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  • 51.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    et al.
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Wilhelm, Hendrik
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Talk is cheap - isn't it?: When and how substantive and rhetorical signals interact to affect stakeholder contributions to crowdfunded projects2016In: Academy of Management Proceedings, January 2016 (Meeting Abstract Supplement), 2016, article id 11643Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While entrepreneurs increasingly rely on crowdfunding to finance product-development projects, we still know little about how entrepreneurs succeed at stimulating resource contributions for these projects. To better understand this relationship, we integrate signaling theory and rhetoric research to derive and test theory on signal portfolios, explaining when and how substantive and rhetorical signals interact to affect resource contributions to crowdfunded projects. We theorize positive as well as negative interaction effects between substantive and rhetorical signals, suggesting that signal complementary and redundancy drive signal-portfolio outcomes. An empirical analysis with longitudinal data covering 2,702 observations of signaling and resource contributions from 197 crowdfunded product-development projects supports our hypotheses. These insights extend signaling theory by offering a theory of signal interdependence, explaining how entrepreneurs’ signal-portfolio performance is positively or negatively affected using specific combinations of signals, and how redundancy of these signals can lead to negative outcomes.

  • 52.
    Weber, Clarissa E.
    et al.
    Faculty of Business and Economics, University of Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Wilhelm, Hendrik
    Faculty of Management, Economics and Society, Witten/Herdecke University, Witten, Germany.
    After successful fundraising: how overfunding and category spanning affect the release and audience-perceived quality of crowdfunded products2023In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 61, p. 1009-1026Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Overfunding of crowdfunded product-development projects would seem to be a welcome outcome for entrepreneurs, yet initial theory and evidence suggest that overfunding can have both positive and negative consequences. To overcome these contradictory predictions, we develop theory linking research on slack resources, audience expectations, and product category spanning to hypothesize boundary conditions for whether and when overfunding has a positive or negative effect on the product-development outcomes of product release and audience-perceived product quality. Post-crowdfunding data on video-game development projects show that entrepreneurs with high-category-spanning products benefit substantially less from overfunding than entrepreneurs with low-category-spanning products. Our study provides novel insights into the relation between overfunding and product release as well as audience-perceived product quality. It also contributes to our emerging understanding of the role of categories in the context of crowdfunding. We discuss implications for theory and practice.

  • 53.
    Wilhelm, Hendrik
    et al.
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Juntunen, J.
    Expanding Performance Feedback Theory to Temporary Organizations2017In: 33rd EGOS Colloquium: The Good Organization: Aspirations, Interventions, Struggles, Copenhagen, July 6–8, 2017., 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Temporary organizations—such as projects—are increasingly relevant, yet organization theory on temporary organizations remains incomplete. In particular, we have little understanding of when and how temporary organizations change. Performance feedback theory, the behavioral theory of the firm’s cornerstone to explain change in organizations, provides a promising platform to address this problem. We bring together ideas on goal-based aspiration levels, time pressure, and vicarious learning to expand performance feedback theory to temporary organizations. Specifically, we theorize and test how time pressure and vicarious learning affect aspiration-level induced change in temporary organizations. We test our theory using a unique longitudinal dataset on 575 fundraising projects (7,752 observations) published on Kickstarter. Our results largely confirm our theorizing, demonstrating that performance below the aspiration level (i.e. negative performance feedback) has a non-linear effect on the change of narratives, which is attenuated by time pressure. Furthermore, performance below the aspiration level benefits vicarious learning of complex and general narratives from best-performing peers, a result that parallels temporary organizations and non-temporary organizations. We discuss implications for performance feedback theory and vicarious learning in temporary organizations.

  • 54.
    Wilhelm, Hendrik
    et al.
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Juntunen, J.
    Expanding Performance Feedback Theory to Temporary Organizations2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Temporary organizations—such as projects—are increasingly relevant, yet organization theory on temporary organizations remains incomplete. In particular, we have little understanding of when and how temporary organizations change. Performance feedback theory, the behavioral theory of the firm’s cornerstone to explain change in organizations, provides a promising platform to address this problem. We bring together ideas on goal-based aspiration levels, time pressure, and vicarious learning to expand performance feedback theory to temporary organizations. Specifically, we theorize and test how time pressure and vicarious learning affect aspiration-level induced change in temporary organizations. We test our theory using a unique longitudinal dataset on 575 fundraising projects (7,752 observations) published on Kickstarter. Our results largely confirm our theorizing, demonstrating that performance below the aspiration level (i.e. negative performance feedback) has a non-linear effect on the change of narratives, which is attenuated by time pressure. Furthermore, performance below the aspiration level benefits vicarious learning of complex and general narratives from best-performing peers, a result that parallels temporary organizations and non-temporary organizations. We discuss implications for performance feedback theory and vicarious learning in temporary organizations.

  • 55.
    Wilhelm, Hendrik
    et al.
    Witten Herdecke Univ, Fac Management Econ & Soc, D-58455 Witten, Germany..
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Umea Univ, Umea Sch Business Econ & Stat, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Weber, Clarissa E.
    Univ Gottingen, Fac Business & Econ, D-37073 Gottingen, Germany..
    Juntunen, Jouni K.
    Univ Vaasa, Sch Technol & Innovat, Vaasa 65200, Finland.;Univ Vaasa, Innovat & Entrepreneurship InnoLab, Vaasa 65200, Finland..
    Ebers, Mark
    Univ Cologne, Fac Management Econ & Social Sci, D-50672 Cologne, Germany..
    (No) Time for Change: When and Why Entrepreneurs Act During Underperforming Fundraising Attempts2023In: Organization science (Providence, R.I.), ISSN 1047-7039, E-ISSN 1526-5455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entrepreneurs need to mobilize funds, but they do so under considerable uncertainty about resource holders' preferences, leading often to fundraising attempts that perform below entrepreneurs' aspirations. Past research has offered contrasting theorizing and evidence for why entrepreneurs then make changes to their product offering during such attempts as well as for why entrepreneurs refrain from taking such action. This paper develops and tests behavioral theory to reconcile this tension, explicating when and why entrepreneurs change their product offering during underperforming fundraising attempts. Specifically, we argue that entrepreneurs draw on three sources of information that are inherent to fundraising attempts and that inform the extent of their actions to change their product offering: the degree to which they perform below their own fundraising aspirations, the degree to which they fall below peer fundraising performance, and the time that remains until the deadline for the fundraising attempt. Longitudinal data on 576 fundraising campaigns (6,758 observations) published on the crowdfunding platform Kickstarter support our theory. By developing novel behavioral theory on when and why entrepreneurs take action during resource mobilization, we offer contributions to research on entrepreneurial resource mobilization, the crowdfunding literature, and the Behavioral Theory of the Firm.

12 51 - 55 of 55
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