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  • 51.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Division of Pediatrics, Diabetes Research Centre, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F
    Department of Pediatrics, Clinical Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Enskär, Karin
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Division of Pediatrics, Diabetes Research Centre, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Exclusive breastfeeding of Swedish children and its possible influence on the development of obesity: a prospective cohort study2008Inngår i: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 8, artikkel-id 42Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Overweight and obesity are increasing among children all over the world. Socio-economic factors may influence the development of overweight and obesity in childhood, and it has been proposed that breastfeeding may protect against obesity. The aim of our study was to examine the relationship between exclusive breastfeeding and obesity when potential confounders, such as socioeconomic factors, are considered. METHODS: The data analyzed was from ABIS (All Babies in Southeast Sweden), a prospective cohort study. All parents with children born between October 1, 1997 and October 1, 1999 in Southeast Sweden (n = 21,700) were asked to participate. Parents were asked to answer periodic questionnaires from the time of the child's birth (n = 16,058) until he/she was five years of age (n = 7,356). Cutoffs for overweight and obesity were defined according to Cole et al, age and gender adjusted. Short-term exclusive breastfeeding was defined as < 4 months of exclusive breastfeeding. Multiple logistic regressions were used to identify variables that predict the child's BMI (Body Mass Index) at five years of age. RESULTS: At five years of age, 12.9% of the children in the study were overweight and 4.3% were obese. At the age of three months, 78.4% of the children were being breastfed exclusively. The median exclusive breastfeeding duration was four months. High maternal BMI > 30 (AOR = 1.07; CI = 1.05-1.09; P < 0.001), maternal smoking (AOR = 1.43; CI = 1.05-1.95; P = 0.023) and being a single parent (AOR = 2.10; CI = 1.43-3.09; P < 0.001) were associated with short-term exclusive breastfeeding (less than 4 months). Short-term exclusive breastfeeding was less common if one of the parents had a university degree (Mother: AOR = 0.74; CI = 0.61-0.90; P = 0.003 Father: AOR = 0.73; CI = 0.58-0.92; P = 0.008) or if the father was more than 37 years old (AOR = 0.74; CI = 0.55-0.99; P = 0.045). Short-term exclusive breastfeeding was associated with obesity in five-year-old children (simple logistic regression: OR = 1.44; CI = 1.00-2.07; P = 0.050), but when including other independent factors in the analysis, short-term exclusive breastfeeding did not attain statistical significance. CONCLUSION: We cannot exclude the possibility that exclusive breastfeeding influences weight development, but it does not seem to protect against obesity at five years of age.

  • 52.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Åkerman, Linda
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University and University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University and Östergötland County Council, Sweden.
    Physical Activity, Blood Glucose and C-Peptide in Healthy School-Children, a Longitudinal Study2016Inngår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, nr 6, artikkel-id e0156401Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To further elucidate the relationship between physical activity and several risk factors for development of diabetes (glucose, C-peptide and obesity) over time.

    Methods

    A prospective longitudinal study where physical activity was measured on 199 children from Kalmar and Linköping at age 8, and the same 107 children from Linköping again at age 12. Anthropometric data was collected and blood was analyzed for C-peptide and f-glucose. The children in the study were representative for the general Swedish child population, and on an average lean.

    Results

    High physical activity was related to lower C-peptide at age 8 and 12. This correlation was especially pronounced in boys, who also were more physically active than girls at both time points. The association seen at 8 years of age was similar at age 12 in most children. Children with higher BMI Z-Score had a higher fasting C-peptide (age 12) but linear regression showed that children with more steps per day were less likely to have a higher fasting C-peptide irrespective of BMI. Longitudinal follow-up showed that a decrease in physical activity increased insulin resistance and β-cell load.

    Conclusions

    Already in young children, physical activity improves insulin sensitivity and decreases the need of C-peptide over time. This seems to become even more pronounced with increasing age when children are followed longitudinally. Low physical activity increases the load on insulin producing β-cells, might increase the risk for both type 1- and 2 diabetes.

  • 53.
    Imms, Christine
    et al.
    School of Allied Health and Centre for Disability and Development Research, Faculty of Health Sciences, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia.
    Adair, Brooke Adair
    School of Allied Health and Centre for Disability and Development Research, Faculty of Health Sciences, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia.
    Keen, Deb
    Autism Centre of Excellence, Griffith University, Mt Gravatt, Qld, Australia.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rosenbaum, Peter
    School of Allied Health and Centre for Disability and Development Research, Faculty of Health Sciences, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    ‘Participation’: a systematic review of language, definitions, and constructs used in intervention research with children with disabilities2016Inngår i: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 58, nr 1, s. 29-38Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    Improving participation of children with disabilities is a priority; however, the participation construct lacks clarity. This systematic review investigated how researchers defined ‘participation’ and the language used in participation intervention research.

    Method

    Nine health and education databases were searched for intervention studies of children with disabilities that included a participation outcome. Quantitative data were extracted using a customized form, and participation text data were extracted verbatim. Themes were derived using a thematic coding approach. These participation themes were applied to the outcome measures used in the included studies to compare participation language with the methods used to quantify participation changes.

    Results

    Of the 2257 articles retrieved, 25 were included in this review. Five participation themes and nine subthemes were developed. Two themes, attendance and involvement, were directly related to the participation construct. Three additional themes described related concepts: preferences, activity competence, and sense of self.

    Interpretation

    Attendance and involvement seem to describe the essence of the participation concept. The related themes may provide important avenues to enhance participation outcomes. This review highlighted the need for researchers to define the construct under investigation clearly and select measures carefully, as measurement choice is the mechanism through which the concept is operationalized in research.

  • 54.
    Juul, Jolanta
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, Sect Audiol,Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Neurosci & Physiol,Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, SE-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barrenas, Marie-Louise
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Paediat, Gothenburg Paediat Growth Res Ctr, Inst Clin Sci,Sahlgrenska Acad,Queen Silvia Child, SE-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Holgers, Kajsa-Mia
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Tinnitus and hearing in 7-year-old children2012Inngår i: Archives of Disease in Childhood, ISSN 0003-9888, E-ISSN 1468-2044, Vol. 97, nr 1, s. 28-30Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Tinnitus occurs with or without prior noise exposure (noise-induced tinnitus (NIT) and spontaneous tinnitus (ST)), and is considered a symptom related to permanent hearing impairment (HI) or temporary hearing threshold shift (TTS). Objective To carry out a cross-sectional interview study on TTS, ST and NIT during a standard audiometric screening of 756 7-year-old children in Gothenburg. Results 41% out of 756 children reported either NIT or ST on several occasions, 17% reported recurrent TTS and 7% failed the audiometry screening. The probability of ST was 27% for children with no HI or TTS (OR=1.23 (95% CI 1.12 to 1.34)) but 63% (OR=1.16 (95% CI 1.02 to 1.33)) if exhibiting both HI and TTS. Conclusion This study confirms an increased occurrence of spontaneous tinnitus in children with TTS or HI and in children with both TTS and HI, in particular, but also in children with normal hearing. Possibly, tinnitus in young children correlates with stress as in adolescents and adults.

  • 55.
    Karlsson, Katarina
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad.
    ”Jag är rädd, jag vill till mamma”: Yngre barns, föräldrars och sjuksköterskors levda erfarenheter av nålprocedurer i vården2015Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna avhandling är att skapa kunskap om vad det innebär för yngre barn att genomgå nålrelaterade medicinska procedurer. Dessutom vad vårdande stöd i samband med dessa procedurer innebär utifrån barns, föräldrars och sjuksköterskors perspektiv. Nålrelaterade medicinska procedurer är undersökningar som barn behöver vara med om i vården för att motverka sjukdom, för att ta reda på varför barnet är sjukt och för att ge barnet behandling. Dessa åtgärder innebär att barn behöver vara med om nålstick.

    Med hjälp av deltagande observationer och livsvärldsintervjuer, som har dokumenterats genom videoobservationer, fältanteckningar och ljudinspelningar, har datainsamlingen genomförts i vården med yngre barn, 3-7 år, deras föräldrar och sjuksköterskor. Barnen har berättat om konsekvenser som de har upplevt av nålprocedurer och om att få stöd vid dessa åtgärder. Föräldrar och sjuksköterskor har berättat om sina erfarenheter av att ge stöd till barnen.

    Avhandlingens resultat visar att en framträdande konsekvens för barn under nålprocedurer är upplevelse av rädsla. Hur föräldrar och sjuksköterskor svarar an mot detta har en avgörande betydelse för om barnets rädsla ökar eller minskar.

    Denna avhandling bidrar med kunskap om barns upplevelser av nålprocedurer och behov av stöd samt hur stödet kan utformas vid dessa åtgärder. Emellertid, forskning inom området ärfortfarande otillräcklig och ytterligare forskning behövs där barns perspektiv lyfts fram i vården.

  • 56.
    Karlsson, Katarina
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Rydström, Ingela
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Nyström, Maria
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Enskär, Karin
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Dalheim Englund, Ann-Charlotte
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Consequences of needle-related medical procedures: A hermeneutic study with young children (3–7 years)2016Inngår i: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 31, nr 2, s. e109-e118Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Needle-related medical procedures (NRMPs) are often frightening and cause children anxiety and pain. Only a few studies have examined the perspectives of younger children. More knowledge is needed about younger children's experiences in caring situations such as NRMPs.

    Aim

    The aim of this study was to explain and understand the consequences related to NRMPs from younger children's perspectives.

    Methods

    Participant observations and interviews with younger children who had experienced NRMPs were analysed using a lifeworld hermeneutic approach.

    Results

    Experiencing fear is central for younger children during an NRMP and interpretation of its consequences formed the basis for the following themes: seeking security, realizing the adult's power, struggling for control, feeling ashamed, and surrendering. A comprehensive understanding is presented wherein younger children's experiences of NRMPs vary across time and space related to weakening and strengthening their feelings of fear.

    Conclusions

    Awareness is needed that adults' power becomes more obvious for children during an NRMP. Children's surrender does not necessarily imply acceptance of the procedure. Providing children with opportunities to control elements of the procedure creates a foundation for active participation, and vice versa.

  • 57.
    Liao, Ya-Tzu
    et al.
    Graduate Institute of Early Intervention, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taiwan.
    Hwang, Ai-Wen
    Graduate Institute of Early Intervention, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taiwan.
    Liao, Hua-Fang
    The School and Graduate Institute of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taiwan.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. SALVE (Socialt arbete, Livssammanhang, Välfärd).
    Kang, Lin-Ju
    Graduate Institute of Early Intervention, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taiwan.
    Understanding the participation in home, school, and community activities reported by children with disabilities and their parents: A pilot study2019Inngår i: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, nr 12, artikkel-id 2217Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Participation has significant impact on children’s health and well-being. Knowledge is limited on how children with disabilities perceive their participation and whether their perceptions differ from their parents. This pilot study aimed to explore whether self-reported frequency of participation and prioritized activities differ between children with disabilities and their parents. Thirty children with disabilities eligible for special education in elementary school and their parents were included. Each of them were interviewed with the Chinese version of Picture My Participation (PMP), separately, to identify the child’s participation frequency in 21 activities at home, school, and community, desire-to-change activities, and the level of involvement in these activities. The results indicated that children’s ratings of participation frequency were significantly lower than parents’ ratings in home activities but not in school and community activities, as analyzed by the Wilcoxon Signed Ranked test. Nineteen (63%) child–parent pairs had selected entirely different items as their desire-to-change activities. Children selected the activities that they were somewhat to very involved in; while parents selected the activities they thought their children were less involved in. Our findings suggest that children with disabilities had unique views on life and this should be supported in their health care and individualized education plans.

  • 58.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Mälardalen University.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Participation profiles in domestic life and peer relations as experienced by adolescents with and without impairments and long-term health conditions2019Inngår i: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 22, nr 1, s. 27-38Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To investigate how individual and environmental factors relate to self-reported participation profiles in adolescents with and without impairments or long-term health conditions.

    METHODS: A person-oriented approach (hierarchical cluster analysis) was used to identify cluster groups of individuals sharing participation patterns in the outcome variables frequency perceived importance in domestic life and peer relations. Cluster groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA).

    RESULTS: A nine-cluster solution was chosen. All clusters included adolescents with impairment and long-term health conditions. Perceived importance of peer relations was more important than frequent attendance in domestic-life activities. Frequency of participation in dialogues and family interaction patterns seemed to affect the participation profiles more than factors related to body functions.

    CONCLUSION: Type of impairment or long-term health condition is a weaker determinant of membership in clusters depicting frequency and perceived importance in domestic life or peer relations than dialogue and family environment.

  • 59.
    Mahdi, Soheil
    et al.
    Division of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), CAP Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ronzano, Nadia
    Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatric Unit, Department of Biomedical Science, University of Cagliari, Italy.
    Knüppel, Ane
    Research Unit for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Dias, José Carlos
    Childhood and Adolescence Psychiatry Department, Oporto Hospital Centre, Porto, Portugal.
    Albdah, Ayman
    Child Psychiatry Division, King Abdullah Specialist Children Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Chien-Ho, Lin
    Department of Psychiatry, Chimei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Almodayfer, Omar
    Mental Health Department, KAMC-R, MNGHA, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Bluschke, Annet
    Cognitive Neurophysiology, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Technical University, Dresden, Germany.
    Karande, Sunil
    Learning Disability Clinic, Department of Paediatrics, Seth GS Medical College and KEM Hospital, Parel, India.
    Huang, Huei-Lin
    Institute of Behavioral Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, National Chen Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Christiansen, Hanna
    Department of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg, Germany.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete.
    de Vries, Petrus J.
    Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Coghill, David
    Departments of Paediatrics and Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
    Tannock, Rosemary
    Research Institute of the Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
    Rohde, Luis
    ADHD Outpatient Program, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    Bölte, Sven
    Division of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), CAP Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    An international clinical study of ability and disability in ADHD using the WHO-ICF framework2018Inngår i: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 27, nr 10, s. 1305-1319Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the fourth and final study designed to develop International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF, and children and youth version, ICF-CY) core sets for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). To investigate aspects of functioning and environment of individuals with ADHD as documented by the ICF-CY in clinical practice settings. An international cross-sectional multi-centre study was applied, involving nine units from eight countries: Denmark, Germany, India, Italy, Portugal, Saudi Arabia, Sweden and Taiwan. Clinicians and clinical researchers rated the functioning level of 112 children, adolescents and adults with ADHD using the extended ICF-CY checklist version 2.1a. The ratings were based on a variety of information sources, such as medical records, medical history, clinical observations, clinical questionnaires, psychometric tests and structured interviews with participants and family members. In total, 113 ICF-CY categories were identified, of which 50 were related to the activities and participation, 33 to environmental factors and 30 to body functions. The clinical study also yielded strengths related to ADHD, which included temperament and personality functions and recreation and leisure. The study findings endorse the complex nature of ADHD, as evidenced by the many functional and contextual domains impacted in ADHD. ICF-CY based tools can serve as foundation for capturing various functional profiles and environmental facilitators and barriers. The international nature of the ICF-CY makes it possible to develop user-friendly tools that can be applied globally and in multiple settings, ranging from clinical services and policy-making to education and research. 

  • 60.
    McAuliffe, Tomomi
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Thomas, Yvonne
    Allied Health and Social Sciences, Institute of Health & Society, University of Worcester, Worcester, United Kingdom.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Cordier, Reinie
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    The experiences of mothers of children with autism spectrum disorder: Managing family routines and mothers’ health and wellbeing2019Inngår i: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, ISSN 0045-0766, E-ISSN 1440-1630, Vol. 66, nr 1, s. 68-76Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/aim: Families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) use family routines to provide predictability and structure to support occupational engagement of their family members. Mothers assume the major role to orchestrate occupations in constructing family routines, which may impact their health and wellbeing. However, the experiences of mothers in managing family routines and their health and wellbeing have not been the main focus in previous research. Thus, this study explored the experiences of mothers of children with ASD in managing family routines and their perceptions of the impact of family routines on their health and wellbeing.

    Methods: An interpretive phenomenological approach was used. Twenty mothers of children with ASD, aged between 28 and 56 years, participated in semi-structured interviews. Data were transcribed verbatim and each transcript was analysed.

    Results: Five themes that summarise mothers’ perceptions towards health and wellbeing when managing family routines emerged: (i) Keeping on track keeping healthy; (ii) My life is busy, because I do everything for everyone else; (iii) Keeping on track all the time is tiring or frustrating; (iv) Looking after my family by looking after myself; and (v) I am not perfect and it is OK.

    Conclusion: This study highlighted the substantial efforts required in constructing family routines that may be at the cost of mothers’ health and wellbeing. However, mothers may be able to cope with everyday demands in managing family routines by changing their perspectives. By integrating ‘me-time’ activities in family routines, mothers may be able to support their own health and wellbeing. Mothers’ values and needs are reflected in family routines; hence, thorough understanding of family routines may be a key to support mothers’ occupational engagement. 

  • 61.
    Nilsson, John
    et al.
    Department of Paediatrics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Åkesson, Karin
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Futurum—Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping County Council .
    Hanberger, Lena
    Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Paediatrics and Diabetes Research Centre, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    High HbA1c at onset cannot be used as a predictor for future metabolic control for the individual child with type 1 diabetes mellitus.2017Inngår i: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448, Vol. 18, nr 8, s. 848-852Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To study how metabolic control at onset of type 1 diabetes correlates to metabolic control and clinical parameters during childhood until transition from pediatric care to adult diabetes care.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data at onset, three months, one, three, and five years after diagnosis and at transition, on HbA1c and clinical parameters, on 8084 patients in the Swedish pediatric quality registry, SWEDIABKIDS, were used. Of these patients, 26% had been referred to adult diabetes care by 2014.

    RESULTS: Children with HbA1c < 72 mmol/mol (8.7%) (20% of patients, low group) at diagnosis continued to have good metabolic control during childhood, in contrast to children with HbA1c > 114 mmol/mol (12.6%) (20% of patients, high group) at diagnosis, who continued to have high HbA1c at follow-up. For the individual, there was no significant correlation between high HbA1c at onset and during follow-up. During follow-up, children in the high group were more often smokers, less physically active, and more often had retinopathy than children in the low group (P < .01, .01, .03 respectively).

    CONCLUSION: High HbA1c at onset was associated with high HbA1c during follow-up on a group level, but it cannot be used as a predictor of future metabolic control on an individual level. These results emphasize the important work done by the diabetes team in the first years after diagnosis. It is important to continuously set high goals for the achievement of tight metabolic control, in order to decrease the risk of microvascular complications.

  • 62.
    Nordal, Ellen Berit
    et al.
    Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Rypdal, Veronika
    Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Arnstad, Ellen Dalen
    Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, NTNU - Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Aalto, Kristiina T.
    Children's Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Berntson, Lillemor
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ekelund, Maria
    Department of Pediatrics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Fasth, Anders
    Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Glerup, Mia
    Department of Pediatrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Herlin, Troels
    Department of Pediatrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Susan M.
    Department of Pediatrics, Rigshospitalet Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Peltoniemi, Suvi Marikki
    Helsingin Yliopisto, Helsinki, Finland.
    Zak, Marek Stanislaw
    Department of Pediatrics, Rigshospitalet Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Songstad, Nils Thomas
    Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Rygg, Marite
    Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, NTNU - Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Marhaug, Gudmund O.
    St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
    Pedersen, Freddy Karup
    Copenhagen.
    Lahdenne, Pekka
    Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Participation in school and physical education in juvenile idiopathic arthritis in a Nordic long-term cohort study2019Inngår i: Pediatric Rheumatology, ISSN 1546-0096, E-ISSN 1546-0096, Vol. 17, nr 1, artikkel-id 44Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of the study was to describe school attendance and participation in physical education in school among children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).

    Methods: Consecutive cases of JIA from defined geographical areas of Finland, Sweden and Norway with disease onset in 1997 to 2000 were followed for 8 years in a multi-center cohort study, aimed to be as close to population-based as possible. Clinical characteristics and information on school attendance and participation in physical education (PE) were registered.

    Results: Participation in school and in PE was lowest initially and increased during the disease course. Eight years after disease onset 228/274 (83.2%) of the children reported no school absence due to JIA, while 16.8% reported absence during the last 2 months due to JIA. Full participation in PE was reported by 194/242 (80.2%), partly by 16.9%, and none by 2.9%. Lowest participation in PE was found among children with ERA and the undifferentiated categories. Absence in school and PE was associated with higher disease activity measures at the 8-year visit. School absence > 1 day at baseline predicted use of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, including biologics (DMARDs) (OR 1.2 (1.1-1.5)), and non-remission off medication (OR 1.4 (1.1-1.7) 8 years after disease onset.

    Conclusion: School absence at baseline predicted adverse long-term outcome. In children and adolescents with JIA participation in school activities is mostly high after 8 years of disease. For the minority with low participation, special attention is warranted to promote their full potential of social interaction and improve long-term outcome.

  • 63.
    Norderyd, Johanna
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    A biopsychosocial approach to functioning, oral health and specialist dental health care in children with disabilities – Swedish and international perspectives2017Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Maintaining good oral health may be more important for children with disabilities than others, since problems with oral health may increase the impact of a disability, or the medical condition may increase the risk for poor oral health. In addition, the risk for oral health problems may be influenced by the functioning of the child. Functioning can also affect the child’s ability to cooperate in the dental setting, and how dental treatment is performed. A medical diagnosis alone does not provide enough information about a child’s functioning, nor oral health. Thus, there is a need for a holistic perspective of oral health and dental health care in children with disabilities. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - Children and Youth (ICF-CY) enables a structured assessment of the biopsychosocial consequences of a health condition.

    Aim: The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate how biopsychosocial factors relate to oral health and specialist dental health care in children with disabilities in a Swedish, and an international context, with special focus on the experience of dental treatment under general anaesthesia (DGA).

    Material and methods: The research was conducted using a quantitative, cross-sectional, comparative and descriptive design. An ICF-CY Checklist for Oral Health was completed with data from a structured interview with children 0-16 years old, referred for specialist dental health care, and their parents/carers. Additional information was retrieved from dental and medical records. Three groups were included in data analyses: one large international group of 218 children from Argentina, France, Ireland and Sweden; one large Swedish group with 99 children with complex disabilities; and one international group of children with disabilities and manifest dental caries from Argentina, France and Sweden.

    Results: The ICF-CY Checklist for Oral Health identified both common and varying functional, social and environmental aspects relevant for oral health and oral health care in children who had been referred to specialist dental clinics in four countries. Swedish children with caries experience had been referred to a paediatric dental specialist clinic at a significantly older age than caries-free children. The medical diagnoses were not significantly related to dental caries or child functioning in the large Swedish group with complex disabilities and low caries prevalence, nor was there a significant relationship between dental caries and child functioning. Collinearity between dental caries and problems in the functioning factor ’Interpersonal interactions andrelationships’ was observed in the international group of children with disabilities and manifest dental caries. DGA sessions with combined medical and dental treatment were common in the large Swedish study group. Children with experience of DGA had more severe problems in intellectual functions than those without experience of DGA. Problems in interpersonal interactions and relationships increased, while problems with mobility decreased, the likelihood for children having had experience of DGA. On international group level, dmft/DMFT was significantly higher in children with the experience of DGA than in those without DGA experience, but looking at Argentina, France and Sweden separately, this was not true for the Swedish children. There were significant, international differences between the prevalence of dmft/DMFT, DGA and environmental barriers.

    Conclusion: The biopsychosocial perspective, operationalised by the ICF-CY, contributes a holistic view on oral health and specialist dental health care in children with disabilities. In addition to certain differences, children with different health status from different countries share many functional and environmental aspects, important for oral health and dental health care. Early referral to a paediatric specialist dental clinic seemed favourable for oral health. The medical diagnosis was not related to child functioning or dental caries. Child functioning had a significant impact on DGA, and in children with disabilities and manifest dental caries, child functioning also had a correlation with caries. The dental caries burden was a stronger factor than functioning for the experience of DGA, however, dental health organisation and country context seemed to matter the most. Combining dental and medical procedures during the same GA session is good use of resources for both the individual and the society. To ensure children with complex disabilities to have the possibility of achieving equivalent good oral health as other children, DGA is one important factor.

  • 64.
    Norderyd, Johanna
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Faulks, D.
    Molina, G.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Klingberg, G.
    What determines dental caries treatment under general anaesthesia in children with disabilities: number of cavities, child functioning or dental organisation?Manuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 65.
    Norderyd, Johanna
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. National Oral Disability Centre for Rare Disorders, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Faulks, Denise
    CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Service d'Odontologie, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
    Molina, Gustavo
    Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Cordoba, Argentina.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete.
    Klingberg, Gunilla
    Departement of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Which factors most influence referral for restorative dental treatment under sedation and general anaesthesia in children with complex disabilities: Caries severity, child functioning or dental service organisation?2018Inngår i: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 28, nr 1, s. 71-82Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child gives all children right to the highest standard of services for treatment and rehabilitation. For children with disabilities, sedation and general anaesthesia (GA) are often indicated for dental treatment; however, accessibility to this varies. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health – Child and Youth version (ICF-CY) enables a biopsychosocial description of children undergoing dental treatment.

    Aim

    To investigate conscious sedation and GA in children with complex disabilities and manifest caries and analyse how caries, child functioning, and dental service organisation relate to dental GA (DGA), comparing Argentina, France, and Sweden using the ICF-CY.

    Design

    Quantitative, cross-sectional; data collected through structured interviews, observation, and dental records.

    Results

    Sedation and DGA were common. Children with limitations in interpersonal interactions and relationships were more likely to have had DGA (OR: 5.3, P = 0.015). Level of caries experience was strongly correlated with experience of DGA. There were significant differences between countries regarding caries prevalence, sedation, DGA, and functional and environmental factors.

    Conclusions

    Although caries experience and child functioning are important, dental health service organisation had the most impact on the incidence of DGA, and for the use of conscious sedation, for children with complex disabilities.

  • 66.
    Norman, Åsa
    et al.
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zeebari, Zangin
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Statistik. Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Gisela
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Elinder, Liselotte Schäfer
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Parental support in promoting children's health behaviours and preventing overweight and obesity - a long-term follow-up of the cluster-randomised healthy school start study II trial.2019Inngår i: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 19, nr 1, artikkel-id 104Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Effects of obesity prevention interventions in early childhood are only meaningful if they are sustained over time, but long-term follow-up studies are rare. The school-based cluster-randomised Healthy School Start (HSS) trial aimed at child health promotion and obesity prevention through parental support was carried out in 31 pre-school classes (378 families) in disadvantaged areas in Sweden during 2012-2013. Post-intervention results showed intervention effects on intake of unhealthy foods and drinks, and lower BMI-sds in children with obesity at baseline. This study aimed to evaluate the long-term effectiveness 4 years post-intervention.

    METHODS: Data were collected from 215 children in March-June 2017. Child dietary intake, screen time, and physical activity were measured through parental-proxy questionnaires. Child height and weight were measured by the research group. Group effects were examined using Poisson, linear, logistic, and quantile regression for data on different levels. Analyses were done by intention to treat, per protocol, and sensitivity analyses using multiple imputation.

    RESULTS: No between-group effects on dietary intake, screen time, physical activity, or BMI-sds were found for the entire group at the four-year follow-up. In girls, a significant subgroup-effect was found favouring intervention compared to controls with a lower intake of unhealthy foods, but this was not sustained in the sensitivity analysis. In boys, a significant sub-group effect was found where the boys in the intervention group beyond the 95th percentile had significantly higher BMI-sds compared to boys in the control group. This effect was sustained in the sensitivity analysis. Analyses per protocol showed significant intervention effects regarding a lower intake of unhealthy foods and drinks in the children with a high intervention dose compared to controls.

    CONCLUSIONS: Four years after the intervention, only sub-group effects were found, and it is unlikely that the HSS intervention had clinically meaningful effects on the children. These results suggest that school-based prevention programmes need to be extended for greater long-term effectiveness by e.g. integration into school routine practice. In addition, results showed that children with a high intervention dose had better long-term outcomes compared to controls, which emphasises the need for further work to increase family engagement in interventions.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN, ISRCTN39690370, retrospectively registered March 1, 2013, http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN39690370 .

  • 67.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Björk, Maria
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad.
    Ringnér, Anders
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing, Umeå, Sweden.
    The Pediatric Inventory for Parents - Swedish Translation and Psychometric Testing.2018Inngår i: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 42, s. E97-E102Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Pediatric Inventory for Parents (PIP) measures parental stress related to caring for a child with an illness. However, no Swedish translation is available.

    PURPOSE: This study reports a Swedish translation of the PIP and psychometric properties of the instrument.

    DESIGN AND METHODS: This is a descriptive/methodological paper. The PIP was translated and culturally adapted to Swedish, and comprehensibility was tested. Data were collected twice from 48 parents of children with different illnesses, and initial psychometric properties of the instrument were examined. The IES-R (Impact of Event Scale-Revised) was used for concurrent validity.

    RESULTS: The Swedish version of the PIP demonstrated good correlations with the IES-R, and temporal changes were similar. Endorsement frequencies and test-retest were also satisfactory. When comparing groups of parents, the parents of children with cancer were statistically significantly more distressed, both on total score and for emotional distress and role function. Discriminative validity was demonstrated by comparing parents of children with cancer with parents of children with other diseases.

    CONCLUSIONS: The Swedish version of the PIP seems to be a valid and reliable instrument. However, as we used relatively small sample, for the future, we suggest further testing with larger samples.

    PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Clinicians and researchers seeking to measure parental distress in chronic illness could use the Swedish version of the PIP.

  • 68.
    Olsson, Lena
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Children with mild intellectual disability and their families – needs for support, service utilisation and experiences of support2016Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on service utilisation among children with mild ID and their families, their needs for support and their experiences of support.

    Aims

    The overall aim of the thesis was to explore and describe service utilisation patterns among families of children with mild ID from a systems perspective.

    Methods

    A cross-sectional, descriptive and comparative quantitative design was used to describe the extent of service utilisation among 84 children with mild ID and their families (paper I and II). The types and number of services utilised were investigated in relation to the child’s age, gender and school setting. Data concerning the services utilised were collected from the organisational records of social services and paediatric habilitation units. In paper III, a descriptive questionnaire design was used to describe the support needs of families of 38 children with mild ID. A confirmatory design was used to examine the relation between family needs for support and (a) parental self-efficacy and (b) parents’ control over services. A confirmatory design was also used to examine the relation between parents’ experiences of the helpfulness of the support and (a) parental self-efficacy and (b) parents’ control over services. In paper IV a longitudinal, comparative and confirmatory design was used to investigate whether social service utilisation patterns differ over time when children with mild ID in self-contained classes are compared with those integrated into mainstream classes (n=405).

    Results

    In total, 60% of the families utilised paediatric habilitation services, and 40% of the families used disability-related services provided by social services. The most commonly utilised services were services concerned support outside of the home, such as respite care and services to improve children’s participation in society. Approximately 25% of the families utilised social problems-related services provided by social services. The most commonly utilised services concerned those to support parents in their parenting roles and financial assistance. In contrast to older children, younger children were more likely to utilise paediatric habilitation services. Older children utilised a higher number of disability-related service types provided by social services. Few differences were found between males and females. The majority of families did not utilise such services that are provided by social services. It was rare for families to use both disability-related services and those that address social problems during the same year.

    Commonly reported family needs concerned information about what services are available for their child, their child's impairment, how to respond to their child's behaviour and how to teach their child skills. Other common needs included access to parent support networks, to find suitable leisure activities for the child, and more alone time for parents. In contrast to families with mothers who did not participate in paid work, families with mothers who were employed expressed a lower requirement for support such as counselling, contact with other parents of children with impairments, more friends and more alone time for parents. Similar results werefound for families with mothers with higher levels of education. Parents with higher levels of perceived self-efficacy reported a lower need for information, as did also parents with higher levels of control over services. Parents with higher levels of control over services experienced the support as being more helpful.

    Children with mild ID who attended self-contained classes were more likely to utilise paediatric habilitation services than children integrated in mainstream classes. The same pattern was found for utilisation of disability-related services provided by social services. Integrated children who changed school setting to attend self-contained classes were more likely to begin to utilise disability-related services in comparison with those children who continued to be integrated. The former also had a higher likelihood of increasing the number of disability-related service types utilised.

    Conclusions

    In addition to disability-related problems, families of children with mild ID may also be at a higher risk of experiencing social problems when compared with the general population. Furthermore, very few families utilised both disability-related services and services addressing social problems. This implies that collaboration flaws exist between those professionals concerned with child welfare services and those concerned with disability-related services. A strong predictor of service utilisation was the type of school setting: children attending self-contained classes had a higher rate of service utilisation than those attending mainstream classes. This indicates that service systems outside of school are designed to collaborate with groups of pupils in special classes rather than individual children in mainstream classes. The strong need for information by families indicates that an ecological framework should be used to identify those factors that affect information availability and effectiveness. To increase parents’ perceived level of control over services, HSO professionals need to work in a capacity building manner with the explicit goal to enhance parental self-efficacy.

  • 69.
    Olsson, Lena
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Elgmark Andersson, Elisabeth
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi.
    Integration of pupils with mild intellectual disability in mainstream school settings - goog or bad for social service utilisation? A longitudinal study among children with mild intellectual disability in SwedenManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 70.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Tsai, Mengche
    National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Lin, Yi Ching
    National Taipei University of Education, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Strong, Carol
    National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Latner, Janet D.
    University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, United States.
    Fung, Xavier C.C.
    Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong.
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong.
    Tsang, Hector W.H.
    Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong.
    Psychometric properties and measurement invariance of the Weight Self-Stigma Questionnaire and Weight Bias Internalization Scale in children and adolescents2019Inngår i: International Journal of Clinical and Health Psychology, ISSN 1697-2600, E-ISSN 2174-0852, Vol. 19, nr 2, s. 150-159Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Objective: Given the negative consequences of weight bias, including internalized weight stigma, on health outcomes, two instruments—the Weight Self-Stigma Questionnaire (WSSQ) and Weight Bias Internalization Scale (WBIS)—have been developed. However, their psychometric properties are yet to be tested for Asian pediatric populations.

    Method: Participants aged 8 to 12 years (N = 287; 153 boys) completed the WSSQ and the WBIS, and they were classified into either a group with overweight or a group without overweight based on self-reported weight and height.

    Results: Both WSSQ and WBIS had their factor structures supported by confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs). The measurement invariance of two-factor structure was further supported for WSSQ across gender and weight status. The measurement invariance of single-factor structure was supported for WBIS across gender but not across weight status.

    Conclusions: WSSQ and WBIS were both valid to assess the internalization of weight bias. However, the two instruments demonstrated different properties and should be applied in different situations. 

  • 71.
    Pan, Yi-Ling
    et al.
    Division of Physical Therapy, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Hwang, Ai-Wen
    Graduate Institute of Early Intervention, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan.
    Simeonsson, Rune J.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. School Psychology and Applied Developmental Science and Special Education, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, United States.
    Lu, Lu
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Liao, Hua-Fang
    Taiwan Society of ICF, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Utility of the early delay and disabilities code set for exploring the linkage between ICF-CY and assessment reports for children with developmental delay2019Inngår i: Infants and young children, ISSN 0896-3746, E-ISSN 1550-5081, Vol. 32, nr 3, s. 215-227Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) offers a universal language of codes to document childhood functioning. The ICF-CY Code Set for Infants with Early Delay and Disabilities (EDD Code Set) has been developed to facilitate the practical application of the ICF for children. The purpose of this study was to examine the utility of the EDD Code Set by exploring the linkage between ICF and children's assessment reports. We reviewed 30 Comprehensive Assessment Reports (CAR) for children with developmental delay (DD), aged 9-34 months in a joint evaluation center. Meaningful concepts in compulsory and supplementary sections of the CAR were identified and linked to the EDD Code Set. Linkage was measured by (a) number of linked codes and (b) average of code-only and code-with-qualifier percentages. Content in the CAR was linked to 72 of the 82 EDD codes with more codes linked from the supplementary (71) than the compulsory section (58). The largest proportion of linked codes was activities and participation (85%). The EDD Code Set can be used to examine the ICF linkage of pediatric assessment reports and guide future development or revision of pediatric documentation and participation-based intervention. 

  • 72.
    Parsons, Dave
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Cordier, Reinie
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Lee, Hoe
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    A randomised controlled trial of an information communication technology delivered intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder living in regional Australia2019Inngår i: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 49, nr 2, s. 569-581Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This exploratory randomised controlled trial tested the effectiveness of a tablet-based information communication technology early intervention application to augment existing therapy with the aim of improving visual motor, imitation, language and social skills in young children with ASD who reside in regional areas. Fifty-nine participants were recruited and randomised to either a therapy-as-usual group or intervention group. With the exception of the expressive language subscale on the Mullen Scales of Early Learning, no significant between-group differences were recorded for visual motor, imitation, receptive language and social skills of participants between baseline and post-intervention. When all participants were pooled and measured over time, improvements were shown in receptive and pragmatic language and social skills; these gains were maintained, thus suggesting skill acquisition. 

  • 73.
    Parsons, Dave
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Cordier, Reinie
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Lee, Hoe
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Stress, coping, and quality of life in families with a child with ASD living regionally2019Inngår i: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The present study aimed to explore whether regionality is associated with differing stress levels, coping, QOL and daily routines for parents and families of a child with ASD (aged 2–18 years) in Western Australia using validated outcome measures and compare the stress levels and QOL of this group to population norms.

    Methods: A sample of 278 families living in Western Australia who have a child or adolescent (2–18 years old) with a clinical diagnosis of ASD participated in a cross-sectional survey. Multivariate logistic regression modelling was conducted to determine key factors associated between regionality and demographic variables, quality of life, coping styles, time use, and stress levels.

    Results: Parents living in low densely populated areas were more likely to adopt avoidant coping mechanisms, compared to those living in densely populated areas. Fathers with children on the autism spectrum were less likely to be educated above diploma level in regional and remote areas. Stress, QOL or daily routines did not differ by regionality; however, the total sample (i.e., parents from both LDP and DP areas) experienced significantly higher levels of stress and lower QOL when compared to the general population.

    Conclusions: The findings suggest that despite having higher levels of stress and lower QOL compared to the general population, residing in a geographically LDP area in Western Australia has a small association on preferred coping style preference and has no association on stress levels, QOL or daily routines for parents who have a child with ASD.

  • 74.
    Petersson, Christina
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Using health-related quality of life instruments for children with long-term conditions: On the basis of a national quality registry system2016Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: There has been a continuous development of new technologies in healthcare that are derived from national quality registries. However, this innovation needs to be translated into the workflow of healthcare delivery, to enable children with long-term conditions to get the best support possible to manage their health during everyday life. Since children living with long-term conditions experience different interference levels in their lives, healthcare professionals need to assess the impact of care on children’s day-to-day lives, as a complement to biomedical assessments.

    Aim: The overall aim of this thesis was to explore and describe the use of instruments about health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in outpatient care for children with long-term conditions on the basis of a national quality registry system.

    Methods: The research was conducted by using comparative, cross-sectional and explorative designs and data collection was performed by using different methods. The questionnaire DISABKIDS Chronic Generic Measure -37 was used as well as semi-structured interviews and video-recordings from consultations. Altogether, 156 children (8–18 years) and nine healthcare professionals participated in the studies. Children with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) (n 131) answered the questionnaire DISABKIDS and children with rheumatic diseases, kidney diseases and T1D (n 25) were interviewed after their consultation at the outpatient clinic after the web-DISABKIDS had been used. In total, nine healthcare professionals used the HRQOL instrument as an assessment tool during the encounters which was video-recorded (n 21). Quantitative deductive content analysis was used to describe content in different HRQOL instruments. Statistical inference was used to analyse results from DISABKIDS and qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the interviews and video-recordings.

    Results: The findings showed that based on a biopsychosocial perspective, both generic and disease-specific instruments should be used to gain a comprehensive evaluation of the child’s HRQOL. The DISABKIDS instrument is applicable when describing different aspects of health concerning children with T1D. When DISABKIDS was used in the encounters, children expressed positive experiences about sharing their results with the healthcare professional. It was discovered that different approaches led to different outcomes for the child when the healthcare professionals were using DISABKIDS during the encounter. When an instructing approach is used, the child’s ability to learn more about their health and how to improve their health is limited. When an inviting or engaging approach is used by the professional, the child may become more involved during the conversations.

    Conclusions: It could be argued that instruments of HRQOL could be used as a complement to biomedical variables, to promote a biopsychosocial perspective on the child’s health. According to the children in this thesis, feedback on their results after answering to web-DISABKIDS is important, which implies that healthcare professionals need to prioritize time for discussions about results from HRQOL instruments in the encounters. If healthcare professionals involve the child in the discussion of the results of the HRQOL, misinterpreted answers could be corrected during the conversation. Concurrently, this claims that healthcare professionals invite and engage the child.

  • 75.
    Petersson, Christina
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Åkesson, Karin
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Children's experiences about a structured assessment of health-related quality of life during a patient encounter2016Inngår i: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 42, nr 3, s. 424-432Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    It has been stated that care for children with chronic health conditions tends to focus on condition-specific issues rather than how these children experience their health and everyday life functioning.

    Aim

    The aim of this study was to explore children's experiences about a structured assessment of health-related quality of life applied during a patient encounter.

    Methods

    Prior to the start of the study, a clinical intervention based on the questionnaire DISABKIDS Chronic Generic Measure (DCGM-37) was performed. A qualitative explorative design was chosen, and 25 children between 10–17 years of age were interviewed after the consultation at four different paediatric outpatient clinics. Data were analysed according to qualitative content analysis.

    Results

    The results were twofold: children experienced that the assessment was providing them with insights about their health, which motivated them to make lifestyle changes. When outcomes were discussed and requested, the children felt encouraged.

    Conclusions

    The use of an assessment of health-related quality of life may promote insights about health and encourage children with chronic health conditions to discuss their outcomes with healthcare professionals.

  • 76.
    Petersson, Christina
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Åkesson, Karin
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Golsäter, Marie
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    To promote child involvement – healthcare professionals' use of a health-related quality of life assessment tool during paediatric encounters2017Inngår i: European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare, ISSN 2052-5648, E-ISSN 2052-5656, Vol. 5, nr 1Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Children and healthcare professionals should be provided with easy-to-use tools which could lead to actionable results.

    Objectives: There is increasing interest in the use of patient reported outcomes to aid management of individual care; therefore, the use of health-related qualityof life (HRQOL) assessments during consultations need to be studied. The aim of this study was to explore how healthcare professionals use a HRQOL assessment tool during paediatric encounters.

    Design: A descriptive, explorative design with a qualitative approach based on video recordings was chosen.

    Methods: Twenty-one video recordings, from nine different healthcare professionals’ consultations where an assessment tool of HRQOL were used were analysed by content analysis.

    Results: The healthcare professionals were using different strategies and when they combined these strategies three approaches emerged. The instructing approach was characterized by healthcare professionals giving a summary of the results, leading to children becoming passive bystanders in the encounter. Based on an inviting approach, the children’s perceptions of their situation were requested while the items were explored. This resulted in involving the children in the conversations. In the engaging approach, an open dialogue and a common interpretation were sought to guide further care which was interpreted as children becoming actively involved.

    Conclusions: The child’s involvement could be facilitated depending on which approach is being used. When an inviting and engaging approach is used, actions in a non-linear set of interactions is co-produced with the child.

    Relevance to practice: The use of an HRQOL assessment tool change the management during consultations and could promote child involvement dependent on which approach the healthcare professionals are using.

  • 77.
    Rydén, Anna
    et al.
    Division of Paediatrics and Diabetes Research Centre, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Division of Paediatrics and Diabetes Research Centre, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Fredriksson, Mats
    Linköping Academic Research Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för naturvetenskap och biomedicin. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Biomedicinsk plattform.
    General immune dampening is associated with disturbed metabolism at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes2014Inngår i: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 75, nr 1, s. 45-50Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a serious diagnosis with the prospect of grave short- and long-term complications and even death if poorly managed. An attempt has been made to describe how clinical and immunological deviations might influence each other close to the diagnosis of T1D.

    Methods:

    Sixty-nine newly diagnosed T1D children were studied together with a reference group of 30 healthy children. Cytokines (interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α) were detected in in vitro culture by multiplex fluorochrome technique. Information of clinical status of the patients such as BMI, weight loss, pubertal stage, duration of symptoms, previous and/or ongoing infections, insulin requirement, and ketoacidosis were gathered together with the analysis of C-peptide and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c).

    Results:

    In general, low cytokine secretion was found at diagnosis of T1D. However, high C-peptide, short duration of symptoms, or an infection prior to diagnosis was associated with increased immune activity including proinflammatory, Th2-associated, and Tr1-associated cytokines. In contrast, ketoacidosis and later pubertal stage at onset of disease were more related to a Th1-prone response.

    Conclusion:

    There is a general immune dampening at diagnosis of T1D, which appears to be related to the metabolic state close to diagnosis.

  • 78.
    Samuelsson, U.
    et al.
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Paediatrics and Diabetes, Research Centre, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Westerberg, L.
    IFM Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Åkesson, Karin
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Department of Pediatrics, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Birkebæk, N. H.
    Department of Pediatrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Bjarnason, R.
    Landspitali University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Drivvoll, A. K.
    Norwegian Childhood Diabetes Registry, Division of Paediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway & Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Skrivarhaug, T.
    Norwegian Childhood Diabetes Registry, Division of Paediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway & Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Svensson, J.
    Herlev University Hospital, CPH-Direct, Pediatric Department, Herlev, Denmark & University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Health and Medical Science, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Thorsson, A.
    Landspitali University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Hanberger, L.
    Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Geographical variation in the incidence of type 1 diabetes in the Nordic countries: A study within NordicDiabKids2019Inngår i: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) is high in the Nordic countries with geographic differences between as well as within countries. Objective: To describe the geographical distribution of the incidence of T1D among children in four Nordic countries, an area where the population is considered genetically similar. Methods: Data on children 0 to 14 years of age and diagnosed with T1D 2006 to 2011 was collected from four Nordic national pediatric quality diabetes registries. Data included year of diagnosis (2006-2011), sex, and age at diagnosis. Figures for number of children at risk during 2006 to 2011—as well as total population, proportion with foreign background and size of populated areas of geographic regions—were collected from official statistics. Results: The total incidence during the study period for all four countries was 35.7/100 000 person years but differed between the countries (range 18.2-44.1; P <.001). The incidence difference between the countries was most obvious in the highest age group, 10 to 14 years of age, whereas there was no difference in the youngest age group 0 to 5 years of age. Iceland had similar incidence in the entire country, whereas the other countries had areas with different incidence. Densely populated areas, such as major cities, had the lowest incidence. Conclusion: The incidence of T1D differed between the Nordic countries and also between the neighboring countries and generally decreased with population density. This indicates that environmental factors may contribute to the level of incidence of T1D.

  • 79. Schertz, M.
    et al.
    Zuk, L.
    Green, Dido
    Tel Aviv University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Occupational Therapy, Ramat Aviv, Israel.
    Long-term neurodevelopmental follow-up of children with congenital muscular torticollis2013Inngår i: Journal of Child Neurology, ISSN 0883-0738, E-ISSN 1708-8283, Vol. 28, nr 10, s. 1215-1221Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Congenital muscular torticollis is a common condition, but long-term neurodevelopmental follow-up is lacking. This study reports on neurodevelopmental outcome of 68 children, aged 7 to 9 years, with a history of congenital muscular torticollis, excluding children with torticollis due to other conditions. Thirty-eight children were examined for presence of neurodevelopmental disorders. Telephone interview data were available for an additional 30 children. Of those examined, 22/38 (57.9%) had or were at risk for a developmental disorder (attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), developmental coordination disorder, language impairment, autistic spectrum disorder) on at least 1 of the assessments administered, 23/38 (60.5%) had received developmental treatment during childhood. One child, based on a telephone interview, had a history of developmental treatment. Therefore, 30/68 (44.1%) children of the total sample demonstrated a developmental delay/disorder, currently (22/68) or previously (8/68). Our findings suggest congenital muscular torticollis to be a significant risk factor for later neurodevelopmental conditions with disorders presenting at different stages of development.

  • 80.
    Schichtel, Franziska
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Interventions with the focus on refugee children´s mental health: A systematic literature review2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
  • 81.
    Sim, Angela
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Cordier, Reinie
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    “We are in this together”: Experiences of relationship satisfaction in couples raising a child with autism spectrum disorder2019Inngår i: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 58, s. 39-51Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Couple relationships play an integral role in family adjustment when a child has autism spectrum disorder (ASD), yet, it is unclear what factors contribute to the maintenance of relationship satisfaction in these couples.

    Method: Using phenomenology, data from eleven couple interviews were analysed to gain an understanding of the lived experiences of relationship satisfaction when raising a child with ASD.

    Results: The overall essence of “We are in this together” reflected the attitude that a strong partnership was beneficial in maintaining relationship satisfaction. This essence was captured in three main themes: 1) Shared beliefs, 2) Teamwork and 3) Shared experiences which closely paralleled the Walsh family resilience framework.

    Conclusions: Couples can be supported in these key areas to strengthen their relationship to serve as a source of resilience for families with a child with ASD. 

  • 82.
    Sjöman, Madeleine
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Social interactions and change in children’s engagement and externalizing behavior difficulties in preschoolManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 83.
    Sjöman, Madeleine
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Axelsson, A.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Mälardalens högskola.
    Danielsson, H.
    Social interactions - predictor of children’s engagement and hyperactivity in preschoolManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 84.
    Sonmark, Kristina
    et al.
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Department of Sociology, Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Godeau, Emmanuelle
    Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse, France.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Bygren, Magnus
    Department of Sociology, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Modin, Bitte
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Department of Sociology, Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Individual and contextual expressions of school demands and their relation to psychosomatic health a comparative study of students in France and Sweden2016Inngår i: Child Indicators Research, ISSN 1874-897X, E-ISSN 1874-8988, Vol. 9, nr 1, s. 93-109Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the health-related implications of both individual students’ and class-level concentrations of perceived demands in terms of pressuring, difficult and tiring schoolwork in France and Sweden, two countries with substantial differences in their educational systems and recent notable differences in PISA-results. Data come from Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (2001/02, 2005/06 and 2009/10) and comprise a total of 33,243 students aged 11, 13 and 15. Findings show that feeling under pressure from schoolwork is less prevalent in Sweden than in France among 11 and 13-year olds, but almost twice as common among 15-year olds. Yet its correlation with 15-year olds’ psychosomatic complaints is stronger in France than in Sweden. Feeling tired by schoolwork is equally common for 11- and 13-year olds in the two countries, but more frequent among 15-year olds in Sweden. It is also a stronger predictor of psychosomatic complaints in Sweden than in France across all age-groups. While it is more common at all ages to perceive the schoolwork as difficult in France, its relationship with psychosomatic complaints is stronger among students in Sweden. The proportion of classmates reporting high school demands is also linked to poorer student health, but these effects were largely confined to girls in both countries.

  • 85.
    Taylor, Susan
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    McCutcheon, Sara
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    McLean, Belinda
    School of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
    Parsons, Richard
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Jacoby, Peter
    Population Sciences, Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, Australia.
    Carey, Leeanne
    School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Elliott, Catherine
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Haptic exploratory procedures of children and youth with and without cerebral palsy2019Inngår i: Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, ISSN 0194-2638, E-ISSN 1541-3144, Vol. 39, nr 3, s. 337-351Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Compare haptic exploratory procedures (EPs) and exploratory movements (EMs) of children. This study also tested the interrater reliability of a novel digital recording method.

    Methods: Participants were 31 children with typical development (TD) (aged 6 years 1 month to 15 years 9 months; 14 male) and 23 children with spastic unilateral cerebral palsy (CP) (aged 6 years to 15 years 5 months; 13 males; right hemiplegia, n = 12).

    Results: There were no statistically significant differences between groups for expected EP (p =.15), additional EPs (p =.78), or EMs (p =.69) but there was for mean duration of exploration (p <.001) and accuracy (p <.001). This suggests that although children with CP performed similar haptic EPs for each object as children with TD, they took more time and were less accurate in their identification. There was substantial agreement between the two raters' observations of expected EP, κ =.64, p <.0005.

    Conclusion: Children with CP performed similar haptic EPs as their TD peers. However, despite similarities, the results indicate that for children with CP manual ability was not the primary determinant of accuracy or speed of identification. This study provides evidence for a reliable method of recording haptic EPs. 

  • 86.
    Taylor, Susan
    et al.
    Faculty of Computing Health and Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia.
    McLean, B.
    School of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. School of Occupational Therapy and Social work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Carey, L.
    Neurorehabilitation and Recovery, The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne, Australia.
    Girdler, S.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Elliott, C.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Blair, E.
    Population Sciences, Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, Australia.
    Does somatosensation change with age in children and adolescents? A systematic review.2016Inngår i: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 42, nr 6, s. 809-824Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Somatosensory modalities, such as touch, proprioception and haptic ability, greatly influence the achievement of developmental milestones for children. Describing somatosensory impairment, natural variability and typical or expected developmental changes across age groups will help establish frameworks for intervention in clinical populations. This systematic review aimed to determine how different somatosensory modalities develop across childhood into adolescence to use as a point of reference for children at risk of somatosensory impairment.

    METHODS: Searches of five electronic databases were undertaken through EBSCO-host (MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SPORTDiscus and ERIC) for studies measuring at least one somatosensory modality in typically developing individuals between birth and 18 years and analysed by age. Characteristics of studies were collected including country of origin, sample size, demographics and outcome measure used. Quality assessment and data extraction were performed by two independent reviewers.

    RESULTS: Twenty three cross-sectional studies were included from a total of 188 articles retrieved: 8 examined aspects of touch, 5 proprioception and 10 haptic ability. Variability of study designs and variation in assessment tools precluded any formal meta-analysis.

    CONCLUSIONS: Somatosensation matures through childhood into adolescence; however, the present review found the pattern of somatosensory development varied depending on the assessment tool used and the aspect of somatosensation being measured, making it difficult to describe typical performance. There is a need for comprehensive assessment batteries to measure the somatosensation, including touch, proprioception and haptic ability, of children at risk of somatosensory impairment to aid in the development of effective interventions.

  • 87.
    Taylor, Susan
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Department of Paediatric Rehabilitation, Perth Children's Hospital, Australia.
    McLean, Belinda
    School of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Western Australia, Department of Paediatric Rehabilitation, Perth Children's Hospital, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Australia.
    Carey, Leeanne M.
    School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya
    Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Population Sciences, Telethon Kids Institute, Australia.
    Elliott, Catherine
    Department of Paediatric Rehabilitation, Perth Children's Hospital, Australia.
    Blair, Eve
    Population Sciences, Telethon Kids Institute, Australia.
    Assessing body sensations in children: Intra-rater reliability of assessment and effects of age2019Inngår i: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 82, nr 3, s. 179-185Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: This article examines the effect of age and gender on somatosensory capacity for children and adolescents, and provides preliminary normative data and reliability for the SenScreen © Kids, a new standardised measure of touch, wrist position sense and haptic object recognition.

    Method: A cross-sectional study of 88 typically developing children aged 6–15 years (mean 10.3 years; SD 2.6 years) was used to determine the developmental effects of age and gender on somatosensory capacity. Intra-rater reliability was assessed in 22 of the 88 participants at two time points (mean 8.8 years; SD 2.6 years).

    Results: Statistically significant differences were observed between age groups for tactile discrimination, wrist position sense and haptic object recognition, but not for touch registration for which all except one participant achieved a maximum score. There was no effect of gender. Three of four SenScreen Kids subtests demonstrated good intra-rater agreement between time points.

    Conclusions: Somatosensory capacity increased with age for typically developing children aged 6–15 years. Three subtests of the SenScreen Kids demonstrated good intra-rater reliability with typically developing children. Further investigation of reliability is required, and all subtests require psychometric testing with clinical populations.

  • 88.
    Tennstedt, Frida
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Ortopedteknisk plattform.
    Mastoraki Karlsson, Linnea
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Ortopedteknisk plattform.
    Barns intryck av omgivningen på en ortopedteknisk avdelning: -      En kvalitativ studie om hur barn uppfattar miljön och mötet på en ortopedteknisk avdelning2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: För att uppnå en god barnanpassad vård inom ortopedteknik krävs information om hur barn uppfattar mötet på en ortopedteknisk avdelning. Genom att ta del av barns tankar, åsikter och förslag kan verksamheter i framtiden lättare argumentera för exempelvis hur lokaler bör inredas och hur man bör bemöta barn.

     

    Syfte: Syftet med denna studie är att undersöka hur barn upplever mötet på en ortopedteknisk avdelning i avseendet vårdmiljö och möte med ortopedingenjören.

     

    Metod: En kvalitativ metod där deltagarna får rita och berätta kallad “Draw and tell” och åtta intervjuer med barn mellan 6 till 12 år om deras upplevelse efter besöket hos en ortopedingenjör genomfördes. Intervjuerna transkripterades och en innehållsanalys genomfördes.

     

    Resultat: Vissa gemensamma faktorer hittades i intervjuerna så som att det ansågs att det samtalades för mycket utan att engagera barnet samt att aktiviteter som fanns sågs som bra då det kunde bli lite väntan under besöket. Det fanns flera förslag på andra aktiviteter som önskades under väntan och speglade barnens egna intressen så som datorspel och böcker.

     

    Slutsats: Denna studie visar att det som ortopedingenjören är viktigt att engagera barnen vid mötena samt att aktiviteter finns till hands under långa väntetider.

     

    Nyckelord: Barns upplevelser, ortopedteknik, ortopedingenjör, bemötande, miljö

  • 89.
    Tompa, Andrea
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för naturvetenskap och biomedicin. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Biomedicinsk plattform. Division of Diagnostics, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Åkesson, Karin
    Department of Pediatrics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Sandra
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för naturvetenskap och biomedicin. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Biomedicinsk plattform.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för naturvetenskap och biomedicin. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Biomedicinsk plattform.
    Suppressed immune profile in children with type 1 diabetes in combination with celiac disease2019Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Cytokines, chemokines, acute phase proteins (APP), adipocytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) are involved in different pathophysiological processes of inflammatory character. The role of the different immune markers and the peripheral immunoregulatory milieu in children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in combination with celiac disease (CD) is not fully understood and is not well studied. The purpose of the present study was therefore to acquire more knowledge and to gain deeper understanding on peripheral immunoregulatory milieu in children with T1D and/or CD.

    Methods: The study included children diagnosed with T1D in combination with CD (n=18), children with T1D (n=27) or CD (n=16), and reference children (n=42).

    Blood samples were collected, and serum stored in -80°C until analysis, avoiding multiple freeze-thaw cycles. The inflammatory cyto/chemokines (IL-1β, -5, -6, -8, -9, -10, -13, -15, -17A, -22, -25, -33, IFN-γ, TNF-α, G-CSF, MCP-1, MIP-1α, MIP-1β), diabetes related immune markers (visfatin, resistin), APP (procalcitonin (PTC), ferritin, tissue protein activator, fibrinogen, serum amyloid A) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-1, -2, -3) were analyzed with Luminex technique using Bio-Plex assays. Hierarchical cluster analysis was used to identify similarities/differences in immune profiles between children with double diagnosis and children with single diagnosis and reference children. Mann-Whitney U test was used for comparison of the different diagnosis groups within the clusters and whole cohort, respectively.

    Results: The largest cluster included 75% of the participants and the diagnose distribution in the cluster were very similar to the distribution in the whole study cohort. The remaining 25% were divided in two smaller clusters representing 15.5% and 6.5% respectively. The major finding of this study showed that children with double diagnosis had (1) lower serum levels of IL-22, MCP-1, PCT, visfatin and MMP-2 compared to children with T1D; and (2) lower serum levels of the APC associated chemokine MIP-1α compared to reference children, observed in the main cluster. Most of these observations were also seen in the whole cohort.  

    Conclusion: Our observations indicate decreased serum levels of IL-22, MIP-1α, MCP-1, PCT, visfatin and MMP-2 in children diagnosed with T1D in combination with CD. These results indicate a suppressed immune profile including Th17 cytokines, chemokines, acute phase proteins, diabetes-related and matrix metalloproteinase immune markers. Functional studies of the involved immune cells (CD4+ Treg, CD8+ Treg, NK-cells and dendritic cells) could contribute to elucidate the heterogeneous immunological processes in children with more than one autoimmune disease.

  • 90.
    Wigston, Christine
    et al.
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Parsons, Richard
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Participation in extracurricular activities for children with and without siblings with autism spectrum disorder2017Inngår i: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 20, nr 1, s. 25-39Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To compare the number, frequency, enjoyment and performance in extracurricular activities of siblings of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) to their typically developing (TD) peers, and to identify differences between actual and desired participation.

    METHODS:

    A case-control study with 30 siblings of children with ASD and 30 siblings of TD children was conducted using the Paediatric Interest Profiles and a questionnaire.

    RESULTS:

    Siblings of children with ASD participated in fewer extracurricular activities than those with TD siblings. ASD symptoms were significantly associated with the sibling participating in fewer extracurricular activities. Children with TD siblings had higher enjoyment scores in relaxation activities than children with siblings with ASD.

    CONCLUSION:

    While results were mainly positive, some differences indicated that having a sibling with ASD may impact participation in extracurricular activities. Assessments of participation barriers, as well as support to minimise participation restrictions among siblings of children with ASD are required.

  • 91.
    Wilder, Jenny
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Axelsson, Anna Karin
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Carlsson, Maggan
    Föreningen JAG.
    Jag är med! Om personlig assistans och barns delaktighet i familjeaktiviteter2013Bok (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 92. Wilson, B. N.
    et al.
    Crawford, S. G.
    Green, Dido
    Guy’s & St Thomas’ Foundation Trust & Kings College London Biomedical Research Centre, Strand, London, UK.
    Roberts, G.
    Aylott, A.
    Kaplan, B. J.
    Psychometric properties of the revised Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire2009Inngår i: Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, ISSN 0194-2638, E-ISSN 1541-3144, Vol. 29, nr 2, s. 184-204Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire (DCDQ) is a parent-completed measure designed to identify subtle motor problems in children of 8 to 14.6 years of age. The purpose of this study was to extend the lower age range to children aged 5 to 7 years, revise items to ensure clarity, develop new scoring, and evaluate validity of the revised questionnaire. Additional items with improved wording were generated by an expert panel. Analyses of internal consistency, factor loading, and qualitative/quantitative feedback from researchers, clinicians, and parents were used to select 15 items with the strongest psychometric properties. Internal consistency was high (alpha = .94). The expanded questionnaire was completed by the parents of 287 children, aged 5-15 years, who were typically developing. Logistic regression modeling was used to generate separate cutoff scores for three age groups (overall sensitivity = 85%, specificity = 71%). The revised DCDQ was then compared to other standardized measures in a sample of 232 children referred for therapy services. Differences in scores between children with and without DCD (p < .001) provide evidence of construct validity. Correlations between DCDQ scores and Movement Assessment Battery for Children (r = .55) and Test of Visual-Motor Integration (r = .42) scores support concurrent validity. The results provide evidence that the revised DCDQ is a valid clinical screening tool for DCD.

  • 93.
    Zielinski, Ingar M.
    et al.
    Behavioural Science Institute, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
    Green, Dido
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Department of Sport and Health Science, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Rudisch, Julian
    Department of Sport and Health Science, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Jongsma, Marijtje L. A.
    Behavioural Science Institute, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
    Aarts, Pauline B. M.
    Department of Pediatric Rehabilitation, Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
    Steenbergen, Bert
    Behavioural Science Institute, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
    The relation between mirror movements and non-use of the affected hand in children with unilateral cerebral palsy2017Inngår i: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 59, nr 2, s. 152-159Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:

    In children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP), it is widely believed that mirror movements contribute to non-use of the affected hand despite preserved capacity, a phenomenon referred to as developmental disregard. We aimed to test whether mirror movements are related to developmental disregard, and to clarify the relation between mirror movements and bimanual function.

    Method:

    A repetitive squeezing task simultaneously measuring both hands' grip-forces was developed to assess mirror movements by using maximum cross-correlation coefficient (CCCmax) as well as strength measures (MMstrength). Developmental disregard, bimanual performance, and capacity were assessed using a validated video-observation method. Twenty-one children with unilateral CP participated (Median age 10y 7mo, interquartile range [IQR] 10y 1mo–12y 9mo). Outcome measures of mirror movements were correlated to developmental disregard, bimanual performance, and capacity scores using Spearman's correlations (significance level: α&lt;0.05).

    Results:

    Mirror movements were not related to developmental disregard. However, enhanced mirror movements in the less-affected hand were related to reduced performance (CCCmax: ρ=−0.526, p=0.007; MMstrength: ρ=−0.750, p<0.001) and capacity (CCCmax: ρ=−0.410, p=0.033; MMstrength: ρ=−0.679, p<0.001). These relations were only moderate (performance:MMstrength: ρ=−0.504, p=0.010), low (capacity: MMstrength: ρ=−0.470, p=0.016) or absent for mirror movements in the affected hand. Additionally, seven children showed stronger movements in their less-affected hands when actually being asked to move their affected hand.

    Interpretation:

    These findings show no relation between mirror movements and developmental disregard, but support an association between mirror movements and bimanual function.

  • 94.
    Åkesson, Karin
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Ryhov City Hospital, Jönköping.
    Hanberger, Lena
    Linköping University Hospital.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Linköping University Hospital.
    The influence of age, gender, insulin dose, BMI, and blood pressure on metabolic control in young patients with type 1 diabetes2015Inngår i: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448, Vol. 16, nr 8, s. 581-586Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To explore the relationship between certain clinical variables and metabolic HbA1c at diagnosis correlated to HbA1c at follow-up (p < 0.001). There was a clear gender difference regarding HbA1c. Girls had higher values both at diagnosis and at follow-up (p < 0.001). Girls also had lower BMI and pH at diagnosis than boys (p < 0.001). In contrast, girls with the highest body mass index (BMI) at follow-up had higher mean HbA1c at follow-up in 2010 (p < 0.001). Having a mother and/or a father with high BMI implied higher HbA1c at diagnosis (p < 0.003).

    Conclusions

    HbA1c at diagnosis seems to predict metabolic control years later. There is a gender difference at diagnosis as female patients have higher HbA1c than males at diagnosis as well as at follow up. As metabolic control is very much correlated to complications there is a need to early identify patients at risk of poor metabolic control. Even though we do not know whether a high HbA1c level is mainly due to severity of the disease or to behavioral patterns, new ways to treat and support these children, especially girls, are needed.

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