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  • 51.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    The Relationship Between Intelligence Quotient and Aspects of Everyday Functioning and Participation for People Who Have Mild and Borderline Intellectual Disabilities2018Ingår i: JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, ISSN 1360-2322, E-ISSN 1468-3148, Vol. 31, nr 1, s. e68-e78Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    This study explored the relationship between intelligence quotient (IQ) and aspects of everyday functioning/participation in individuals (age 16–40) who have a mild/borderline intellectual disability (IQ 55–85).

    Method

    Correlations were examined between IQ and (i) self-rated (n = 72) ability, participation as performance (how often an activity is performed), important participation restriction (not/seldom performing an activity perceived as important) and general well-being and (ii) proxy-rated (n = 41) ability and participation as performance.

    Results

    No significant correlations between IQ and any of the explored measures were found. However, the effect sizes of the correlations between IQ and ability were considered as small but not negligible.

    Conclusions

    The results support the notion that IQ is a poor predictor of general aspects of everyday functioning in persons with mild/borderline intellectual disability. The result indicates that self-ratings partly generate other information than proxy ratings which may be important for assessments of supportive requirements and diagnosis.

  • 52.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Rheumatology, Linköping University, Linköping , Sweden.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro , Sweden.
    Important aspects of participation and participation restrictions in people with a mild intellectual disability2014Ingår i: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 36, nr 15, s. 1264-1272Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study explored a possibility to assess the concepts of participation and participation restrictions in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) by combining self-ratings of the perceived importance with the actual performance of different everyday activities in people with a mild intellectual disability.

    Method: Structured interviews regarding 68 items from the ICF activity/participation domain were conducted (n  = 69). The items were ranked by perceived importance, performance and by combined measures. Furthermore, the measures were related to a single question about subjective general well-being.

    Results: Rankings of performance highlighted about the same items as “important participation”, while rankings of low performance addressed quite different items compared with “important participation restriction”. Significant correlations were found between subjective general well-being and high performance (r = 0.56), high performance/high importance (important participation) (r = 0.56), low performance (r = –0.56) and low performance/high importance (important participation restriction; r = –0.55).

    Conclusions: The results support the clinical relevance of the ICF and the studied selection of 68 items. Although performance only may sometimes be a relevant aspect, knowledge about the relationship between the perceived importance and the actual performance is essential for clinical interventions and for research aiming to understand specific needs regarding participation.

  • 53.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Rheumatology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University.
    International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories explored for self-rated participation in Swedish adolescents and adults with a mild intellectual disability2012Ingår i: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 44, nr 7, s. 562-569Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To explore internal consistency and correlations between perceived ability, performance and perceived importance in a preliminary selection of self-reported items representing the activity/participation component of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF).

    DESIGN: Structured interview study.

    SUBJECTS: Fifty-five Swedish adolescents and adults with a mild intellectual disability.

    METHODS: Questions about perceived ability, performance and perceived importance were asked on the basis of a 3-grade Likert-scale regarding each of 68 items representing the 9 ICF domains of activity/participation.

    RESULTS: Internal consistency for perceived ability (Cronbach’s alpha for all 68 items): 0.95 (values for each domain varied between 0.57 and 0.85), for performance: 0.86 (between 0.27 and 0.66), for perceived importance: 0.84 (between 0.27 and 0.68). Seventy-two percent of the items showed correlations > 0.5 (mean = 0.59) for performance vs perceived importance, 41% > 0.5 (mean = 0.47) for perceived ability vs performance and 12% > 0.5 (mean = 0.28) for perceived ability vs perceived importance.

    CONCLUSION: Measures of performance and perceived importance may have to be based primarily on their estimated clinical relevance for describing aspects of the ICF participation concept. With a clinimetric approach, parts of the studied items and domains may be used to investigate factors related to different patterns and levels of participation, and outcomes of rehabilitation.

  • 54. Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Thyberg, M
    Factors related to self-fated participation in adolescents and adults with mild intellectual disability: A systematic literature review2008Ingår i: JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, ISSN 1360-2322, E-ISSN 1468-3148, Vol. 21, nr 3, s. 277-291Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Self-rated participation is a clinically relevant intervention outcome for people with mild intellectual disability. The aim of this systematic review was to analyse empirical studies that explored relationships between either environmental factors or individual characteristics and aspects of participation in young adults with mild intellectual disability. Method Four databases were used, 756 abstracts examined and 24 studies were evaluated in-depth. Results Four aspects of participation were found: involvement, perceptions of self, self-determination and psychological well-being. Reported environmental factors were: social support, choice opportunity, living conditions, school, work and leisure, attitudes, physical availability and society. Reported individual characteristics were adaptive and social skills. Conclusions There is a relative lack of studies of factors influencing self-rated participation and existing studies are difficult to compare because of disparity regarding approaches, conceptual frameworks, etc. For adequate interventions, it seems important to study how profiles of participation are influenced by different patterns of environmental factors and individual characteristics.

  • 55. Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Thyberg, M
    Factors with a positive relation to self rated participation in adolescent and adult people with mild intellectual disability: a systematic literature review2007Ingår i: Oral presentation 30 min: The international summit for an alliance on social inclusion, AAMR Montréal, 2007Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 56.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University/County Council of Gävleborg, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    How are the activity and participation aspects of the ICF used? Examples from studies of people with intellectual disability2015Ingår i: NeuroRehabilitation (Reading, MA), ISSN 1053-8135, E-ISSN 1878-6448, Vol. 36, nr 1, s. 45-49Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Interdisciplinary differences regarding understanding the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) concepts activity/participation may hinder its unifying purpose. In the ICF model, functioning (and disability) is described as a tripartite concept: 1) Body structures/functions, 2) Activities, and 3) Participation. Activities refer to an individual perspective on disability that does not tally with the basic structure of social models.

    OBJECTIVE: To review how activity and participation are actually used in studies of intellectual disability (ID).

    CONCLUSION: Based on 16 papers, four different usages of activity/participation were found. 1) Theoretical reference to tripartite ICF concept with attempts to use it. 2) Theoretical reference to tripartite ICF concept without actual use of activities. 3) "Atheoretical" approach with implicit focus on participation. 4) Theoretical reference to bipartite concept with corresponding use of terms. The highlighted studies have in common a focus on participation. However, the usage of the term "activity" differs both within and between studies. Such terminology will probably confuse interdisciplinary communication rather than facilitating it. Also, the use of an explicit underlying theory differs, from references to a tripartite to references to a bipartite concept of disability. This paper is focused on ID, but the discussed principles regarding the ICF and interdisciplinary disability theory are applicable to other diagnostic groups within rehabilitation practices.

  • 57.
    Augustine, Lilly
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Kristianstad University, Sweden.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. SALVE (Socialt arbete, Livssammanhang, Välfärd).
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Linking youths’ mental, psychosocial, and emotional functioning to ICF-CY: Lessons learned2018Ingår i: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 40, nr 19, s. 2293-2299Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Linking ready-made questionnaires to codes within the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version with the intention of using the information statistically for studying mental health problems can pose several challenges. Many of the constructs measured are latent, and therefore, difficult to describe in single codes. The aim of this study was to describe and discuss challenges encountered in this coding process.

    Materials and methods: A questionnaire from a Swedish research programme was linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version and the agreement was assessed.

    Results: Including the original aim of the questionnaire into the coding process was found to be very important for managing the coding of the latent constructs of the items. Items from the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version chapters with narrow definitions for example mental functions, were more easily translated to meaningful concepts to code, while broadly defined chapters, such as interactions and relationships, were more difficult.

    Conclusion: This study stresses the importance of a clear, predefined coding scheme as well as the importance of not relying too heavily on common linking rules, especially in cases when it is not possible to use multiple codes for a single item.

    • Implications for rehabilitation
    • The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version, is a useful tool for merging assessment data from several sources when documenting adolescents’ mental functioning in different life domains.

    • Measures of mental health are often based on latent constructs, often revealed in the description of the rationale/aim of a measure. The latent construct should be the primary focus in linking information.

    • By mapping latent constructs to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version, users of the classification can capture a broad range of areas relevant to everyday functioning in adolescents with mental health problems.

    • The subjective experience of participation, i.e., the level of subjective involvement, is not possible to code into the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version. However, when linking mental health constructs to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version codes, the two dimensions of participation (the being there, and the level of involvement) need to be separated in the linking process. This can be performed by assigning codes focusing on being there as separate from items focusing on the subjective experience of involvement while being there.

  • 58.
    Axelsson, Anna Karin
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Wilder, Jenny
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Engagement in family activities: a quantitative, comparative study of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities and children with typical development2013Ingår i: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 39, nr 4, s. 523-534Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Participation is known to be of great importance for children's development and emotional well-being as well as for their families. In the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health – Children and Youth version participation is defined as a person's ‘involvement in a life situation’. Engagement is closely related to involvement and can be seen as expressions of involvement or degree of involvement within a situation. This study focuses on children's engagement in family activities; one group of families with a child with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) and one group of families with children with typical development (TD) were compared.

    Methods

    A descriptive study using questionnaires. Analyses were mainly performed by using Mann–Whitney U-test and Spearman's rank correlation test.

    Results

    Engagement in family activities differed in the two groups of children. The children with PIMD had a lower level of engagement in most family activities even though the activities that engaged the children to a higher or lesser extent were the same in both groups. Child engagement was found to correlate with family characteristics mostly in the children with TD and in the children with PIMD only negative correlations occurred. In the children with PIMD child engagement correlated with cognition in a high number of listed family activities and the children had a low engagement in routines in spite of these being frequently occurring activities.

    Conclusions

    Level of engagement in family activities in the group of children with PIMD was lower compared with that in the group of children with TD. Families with a child with PIMD spend much time and effort to adapt family living patterns to the child's functioning.

  • 59.
    Backman, Ellen
    et al.
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. SALVE (Socialt arbete, Livssammanhang, Välfärd).
    Karlsson, Ann-Kristin
    Department of Research and Development, Region Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Documentation of everyday life and health care following gastrostomy tube placement in children: a content analysis of medical records2019Ingår i: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, s. 1-11Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Everyday routines play a vital role in child functioning and development. This study explored health professionals' documentation of everyday life and health care during the first year following gastrostomy tube placement in children and the content of intervention goals.

    METHODS: The medical records of 39 children (median age 38 months, min-max: 15-192) in one region of Sweden were analysed. A content analysis approach was used with an inductive qualitative analysis supplemented by a deductive, quantitative analysis of documented intervention goals following the ICF-CY.

    RESULTS: One overall theme, "Seeking a balance", captured the view of life with a gastrostomy and the health care provided. Two categories, "Striving for physical health" and "Depicting everyday life" with seven sub-categories, captured the key aspects of the documentation. Twenty-one children (54%) had intervention goals related to the gastrostomy, and these goals primarily focused on the ICF-CY component "Body functions".

    CONCLUSIONS: To some extent the medical records reflected different dimensions of everyday life, but the intervention goals clearly focused on bodily aspects. Understanding how health care for children using a gastrostomy is documented and planned by applying an ecocultural framework adds a valuable perspective and can contribute to family-centred interventions for children using a gastrostomy. Implications for Rehabilitation There is a need for increased awareness in healthcare professionals for a more consistent and holistic healthcare approach in the management of children with gastrostomy tube feeding. This study suggests that an expanded focus on children's participation in everyday mealtimes and in the healthcare follow-up of gastrostomy tube feeding is important in enhancing the intervention outcome. Multidisciplinary teams with a shared bio-psycho-social understanding of health would contribute to a situation in which the everyday lives of households adapt to living with gastrostomy. Routine care for children with gastrostomy should follow a checklist combining crucial physiological aspects of gastrostomy tube feeding with seemingly mundane family functions in order to achieve a successful gastrostomy tube feeding intervention.

  • 60.
    Bagué Grifoll, Janona
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    “Children in preschool class have to learn to sit a bit more”: Swedish preschool, preschool class and primary school teachers’ perspectives on the transition from preschool to school2019Självständigt arbete på avancerad nivå (magisterexamen), 10 poäng / 15 hpStudentuppsats (Examensarbete)
    Abstract [en]

    The transition from preschool to primary school is considered by many researchers as being one of the most challenging transitions that children can experience in their educational development. In 1998, in an effort by the Swedish government to facilitate this transition, preschool class was introduced as a voluntary bridge year between preschool and primary school.  Changes in school legislation in 2018 made attendance to preschool class compulsory. Despite the introduction of preschool class in the Swedish system, a lack of knowledge and research about the policies and practices in preschool classes for successful supporting this transition has been observed. The aim of the present qualitative study was to characterize preschool, preschool class, and primary school teachers’ understandings of the transition from preschool to primary school as reflected in their teaching practices. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with preschool, preschool class and primary school teachers at one school and affiliated preschool in a town in the South of Sweden. Observations of the preschool class were also conducted. Theories of transition were applied to analyze the teachers’ understandings of the transition from preschool to primary school.  All of the participating teachers considered the change to compulsory attendance in preschool class to be beneficial for a successful transition for the children from preschool to primary school. Two key factors were identified that appeared to be consequential for how the teachers understood and worked with children’s transitions: (a) the organizational structures in place to support the teachers’ work, related to the teachers’ ability to coordinate with each other and have access to information relevant to prepare the children for the transition; and (b) the lack of a common pedagogical framework across the preschool and school.

  • 61.
    Bartolo, Paul A.
    et al.
    University of Malta.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Giné, Climent
    Universitat Ramon Llull.
    Kyriazopoulou, Mary
    European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education.
    Ensuring a Strong Start for All Children: Inclusive Early Childhood Education and Care2016Ingår i: Implementing Inclusive Education: Issues in Bridging the Policy-Practice Gap / [ed] Amanda Watkins,Cor Meijer, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016, s. 19-35Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter highlights the importance of providing all children, and particularly those at risk, vulnerable children and children with disabilities, with opportunities for a quality inclusive Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC). It first sets out the evidence that quality inclusive ECEC provision is essential for all children to develop their potential and lifelong learning competencies that will ensure their successful participation in school and adult life. It then describes the main international and European policies for inclusive ECEC. A more detailed account is given of the five key principles for action towards improving the quality of ECEC provision developed by the thematic working group of the European Commission (2014) ‘Quality Framework for Early Education and Care’ that are also very similar to those proposed by the OECD (2015) ‘Starting Strong IV’. The concluding section underlines the need to address more strongly the provision of enabling opportunities for accessibility to ECEC of children at risk of exclusion. More importantly, it highlights the need to research and improve not only these children’s presence in ECEC but also their level and quality of active participation and engagement in the social and learning activities of early childhood inclusive provision. The chapter reflects the research and policy development work being undertaken by the European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education in its (2015–2017) project on Inclusive Early Childhood Education (IECE) led by the present authors.

  • 62.
    Bartolo, Paul A.
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Malta, Msida, Malta.
    Kyriazopoulou, Mary
    European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education, Odense, Denmark.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Giné, Climent
    Faculty of Psychology, Education Sciences and Sport Blanquerna, Ramon Llull University, Barcelona, Spain.
    An adapted ecosystem model for inclusive early childhood education: a qualitative cross European study2019Ingår i: International Journal of School & Educational Psychology, ISSN 2168-3603, E-ISSN 2168-3611Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Early intervention for children vulnerable to exclusion is currently focused on the child?s effective inclusion in mainstream early childhood education. There is thus a search for developing a shared understanding of what constitutes quality inclusive preschool provision. This was the aim of a qualitative 3-year (2015?17) study of inclusive settings for children from 3 years to compulsory education across European countries, conducted by the European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education. Data consisted of practitioner descriptions of 32 example inclusive preschools from 28 European countries, and more detailed data collected during short visits to eight of the example settings. Qualitative, thematic analysis identified 25 subthemes representing the perceived constituents of inclusive early childhood education provision. These were organised within a framework that intertwined the structure-process-outcome model with the ecological systems model. The resulting adapted ecosystem model for inclusive early childhood education comprises five dimensions: (1) the inclusive education outcomes, (2) processes, and (3) structural factors within the micro environment of the preschool; and the wider (4) inclusive structural factors at community, and (5) at national levels. The framework can be useful for practitioners as well as researchers and policy makers seeking to improve inclusive early childhood education provision.

    Publikationen är tillgänglig i fulltext från 2020-07-23 00:00
  • 63.
    Bartolo, Paul
    et al.
    European Agency of Special Needs and Inclusive Education.
    Björck-Åkesson, EvaHögskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.Giné, ClimentUniversitat Ramon Llull, Barcelona, Spain.Kyriazopoulou, MaryEuropean Agency of Special Needs and Inclusive Education.
    Inclusive Early Childhood Education: An analysis of 32 European examples2016Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 64.
    Batsopoulou, Meropi Aliki
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Examining play behaviors of children with internalized emotional disturbances in preschool context: A systematic literature review2017Självständigt arbete på avancerad nivå (magisterexamen), 10 poäng / 15 hpStudentuppsats (Examensarbete)
    Abstract [en]

    Child initiated play appears as a means for children to express their inner world and personality and works as a milestone promoting their overall development. Internalized emotional disturbances constrain children’s functioning and have an impact on their general behavior, hindering their development. Most of the times, it appears challenging for teachers to identify a child with internalizing problems in the preschool classroom and most interventions are targeting children with externalized problems. Since play is a way for children to express, observations of children’s behavior while playing, provide information about their inner thoughts and concerns. The aim of the present study was to identify play behaviors and tendencies in types of play that children with typical and atypical internalized emotional disturbances show in free play situations in preschool. A systematic literature review was conducted in order to reach this goal. Six articles were included in which five internalized emotional disturbances were mentioned -one typical and four atypical. Findings revealed eight overt play behaviors, with prevalent these of non-play, solitary-passive behavior, unconscious play activity and desire for peer play but no attempt for it. Regarding engagement in play types, children exhibiting internalized problems were more prone to constructive and creative play and less engaged in symbolic play, which can be possible indicator of developmental delays. This study works as a tool for professionals in order to identify play behaviors of children with internalized emotional disturbances in preschool child initiated play. Subsequently, the findings assist interventionists on providing adequate support and clinicians on shedding light on the dubious field of emotional and behavioral disorders in early childhood.

  • 65.
    Bertills, Karin
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Student engagement and high-quality teaching in PE2018Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 66.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. SALVE (Socialt arbete, Livssammanhang, Välfärd).
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Inclusive teaching skills and student engagement in physical education2019Ingår i: Frontiers in Education, ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 4, nr 74Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Including students with disabilities in school-based Physical Education (PE) is common practice. However, little is known about students’ engagement and interaction in this environment and how it is related to PE teaching skills. Student engagement and interaction patterns were therefore observed. A multiple time-sampling method was used to perform observations of individual, contextual and environmental aspects of student engagement in school-based PE lessons. Three groups of students, aged 14 (n = 94), with: (1) Disabilities (n = 23), (2) Low grades (n = 27), and (3) High grades (n = 44) were compared. Students, independent of group, showed relatively high engagement in PE. The observed frequency of linking lesson content to PE syllabus in combination with using a vibrant affective tone when instructing was used as an indicator of high-/low-level teaching skills. Higher student engagement was observed in environments with high-level PE teaching skills, which included more whole group teaching, a higher frequency of student-teacher communicative proximity and more instructions. Students with disabilities and with low grades were more often observed in whole group activities, students with high grades in small group activities. The primary type of support provided to students with disabilities in PE seemed to consist of communicative proximity to the teacher. They were more often observed to be close to the teacher. Our results suggest that proximity to the teacher may serve as an indicator of inclusive teaching. In high-level teaching environments, teachers were more frequently in communicative proximity to all students, which facilitates learning. Lessons were also more focused (physically and academically) and technical devices and music were used for teaching purposes. More complex lesson content requires more instructions and our results show that, despite more instructions, all student groups were more on-task. Implied from our observations is that lesson complexity, the structuring of whole/small group formats, teacher proximity, and student engagement are aspects to consider when studying school-based PE. More instructions, closer communicative proximity and higher student engagement in high-level teaching provide students with more learning opportunities and facilitate feed-back and feed-forward, and individual support to students with disabilities.

  • 67.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. SALVE (Socialt arbete, Livssammanhang, Välfärd).
    Augustine, Lilly
    School of Education and Environment, Kristianstad university, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Measuring self-efficacy, aptitude to participate and functioning in students with and without impairments2018Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 33, nr 4, s. 572-583Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Including vulnerable groups of students such as students with learning disabilities in mainstream school research, require ethical considerations and questionnaire adaptation. These students are often excluded, due to low understanding or methodologies generating inadequate data. Students with disability need be studied as a separate group and provided accessible questionnaires. This pilot study aims at developing and evaluating student self-reported measures, rating aspects of student experiences of school-based Physical Education (PE). Instrument design, reliability and validity were examined in Swedish secondary school students (n = 47) including students, aged 13, with intellectual disability (n = 5) and without impairment and test–retested on 28 of these students. Psychometric results from the small pilot-study sample were confirmed in analyses based on replies from the first wave of data collection in the main study (n = 450). Results show adequate internal consistency, factor structure and relations between measures. In conclusion, reliability and validity were satisfactory in scales to measure self-efficacy in general, in PE, and aptitude to participate. Adapting proxy ratings for functioning into self-reports indicated problems. Adequacy of adjustments made were confirmed and a dichotomous scale for typical/atypical function is suggested for further analyses.

  • 68.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. School of Education and Environment, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad.
    Quality teaching and student perceived self-efficacy, function and aptitude to participate in PE2017Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Students with disability show a trajectory of higher incidence of school failure. High quality teaching and proper support may foster high self-efficacy, as protective factors for successful school outcomes. Physical Education (PE) can provide students with a context in which self-efficacy is promoted. At transition into high school with higher cognitive stakes, developmental changes and individual social identification coinciding, a disability may add to the challenge of success. Investigating self-efficacy as a predictor of achievement operationalized as grade points, student perceived self-efficacy, function and aptitude to participate in PE, and teacher rated teaching quality are examined.

    Method: Three groups were studied, students with 1. Diagnosed disability, 2. Low grades and 3. High grades in PE in year 6. Questionnaires were completed by students in 26 classes including classmates (n=450, 228 boys) and their PE-teachers (n=25). Correlations were analyzed, differentiating groups of students.

    Results: Students with disabilities experience lower general self-efficacy and in PE, and are less apt to participate in PE. Their PE self-efficacy is higher if the classroom climate is good. PE-teachers systematic work with grading has positive effects on academic and movement self-efficacy for students with low grades and on health self-efficacy for students with high grades. Highest effect of perceived socio-cognitive function is displayed in students with low grades, the correlation is stronger in general self-efficacy than in self-efficacy in PE. Students with high grades have higher self-efficacy in general and in PE.

    Conclusions: Student perceived socio-cognitive function is of major importance to students experience of self-efficacy. Most impact is seen on subscales measuring academic and movement self-efficacy.

  • 69.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. SALVE (Socialt arbete, Livssammanhang, Välfärd).
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. School of Education and Environment, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Student engagement and high quality teaching in PE2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 70.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    SIDR, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. School of Education and Environment, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad.
    Quality teaching and student perceived self-efficacy, function and aptitude to participate in Physical Education2017Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 71.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Relationships between physical education (PE) teaching and student self-efficacy, aptitude to participate in PE and functional skills: with a special focus on students with disabilities2018Ingår i: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 23, nr 4, s. 387-401Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Students with disability show an increasing incidence of school failure. Quality teaching and appropriate support may foster high self-efficacy, a predictive factor for successful school outcomes. Physical Education (PE) can provide students with a context in which self-efficacy and participation are promoted leading to improved academic achievement. The transition into secondary school can be challenging for many students with increased educational demands, developmental changes and individual social identification coinciding. A disability may add to the challenge of success.

    Methods: Three groups of students, aged 13 years and enrolled in Swedish mainstream schools were targeted (n = 439). Groups included students with 1. A diagnosed disability, 2. Low grades in PE (D–F) and 3. High grades (A–C) in PE. Questionnaires were collected and analyzed from 30/439 students with a diagnosed disability (physical, neuro-developmental and intellectual) from 26 classes, their classmates and their PE-teachers (n = 25). Relationships between student self-reports and PE-teachers’ self-ratings were investigated. Also examined was the potential to which students’ functional skills could predict elevated general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. Results were compared with the total sample and between the three target groups (n = 121).

    Results: For students with disabilities, better self-rated teaching skills were related to lower student perceived general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. The impact of classroom climate in PE was more obvious among students with disabilities. Perceived functional skills were associated with elevated general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. Better socio-cognitive functional skills had an overall positive effect on all outcomes. Students with disabilities reported results similar to the total sample, the D–F group scored lower and the A–C group higher than the total sample and the disability group. Elevated self-efficacy in PE is six times less probable in students with disabilities, compared to the A–C group.

    Conclusions: Our findings that better teacher planning and grading skills, are detrimental to students disadvantaged by disability is contradictive. Improving the establishment and communication of adapted learning standards at the transition to secondary school is a crucial and a predictive factor for promoting positive school experiences for students with disability. Students with disabilities need to be assured that the intended learning outcomes can be reached by doing activities differently than their typically functioning peers. Consideration of class composition is suggested as a means of promoting a positive learning climate, which would particularly benefit students with disabilities. Allocation of resources to support student socio-cognitive skills would improve experiences for the D–F group and likely promote a positive learning environment.

  • 72.
    Beteinaki, Eleftheria
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Social Interactions and Friendships of adolescents with vision impairments: A scoping review2019Självständigt arbete på avancerad nivå (magisterexamen), 10 poäng / 15 hpStudentuppsats (Examensarbete)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Social exclusion of people with vision impairments is an ongoing issue. Since social inclusion emphasizes social and emotional aspects as distinct from academic ones and the aspects concerning opportunities, the focus is turned on the domain of social interactions and friendships. Adolescence is the time point when youth feels mostly the need to ‘fit in’ in social circles and groups and the social life and friendships are important aspects of young people’s well-being and development.

    Aim: The aim of this study is to review the existing literature on the social interactions and friendships of adolescents with visual impairments from their own perspective and investigate the interventions designed to improve their social interactions and friendships.

    Method: A literature search on the databases of ERIC, CINAHL and PsycINFO and a hand search on the reference lists of the relevant articles was conducted. The search was limited to recent peer reviewed studies published in English, reporting perspectives of adolescents (13-18 years old) with visual impairments on their social interactions and friendships and intervention studies aimed to support them in the aforementioned domain.

    Results: In the 18 included studies, adolescents with vision impairments engaged more in passive activities that were not highly interactive. They reported being satisfied with their networks and friends, however contradictions existed in the perceived quality of friendships and the feeling of loneliness. The context of school was presented often as problematic compared to other contexts, and friendships in schools were rare. According to adolescents’ voices, friendships helped to cope with the impairment, friends had a meaningful role in their life and they made school life more enjoyable. In comparison to their sighted peers, adolescents with vision impairments had smaller networks and less friends with whom they had different type of relationships. Lastly even though several barriers and facilitators were identified, which belong to domains of Body functions and structures and Physical, Attitudinal and Social environment, there was a lack of interventions aiming to support the social interactions and friendships of adolescents with vision impairments.

    Conclusions: Considering the importance of social interactions and friendships in adolescents’ life for them to learn, develop and enjoy, more interventions with social focus need to be designed in respect to the challenges that exist. A plethora of barriers and facilitators impacting the social interactions and friendships of adolescents with vision impairments were identified that need to be taken into consideration for future research and interventions since the existing literature provided so far is limited. Adolescents need to be engaged in this process so that their interests, preferences and their views are prioritized. 

  • 73.
    BILGIN, IDIL
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    The consequences of perceived discrimination on internalizing mental health outcomes for immigrant adolescents in OECD countries: A systematic literature review2017Självständigt arbete på avancerad nivå (magisterexamen), 10 poäng / 15 hpStudentuppsats (Examensarbete)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last few decades the focus of immigration flows has been predominantly toward member countries of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Immigration is a process full of challenges, and perceiving as being discriminated by host country natives is one of the biggest difficulties for the immigrants. This challenge is especially represented in immigrant adolescent population due to their higher sensitivity of perception of others. Thus, perceived discrimination characterized as being a significant negative consequence resulting internalizing mental health outcomes for immigrant adolescents. Therefore, the aim of this study is to conduct a systematic literature review in order to identify and discuss the findings of the existing studies that focus on the consequences of perceived discrimination on internalizing mental health outcomes for immigrant adolescents in OECD countries. The systematic review included 16 studies for data extraction. The results showed that perceived discrimination has significant negative consequences on internalizing mental health outcomes for immigrant adolescents in OEDC countries resulting in higher levels of: depression, anxiety, psycho-somatization, post-traumatic stress disorder, and obsession-compulsion symptoms. However, within this relationship, there are also moderating and mediating variables. Self-esteem, familism and cognitive appraisal of discriminatory events were characterized as mediators. Parental support, adherence to traditional family values, acculturation, transcultural identity, older age, higher socioeconomic status (SES), and ethnic identity were characterized as moderators. It is recommended that the negative consequences of perceived discrimination on internalizing mental health outcomes should be taken into consideration on societal levels and in mental health fields when planning interventions and therapies for immigrant adolescents. Additionally, further research in this field should be conducted in other OECD countries with different immigrant groups in order to increase the generalizability of the findings.

  • 74.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Att ge och ta emot: samspel med små barn med rörelsehinder och kommunikations-handikapp1987Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 75.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Cooperation with families: A Swedish Intervention Model2000Ingår i: Proceedings 9es. Jornades Internacionals dÁtencio Precoc: 28/6 – 1/7, 2000. Barcelona, 2000, s. 1-15Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 76.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Early Intervention Across Boundaries - International Collaboration in Research and Education2019Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Symposium Description:

    In line with the primary purpose of ISEI, to provide a framework and forum for professionals from around the world to communicate about advances in the field of early intervention, this symposium aims to discuss and raise issues related to the added value of international collaboration in early childhood intervention research and education today and in the future. It is informed by experiences of the EU-US Transatlantic Consortium on Early Intervention (EU-US Atlantis Programme, Excellence Mobility Project 2001-2013) and from collaboration in ISEI. Building on multilateral collaboration and agreements between universities and funding agencies, based on equal standards for quality we can share and learn from each other. By developing joint priorities building on the strengths in individual countries a common theoretical framework for research and education related to early intervention has been created guiding policy and practice.

  • 77.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Från en differentierad förskola och skola till delaktighet i lärandemiljöer som anpassas till olika förutsättningar och behov2009Ingår i: Specialpedagogisk tidskrift - att undervisa, ISSN 2000-429X, nr 4, s. 8-9Artikel i tidskrift (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 78.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Functional activities and participation2003Ingår i: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology: European Academy for Childhood Disability, conference, Oslo, 2003Konferensbidrag (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 79.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    ICF for children and youth2002Ingår i: Invited presentation at the third Nordic Baltic Conference on ICF. Helsinki, Finland, 2002Konferensbidrag (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 80.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    ICF for children and youth2002Ingår i: Invited presentation at ICF-meeting, Västerås, Sweden, 2002Konferensbidrag (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 81.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    ICF for children and youth: Field trial in Sweden2003Ingår i: Invited presentation at ICF-meeting, Washington, USA, 2003Konferensbidrag (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 82.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    ICF for children and youth. Field trial in Sweden2004Ingår i: Invited presentation at ICF-meeting, Pädagogische Hochschule Zürich, Switzerland, 2004Konferensbidrag (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 83.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    ICF for children and youth. Field trial in Sweden2003Ingår i: Invited presentation at ICF-meeting, Durban, South Africa, USA, 2003Konferensbidrag (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 84.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    ICF in communication intervention2004Ingår i: 11th Biennial Conference of the Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication. Natal, Brazil, 2004Konferensbidrag (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 85.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health for Children and Youth ICF-CY2006Ingår i: Invited presentation MHADIE meeting: Ljubljana, Slovenia, November 22-24th 2006, 2006Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 86.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health for Children and Youth ICF-CY2006Ingår i: Invited presentation MHADIE meeting: Prague, Tjeckien, June 2006, 2006Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 87.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health for Children and Youth ICF-CY2005Ingår i: Invited presentation at Center for Disease-Control and Prevention, CDC-meeting, Atlanta, 2005Konferensbidrag (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 88.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health for Children and Youth ICF-CY: Fieldtrials and current research in Sweden2005Ingår i: Invited presentation at ICF-meeting, UNESCO, Bangkok, Thailand, 2005Konferensbidrag (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 89.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health for Children and Youth ICF-CY: Fieldtrials and current research in Sweden2005Ingår i: Invited presentation at WHOmeeting, Geneva, 2005Konferensbidrag (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 90.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    International Classification of functioning: Swedish field trial in child and youth habilitation2001Ingår i: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology: European Academy of Childhood Disability, Abstracts, 2001, 2001, s. p 41-Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 91.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Internationell Klassifikation av funkrionstillstånd: Funkrionshinder och Hälsa för Barn och Ungdom (ICF-CY)2006Ingår i: 10:e Forsknings- och utvecklingskonferensen: Habiliteringens Forskningscentrum & Örebro Universitet. Örebro, 4-5 april, 2006, 2006, s. s 24-Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 92.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Interventions for pre-school children in the ”grey-zone” of neurodevelopmental risk2007Ingår i: Paper presented at Research in Education and Rehabilitation Science: 7th International Scientific conference & The 2nd ISEI Conference, University of Zagreb, Croatia, June 14-16th, 2007, 2007Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 93.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    It takes two to communicate1998Ingår i: Our children – their future: Proceedings of the Folke Bernadotte International Memorial Conference. Our Children - Their Future. Children And Young Persons With Disabilities, 1998, s. 16-19Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 94.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Kartläggning: En del av interventionen och en förutsättning för individualisering2001Ingår i: FUR-BladetArtikel i tidskrift (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 95.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Kunskapsfrukt utan kärna2008Ingår i: Pedagogiska magasinet, ISSN 1401-3320, nr 2, s. 32-35s. 32-35Artikel i tidskrift (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 96.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Measuring Sensation Seeking1990Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 97.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    New Technology for Children in Early Attention2000Ingår i: Proceedings 9es. Jornades Internacionals dÁtencio Precoc: 28/6 – 1/7, 2000. Barcelona, 2000, s. p 6-Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 98.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Samspel mellan små barn med rörelsehinder och talhandikapp och föräldrar: En longitudinell studie1992Bok (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 99.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Samspel och inflytande: Barnet och familjen1999Ingår i: Dokumentation: Människa, handikapp, livsvillkor, 7:e forskningskonferensen, Örebro den 13 och 15 april 1999, 1999, s. 101-102Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 100.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Specialpedagogik: Ett kunskapsområde med många dimensioner2007Ingår i: Reflektioner kring specialpedagogik: sex professorer om forskningsområdet och forskningsfronterna, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2007, s. 85-99Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
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