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  • 51.
    Roos, Johan
    Copenhagen Business School.
    Fri os fra nye ideer og investeringer2011In: Berlingske NyhedsmagasinArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 52.
    Roos, Johan
    Copenhagen Business School .
    Færre forskere betyder færre studerende2010In: Berlingske NyhedsmagasinArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 53.
    Roos, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    I Matter: Remaining the 1st Author in Strategy Research2005In: Innovating Strategy Processes / [ed] Floyd, S et al, Malden: Blackwell Publishing, 2005, p. 252-262Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Roos, Johan
    Copenhagen Business School .
    Innovation skaber job, som skaber velstand2010In: Berlingske NyhedsmagasinArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 55.
    Roos, Johan
    Copenhagen Business School.
    Kina ryster verden2010In: Berlingske NyhedsmagasinArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 56.
    Roos, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Lessons Needed to Beat the Computer2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last few decades, Moore’s Law (the theory of Gordon Moore, co-founder of Intel, that the number of transistors per square inch on integrated circuits will double every two years) is enabling tremendous “creative destruction” of many industries.

    A recent study by Carl Benedikt Frey and Michael Osborne at Oxford university estimates that half of 702 occupations could be computerised within the next two decades. The study predicts that even cognitive tasks are susceptible to being computerised, such as some within the healthcare, legal and financial services SECTORS. These increasingly benefit from software that analyses and recognises patterns in big data, replacing the need for human intelligence to do this work.

  • 57.
    Roos, Johan
    Copenhagen Business School .
    Lær af Sverige: Reformér efterlønnen2010In: Berlingske NyhedsmagasinArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 58.
    Roos, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Making the Good even Better2014In: Global Focus: the E F M D business magazine, ISSN 1784-2344, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 48-51Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Johan Roos explains how Jönköping International Business School in Sweden is being reformed and reinvigorated.

    You are probably not very familiar with Jönköping International Business School (JIBS) or its Swedish name Internationella Handelshögskolan but our goal is that within five years you will be.

    Having become its Dean two years ago, I have been working with my management team and faculty to put us on the path to having a global footprint far beyond our small size and remote setting in central Sweden. What we are doing at JIBS makes an interesting case for any business school leader who seeks to transform his or her organisation.

  • 59.
    Roos, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Practical Wisdom: Making and teaching the governance case for sustainability2017In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 140, p. 117-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the larger role that business education must begin playing in developing a generation of new leaders with the skills required to tackle the complex and increasingly serious challenges of sustainability. It posits a new framework for cultivating more responsible ways of thinking and acting in our current and future business students. The foundation of this framework seeks not just to complement, but to strengthen the two most common arguments for sustainability – the moral case and the economic case – with a third argument—the governance case based on Aristotle’s concept of practical wisdom (Gr. phronesis) as the ‘middle ground’ of thoughtful action. Practical wisdom stands between science (Gr. episteme) and cunning (Gr. metis) and is the habit of acting in ways that are both ethically and economically effective, but above all that support the common good. Practical wisdom strikes balances between individual and common interests, short-term and long-term perspectives as well as between adapting to and shaping the environment. The article notes how accreditation standards for business schools are now including sustainability issues and practices, but more must be done. The article proposes several fundamental changes in how we educate students to start leading businesses beyond the profit motive and corporate social responsibility (CSR) paradigms into responsible and sustainable practices that serve the common good

  • 60.
    Roos, Johan
    Copenhagen Business School.
    Problemet med tallet 29,52010In: Berlingske NyhedsmagasinArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [da]

    Ideen med bachelorgraden var, at unge skulle kunne gå ud i erhvervslivet efter tre år studier. Men ideen er faldet til jorden. I praksis er de unge næsten 30 år, inden de er færdige med studierne.

  • 61.
    Roos, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Reflections on the Future of Business Schools and Elephants2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    DURING the course of in 2013-2014, as the Dean of a Swedish business school I participated in three educational programs devoted to exploring and assessing the status of higher education and what university presidents, deans and senior-levels administrators can do to improve our future.  One conference was an 18-months-nine-weekend program offered by The Association of Swedish Higher Education. Another was a 1-weekend seminar at the Harvard University Graduate School of Education for experienced university presidents. The third was the week-long leadership in higher education program offered by the Oxford Academy for Education and Development. In reviewing these learning experiences as part of my preparation for the upcoming 2015 EFMD Conference for Deans & Directors General, I had three insights that may help many of us strategize for 2015 and beyond.

  • 62.
    Roos, Johan
    Copenhagen Business School .
    Samfundsvidenskab bidrager til vækst2010In: Berlingske NyhedsmagasinArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 63.
    Roos, Johan
    Copenhagen Business School .
    Singapore – et eksempel for Danmark2010In: Berlingske NyhedsmagasinArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 64.
    Roos, Johan
    Copenhagen Business School.
    Slip universiteterne fri2010In: Berlingske NyhedsmagasinArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 65.
    Roos, Johan
    Imagination Lab Foundation, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Sparking strategic imagination2004In: MIT Sloan Management Review, ISSN 1532-9194, E-ISSN 1532-8937, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 96-96Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Over the course of the past two decades, it has become increasingly, abundantly clear that companies must find ways to be more innovative, more flexible and better prepared. For the development and communication of strategy to become the inspired and inspiring process it must be, it is up to company leaders to alter their strategizing practices in three crucial, perhaps counterintuitive, ways. First, be more subjective and less generic. Second, explore new ways to stimulate insights and communication. And third, recognize that context matters. It is up to dissatisfied leaders to question the conventional formula and reinvent the components of strategy creation by engaging more of what makes people human - our imagination.

  • 66.
    Roos, Johan
    Copenhagen Business School .
    Strategi fra neden og fra oven2010In: Berlingske NyhedsmagasinArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 67.
    Roos, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    The benefits and limitations of leadership speeches in change initiatives2013In: Journal of Management Development, ISSN 0262-1711, E-ISSN 1758-7492, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 548-559Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present a case study in the use of leadership speech to advance a change initiative in a large organization.

    Design/methodology/approach – This paper is informed by the author's personal experience in designing a public speaking program to infuse a change management campaign in his organization.

    Findings – The case study concludes with an analysis of the benefits and limitations of leadership speech giving. It highlights how speeches can help inspire and motivate people to adopt change, as well as the limitations of speeches to secure change without additional persuasive tools and techniques.

    Research limitations/implications – The application of speech giving in organizational leadership programs might inform future research into this important technique.

    Practical implications – This case will be of benefit to practicing leaders as well as researchers interested in public speaking, dialogue, and negotiation.

    Originality/value – The value of this paper lies in its examination of a specific case in which speech giving was used to inspire change in an environment in which opposing power dynamics superseded the benefits of the speeches.

  • 68.
    Roos, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    The Changing Business of Business Schools2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    I think it’s time for us to admit that the critics have a valid question: Why aren’t business schools changing faster to keep up with changes in the business world?

    Recently I attended two gatherings for business school deans where this question surfaced center stage. The first was the EFMD Conference for Deans & Directors General in Gothenburg, Sweden and other, the AACSB Deans Conference in San Francisco, CA. These meetings attracted respectively more than 300 and 600 business school leaders from all over the world and were a great place to assess what’s going on and, more importantly, what’s not.

    At the EFMD meeting, I moderated a plenary where The Economist writer Adrian Wooldridge unleashed a set of criticisms at business schools—e.g., being too slow, focusing on the wrong things, being too distant from realities in their research, and preoccupied in publishing incremental insights in slow academic journals with only a modest impact. (See his summary in a Schumpeter column here). The Forbes writer Steve Denning followed up with an article saying that business schools take comfort in keeping that disruption slow. Richard Straub, President of the Global Peter Drucker Forum, commented that business schools suffer from the syndrome of our own success; we do not see the need to change what we believe is a winning model.

  • 69.
    Roos, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    The PhD Effect: When Schools in Developed Nations Partner with Schools in Emerging Economies, They can Help Whole Regions Grow More Prosperous2015In: BizEd, ISSN 2161-8380, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 36-42Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    WHEN BUSINESS SCHOOLS DECIDE to internationalize their programs, they can do more than simply build campuses halfway across the globe—they can increase the potential of an entire region. At Jönköping International Business School (JIBS) in Sweden, that was our goal when we first began designing programs to train PhDs in two African nations. While many business schools recently have added global dimensions to their programs—through student and faculty exchanges, short- and long-term study abroad initiatives, and international student recruitment—we believe our model is somewhat different. At JIBS, we strive to build deep, long-term relationships between our school, our partner institutions, and all of our stakeholders. We don’t just disseminate our educational expertise; we function as both an advisor and a service provider to our partners. We believe that our model increases the long-term “economic complexity” in the nations where we operate and that we can be a critical factor in creating widespread prosperity. At JIBS we have been calling this the “Into Africa” strategic initiative. 

  • 70.
    Roos, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    The Renaissance We Need in Business Education2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Having taught at five business schools over several decades and served as Dean of two, I have come to a conclusion: The educational institutions where our future business leaders are being trained must be recalibrated and transformed dramatically.

    Business education today is anachronistic in both how it is conducted and what its content focuses on. Our brick institutions have in no way caught up with what today’s technologies make possible in terms of virtual learning and individualized, customized instruction. More importantly, business education needs to evolve once again, revising its goals to educate leaders of the future who have a new set of skills: sustainable global thinking, entrepreneurial and innovative talents, and decision-making based on practical wisdom.

  • 71.
    Roos, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    The Tragedy of the Commons: An Emerging Risk to the Entrepreneurial Society2015In: 7th Global Peter Drucker Forum: Claiming our Humanity : Managing in the Digital Age, Vienna: GPDF , 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Economist Willian Foster Lloyd described the notion of “commons” in 1833 in reference to the open pastures being damaged by self-interested herdsmen. Biologist Garreth Hardin used the term in 1968 to describe how population growth spoils our shared atmosphere, oceans and rivers. It is the over-utilization of the commons that inevitably leads to the tragedy, causing unhappiness, conflicts and ultimately extinction.

    Western society in the 21st century is clearly built on the notion of the commons – the very human right to be part of a prosperous culture that values intelligence, tolerance, peaceful lives, and progress. This commons makes up the foundation of our nations, as much as the air and the oceans, and it did not come easily. Philosopher Slavoj Zizek reminds us that all features we identify today with liberal democracies – like the freedom of speech, voting rights, gender equality, mass education and the right to a decent livelihood –  were gained through often violent popular struggles during the 19th century. In the 20th century, it took two World Wars and myriad local conflicts to arrive at a modicum of global peace and prosperity.

  • 72.
    Roos, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    To MOOCS or Not to MMOC, That is the Question2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The MOOCs phenomenon – Massive Open Online Courses – comes with either the threat or promise of disruptive innovation in one of the fundamental pillars of society: higher education. How should business schools deal with this phenomenon?

    MOOCs are networked higher education courses delivered on the net to anyone with a thick internet connection, anywhere. The first MOOC was offered in 2008 – and was a result of the convergence of distance (“e-“) learning and the accelerating bandwidth of the internet. The acronym speaks to the promises that MOOCs offer:

    • Massive. The technology enables thousands of students to enroll and participate at any time in courses about anything taught by talented professors from any institution in the world.
    • Open.  They are open in several respects. Anyone can enroll. Students may pay a symbolic fee to get the formal credit from the host institution, but they do not pay for participation in the course.  The material produced by faculty is open and shared openly.
    • Online. Participants network openly with faculty, among themselves, and with others who are online. Content is always available on the net and can take many forms, like articles, books, videos, tweets and tags.
    • Courses.  MOOCs can cover just about any course taught in a traditional university setting, from humanities to social sciences, to even the hard sciences. Almost no type of course is MOOC ineligible.
  • 73.
    Roos, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Transformative Management Education2008In: Teaching and Learning at Business Schools: Transforming the Delivery of Business Education / [ed] Bild, M., Mårtensson, P. and K. Nilsson, Aldershot: Gower Publishing Ltd., 2008, p. 63-76Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 74.
    Roos, Johan
    Copenhagen Business School .
    Universiteter skaber nyt væksthus2010In: Berlingske NyhedsmagasinArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 75.
    Roos, Johan
    Copenhagen Business School .
    Væk med silotænkingen2010In: Berlingske NyhedsmagasinArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [da]

    Et forslag til ny forskningsstrategi i EU peger på større tværfaglighed og samarbejde mellem den offentlige og private sektor. Det er en ny mulighed for universiteterne.

  • 76.
    Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Aadne, J.H.
    von Krogh, G
    Representationism: The Traditional Approach to Cooperative Strategies1996In: Managing Knowledge: Perspectives on cooperation and competition / [ed] von Krogh, G., and J. Roos, Sage Publications, 1996, p. 9-31Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 77. Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Krogh, Georg von
    Brønn, Peggy S.
    Managing strategy processes in emergent industries: the case of media firms1996Book (Other academic)
  • 78.
    Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Lorange, P
    Analytical Steps in the Formation of Strategic Alliances1991In: Journal of Organizational Change Management, ISSN 0953-4814, E-ISSN 1758-7816, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 60-72Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 79.
    Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Lorange, P
    Stolpersteine beim Management Strategischer Allianze1992In: Wegweiser für Strategische Allianzen / [ed] Bronder, C., and R. Pritzl, Gabler Verlag/GWV Fachverlage GmbH, 1992, p. 343-354Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 80.
    Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Lorange, P
    Strategic Alliance Evolution and Global Partnerships1991In: Irish Marketing Review, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 11-22Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 81.
    Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Lorange, P
    The Challenge of Cooperative Ventures1987In: The Challenge of Cooperative Ventures / [ed] Lorange, P., and J. Roos, IIB/Stockholm School of Economics , 1987, p. 120-131Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 82.
    Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Lorange, P
    Why Some Strategic Alliances Succeed and Others Fail1991In: Journal of Business Strategy, ISSN 0275-6668, E-ISSN 2052-1197, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 25-30Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 83.
    Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Lyles, M
    von Krogh, G
    Kleine, D
    The Impact of Individual and Organizational Learning on Formation and Management of Organizational Cooperation1996In: Managing Knowledge: Perspectives on cooperation and competition / [ed] von Krogh, G., and J. Roos, Sage Publications, 1996, p. 82-99Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 84.
    Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Marotto, M
    Patterns of Changing Actor and Process Resources in Coevolving Industries: he Case of Bancassurance in Switzerland2000In: Mobilizing the Self-Renewing Organization: The Coevolution Challenge / [ed] A. Lewin and H. Volberda, Sage Publications, 2000Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 85.
    Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Hult International Business School, US.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Danielsson, Emil
    Solving for X:: Turning Academic Research Into Public Engagement2016In: BizEd, ISSN 2161-8380, no 3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    THE CHALLENGE: In the eyes of the public, academic research is not innovative or engaging, nor does it create an impact on society. One renowned 2007 study claimed that 50 percent of academic papers are read only by their authors and journal editors, and 90 percent are never cited, which signifies that no one finds them useful. At Jönköping International Business School (JIBS) in Sweden, we wanted to challenge this perception. We asked, “How can we translate our faculty’s research into information that’s relevant and valuable to the public discourse?” Our answer was to create a new blogging platform called Vertikals.

  • 86.
    Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Oliver, D
    Dealing with Surprises: Collaborating in an Alliance Team2002In: Cooperative Strategies and Alliances / [ed] Contractor, F and P. Lorange, Elsevier, 2002, p. 849-873Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 87.
    Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Intl. Inst. for Mgmt. Development, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Oliver, D.
    From Fitness Landscapes to Knowledge Landscapes1999In: Systemic Practice and Action Research, ISSN 1094-429X, E-ISSN 1573-9295, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 279-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the complexity theory concept of fitness landscapes, this article develops and discusses the concept of "knowledge landscapes." A knowledge landscape is a metaphor describing the ever-changing potential knowledge peaks and valleys that surround each one of us. Individuals, communities, and organizations move on their own knowledge landscapes by simultaneously climbing local peaks and exploring other visible peaks. The higher one climbs, the harder it is to climb still higher. Our ability to climb is also limited by our identity, who we are, which on an organizational level is linked to the tightness of organizational interconnectedness. Coevolutionary struggles between individuals and organizations can lead us to climb potential knowledge peaks faster. Moreover, our knowledge landscapes exist on many levels of scale, meaning that what appears to be one peak is actually a series of subpeaks on a smaller level of scale.

  • 88.
    Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Richardson, K
    Tait, A
    Lissack, M
    The Coherent Management of Complex Projects and the Potential Roles of Group Decision Support Systems2005In: Managing Organizational Complexity: Philosophy, Theory, and Application / [ed] Richardson, K, Information Age Publishing, 2005, p. 431-456Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 89. Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Rogers, B
    Enlight Interactive: Making Strategy in Internet Time2003Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Enlight Interactive, based in Sweden, specialises in delivering everything from complete learning systems for companies to interactive entertainment and educational software for individuals. In March 2000, Pelle Tornell, Chief Executive Officer of Enlight Interactive, and co-founder Jonas Ryberg were faced with a daunting task - how to create a vision for their rapidly expanding company in the fast-paced Internet-driven economy. Tornell remarked, 'In this business it's not about what you look like today it's about what you will look like tomorrow.' Both Tornell and Ryberg viewed Enlight's mission as creating tools for developing and refining knowledge. However they faced several distinct challenges in early 2000 which included how to continue to grow the company how to manage the firm's rapid growth and how to effectively communicate their strategic goals throughout the organisation. Possible discussion questions include: Given the strategic challenges facing Enlight Interactive how should they proceed? What should their vision be as they move forward? This case contains colour exhibits.

  • 90. Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Roos, Göran
    Dragonetti, Nicola Carlo
    Edvinsson, Leif
    Intellectual capital: navigating the new business landscape1997Book (Other academic)
  • 91. Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Roos, Madeleine
    Thinking from within: a hands-on strategy practice2006Book (Other academic)
  • 92.
    Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Said, R
    Generating Managerial Commitment and Responsibility2005In: European Management Review, ISSN 1740-4754, E-ISSN 1740-4762, Vol. 2, p. 48-58Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 93.
    Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Statler, M
    Reframing strategic preparedness: an essay on practical wisdom2006In: International Journal of Management Concepts and Philosophy, ISSN 1478-1484, E-ISSN 1741-8135, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 99-117Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 94.
    Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Statler, M
    Victor, B
    ‘Ain’t Misbehavin’: Taking Play Seriously in Organizations2009In: Journal of Change Management, ISSN 1469-7017, E-ISSN 1479-1811, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 87-107Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 95.
    Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Statler, M
    Victor, B
    Illustrating the Need for Practical Wisdom2006In: International Journal of Management Concepts and Philosophy, ISSN 1478-1484, E-ISSN 1741-8135, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 1-30Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 96.
    Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Norwegian School of Management.
    Veie, E
    Welch, L. S.
    A case-study of equipment purchasing in Czechoslovakia1992In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 257-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On the basis of interviews in Norway and Czechoslovakia, this article examines the changes in procurement decision making processes by organizations in Czechoslovakia as a result of the dramatic political and economic restructuring since 1989. The focus is on the area of environmental protection equipment where, in spite of the economic constraints, the strongly recognized need for action in Czechoslovakia to control pollution will result in many new market openings for Western companies. It was found that there has been a significant shift from the past pattern of a multistage, time-consuming, highly bureaucratized procurement process, over which the user organization had very little control. In the new model, the user has control over the purchasing process, thus cutting the time involved and leaving a number of past key actors in an advisory role. Past formal networks are being disrupted or broken and there are now opportunities for Western firms to form more direct relationships with user firms.

  • 97.
    Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Venzin, M
    von Krogh, G
    Future Research into Knowledge Management1998In: Knowing In Firms: Understanding, Managing and Measuring Knowledge / [ed] von Krogh, G., and J. Roos, Sage Publications, 1998, p. 26-66Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 98.
    Roos, Johan
    et al.
    International Institute for Management Development (IMD), Switzerland.
    Victor, B.
    Towards a new model of strategy-making as serious play1999In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 348-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new model of strategy-making as play is presented in response to increasing calls for a deeper theory of strategy-making. First an elaboration of the construct of strategic imagination is offered, describing three distinct, but interrelated forms of imagination: descriptive, creative, and challenging. Strategic Imagination is defined as an emergent property of a complex interplay between the three kinds of imagination. Then, extending the work of the planning and design schools, the model describes the complex social dynamic of strategy-making itself. Applying the notion of play from anthropology and cognitive development, the strategy-making process is described as a three-phase play process. The three phases, constructing to stimulate new ideas, story telling to share meaning, and deep engagement to assimilate new directions, are described. Finally some directions for strategy-making practice improvement are offered.

  • 99.
    Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Imagination Lab. Foundation, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Victor, B.
    Statler, M.
    Playing seriously with strategy2004In: Long range planning, ISSN 0024-6301, E-ISSN 1873-1872, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 549-568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article details two cycles of interventions and reflection in various executive development contexts led by the authors as facilitator/consultants. Their hunch that changing the constraints of strategy processes would also change the content generated was tested by changing the typical mode of work to that of 'serious play' and modifying the usual medium from verbal, computer and two-dimensional text and graphic by the introduction of 3-D media (LEGO bricks). The authors examine the potential for using serious play in the particular organizational challenge of making strategy, and highlight the capacity of 'action research' to contribute simultaneously to both academic understanding and practical value. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 100.
    Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    von Krogh, G
    A Phraseologic View of Organizational Learning1997In: Advances in Strategic Management / [ed] Huff, AS., and J. March, JAI Press Ltd, 1997, p. 53-74Chapter in book (Refereed)
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