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  • 51.
    Heikkinen, Tim
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development.
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development.
    Andersson, Petter
    GKN Aerospace Sweden.
    Automated Producibility Assessment Enabling Set-Based Concurrent Engineering2016In: Transdisciplinary Engineering: Crossing Boundaries / [ed] Milton Borsato, Nel Wognum, Margherita Peruzzini, Josip Stjepandić and Wim J.C. Verhagen, IOS Press, 2016, p. 947-956Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aero-engine industry is continuously faced with new challenging cost and environmental requirements. This forces company's, active in the industry, to work toward more fuel efficient engines with less environmental impact at a lower cost. This paper presents a method for assessing producibility of large sets of components within aircraft engines to enable a Set-Based Concurrent Engineering development approach. A prototype system has been developed aimed at enabling weldability analysis at a sub-supplier within the aero-engine industry. It is a part of a multi-objective decision support tool used in early design stages. The tool produces sets of CAD-models reaching the hundreds for different analyses, mainly focusing on performance aspects within structural analysis, aerodynamics and thermodynamics.

  • 52.
    Hjertberg, Tim
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    A tool for obtaining transparency and traceability in heterogeneous design automation environments2018In: Computer-Aided Design and Applications, ISSN 1686-4360, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 488-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, CAD-system are used for much more than just geometric modeling. They are complemented by various software and information sources forming a complete environment for handling all life-cycle aspects of the product. In such systems, the CAD-system works as a central hub. The software and information sources may be of various types making the system highly heterogenous. This presents problems with transparency and traceability in the system making long term management difficult. In this paper, a novel tool is presented to keep track of the dependencies between the various parts of such systems providing an overview and making it possible to predict the effect of proposed changes and facilitating long term management. The tool is tested in a highly heterogeneous environment at a manufacturer of aerospace components, with the result that the traceability is expected to increase at the expense of that time must be spent on defining dependencies and meta-information as the system is evolving.

  • 53.
    Hjertberg, Tim
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development.
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development.
    Managing Dependencies in Heterogeneous Design Automation Systems2016In: Transdisciplinary Engineering: Crossing Boundaries / [ed] Milton Borsato, Nel Wognum, Margherita Peruzzini, Josip Stjepandić and Wim J.C. Verhagen, IOS Press, 2016, p. 279-288Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing competition in cost efficiency, lead-times, product quality, quotation accuracy, and abilities to provide customization drives companies toward development and adoption of new methods. To re-use knowledge gained from previous projects in order to avoid producing the same knowledge again and to circumvent previously encountered obstacles is an approach which is more or less used by most companies. Utilization of Design Automation (DA) systems in the engineering design process have proven to increase process efficiency and to enable new ways of working by systematic re-use of engineering knowledge. In order to ensure system longevity, industrial practitioners and researchers have pointed at implementation and long term management as important aspects to consider during development. The systems are often built on top of commercial software and legacy systems integrated by different types of scripts and system descriptions which becomes dependent of each other in different ways. Changes made during maintenance in one of these artifacts propagates through the dependency structure making traceability and transparency key factors for keeping the system valid over time. This paper presents a description of the problem in a real industrial setting together with a suggestion of an approach, based on set-up and management of dependencies between sections inside and across different types of system components, which is aimed to aid implementation and management of DA tools. A prototype system which informs the user, of functional sections related to a functional section to be updated, have been developed. The prototype is applied on a multidisciplinary heterogeneous system environment used for simulation based knowledge build up and concept evaluations of jet engine components.

  • 54.
    Hjertberg, Tim
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Poorkiany, Morteza
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Implementation and management of design systems for highly customized products – state of practice and future research2015In: Transdisciplinary lifecycle analysis of systems: Proceedings of the 22nd ISPE Inc. International Conference on Concurrent Engineering / [ed] Richard Curran, Nel Wognum, Milton Borsato, Josip Stjepandić, Wim J.C. Verhagen, IOS Press, 2015, p. 165-174Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Individualized products, resource-smart design and production, and afocus on customer value have been pointed out as three opportunities for Swedishindustry to stay competitive on a globalized market. All these three opportunitiescan be gained by efficient design and manufacture of highly customized products.However, this requires the development and integration of the knowledge-basedenabling technologies of the future as pointed out by The European Factories ofthe Future Research Association (EFFRA). Highly custom engineered productsrequire an exercising of a very rich and diverse knowledge base about the products,their production and the required resources for design and manufacture. Thedevelopment and implementation of systems for automated design and productionpreparation of customized products is a significant investment in time and money.However, our experience from industry indicates that significant efforts arerequired to introduce and align these kinds of systems with existing operations,legacy systems and overall state of practice. In this paper, support for systemdevelopment in literature has been reviewed in combination with a survey on thestate of practice in four companies regarding implementation and management ofautomated systems for custom engineered products. A gap has been identified anda set of areas for further research are outlined.

  • 55. Jansson, Gustav
    et al.
    Mukkavaara, Jani
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Breakdown Structure in the Digitalization of Design Work for Industrialized House-Building: A Case Study of Systems Building Using Predefinition Levels of Product Platforms2019In: ICCREM 2019: Innovative Construction Project Management and Construction Industrialization / [ed] Yaowu Wang, Ph.D., Mohamed Al-Hussein, Ph.D., and Geoffrey Q. P. Shen, Ph.D., American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2019, p. 49-57Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrialized house-building companies predefine parameters in platforms. In the strive to identify efficient information flow with automation and configuration, the design process requires a breakdown of the product structure of a building to digitally communicate between information systems. The level of predefinitions varies between industrialized house-builders according to market position, type of building processes, and maturity in business. The client decoupling point according to the predefinitions of house-building as a product is central for how and when production information is created. Bill of materials is a breakdown structure that visualize relations and the transformation between engineering, preparation, and production processes from a life cycle perspective. A case study at eight house-building companies was chosen with the aim to identify relations between the level of predefinitions and breakdown structures. House-building platforms with a high level of predefinition on layouts, components, and interfaces show a tendency to use less time in BIM-tools for engineering work and a high level of parameters in manufacturing configuration systems to prepare for production. Meanwhile, the opposite with low levels of predefinitions on components and interfaces focus on BIM-tools for engineering work with longer lead times. An interesting outcome is those with a high level of predefinitions in interfaces but lower levels on component dimensions. These companies have the ability to position their offer to a wide market with flexibility in the engineering work and need to communicate the high levels of interface parameters for the manufacturing sequence with a breakdown of the product together with architects.

  • 56.
    Johansson, Joel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    André, Samuel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Simulation ready CAD-models as a means for knowledge transfer between technology development and product development2015In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED, Vol 6: Design Methods And Tools - Pt 2 / [ed] Weber, C; Husung, S; Cantamessa, M; Cascini, G; Marjanovic, D; Graziosi, S, Glasgow, Scottland, UK: The Design Society, 2015, Vol. 6, p. 195-205Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing companies tend to separate technology development (TD) from product development (PD) as has been devised by research within the field of innovation management. When a technology is ready it somehow has to be made available to the PD teams so that the engineers working in PD projects can adapt the new technology into new products. The question is how that work can be supported. The ultimate goal of the research presented in this paper is to develop methods and tools to assist the knowledge transfer between TD and PD with a focus on supporting the actual use of the new technology in PD. This paper presents an industrial case along with a proposed method to achieve this. The TD and PD processes in the case company were reviewed with focus on how simulation models evolve over time and how they are used for different purposes. It was discovered that simulation ready CAD-models can be used to transfer the output from TD to PD.

  • 57.
    Johansson, Joel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Contero, M.
    Universitat Politècnicade València, Spain.
    Company, P.
    Universitat Jaume I, Spain.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Supporting connectivism in knowledge based engineering with graph theory, filtering techniques and model quality assurance2018In: Advanced Engineering Informatics, ISSN 1474-0346, E-ISSN 1873-5320, Vol. 38, p. 252-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mass-customization has forced manufacturing companies to put significant efforts to digitize and automate their engineering and production processes. When new products are to be developed and introduced the production is not alone to be automated. The application of knowledge regarding how the product should be designed and produced based on customer requirements also must be automated. One big academic challenge is helping industry to make sure that the background knowledge of the automated engineering processes still can be understood by its stakeholders throughout the product life cycle. The research presented in this paper aims to build an infrastructure to support a connectivistic view on knowledge in knowledge based engineering. Fundamental concepts in connectivism include network formation and contextualization, which are here addressed by using graph theory together with information filtering techniques and quality assurance of CAD-models. The paper shows how engineering knowledge contained in spreadsheets, knowledge-bases and CAD-models can be penetrated and represented as filtered graphs to support a connectivistic working approach. Three software demonstrators developed to extract filtered graphs are presented and discussed in the paper.

  • 58.
    Johansson, Joel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Applying Connectivism to Engineering Knowledge to Support the Automated Business2017In: 24th ISPE International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering (TE2017): Transdisciplinary Engineering: A Paradigm Shift / [ed] C. H. Chen, A. C. Trappey, M. Peruzzini, J. Stjepandic, N. Wognum, IOS Press, 2017, p. 621-628Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Maintaining products in an automated business includes digitalization and automation of engineering knowledge. When new products are to be developed, and introduced not only has the production processes be automated but also the knowledge regarding how the product should be constituted depending on customer requirements. One big challenge that companies of this kind face is how to make sure that the knowledge automated still can be understood by its stakeholders during the development project and after product release and through the whole product life-cycle, which might last for decades. In this paper, we present a method to navigate and share vast amount of knowledge in businesses with high degree of automated engineering. The method is based on the connectivistic view of knowledge were network formation and filtering are two corner stones which implies the utilization of graph theory together with electronic publishing functionality.

  • 59.
    Johansson, Joel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Automated Design Assessment as a Strategic Part of Design Platforms2017In: 24th ISPE International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering (TE2017): Transdisciplinary Engineering: A Paradigm Shift / [ed] C. H. Chen, A. C. Trappey, M. Peruzzini, J. Stjepandic, N. Wognum, IOS Press, 2017, p. 441-448Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a general model for businesses to work with their engineering assessments to challenge fluctuating requirements which is the result of a recently finished research project. The model is presented together with a case study of a company with a product that continuously is and must be adapted to a changing market to be alive at all. The company has developed a streamlined development process that is configured based on current needs from time to time. One keystone to make the mass customization possible to this company is the augmented synthesis and the automated assessment of the product variants rendered through the configured development process. The automated process of making the assessments and how it connects to the general model is also presented in the paper.

  • 60.
    Johansson, Joel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    How to Successfully Implement Automated Engineering Design Systems: Reviewing Four Case Studies2013In: 20th ISPE International Conference on Concurrent Engineering / [ed] Cees Bil, John Mo, Josip Stjepandic, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2013, p. 173-182Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Johansson, Joel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Knowledge Objects Enable Mass-Individualization2017In: EUROGEN 2017 – BOOK of Extended Abstracts / [ed] Esther Andrés, Leo González, Jacques Periaux, Nicolas Gauger, Kyriakos Giannakoglou, Domenico Quagliarella, Madrid: Technical University of Madrid , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mass customization and product individualization are driving factors behind design automation, which in turn are enabled through the digitalization of engineering work. The goal is to offer customers optimized solutions to their needs timely and with as high profit as possible. The path to achieve such a remarkable goal can be very winding and tricky for many companies, or even non-existing at the moment being. To succeed requires three essential parts: digitized product knowledge, facilities to automate the digitized product knowledge, and optimization algorithms. This paper shows how these three parts can be supported in engineer-to-order businesses through the concept of knowledge objects. Two case examples are also described in the paper.

  • 62.
    Johansson, Joel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Knowledge objects enable mass-individualization2019In: Evolutionary and Deterministic Methods for Design Optimization and Control With Applications to Industrial and Societal Problems. / [ed] Andrés-Pérez E., González L., Periaux J., Gauger N., Quagliarella D., Giannakoglou K., Cham: Springer , 2019, p. 371-386Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mass customization and product individualization are driving factors behind design automation, which in turn are enabled through the formalization and automation of engineering work. The goal is to offer customers optimized solutions to their needs timely and as profitable as possible. The path to achieve such a remarkable goal can be very winding and tricky for many companies, or even non-existing at the moment being. To succeed requires three essential parts: formally represented product knowledge, facilities to automatically apply the product knowledge, and optimization algorithms. This paper shows how these three parts can be supported in engineer-to-order businesses through the concept of knowledge objects. Knowledge Objects are human readable descriptions of formalized knowledge bundled with corresponding computer routines for the automation of that knowledge. One case example is given at the end of the paper to demonstrate the use of knowledge objects. © 2019, Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature.

  • 63.
    Johansson, Joel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Three examples of how DSM enhances engineering design automation2013In: Proceedings of 15th International DSM Conference: Reducing Risk in Innovation, Carl Hanser Verlag GmbH, 2013, p. 3-10Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Johansson, Joel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Poorkiany, Morteza
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Design Rationale Management – a Proposed Cloud Solution2014In: Advances in Transdisciplinary Engineering: Moving Integrated Product Development to Service Clouds in the Global Economy / [ed] Jianzhong Cha, Shuo-Yan Chou, Josip Stjepandić, Richard Curran, Wensheng Xu, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2014, p. 204-214Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to increasing complexity of modern products it is many times impossible for single individual engineers to fully grasp the product they are a part of developing. Valuable time during the product development is therefore spent searching for knowledge about different aspect of the product. To enable engineers finding right knowledge in different situations, the knowledge must first of all exist. Secondly, it needs to be structured and thirdly, it needs to be accessible. In this paper all of these three aspects of design rationale (reasons for why the product is designed the way it is) are addressed with the main focus on the latter one, accessibility. An information model is presented that can be used to structure the design rationale. It also presents a schematic overview of how a cloud solution could be realized using the information model to make a complete system for instantly capturing, filtering and accessing design rationale in a contextual manner.

    To enable the instant and contextual capture, filtering and access of the design rationale, the design rationale management systems should be present to the engineers everywhere in the digital environment, ready for service. It should also include functions that make the design rationale shared to all privileged users making sure everyone has updated versions of the stored knowledge.

    In this work the main ideas of a method for instant and contextual capture, filtering and access of the design rationale are introduced and a pilot system described as a proof of concept. The pilot system can be used to capture, filter and access design rationale across and within text-documents, spread sheets and CAD-models.

  • 65.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Exploring Product Development in Industrialized Housing to Facilitate a Platform Strategy2018In: Proceedings of 26th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction / [ed] González, V.A., Chennai, India: The International Group for Lean Construction , 2018, p. 538-548Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrialized house-building companies are offering unique products by adopting an engineer-to-order (ETO) strategy. Client satisfaction is achieved by adaptation of product solutions and swift introduction of new technology in combination with cost-efficient production and short lead-time for completion. Product development is executed in collaboration with the clients and changes in requirements are frequent. The use of product platforms, where external and internal efficiency are well-balanced, has been acknowledged as a strategic enabler for mass customization and increased competitiveness. However, ETO-companies struggle with adopting the common product platform approach, set by pre-defined modules and components. Predefinitions may cause an imbalance between product development and a lean production system. The aim of this work was to analyse current strategies and support to master the balance of external and internal efficiency in product development within industrialized housebuilding to facilitate the development of a product platform strategy. Data were gathered from a single case study and an on-going product platform development and includes interviews and document analysis. The findings show that product development is guided by a technical platform, but there is an imbalance where external efficiency is prioritized over the internal efficiency.

  • 66.
    Löfving, Malin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Melander, Anders
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Andersson, David
    Träcentrum, Nässjö.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Thulin, Mikael
    Träcentrum, Nässjö.
    Initiation of Hoshin Kanri in SMEs using a tentative process2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hoshin Kanri is a management method supporting strategic work. In spite of a number of Hoshin Kanri success stories in large organizations, little research attention are given to SMEs. This research encourages an increased focus on Hoshin Kanri in SMEs. In this paper a tentative process for the initiation of Hoshin Kanri in SMEs is outlined. We also identify factors influencing the initiation of Hoshin Kanri in SMEs based on findings from eight case studies. The result shows that the initiation of Hoshin Kanri varied in the case studies as the factors enable or hinder the initiation of Hoshin Kanri.

  • 67.
    Löfving, Malin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Melander, Anders
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Andersson, David
    Träcentrum.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Thulin, Mikael
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Introducing the Hoshin Kanri approach in small and medium sized companies2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to grow, small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) have to balance the inherent flexibility of the small firm with formal work division and administrative routines. This balancing is apparent in SME’s approach to strategy work. In order to address this need of balancing in strategy work we in this paper introduce the Hoshin Kanri approach to the SME context. Based on an extensive literature review we identify the principles of Hoshin Kanri and develop an adapted approach to small and medium sized companies. Finally we report on the lessons learnt after initiating the adapted approach in four SMEs.

  • 68.
    Löfving, Malin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Melander, Anders
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Andersson, David
    Träcentrum.
    Thulin, Mikael
    Träcentrum.
    Leadership characteristics and Hoshin Kanri in small and medium sized enterprises2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims at contribute to an understanding of how present leadership characteristics influence the implementation of HK in manufacturing SMEs. The research is based around two case companies where the ideas of HK was implemented in an action research project. The leadership characteristics associated with HK include characteristics such as supporting, coaching, challenging, involving top management and co-workers. The findings show that HK leadership characteristics have similarities with lean leadership and developmental leadership characteristics. The two cases have successfully began to implement HK and the CEO’s in both cases have a present leadership style resembling of developmental leadership.

  • 69.
    Melander, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Johansson, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Simulation and Optimization.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Granath, Kaj
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering.
    Hellborg, Göran
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering.
    Entreprenöriell produktframtagning för industriellt byggande2014Report (Other academic)
  • 70.
    Melander, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Löfving, Malin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Andersson, David
    Träcentrum, Sweden.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Thulin, Mikael
    Träcentrum, Sweden.
    Introducing the Hoshin Kanri strategic management system in manufacturing SMEs2016In: Management Decision, ISSN 0025-1747, E-ISSN 1758-6070, Vol. 54, no 10, p. 2507-2523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the basic principles and introduction of the Hoshin Kanri (HK) strategic management system, as related to the management practices in manufacturing small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

    Design/methodology/approach – This paper reports the findings from the introduction of HK to four manufacturing SMEs by following an assistance support-based research approach where teams of coaches and researchers observed and learned from the introduction phase. The overall design of the project is theory building and learning oriented.

    Findings – It is suggested that the successful introduction of a strategic management system in manufacturing SMEs has to balance the inherent level of formalization therein, with the individual company’s management practices. Based on HK as the strategic management system, pDCA is proposed as an alternative approach to the introduction, matching differences in management practices.

    Research limitations/implications – The explorative nature of this research provides room for subsequent studies by elaborating the knowledge on the introduction of strategic management systems in SMEs.

    Practical implications – Awareness of the existing managerial practices is essential when introducing a new strategic management system in manufacturing SMEs. Such awareness is the starting point of customizing the introduction, so that proper levels of engagement and flexibility can be balanced with increasing systematic formalization, and optimized adequacy.

    Originality/value – Following an assistance support-based research approach the result of this research project is summarized in the iterative pDCA model emphasizing engagement and flexibility when incrementally introducing strategic management systems in SMEs. This model addresses a hitherto under-researched topic in strategic management.

  • 71.
    Poorkiany, Morteza
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    A Case Study on Implementing Design Automation: Identified Issues and Solution for Documentation2013In: 20th ISPE International Conference on Concurrent Engineering / [ed] Cees Bil, John Mo, Josip Stjepandić, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2013, p. 324-332Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Computer supported engineering design systems are used as support for designers by automating some tasks/activities of design process. From industrial aspect, implementation of a developed prototype system is a critical task. User acceptance is of high importance and strongly related to the access and understanding of the knowledge which requires a high level of system transparency. In addition, integration of the system in the environment or its compatibility with other systems/tools should be considered. Our experiences in industry show that two major issues are usually raised up during implementing a design automation system which are: documentation and organization. Documentation concerns the way of capturing, storing and distributing the information in systems, and organization concerns alignment of the system with other systems or tools as well as communication and collaboration among system participants and users. The focus of this paper is on documentation and the importance of reuse, design rationale and traceability is discussed. In order to align closely with industry practices, the thoughts are presented along with an on-going case study, where the development and analysis of roof racks for cars are being automated, and a number of challenges have been discussed. 

  • 72.
    Poorkiany, Morteza
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    An explorative study on management and maintenance of systems for design and manufacture of customized products2016In: The 2016 IEEE International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management / [ed] Kadarsah SURYADI, Budi HARTONO, T.M.A. ARI SAMADHI,Nan CHEN, Min XIE, IEEE, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the issues regarding retrieve, reuse and update of design information in context of customized products and adaptive design. Capturing and representing design rationale during the development process has been identified as an important factor to support design of product variants. The study explores the development process from identifying customer requirements to production preparation in a case company which has long tradition in automating generation of design variants.  

  • 73.
    Poorkiany, Morteza
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Capture, structure and share design rationale in a design family development processManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 74.
    Poorkiany, Morteza
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Capturing, structuring, and accessing design rationale across product design and FEA2016In: Product lifecycle management in the era of Internet of things: 12th IFIP WG 5.1 International Conference, PLM 2015, Doha, Qatar, October 19-21, 2015, revised selected papers / [ed] A. Bouras, B. Eynard, S. Foufou, K-D. Thoben, 2016, p. 387-396Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Implementing design automation systems to automate repetitive and time consuming design tasks enables engineer-to-order manufacturers to perform custom engineering in minimum time. To maintain a design automation system, regular updating of design information and knowledge is necessary. Consequently, there is a need of principles and methods to support capturing and structuring associated knowledge, specially, design rationale. In this paper a method for capturing, structuring, and accessing to design rationale in order to support maintenance of design automation systems is presented. The method is tested through a design automation system that develops FEA (finite element analysis) models automatically. The results are evaluated in a case company which is a supplier to the automotive industry serving many brands and car models which each more or less requires a unique solution.

  • 75.
    Poorkiany, Morteza
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Capturing, structuring and accessing design rationale in integrated product design and manufacturing processes2016In: Advanced Engineering Informatics, ISSN 1474-0346, E-ISSN 1873-5320, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 522-536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing customized products is the business case for many manufacturing companies striving to fulfill the customers’ specific needs. When manufacturing customized products it is often necessary to also develop corresponding customized manufacturing tooling. There is a need to support concurrent development of new product variants along with their manufacturing toolsets. The communication between design engineers and manufacturing engineers is hence a key issue that if solved would enable design engineers to foresee how changes in product design affect tooling design and vice versa. To understand the correlation between the design of a product and its corresponding manufacturing tools, access to design rationale of the product and the developed tooling is required. Design rationale provides an explanation of why an artifact is designed in the way it is, including statements (textual, numerical or geometrical), argumentations, and decisions. Since design rationale is composed of information scattered all across the company's repositories in different formats (e.g. in type of a geometry, picture, table, and textual document), representing the design rationale is a challenge for many enterprises. In this paper a method is introduced that enables capture, structure and access to design rationale across product design and tooling design. The system enables representing design rationale in formats such as CAD models, spreadsheets, textual formats, and web pages. The method has been examined by developing a prototype system tested in a case company which develops and manufactures customized car accessories, such as roof racks and bike carriers, for different car models. The company develops and manufactures the products as well as the required tooling equipment. The prototype system includes different software commonly used by engineers during designing a product, for the purpose of making it applicable for other companies.

  • 76.
    Poorkiany, Morteza
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Support management of product families and the corresponding automation systems – A method to capture and share design rationale2017In: Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Engineering Design / [ed] Anja Maier, Stanko Škec, Harrison Kim, Michael Kokkolaras, Josef Oehmen, Georges Fadel, Filippo Salustri, Mike Van der Loos, The Design Society, 2017, Vol. 6, p. 267-276Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to innovate and launch customized products that are well matched to customer demands is a competitive factor for many manufacturing companies. Development of highly customized products requires following an engineer-to-order business process to tailor the products according to customers’ specifications, which brings more value to the customer and profit to the company. Using design automation systems to automate repetitive and time consuming design tasks enables the manufacturers to perform custom engineering in minimum time. To manage and maintain a product family and the corresponding automation systems, updating the design knowledge is required. Use of design rationale will normally become a necessity to allow a better understanding of the knowledge. Consequently, there is a need of principles and methods to enable capture and effectively share the design rationale. In this paper a method for capturing and sharing design rationale is presented. The results are evaluated in a case company which is a supplier of tooling for manufacturing industry.

  • 77.
    Poorkiany, Morteza
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Support reuse and maintenance of design information in a development process of custom engineered product2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper a method is introduced that supports reuse and maintenance of design information. The method allows sharing design information in different levels of details tailored for the stakeholders according to their needs. In addition, it is possible to share the information in multiple formats to suite different purposes. The results are demonstrated in an industrial partner which is a supplier of tooling for manufacturing industry.

  • 78.
    Poorkiany, Morteza
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Supporting Tooling Design of Customized Products by Instant Access to Design Rationale2014In: The 6th International Swedish Production Symposium 2014 / [ed] Johan Stahre, Björn Johansson, Mats Björkman, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an integrated product and production development environment, where changes in tooling design affect the product design and vice versa, access to design rationale of tooling would support concurrent development of new product variants and required tooling. This paper presents an information model that enables easy capture and access to the design rationale of toolings, moreover, supports tracing relevant information within different design software applications. A solution based on integrating SolidWorks, Microsoft Excel, and Microsoft Word has been developed and an industrial case study, where the system is introduced and evaluated is presented.

  • 79.
    Raudberget, Dag
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    André, Samuel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Modularisation in two Global Product Developing Companies: Current State and Future Outlook2018In: Proceedings of NordDesign: Design in the Era of Digitalization, NordDesign 2018, Linköping: The Design Society, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modularisation and platform strategies enable efficient utilization of resources through economies of scale and are therefore increasingly important for manufacturing companies. On the product side, modules are often considered the basis of product platforms by enabling a variety of product variants by combining interchangeable modules into different products. On the process side, modularisation enables faster and cheaper development of new product variants by reusing physical components, interfaces, and production equipment.

    The benefits of product platforms and modularisation have led two global product developing and manufacturing companies to initiate research projects within this field. The companies have previously made unsuccessful attempts to implement modularisation founded on a componentbased approach and the firms are now searching for other methods to get the benefits of modularisation.

    This paper describes the initial state of practice in modularisation and product platforms in the two companies in their attempts to move from a purely physical approach to modularisation into the universal view that is presented in the Design Platform approach. Here, a platform is viewed as an evolutionary entity involving several company assets such as processes, knowledge, methods, and relationships which are essential to gain the benefits of platforms also in the development phase. The Design Platform contains various concrete resources such as the geometry of physical components, but also inhomogeneous resources such as design rules, processes, methods and design automation.

    The results point to specific barriers that the companies experience when trying to adopt a modularisation strategy. Several barriers are experienced by both companies while some are specific for one of the companies. Through several workshops, the concepts of the Design Platform and a flexible view on modularisation are introduced, and their possibilities are elaborated and appreciated by the workshop participants.

  • 80.
    Raudberget, Dag
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Improving Modularization in Industry by Introducing a New Model for Module Classification2019In: 2018 IEEE International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management, IEEE Computer Society, 2019, p. 1337-1341, article id 8607720Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modules are often considered the basis of product platforms by enabling a variety of product variants based on interchangeable modules. In this way, modules enable efficient utilization of resources through economies of scale. The purpose of this work is to improve the product realization process by introducing a new model for module classification that enable companies to structure their assets and formalizing them in the development system. The modules developed following this methodology contains both physical resources and non-physical resources that can be reused in a structured way, thereby improving the efficiency of the development process. 

  • 81.
    Raudberget, Dag
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Levandowski, Christoffer
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    André, Samuel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Isaksson, Ola
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Müller, Jakob
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Supporting Design Platforms by Identifying Flexible Modules2017In: 21st International Conference on Engineering Design (ICED17): Vol. 3: Product, Services and Systems Design / [ed] Anja Maier, Stanko Škec, Harrison Kim, Michael Kokkolaras, Josef Oehmen, Georges Fadel, Filippo Salustri, Mike Van der Loos, The Design Society, 2017, p. 191-200Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One way for firms to stay competitive is to adapt a platform approach. In product platforms, modules are used as exchangeable design blocks to create a variety in product performance. This is a proven way to get advantages of scale in production by reusing physical parts and investments in manufacturing. To ensure exchangeability between modules, interfaces between modules must be well defined. Hence, from this point of view, there is no such thing as flexible modules. In this research, flexibility refers to the idea of identifying strategic portions of the platform where flexibility is needed and to create the modular division in a way that the assigned modules are de-coupled in theses areas. The presented approach shows how the Design platform concept can be extended by the introduction of flexible modules. These support the Design Platforms by allowing areas of strategic importance to be more flexible and thereby enable room for uncertainties such as fluctuating requirements and future technical development.

  • 82.
    Raudberget, Dag
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Ström, Mikael
    Swerea IVF AB, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Supporting innovation and knowledge transfer from individual to corporate level2018In: Transdisciplinary Engineering Methods for Social Innovation of Industry 4.0: Proceedings of the 25th ISPE Inc. International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering / [ed] Margherita Peruzzini, Marcello Pellicciari, Cees Bil, Josip Stjepandić, Nel Wognum, IOS Press, 2018, p. 576-585Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In most development processes, there is an early phase dedicated to creative concept development aiming at finding solutions to the problem at hand. To arrive at a high-quality solution, several ideas may be conceived and evaluated. However, emerging information and knowledge about product concepts is often not shared on a corporate level since only the final result is documented. This can lead to a significant waste, especially in Set-based design. This paper presents a pragmatic way to structure emerging design information, transferring individual design knowledge to a corporate level. It introduces the Concept Dashboard to track the progress of the concept development and uses an industry standard project workflow system to store and retrieve emerging concept knowledge.

  • 83.
    Stolt, Roland
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    André, Samuel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Introducing Inserts for Die Casting Manufactured by Selective Laser Sintering2018In: Global Integration of Intelligent Manufacturing and Smart Industry for Good of Humanity / [ed] Dušan Šormaz, Gürsel Süer, F. Frank Chen, Elsevier, 2018, p. 309-316Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The advances in additive manufacturing (AM) for high grade steels has in some cases made it possible to manufacture die inserts for demanding processes like high pressure die casting (HPDC). However, several challenges remain before this becomes commonplace. There is still a need of secondary manufacturing steps on the insert after printing. Also, extensive design changes must be made on the die inserts to fully utilize the advantages of AM. Further, the die insert is only one of many parts needed in the die assembly. Much of the die manufacturing will still be done by conventional methods. In this paper, several companies involved in the manufacturing and use of dies for HPDC have been interviewed on that they think is the future role of AM in their business. The result is that the effect of just printing the inserts would will be quite limited at present. Bringing down the time spent on die manufacture is important since that time then could be spent on improving the manufacturability of the parts.

  • 84.
    Stolt, Roland
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    André, Samuel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Andersson, Petter
    GKN Aerospace AB.
    Early stage assessment of the inspectability of welded components: A case from the aerospace industry2016In: Proceedings of the 7th International Swedish Production Symposium, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes a method to indicate potential problems when planning dye penetrant and x-ray inspection of welded components. Inspection has been found to be an important part of the manufacturability evaluation made in a large CAD-based parametric environment for making multidisciplinary design simulations in early stages of design at an aircraft component manufacturer. The paper explains how the proposed method is to be included in the design platform at the company. It predicts the expected probability of detection of cracks (POD) in situations where the geometry of the parts is unfavourable for inspection so that potential problems can be discovered and solved in early stages. It is based on automatically extracting information from CAD-models and making a rule-based evaluation. It also provides a scale for how favourable the geometry is for inspection. In the paper it is also shown that the manufacturability evaluation need to take into consideration the expected stresses in the structures, highlighting the importance of multi-disciplinary simulations.

  • 85.
    Stolt, Roland
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    André, Samuel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Andersson, Petter
    GKN Aerospace Sweden, Sweden.
    Introducing Welding Manufacturability in a Multidisciplinary Platform for the Evaluation of Conceptual Aircraft Engine components2017In: International Journal of Product Lifecycle Management, ISSN 1743-5110, E-ISSN 1743-5129, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 107-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Computer simulations play an important role for evaluating designs in an early stages leading to that more informed decisions can be taken and thereby reducing the risk of costly re-design. In this paper, a platform currently in operation at aeronautical company for doing extensive automated multiobjective design parameter studies on conceptual designs of aircraft engine components is studied. In the paper, an extension of the capability of the platform into making a rule-based evaluation of the welding manufacturability of the conceptual designs is proposed. The extension is tested by a prototype system at the air-craft manufacturer showing the relation between the design parameters and the manufacturability of the components. The results are presented as a manufacturability index showing what trade-offs with other performance criteria of the engine that can be made. It is shown that the manufacturability evaluation can be integrated in the knowledge value stream and supports a set-based concurrent engineering approach in the company.

  • 86.
    Stolt, Roland
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    André, Samuel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Andersson, Petter
    GKN Aerospace AB.
    Manufacturability assessment in the conceptual design of aircraft engines – building knowledge and balancing trade-offs2015In: Product Lifecycle Management in the Era of Internet of Things / [ed] Bouras, A., Eynard, B., Foufou, S., Thoben, K.-D., Springer, 2015, p. 407-417Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the automated assessment of manufacturability of air-craft engine components in the early stages of design, focused on the welding process. It is a novel part of a multi-objective decision support tool for design evaluation, currently running at a manufacturer of jet engine components. The paper briefly describes the tool and how it impacts the product development process. Further, the paper presents an integrated method for manufacturability assessment by finding welding processes that complies with all geometrical and other constraints found in the CAD-models of the conceptual engine. Here, preferences made by manufacturing engineers serves as a base for a manufacturability index so that different parameter settings in the CAD-models can be compared to find the best parameter settings, considering the trade-off with other performance criteria’s of the engine.

  • 87.
    Stolt, Roland
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    André, Samuel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Poorkiany, Morteza
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Managing Risk in the Introduction of New Technology in Products2015In: Journal of Aerospace Operations, ISSN 2211-002X, Vol. 3, no 3-4, p. 167-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper interviews with staff involved in product development from four different companies is presented. The objective is to find out how the companies manage the technical risk of introducing new technology in products and how they prepare for meeting changing requirements from customers. The companies originates from aerospace, automotive and production engineering. Based on the results of the first study, a case study was carried out at the aerospace company. The studies shows that, the introduction of new technology varies with the risk of failure in the validation of the products. Companies that easily can revert back to the former technology is more risk taking. The types of products and the companies’ place in the supply chain has an impact on technology introduction and requirements handling. The companies have strategies for developing requirement specifications prior to the start of the project. This is most elaborate at the aerospace company where a thorough concept evaluation clarify possible variations in requirements.

  • 88.
    Stolt, Roland
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Andersson, Petter
    GKN Aerospace AB, Sweden.
    Design for Inspection: Evaluating the Inspectability of Aerospace Components in the Early Stages of Design2017In: Procedia Manufacturing, E-ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 11, p. 1193-1199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One important part of the manufacturing process of aerospace components is making inspections using Fluorescent Penetrant Inspection (FPI). This mandatory inspection represents a non-negligible part of the manufacturing and service cost. It is therefore important to make the geometry of the components suitable for inspection i.e. practicing Design for Inspection (DFI). This has been studied at an aerospace company with the aim of bringing DFI to the early stages of product development process. In this paper, a tool is proposed for the evaluation of inspectability in the early design stages. The tool is applied on CAD-models of the components automatically ranking the inspectability of design proposals using a novel inspectability index. Thus, inspectability can be considered together with other performance and manufacturing aspects forming a powerful decision support. The tool has been run and evaluated together with manufacturing staff at the aerospace company with promising results.

  • 89.
    Stolt, Roland
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Heikkinen, Tim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Design and Evaluation of Aerospace Components for SLM2019In: Transdisciplinary engineering for complex socio-technical systems: Proceedings of the 26th ISTE International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering, July 30 – August 1, 2019 / [ed] K. Hiekata, B. Moser, M. Inoue, J. Stjepandić & N. Wognum, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2019, p. 147-156Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, the additive manufacturing process SLM (selective laser melting) is of high interest in the aerospace industry for the manufacture of jet engine components. This is driven by several factors such as reducing weight and minimizing the variation in the manufacturing process. In the paper, the state of practice in designing SLM parts is examined showing that there is plenty of opportunity to adapt designs to the process. However, this is often too time consuming in the early stages. By examining the state of art in SLM part design, the paper and identifies the variant specific cost drives that are proposed to be used to rank the manufacturability of different design alternatives for turbine frame aerospace components.

  • 90.
    Stolt, Roland
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Jarfors, Anders E.W.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Challenges and Support when Introducing AM in HPDC Tooling2019In: Transdisciplinary engineering for complex socio-technical systems: Proceedings of the 26th ISTE International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering, July 30 – August 1, 2019 / [ed] K. Hiekata, B. Moser, M. Inoue, J. Stjepandić & N. Wognum, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2019, p. 147-156Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When manufacturing tooling inserts for HPDC (High Pressure Die Casting), several manufacturing steps such as milling, heat treatment, electro discharge machining and finally surface treatment are involved. By instead manufacturing the insert by SLM (Selective laser melting), the process is expected to be quicker and with less material waste compared to the traditional manufacturing. Examples of other expected advantages is higher product variant flexibility and the possibility of making conform cooling channels, extending the die life. However, the insert is part of a die system involving many components. The insert cannot be designed and manufactured without considering the complete die system. This paper seeks how to integrate the insert design in the die assembly design. This is done via an example component and in cooperation with die manufacturing firms. The result is that the printing is a minor step of the total manufacturing process and that special design considerations needs to be taken for an SLM insert. New die concepts are needed that will minimise the amount of material, reduce the tolerance and surface demand and support the subdivision of the die into several printed parts.

  • 91.
    Stolt, Roland
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Heikkinen, Tim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Integrating Additive Manufacturing in the Design of Aerospace Components2018In: Transdisciplinary Engineering Methods for Social Innovation of Industry 4.0: Proceedings of the 25th ISPE Inc. International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering / [ed] Margherita Peruzzini, Marcello Pellicciari, Cees Bil, Josip Stjepandić, Nel Wognum, IOS Press, 2018, p. 145-154Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the aerospace industry, Additive Manufacturing (AM) is quickly gaining ground. When optimizing the design of an AM component, all life-cycle aspects need to be considered. It is by no means limited to the classic weight / stiffness optimization of the topology alone. The AM component design must comply with an array of requirements on for example assembly, maintenance and inspection. In addition, there are the manufacturability requirements and constraints of the printing procedure itself, including component orientation and support structures. In this paper, a proposal on how to integrate the AM design of components with the design of the complete engine structure is presented. To find how the current design process is conducted, an interview study involving design and manufacturing experts has been made at an aerospace company, forming a base for the proposal. The result is that a primary design procedure for the AM component must be made as a separate step involving a limited set of design considerations prior to making a multidisciplinary evaluation of the proposed engine structure.

  • 92.
    Stolt, Roland
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development.
    André, Samuel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development.
    Heikkinen, Tim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development.
    How to Challenge Fluctuating Requirements: Results from Three Companies2016In: Transdisciplinary Engineering: Crossing Boundaries / [ed] Milton Borsato, Nel Wognum, Margherita Peruzzini, Josip Stjepandić and Wim J.C. Verhagen, IOS Press, 2016, p. 1061-1070Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the results from a research project conducted by the research group Computer Supported Engineering Design (CSED) in Jonkoping University in Sweden. The project has the aim of increasing companies’ ability to respond to fluctuating requirements when developing new products and product variants. The companies participating in the project represents automotive, aerospace and production equipment industries. Three different cases of applications have been developed and implemented in the companies. Product models ranging from product to knowledge centered for use in the company’s product and technology platforms have been demonstrated and evaluated though interviews with professionals at the companies. To summarize, the results shows that the companies’ abilities to respond to fluctuating requirements have increased albeit concerns have been raised on the maintenance of knowledge in the implementations.

  • 93.
    Sunnersjö, Staffan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Computer Supported Engineering Design.
    Cederfeldt, Mikael
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Computer Supported Engineering Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Computer Supported Engineering Design.
    Rask, Ingvar
    A Transparent Design System for Iterative Product Development2006In: Journal of Computing and Information Science in Engineering, ISSN 1530-9827, E-ISSN 1944-7078, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 300-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Automated systems for variant design can be used for design iterations in order to guide the designer towards solutions that are optimized with respect to weight, cost, lead time, or other vital properties. In this work such a system for computational design problems is presented together with examples of its application. The system performs design computations, computed aided design model configuration, production process planning, and cost estimation. The design rules and algorithms are captured in knowledge "chunks," which are human readable as well as computer executable. The workflow governing the execution of these rules and algorithms is created using a dependency structure matrix (DSM) which is included in the system. Particular attention has been given to the need for transparency, modularity, and longevity of the system, which is a prerequisite for such a system to become a viable tool in industrial applications. Experiences from the proposed system indicate that the DSM workflow manager in combination with a human readable and modularized knowledge base provides clarity and transparency for both developer and user of the system.

  • 94.
    Thajudeen, Shamnath
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Challenges and critical success factors for the design phase in Swedish industrialised house building2019In: Proceedings of the 35th Annual ARCOM Conference, 2-4 September 2019, Leeds, UK / [ed] Gorse & C. J. Neilson, Association of Researchers in Construction Management (ARCOM), 2019, p. 34-43Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The house building industry has been characterised as less productive compared to the manufacturing industry with numerous and challenging activities including a complex integration process. For the last 20 years, industrialised house building has gained increased research and industry attention and is identified as a potential way to improve the overall house building productivity. In the overall process, the design phase has been identified as the bottleneck with several disciplines which have to be coordinated to generate a design solution that meets various customer and market requirements. Many aspects of a building's performance depend on the decisions taken in the early design process. These decisions can have a substantial impact on the overall design, lead time, cost and quality of the final product. However, there are many other important factors which need to be considered by designers during the design phase. Less attention has been paid to the identification of these factors within the design phase of the industrialised house building. Thus, the main purpose of this paper is to identify challenges and outline the critical success factors to be considered in the design phase of the Swedish industrialised house building. Qualitative research was conducted in combination with literature reviews and multiple case studies linking three Swedish house building companies. Empirical data were gathered from 20 semi-structured interviews. The study identified common challenges in the house building industry and 20 critical factors that should be addressed in the design phase from both literature and practitioners view. The result shows that fixed production is crucial for identifying the critical factors rather than a building system. Also, many challenges identified from this study could be managed by developing a platform-based approach with support tools and methods for critical factors in the design phase.

  • 95.
    Thajudeen, Shamnath
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Impact on the Design Phase of Industrial Housing When Applying a Product Platform Approach2018In: Proceedings of 26th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction / [ed] Vicente A. González, Chennai, India, 2018, p. 527-537Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With a glulam-based post-beam building system, a variety of building solutions is offered on the market for multi-story buildings. The building system must be adaptable to the demands of each project. However, short lead-time, efficient manufacturing and assembly must be ensured. The use of product platforms has been acknowledged as an enabler to manage external (customer) and internal (production) efficiency. The building system cannot be locked to a set of standard components as a high level of customisation is required. A set of methods and tools is needed to support the design work and to ensure that solutions stay inside the boundaries of the platform definition. The aim of this work is to map the state-of-practice in the design phase for a glulam building system from a platform theory perspective and outline a path forward for applying a sustainable platform development in companies where a component-based product platform does not suffice. Empirical data were gathered from an on-going product platform development including interviews and document analysis. The results show the lack of definition in platform-based product development from a theoretical perspective and need for development of support methods for design that align with different production strategies

  • 96.
    Trappey, Amy J. C.
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development.
    Hartmann, Timo
    Institute of Civil Engineering, TU Berlin, Germany.
    James, Anne E.
    Faculty of Engineering and Computing, Coventry University, UK.
    Stjepandic, Josip
    PROSTEP, Germany.
    Trappey, Charles V.
    Department of Management Science, National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan.
    Wognum, Nel
    ATO Group, Technical University of Delft, The Netherlands.
    Advanced design, analysis, and implementation of pervasive and smart collaborative systems enabled with knowledge modelling and big data analytics2017In: Advanced Engineering Informatics, ISSN 1474-0346, E-ISSN 1873-5320, Vol. 33, p. 206-207Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 97.
    Widfeldt, Magnus
    et al.
    Swerea IVF.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Computer Supported Engineering Design.
    Kilbo, Per
    Swerea IVF.
    An Improved Quotation Process within Manufacturing SMEs as Part of a Strategy for Growth2008In: 2008 Proceedings of Swedish Production Symposium, November 18 - 20, 2008, Stockholm, Sweden., Stockholm: Swedish Production Academy , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is generally focusing on the customer and supplier relation in a product creation perspective. The work has specifically been performed together with a metal working SME, and a main customer to this company. Four criterias for a long term succesful relationship and business success was stated from the beginning of the project: In house efficiency; Openness in the chain of suppliers; Co-operative product development and Precision of quotation. Those four areas are all covered in case studies, in close relations to the SME. The problems to combine close relationships and competitive business between customer´s and suppliers are discussed in the paper. A specific task in the project has been to create a demonstrator, a prototype quotation generator for the SME. The goal for the demonstrator was to increase precision and decrease lead times in the quotation process. An evaluation prooves that this is possible, and the demonstrator will stepwise be implemented in the SME. During the project, the SME has had a significant growth. Investments in automation and 3D CAD are made. The project is funded by Vinnova and the companies involved.

  • 98.
    Wognum, Nel
    et al.
    Technical University of Delft, The Netherlands .
    Bil, Cees
    RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Peruzzini, Margherita
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy .
    Stjepandić, Josip
    PROSTEP AG, Germany.
    Verhagen, Wim
    Technical University of Delft, The Netherlands .
    Transdisciplinary Engineering Research Challenges2018In: Transdisciplinary Engineering Methods for Social Innovation of Industry 4.0: Proceedings of the 25th ISPE Inc. International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering / [ed] Margherita Peruzzini, Marcello Pellicciari, Cees Bil, Josip Stjepandić, Nel Wognum, IOS Press, 2018, p. 753-762Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transdisciplinary research (TDR) has been the subject of discourse in the past few decades, but has not been studied much in the context of engineering problems. Many engineering problems can be characterized as ill-defined, like open innovation, adoption of new technology, business development, and the adoption of the Industry 4.0 concept. Transdisciplinary engineering research (TDER) is also performed in large projects by multi-disciplinary teams, as in TDR projects, including stakeholders and people from practice. Such projects may last long, often years. In such large projects, the involved disciplines should include both engineering disciplines as well as disciplines from social sciences. In this paper we address the challenges that exist in adopting a TDER approach. Universities need to prepare students to work in TDER projects. We discuss the current situation in transdisciplinary engineering education (TDEE) and identify challenges that need to be addressed for including TDEE in curricula. The paper ends with a summary and ideas for further research.

  • 99.
    Wognum, Nel
    et al.
    ATO Group, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Technical University of Delft, Netherlands.
    Bil, Cees
    School of Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Peruzzini, Margherita
    Department Engineering Enzo Ferrari, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy.
    Stjepandić, Josip
    PROSTEP AG, Darmstadt, Germany.
    Verhagen, Wim J.C.
    ATO Group, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Technical University of Delft, Netherlands.
    Transdisciplinary systems engineering: Implications, challenges and research agenda2019In: International Journal of Agile Systems and Management, ISSN 1741-9174, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 58-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transdisciplinary processes have been the subject of research since several decades already. Transdisciplinary processes are aimed at solving ill-defined and socially relevant problems. Many researchers have studied transdisciplinary processes and have tried to understand the essentials of transdisciplinarity. Many engineering problems can be characterised as ill-defined and socially relevant, too. Although transdisciplinary engineering cannot widely be found in the literature yet, a transdisciplinary approach is deemed relevant for many engineering problems. With this paper we aim to present an overview of the literature on research into transdisciplinary processes and investigate the relevance of a transdisciplinary approach in engineering domains. After a brief description of past research on transdisciplinarity, implications for engineering research, engineering practice, and engineering education are identified. In all three areas, the current situation is described, while challenges are identified that still exist. The paper ends with a research agenda for transdisciplinary engineering. 

  • 100.
    Xu, Yuchun
    et al.
    Manufacturing Department, School of Applied Science, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL, UK.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Erkoyuncu, John
    Manufacturing Department, School of Applied Science, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL, UK.
    Bankole, O.
    Manufacturing Department, School of Applied Science, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL, UK.
    Goh, Y.
    Wolfson School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU, UK.
    Cheung, W. M.
    School of Computing, Engineering and Information Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, NE1 8ST, UK.
    Baguley, P.
    Manufacturing Department, School of Applied Science, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL, UK.
    Wang, Q.
    School of Engineering and Computing Sciences, Durham University, Durham, DH1 3LE, UK.
    Arundachawat, P.
    Manufacturing Department, School of Applied Science, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL, UK.
    Shehab, E.
    Manufacturing Department, School of Applied Science, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL, UK.
    Newnes, L.
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath, BA2 7AY, UK.
    Roy, R.
    Manufacturing Department, School of Applied Science, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL, UK.
    Cost Engineering for Manufacturing: Current and Future Research2012In: International journal of computer integrated manufacturing (Print), ISSN 0951-192X, E-ISSN 1362-3052, Vol. 25, no 4/5, p. 300-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper aims to identify the scientific challenges and point out future research directions on Cost Engineering. The research areas covered in this paper include: Design Cost; Manufacturing Cost; Operating Cost; Life Cycle Cost; Risk & Uncertainty management; Affordability Engineering. Collected information at the academic forum on Cost Engineering held at Cranfield University in 2008 and further literature review findings are presented. The forum set the scope of the Cost Engineering research, a brainstorming was held on the forum and literatures were further reviewed to understand the current and future practices in cost engineering. The main benefits of the paper include coverage of the current research on cost engineering from different perspectives and the future research areas on Cost Engineering.

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