non-matched unstructured meshes of triangles and parallelograms in  2 and tetrahedra and parallelepipeds in  3. We obtain an explicit lower bound for the penalty weighting function in terms of the local inverse inequality constant. We prove a priori error estimates which are explicit in the mesh size h and in the polynomial degree p. The error bound is optimal in h and suboptimal in polynomial degree by p 1∕2.

  • 6003.
    Chernyakov, A. E.
    et al.
    RAS, SHM RandE Center, St. Petersburg, Russian Federation.
    Aladov, A. V.
    RAS, SHM RandE Center, St. Petersburg, Russian Federation.
    Belov, Ilja
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Belov, V. F.
    Mordovian State University, Saransk, Russian Federation.
    Zakgeim, A. L.
    RAS, SHM RandE Center, St. Petersburg, Russian Federation.
    Modeling of Temperature Distribution Induced by Thermo-Mechanical Deformation of High-Power AlInGaN LED Arrays2019In: THERMINIC 2019 - 2019 25th International Workshop Thermal Investigations of ICs and Systems, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermo-mechanical deformation, thermal resistance, and lateral temperature distribution were experimentally studied for a high-power AlGaInN LED chip-on-board array at three different input powers. A fullscale CFD model of the LED assembly was developed and correlated with the temperature and average thermal resistance measurements to enable prediction of the temperature distribution on the surface of a thermally deformed LED assembly. Application of the thermal resistance partitioning approach to thermal modeling of the deformed LED assemblies was discussed. It can be useful for design engineers for estimation of the temperature distribution across the deformed LED array, at the minimum number of temperature measurements required for model calibration.

  • 6004.
    Chernyakov, Anton E.
    et al.
    SHM R&E Center, RAS, St.Petersburg, Russia.
    Aladov, Andrey V.
    SHM R&E Center, RAS, St.Petersburg, Russia.
    Belov, Ilja
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Zakgeim, Alexander L.
    SHM R&E Center, RAS, St.Petersburg, Russia.
    Thermal resistance and temperature distribution in blue and white high-power LED arrays2017In: Proceedings of the 23rd International Workshop on Thermal Investigations of ICs and Systems (THERMINIC), 2017, IEEE, 2017, p. 1-4, article id Code 132094Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal resistance and temperature distribution for high-power AlGaInN LED chip-on-board arrays in blue and white versions were measured by different methods and tools. The p-n junction temperature was determined through measuring a temperature-dependent forward voltage drop on the p-n junction, at a low measuring current after applying a high heating current. Furthermore, the infrared thermal imaging technique was employed to obtain the temperature map for the test object. A steady-state 3D computational model of the experimental setup was created including temperature-dependent power dissipation in the LED chips and partitioned interfacial thermal resistance between the heatsink and the LED array. Simulations of the heat transfer in the LED array were performed to further investigate temperature gradients observed in the measurements.

  • 6005.
    Cherro, Samir
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Finance.
    Sadiku, Fadilj
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Finance.
    Aim For The Stars: Is it worth paying higher fees for funds within the Morningstar RatingTM system2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Morningstar is an independent provider of investment research and provide information on approximately 380 000 investment offerings about mutual funds. Morningstar are most known for their “star” rating system, which rates funds from the lowest 1-star to the highest 5-stars.

    Since investors frequently use fund data provided by Morningstar, we will evaluate whether investing in funds with higher fees and higher ratings would end up with higher returns. Examinations will be made if there is a relationship between mutual fund performance and the management fees within top-rated (5-star) funds and bottom-rated (1-&2-star).

    The mutual funds which are included in this thesis are United Kingdom (UK) managed and invested in three different markets; Asia-Pacific except-Japan, Europe except UK-Large Cap, and the United States (US) Market. This allows us to compare different markets at different stages of maturity.

    The results clearly show that the top-rated funds within all three markets outperformed the bottom-rated funds. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that the investor in general will earn a higher return by paying a higher management fee (TER) for the top-rated funds in all regions. The results also show that the TER for the bottom-rated funds in Europe and US market is higher compared to the top-rated funds. This means that the investor will pay higher fees for funds that do not perform well.

  • 6006.
    Chesbrough, Henry
    et al.
    ESADE Business School.
    Vanhaverbeke, Wim
    ESADE Business School.
    Bakici, Tuba
    ESADE Business School.
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    ESADE Business School.
    Open Innovation and Public Policy in Europe2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial innovation processes are becoming more open. The large, vertically integrated R&D laboratory systems of the 20th century are giving way to more vertically disintegrated networks of innovation that connect numerous companies into ecosystems. Since innovation policy ultimately rests on the activities and initiatives of the private sector, it is vital that policy follows this evolution.

    Previous innovation policies relied on large companies to act as the engines of innovation in the EU. While large companies remain quite relevant to innovation within the EU, they themselves report that their processes involve many more SMEs and other contributors outside their own walls. Therefore, innovation policy must also move outside the walls of these large companies and consider the roles of human capital, competition policy, financing, intellectual property, and public data in promoting an environment of open innovation.

    In this report, we combine new research and analysis on open innovation with focused interviews of major participants in the European innovation system. The result is a series of recommendations for public policies that could, if implemented, improve the climate for open innovation to take place in the European Union – and thereby improve the competitiveness of the European economy overall. Taken together, these recommendations comprise an informal ‘charter’ for EU open innovation policy. The authors would like to thank Esther Van Zimmeren of the Centre for Intellectual Property Rights (CIR) of the Catholic University of Leuven for her explanation of various aspects of the European patenting system and the role of patent pools and IP clearing houses.

    This report was commissioned by ESADE Business School in Barcelona and the Science|Business Innovation Board AISBL. The Board is a Belgian not-for-profit scientific association that commissions original policy research, engages with policymakers and the press, and works generally to improve the climate for innovation in Europe. Its three co-founders are Science|Business, ESADE and INSEAD, with participation and support from Microsoft, BP, SKF and Imperial College London. In addition, Pfizer contributed support for this particular study. Further information is at www.sciencebusiness.net. The Board is grateful to Máire GeogheganQuinn, EU Commissioner for Research, Innovation and Science, for her encouragement and comments on this research.

  • 6007.
    Cheung, Ching Chi
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Semi-automated process planning and cost estimation of turned components based on CATIA V5 Machining2008Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Magister), 20 points / 30 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    To be more competitive in the market, many companies are trying to speed up the quotation process and quote more attractive prices. Therefore, they have identified a need for support in the quotation process in order to reduce the quotation lead-time and ensure a higher level of accuracy in the cost estimations. The Quotation Calculator, an application program, has been developed as part of the degree thesis which was carried out at AB Norrahammars Mekaniska Verkstad, NMW 2006/07. This Quotation Calculator can be operated to calculate the material and manufacturing costs of a new product.

    NMW has recently acquired licenses for CATIA V5, Dassault Systems, for the purpose of making process planning and NC-programming more efficient. NMW wants to generate the data needed from the machining module for the cost calculations. Hence this project was initiated in order to extract data from CATIA V5 for further use in Quotation Calculator or other computer system in NMW.

    This work has resulted in a system developed with a common hosted programming language to extract and transfer information. The system retrieves model geometry from CAD and information on process planning from CAM, then matches the information in the application for the purpose of cost estimation. The system once developed, is supposed to be used for every new product. For this approach, the relationship of the data from CATIA V5 and the Quotation Calculator has been analyzed.

    Within this thesis, the focus is on production cost estimation. The method used here is programming in Visual Basic Editor to extract information from the machining module in CATIA V5 and then import them to Microsoft Excel. With standard operations, tables of data and several inputs, the cost calculation and hence the quotation process can be automatically implemented. This work has been generated with the Quotation Calculator. With the correct input data to process planning and this new quotation system, the machining time and the costs can be estimated more accurately and easier. The time and cost information is made available for decision making. As a result, the lead time for the quotation process will be shortened and a relatively more attractive price can be quoted to the customers.

  • 6008.
    Chiang, Joling
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Svensson, Mathias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Intercultural Communication in Supply Chain Management: A Study of Communication Frictions and Solutions between Swedish & Chinese Companies2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    China provides the rest of the world vast opportunities thanks to its low cost labour with ample manpower and gradually increasing expertise. It also has a huge potential in its size and market. With the increasing trade between China and Sweden at a rapid pace, the need for a research into intercultural communication, which helps to gener-ate an efficient and effective supply chain, is also growing at an accelerative speed.The purpose of this thesis is to look for possible problems and identify the frictions that may arise from the cause of cultural differences existing in the communication between Swedish and Chinese companies. This research is carried out from a Swedish perspective through the eyes of Swedish companies. However, the way they perceive the communica-tion between Sweden and China and the methods they have used to adjust to the cultural differences can be good examples to those who are interested in Chinese market.In the frame of references, a number of theories and literature related to intercultural communication were used to identify factors that influence communication between cul-tures, which formed the basis of the framework the authors used for the collection of pri-mary data. This thesis was conducted through an interpretive point of view and a qualita-tive method was used for the collection of empirical data. The primary data consisted of in-terviews and the secondary data was collected through literature reviews. Thus, the empiri-cal result was derived from the companies which have business relationship and experience of dealing with Chinese companies. Data was gathered from seven different Swedish com-panies located in Jonkoping County: Waggeryd Cell AB, Scandinavian Eyewear AB, Kapsch TraficCom AB, Kongsberg Automotive, Hestra-Handsken AB, Arlemark Glas AB and Falks Broker AB.The main conclusions of this study are namely that there are a number of cultural differ-ences existing in the communication between Swedish and Chinese companies. In most cases, Swedish companies initially tend to make the most effort to adapt to the situation and bridge these cultural differences by applying diverse solutions. Furthermore, two criti-cal key factors stand out as more important than the others in leading to successful com-munication between Swedish and Chinese companies: relationship and the concept of face. These two factors were shown to be present in all aspects of communication. Therefore, knowledge and successful incorporation of these two essential elements will be of greatest importance for Swedish companies who seek to communicate with Chinese companies.

  • 6009.
    Chik, Pakey Pui-man
    et al.
    University of Hong Kong.
    Runesson, Ulla
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Learning experience and possibilities: a study on two primary 4 chinese language lessons in Hong Kong2008In: Educational Research Journal, ISSN 1560-8263, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 71-95Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we explore how learning experience can best be described and relate to the teaching enactment so as to inform teaching practices in specific contexts. Two lessons dealing with the same topic in Primary 4 in Hong Kong schools were videotaped and a post-lesson diagnostic worksheet was given to the students. The aim of the study was to identify differences between the two lessons in what was made possible for learning on the topic, and to relate those differences to students’ perception and outcomes in learning. The data collected were analysed from the theoretical assumption that “variation” in the “object of learning” is essential to creating learning opportunities in the classroom. The results showed a critical difference in the way the teachers handled the object of learning. This was in turn found to have contributed to the opening of different “patterns of variation and invariance” in and thus, different possibilities for learning the object of learning. This difference was also reflected in the students' report of their perception and outcomes in learning.

  • 6010. Chilcott, Mandy
    et al.
    Barry, Daved
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Nova School of Business and Economics, Portugal.
    Narrating creativity: Developing an emic, first person approach to creativity research2016In: The International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, ISSN 1446-5019, no 3, p. 57-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the complexity of workplace creativity, laboratory or survey-based quantitative research conducted in the positivist tradition supports a trend towards prescriptive 'recipied' lists for stimulating creativity. In contrast, by recognising creativity as a complex multi-level system, we were inspired by ideas from narrative therapy to develop a new narrative inquiry methodology that uses personal storytelling to collaboratively investigate, promote intelligent reflection on, and enhance the creativity process. Our aim was to explore how taking a pragmatic constructivist approach might unfold a new way of eliciting richly descriptive realworld information that exploits local situated knowledge (what we call 'emic creativity') about the individual and group creative processes within a workplace. Using a developmental application of the methodology as a single-level case study on gaming designers in Denmark, we found that the new emic creativity methodology can contribute valuable information about creativity within a particular system.

  • 6011.
    Chimboza, Milcent
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    The effect of financial development on income inequality in Africa: Looking for a needle in a haystack?2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the effect of financial development on income inequality in 20 African countries. Theory and a growing number of empirical studies suggest that the former exerts a negative impact on the latter by enabling low-income holders to undertake income-enhancing education and business investments, thereby promoting a tighter income distribution. However, using the share of GDP constituted by domestic credit to the private sector and broad money respectively as proxies for financial development, the results of this study fail to give significant evidence of this income-equalising effect. Given the heterogeneous nature of the economies studied here and the fact that data quality and quantity improve over time, it is believed that country-specific studies and future research can offer more conclusive results on how financial development influences income distribution in the African context. This would also provide a stronger foundation for policy recommendations in the continent’s plight to address the persistent high levels of income inequality.

  • 6012.
    Chinapah, Vinayagum
    et al.
    Institute of International Education (IIE), Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Blom, Karen Ann
    Institute of International Education (IIE), Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Education for Rural Transformation (ERT) Good Practices: Myth or reality!2013In: Education for Rural Transformation (ERT): Good practices from national and international perspectives, Volume 1: From theory to practice / [ed] Vinayagum Chinapah, Stockholm: Institute of International Education, Department of Education, Stockholm University , 2013, p. 31-52Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6013.
    Chinapah, Vinayagum
    et al.
    Department of Education, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Blom, Karen Ann
    Department of Education, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Introduction2012In: Voices from within: Redefining the “Spaces” of international and comparative education, a collective contribution / [ed] Vinayagum Chinapah, Stockholm: Institute of International Education, Department of Education, Stockholm University , 2012Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6014.
    Chinapah, Vinayagum
    et al.
    Institute of International Education (IIE), Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Blom, Karen Ann
    Institute of International Education (IIE), Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Gani-Dutt, Khaleda
    Introduction2013In: Education for Rural Transformation (ERT): Good practices from national and international perspectives, Volume 1: From theory to practice / [ed] Vinayagum Chinapah, Stockholm: Institute of International Education, Department of Education, Stockholm University , 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6015.
    Chinapah, Vinayagum
    et al.
    Institute of International Education (IIE), Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Blom, Karen Ann
    Institute of International Education (IIE), Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Gani-Dutt, Khaleda
    Introduction2013In: Education for Rural Transformation (ERT): Good practices from national and international perspectives, Volume 2: The "schooling" challenge / [ed] Vinayagum Chinapah, Stockholm: Institute of International Education, Department of Education, Stockholm University , 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6016. Chindamo, M.
    et al.
    Allwood, Jens
    SCCIIL Interdisciplinary Center, Department of Applied IT, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Ahlsen, E.
    Some suggestions for the study of stance in communication2012In: Proceedings - 2012 ASE/IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust and 2012 ASE/IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, SocialCom/PASSAT 2012, 2012, p. 617-622Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interlocutors, express not only information in the form of spoken words but also their feelings and commitments with regard to what is being said. In face-to-face communication participants interact in such a way that they react to one another’s multimodal positioning in the conversation. Often this means that they take a ’stance’. The goal of this paper is to explore the notion of stance through a review and discussion of some of the relevant literature and then relate this to research on social signal processing (SSP). The main focus of the review is on the notion of stance in linguistics, as the point of departure for exploring other fields. Consideration of the relation between gestural communication and expression of emotions will give a more complete view of how a stance is taken and upheld. ©2012 IEEE.

  • 6017.
    Chirico, Francesco
    University of Lugano.
    An empirical examination of the FITS family-business model2007In: The Management Case Study Journal, ISSN 1445-033X, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 55-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present case study research is based on the 'FITS family-business model' aimed at exploring the process that leads to value creation in family business through the lens of knowledge, dynamic capabilities and family culture. Four family-business case studies from Italy and Switzerland are presented and interesting results emerge to support the FITS's view of value creation in family business. Case studies have been analysed and developed closely with the practising entrepreneurs of the family business interviewed.

  • 6018.
    Chirico, Francesco
    University of Lugano.
    Family inertia and value creation in family firms. Are they compatible? New Insights from a simulation study2007In: Dimensions on Family Business Research, Vol 2, No 37, University of Jyvaskyla Press , 2007Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6019.
    Chirico, Francesco
    University of Lugano.
    Improving the long-run survival of family firms: Knowledge-management and resource-shedding processes2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 6020.
    Chirico, Francesco
    University of Lugano, Switzerland.
    Knowledge accumulation in family firms: evidence from four case studies2008In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 433-462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to make a contribution to the understanding of how knowledge can be accumulated in family business. Four family firms from Switzerland and Italy are part of this research. Existing literature combined with the case studies analysed lead to the development of a model that outlines factors responsible for knowledge accumulation viewed as an `enabler of longevity' in family business.The relationships depicted in the model can be read by researchers as hypotheses and suggestions for further research, and by managers as possible factors needed to accumulate knowledge in order to be successful across generations.

  • 6021.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. University of Lugano.
    Knowledge models in family business: evidence from Ticino region (Switzerland)2008In: Culture-Specific Models of Family Businesses: A Compendium using GLOBE Paradigm / [ed] Gupta, V., Levenburg, N., Moore, L., Motwani, J., and Schwarz, T., ICFAI Press , 2008Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6022.
    Chirico, Francesco
    University of Lugano.
    The business failure in the 'start-up phase' and future research in family business2007In: Dimensions on Family Business Research, Vol 1, No 36, University of Jyvaskyla Press , 2007Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6023.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    The creation, sharing and transfer of knowledge in family business2008In: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 0827-6331, E-ISSN 2169-2610, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 413-433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This present research aims at investigating how "knowledge-related human capital" can be accumulated, i.e. created, shared and transferred, in family business over time. "Knowledge-related human capital" is viewed as pure knowledge and skill which family members have gained and developed through education and experience within and outside the organization. Two wine-producing family firms from Switzerland and a liqueur family firm from Italy are part of this research. A tentative knowledge model is presented at the end of the study. It analyses factors responsible for the accumulation process of knowledge in family business across generations.

  • 6024.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Backman, Mikaela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Karlsson, M.
    Pittino, Daniel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    No Firm is an Island: Local Embeddedness and Rural-Urban Contexts for Business Growth in Family versus non-Family Firms.2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6025.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Financial Distress in Family and Non-Family-Controlled Firms2016In: Academy of Management Proceedings, January 2016 (Meeting Abstract Supplement) 12016 / [ed] John Humphreys, Academy of Management , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we heed the call from a growing number of scholars to extend our understanding of performance differences between family and non-family firms. Drawing on the mixed gamble logic of the behavioral agency model and the socioemotional wealth prospective, we provide a more fine-grained understanding of the unique role and diverse logic of dominant owners in relation to performance outcomes. Our findings suggest that family firms are the worst among the best (i.e. among firms that do not experience financial distress, they perform worse) and the best among the worst (i.e. among firms that experience financial distress, they perform better), which we attribute to the fact that family owners have more firm specific current wealth to lose (including not only financial wealth but also SEW), and as such respond differently to financial distress.

  • 6026.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Is the Family an "Asset" or "Liability" for Firm Performance? The Moderating Role of Environmental Dynamism2014In: Journal of small business management (Print), ISSN 0047-2778, E-ISSN 1540-627X, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 210-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By integrating the stewardship and agency perspectives, our study extends the understanding of the dynamics that regulate the family as either an asset or liability for the firm. Our results show that the percentage of family members on the top management team (TMT) has an inverted U-shaped relationship with firm performance. However, when environmental dynamism is low this curvilinear relationship becomes steeper. When environmental dynamism is high, an increased percentage of family members on the TMT enhances firm performance.

  • 6027.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Is the Family an Asset or Liability? The Role of Environmental Dynamism on Family Firm Performance2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6028.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Gomez-Mejia, Luis
    W. P. Carey School of Business, Arizona State University.
    Martin, Geoff
    Melbourne Business School, University of Melbourne.
    Risk-Taking and Financial Distress in Family-controlled Firms2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6029.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Schulze, William S.
    Department of Entrepreneurship and Strategy, David Eccles School of Business.
    Are Family Firms Loss Averse?2019In: Academy of Management Proceedings: Academy of Management, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A substantial stream of research has examined how strategic decision making in family-controlled firms is driven by a concern for safeguarding its socioemotional wealth (SEW), or the “affect related value embedded in the family firm” (Gomez-Mejia et al, 2007: 108). Proponents of this theory argue that because family owners and strongly identify with their firm (Cannella, Jones & Withers, 2015; Deephouse & Jaskiewicz, 2013), they routinely prioritize non-economic goals. In this study, we propose an alternative framing based on social identity. Using a panel study of private Swedish firms, we develop theory and find support for our claim that the concern for social identity gives family firms incentives to pursue penetration strategies and make related acquisitions in their core markets, and to offset the risks of that strategy by making diversifying unrelated) in peripheral markets. A reversal of this strategy when financial implications are averse supports the conclusion that family firms are not loss averse. Implications for BAM-based models of SEW are addressed.

  • 6030.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Carnes, Christina M.
    Wook Huh, Dong
    Hitt, Michael A.
    Pisano, Vincenzo
    Structuring and bundling resources for innovation in different firm life cycle stages2014In: Academy of Management Proceedings: Vol. 2014, No. 1, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study based on a sample of US and Italian private firms confirms that resource orchestration is crucial in the creation of innovation. Structuring and bundling resources are important processes for all firms, especially for the development of innovation. Adopting a resource-based logic, we employed the technique of policy capturing to examine the relationship between resource orchestration and the creation of innovation by firms at different stages of their life-cycle. Our results show that early-stage (start-up and growth) firms attempt to acquire and accumulate resources and to enrich existing capabilities and pioneer new ones to develop novel innovations. This emphasis shifts to divesting resources and stabilizing existing capabilities during later (maturity and revitalization) stages to achieve more incremental innovations. This research contributes to our knowledge of innovation, resource orchestration and the firm life-cycle stages.

  • 6031.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Colombo, Gianluca
    An experimental examination of the Fits family-business model: new insights from a simulation study through system dynamics2008In: Theoretical developments and future research in family business / [ed] Phillip H. Phan and John E. Butler, Charlotte, N.C.: Information Age Publishing, 2008, p. 77-116Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6032.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Criaco, Giuseppe
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Department of Strategic Management and Entrepreneurship, Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Naldi, Lucia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Gomez-Mejia, Luis R.
    Department of Management, W.P. Carey School of Business, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA.
    Kotlar, Josip
    Centre for Family Business, Lancaster University Management School, Bailrigg, Lancaster, UK.
    To patent or not to patent: That is the question. Intellectual property protection in family firms2018In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines family firms’ propensity to protect their intellectual property through patents. Building on the mixed gamble logic of the behavioral agency model, we theorize that family ownership has a U-shaped relationship with firm propensity to patent. Specifically, we argue that family firms’ desire to prevent losses of current socioemotional wealth inhibits their propensity to patent until a threshold level of family ownership, beyond which the family’s socioemotional wealth is secured and a greater focus on prospective financial gains attainable through patents is possible. We also suggest that environmental munificence moderates this nonlinear relationship such that a low-munificent environment accentuates the potentially detrimental (beneficial) effects of low-to-medium (medium-to-high) levels of family ownership on patents. We test our hypotheses on a sample of 4,198 small- and medium-sized family firms.

  • 6033.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    DeTienne, Dawn
    Colorado State University, USA.
    Clinton, Eric
    Dublin City University, Ireland.
    Sciascia, Salvatore
    IULM University-Milan, Italy.
    Resource structuring: linking resource acquisition, accumulation, and divestment in family firms2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While much has been written about the idiosyncratic nature of family firms, the processes of managing the resource base in family firms has received limited attention. We examine resource structuring in family firms, inclusive of resource acquisition, accumulation and divestment. Specifically, we theorize that family firms that engage in resource acquisition and accumulation achieve higher levels of resource divestment. While the family generation in control positively moderate these relationships, the presence of a family CEO negatively moderate them. Additionally, we predict that family CEOs in later generations also engage less in resource divestment. Our theory is tested on a sample of 241 Irish family firms.

  • 6034.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Gómez-Mejia, Luis R.
    W.P. Carey School of Business, Arizona State University, Department of Management, Tempe, AZ, USA.
    Hellerstedt, Karin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Withers, Michael
    Mays Business School, Texas A&M University, Department of Management, College Station, TX, USA.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    To merge, sell or liquidate? Socioemotional wealth, family control, and the choice of business exit2019In: Journal of Management, ISSN 0149-2063, E-ISSN 1557-1211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We take the perspective that considering the affective motives of dominant owners is essential to understanding business exit. Drawing on a refinement of behavioral agency theory, we argue that family-controlled firms are less likely than non-family-controlled firms to exit and tend to endure increased financial distress to avoid losses to the family’s socioemotional wealth (SEW) embodied in the firm. Yet, when confronted with different exit options and performance heuristics suggest that exit is unavoidable family firms are more likely to exit via merger, which we argue saves some SEW, although it is less satisfactory financially. In contrast, non-family firms are more likely to exit via sale or dissolution, options that are more prone to offer higher financial returns than mergers. Family and non-family firms thus show different orders of exit options. We find support for these arguments in a longitudinal matched sample of privately held Swedish firms.

  • 6035.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Hellerstedt, Karin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Mattias, Nordqvist
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Business Exit in Family vs. Non-Family Firms: When Emotional Logic Overrules Rational Judgment2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6036.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Hellerstedt, Karin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    “Do Family Firms Exit Less?”2012In: Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research: Vol. 32, Texas, USA, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6037.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Texas A&M University, Mays Business School, College Station, TX, USA.
    Ireland, Duane
    Texas A&M University, Mays Business School, College Station, TX, USA.
    Sirmon, David
    Texas A&M University, Mays Business School, College Station, TX, USA.
    Franchising and the family firm: creating unique sources of advantage through ‘familiness’2011In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 483-501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paucity of research examining family firms engaged with franchising is surprising. We theorize about differences in franchising behavior between family and nonfamily firms and the relative advantages accruing to family firms in this context. We also explore how selection processes tend to lead to family franchisor/family franchisee matches that enable a more effective sharing of complementary resources. The theoretical framework we develop is grounded in the “familiness” of the family firm as suggested by the logic of the resource based view. Additionally, our theoretical analysis extends and complements the frequent use of agency theory as the basis for studying franchising

  • 6038.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Naldi, Lucia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Criaco, Giuseppe
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Socioemotional Wealth and Innovation in Family Firms: When the Environment Gets Tough, the Family Gets Going!2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6039.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    University of Lugano / Texas A&M University.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Dynamic capabilities and transgenerational value creation in family firms: The role of organizational culture2010In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 487-504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While some research on entrepreneurship in family businesses has focused on transgenerational value creation, a gap exists in understanding how such value is generated across generations. The present research offers insights through the lens of dynamic capabilities, which are created by knowledge and in turn generate entrepreneurial performance and value creation. A model is built based on literature and case research. The crucial role of the organizational culture emerges through the empirical study. Family inertia is considered to be a factor preventing the creation of dynamic capabilities. We find that family inertia depends on characteristics of the family business culture, where paternalism and entrepreneurial orientation influence family inertia positively and negatively, respectively. Family firms from Switzerland and Italy active in the beverage industry represent the empirical context. Theoretical and practical implications are offered.

  • 6040.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Colombo, Gianluca
    University of Lugano, Lugano, Switzerland.
    Mollona, Edoardo
    University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
    Simulating Dynamic Capabilities and Value Creation in Family Firms: Is Paternalism an "Asset" or a "Liability"?2012In: Family Business Review, ISSN 0894-4865, E-ISSN 1741-6248, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 318-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors conduct a simulation study using system dynamics methods to interpret how and when paternalism affects dynamic capabilities (DCs) and by association value creation in family firms. Their simulation experiments suggest that the effect of paternalism on DCs and value creation varies over time. Initially, increasing levels of family social capital and low levels of paternalism are associated with high rates of DCs and value creation accumulation (asset). Later, higher levels of paternalism produce their pressure to decrease DCs, value creation, and family social capital accumulation rates (liability)

  • 6041.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Pathak, Seemantini
    University of Missouri, St. Louis, USA.
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Hoskisson, Robert
    Rice University, USA.
    Family versus Non-Family Firm Mergers: Likes Attract Likes, Outperform Opposites2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using social identity theory, we examine how the identity of the target firm in a family firm-led merger impacts the merged entity’s subsequent performance. We compare family firms’ target preferences and postmerger performance to those of non-family firms, and find that not only are family firms more likely to prefer other family firms as merger partners, but also achieve better post-merger outcomes with them. We test our hypotheses using a large sample of Swedish private firms, which largely controls for national cultural differences. After controlling for endogeneity and self-selection bias, our results support all our hypotheses.

  • 6042.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    University of Lugano (USI) - Institute of Management, Centre for Entrepreneurship & Family Firms (CEF), Lugano, Switzerland.
    Salvato, Carlo
    Bocconi University-Management Department, Milan, Italy.
    Knowledge integration and dynamic organizational adaptation in family firms2008In: Family Business Review, ISSN 0894-4865, E-ISSN 1741-6248, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 169-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The speed of change in competitive environments has prompted firms to develop processes directed at enabling organizational adaptation. This is captured by the concept of dynamic capabilities. We focus on a particular form of business organization, that is, the family firm. Specifically, we argue that knowledge integration—a dynamic capability through which family members' specialized knowledge is recombined—guides the evolution of capabilities. We present a general framework illustrating factors that affect knowledge integration in family firms. We conclude that only those family firms that are able to effectively integrate individual family members' specialized knowledge will be successful in dynamic markets by changing their capabilities over time.

  • 6043.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Salvato, Carlo
    Bocconi University.
    Knowledge internalization and product development in family firms: When relational and affective factors matter2016In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 201-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the forces that support and inhibit product development (PD) in family firms is central to explaining their long-term success and survival. Our study reveals that social capital and relational conflict among family members do not affect PD directly, as existing theory suggests, but only through the internalization of knowledge among family members. In contrast, family members’ affective commitment to the family firm is so powerful that it has both a mediated and a direct effect on PD. These results differ across generations of the controlling family, therefore offering an extension of existing theories of knowledge and PD in family firms.

  • 6044.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). EGADE Business School, Tecnológico de Monterrey.
    Salvato, Carlo
    Bocconi University.
    Byrne, Barbara
    University of Ottawa.
    Akhter, Naveed
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Arriaga Múzquiz, Juan
    EGADE Business School, Tecnológico de Monterrey .
    Commitment escalation to a failing family business2018In: Journal of small business management (Print), ISSN 0047-2778, E-ISSN 1540-627X, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 494-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overarching intent of this manuscript is to heighten awareness to the concept of commitment escalation as it bears on a failing family business. Specifically, drawing on the concept of emotional ownership, together with self-justification arguments, we a) identify factors considered to be most forceful in contributing to the presence of commitment escalation and thus, resistance to change in a failing family business (i.e., emotional ownership, feeling of responsibility, investment of capital, temporal distance from the founder’s business, individualism/collectivism), and b) model these related factors in a form that can serve heuristically to stimulate future empirical research capable of testing for the construct validity of commitment escalation in a family business context. We present potential items that may be useful for future scholars in measuring our constructs of interest as they relate to a failing family business.

  • 6045.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Texas A and M University, Mays Business School, College Station, United States.
    Sirmon, David G.
    Texas A and M University, Mays Business School, College Station, United States.
    Sciascia, Salvatore
    IULM University, Italy.
    Mazzola, Pietro
    IULM University, Italy.
    Entrepreneurial Orientation, Generational Involvement and Participative Strategy: A Configurational Approach to Performance in Family Firms2011In: Academy of Management 2011 Annual Meeting: West meets East. Enlightening. Balancing. Transcending, New York: Academy of Management , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To better understand the entrepreneurship in family firms, we consider the joint interaction effect of entrepreneurial orientation (EO), generational involvement and participative strategy. Drawing on the logic of resource orchestration, we argue that participative strategy acts as a coordinating mechanism that not only mitigates the relational conflict that increased generational involvement generates when mobilized EO, but also enhances family firms' ability to utilize the heterogeneous, yet complementary knowledge and experiences generational involvement offers. Configuring participative strategy and EO with generational involvement provides the direction and coordination needed to unlock the potential value of these unique resources. Our theory suggests that realizing the benefits from entrepreneurship in family firms is a complicated matter, affected by the configuration of EO, generational involvement and participative strategy.

  • 6046.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Sirmon, David G.
    Mays Business School, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, U.S.A..
    Sciascia, Salvatore
    Marketing and Economics Department, IULM University, Milan, Italy.
    Mazzola, Pietro
    Marketing and Economics Department, IULM University, Milan, Italy.
    Resource orchestration in family firms: Investigating how entrepreneurial orientation, generational involvement, and participative strategy affect performance2011In: Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal, ISSN 1932-4391, E-ISSN 1932-443X, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 307-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on the process of resource orchestration, we argue a co-alignment of multiple factors is needed for family firms to increase performance through entrepreneurship. Specifically, we posit that entrepreneurial orientation provides the mobilizing vision to use the heterogeneous yet complementary knowledge and experiences offered by increased generational involvement toward entrepreneurship. However, without a coordinating mechanism, generational involvement leads to conflict and negative outcomes. When, instead, it is also coordinated via a participative strategy, performance gains are achieved. In sum, results suggest that realizing the benefits from entrepreneurship in family firms is a complicated matter affected by the synchronization of entrepreneurial orientation, generational involvement, and participative strategy. Copyright © 2011 Strategic Management Society.

  • 6047.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO). Macquarie Business School, Macquarie University, Department of Management, Sydney, Australia.
    Welsh, Dianne H. B.
    Bryan School of Business & Economics, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, United States.
    Ireland, R. Duane
    Mays Business School, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, United States.
    Sieger, Philipp
    Department of Management and Entrepreneurship, University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Family versus non-family firm franchisors: Behavioral and performance differences2020In: Journal of Management Studies, ISSN 0022-2380, E-ISSN 1467-6486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing from resource-based theory, we argue that family firm franchisors behave and perform differently compared to non-family firm franchisors. Our theorizing suggests that compared to a non-family firm franchisor, a family firm franchisor cultivates stronger relationships with franchisees and provides them with more training. Yet, we predict that a family firm franchisor achieves lower performance than a non-family firm franchisor. We argue, however, that this performance relationship reverses itself when family firm franchisors are older and larger. We test our hypotheses with a longitudinal dataset including a matched-pair sample of private U.S. family and non-family firm franchisors.

  • 6048.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Västerås, Sweden.
    Jackson, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalens högskola, Västerås, Sweden.
    Andersson, Niclas
    Bombardier Transportation, Västerås, Sweden.
    Löv, Richard
    Volvo, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Exploring feedback loops in the industrialization process: A case study2018In: Procedia Manufacturing, Elsevier, 2018, Vol. 25, p. 169-176Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to explore the current available practices of feedback loops at different phases in the industrialization process. Although literature highlights the impact of feedback loops for both product and production systems development, there is limited research about how firms utilize the concept of feedback loops in the industrialization process. Based on a case study at a railway component manufacturing company, the paper presents the identified feedback loops and mechanisms that are working well and not working well within the industrialization process. Further, it explains a practical method to improve the current or establish new feedback loops. The paper contributes to the discussion on the application of lean and agile approaches to the industrialization process where feedback loops act as enablers. 

  • 6049.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Schedin, Joel
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Development projects, stage-gate models, and degree of newness: Examining the correlation from a production perspective2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many companies have adopted stage-gate models to manage different types of development projects, which can vary in degree of newness. Currently, there is limited research on how the development projects, stage-gate models and degree of newness are correlated in practice from a production perspective. Based on a case study at a manufacturing company, this paper examines correlations from a production perspective. The results show that the company runs nine types of development projects in production, and uses two forms of stage-gate models. The degree of newness is not addressed in a structured way in production compared to the product development process.

  • 6050.
    chivarar, sonia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Informatics.
    Akhatov, Sobirjon
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Informatics.
    Rebwar, Shakir
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Informatics.
    Data Mining and Risk Management in Banking: A case study withing banking industry: A Critical Realist perspective on customer retention2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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