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  • 51.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Achieving the potential of seminar teaching: A student-led approach2014In: International Journal of Management in Education (IJMIE), ISSN 1750-385X, E-ISSN 1750-3868, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 160-167Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Demand-Supply Chain Management2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This research aims to enhance the current understanding and knowledge of the demand-supply chain management (DSCM) concept by determining its elements, benefits, and requirements, as well as by analyzing key elements of the concept. Methodology: This research has utilized the case study strategy and the survey strategy, however, the case study strategy dominates. The case study research has involved five companies originating from Sweden and the collection of empirical data mainly from in-depth interviews with key persons representing senior and middle management. The survey research targeted the largest firms in Sweden and Finland and empirical data was collected through an online questionnaire. Findings: This research has established that the main elements of DSCM include market orientation, coordination of the demand and supply processes, viewing the demand and supply processes as being equally important, as well as value creation, differentiation, innovativeness, responsiveness, and cost-efficiency in the demand and supply processes. It has also been revealed that the main benefits of DSCM include enhanced competiveness, enhanced demand chain performance, as well as enhanced supply chain performance, while the main requirements of DSCM include organizational competences, company established principles, demand-supply chain collaboration, and information technology support. A key element of DSCM further investigated is differentiation focused supply chain design. It has been shown that these efforts can be organized into a process of five stages. In addition, it is important that this process is addressed in parallel with the new product development (NPD) process, that information is exchanged between them, and that they are directed on the basis of the same segmentation model. Another key element of DSCM further investigated is coordination between NPD and SCM. This research has identified several significant linkages between these management directions, which motivate the use of an integrative NPD process where the NPD functions are aligned with the main supply functions in the company and other sales-related functions supporting the commercialization. A final key element of DSCM further investigated is the significance of regarding the demand processes and the supply processes as being equally important. This research has revealed that logistics outsourcing can be risky, if it results in the supply processes being considered less important. Nevertheless, if senior management regards the outsourced processes as equally important as the in-house processes, the effect of logistics outsourcing on company strategies and direction in SCM could be reduced and logistics outsourcing could instead provide an opportunity to improve the design and differentiation of the supply chain. Research limitations/implications: This research has proposed, described, and further analyzed a demand-supply oriented management approach. Such a management approach stresses that the demand processes and the supply processes have to be coordinated and directed at an overlying level, in order to gain and sustain a competitive advantage in competitive and fragmented markets. This research is mainly explorative in nature, and more empirical data, from similar and other research settings, is needed to further validate the findings. Another limitation of the research is that it is essentially limited to Swedish companies (even if some Finnish companies are involved in the survey), however, many of the case companies have a large international presence and are among the top three in their industries, facts which provide some grounds for generalization. Practical implications: This research provides researchers and practitioners with insights into how to develop a demand-supply oriented business. It shows that companies should organize themselves around understanding how customer value is created and delivered, as well as how these processes and management directions can be coordinated. In order for this to occur, the demand and supply processes must be considered as being equally important and the firm needs to be managed jointly and in a coordinated manner by the demand- and supply-side of the company. It is also important that value creation is considered in both the demand and supply processes. Originality/value: Despite strong arguments from both researchers and practitioners for a demand-supply oriented management approach only a minority of companies appear to have effectively coordinated the demand and supply processes. This might be influenced by the lack of research examining how the demand and supply processes can be coordinated, what benefits can be gained by coordinating them, and what requirements are necessary to succeed. This research contributes by investigating these types of aspects further.

  • 53. Hilletofth, Per
    Demand-supply chain management: Industrial survival recipe for new decade2011In: Industrial management + data systems, ISSN 0263-5577, E-ISSN 1758-5783, Vol. 111, no 2, p. 184-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to enhance the current understanding and knowledge of the demand-supply chain management (DSCM) concept by determining its elements, benefits, and requirements, and by illustrating its occurrence in practice.

    Design/methodology/approach – This research has utilized a literature and case study research strategy. The case study has involved an international manufacturing company from the appliance industry. Empirical data have been collected mainly from in-depth interviews with key persons representing senior and middle management in the case organization.

    Findings – This research has established that the main elements of DSCM include market orientation, coordination of the demand and supply processes, viewing the demand and supply processes as being equally important, as well as value creation, differentiation, innovativeness, responsiveness, and cost efficiency in the demand and supply processes. It has also been revealed that the main benefits of DSCM include enhanced competitiveness, enhanced demand chain performance, and enhanced supply chain performance, while the main requirements of DSCM include organizational competences, company-established principles, demand-supply chain collaboration, and information technology support.

    Research limitations/implications – This research is explorative in nature, and more empirical data, from similar and other research settings, are needed to further validate the findings. Another limitation of the research is that it is limited to one Swedish company; however, the involved case company has a large international presence and is among the top three in its industry, which provides some ground for the generalization. A final limitation of the research is that the involved company only represents one industry.

    Practical implications – This paper provides insights useful to researchers and practitioners on how to develop a demand-supply oriented business. It highlights that firms should organize themselves around understanding how customer value is created and delivered and how these processes and management directions can be coordinated. The demand and supply processes have to be considered as equally important and the firm needs to be managed by the demand side and supply side of the company jointly in a coordinated manner.

    Originality/value – The need to coordinate the demand and supply processes has been emphasized in both the demand and supply chain literature but still remained relatively unexplored; thus, this paper contributes by investigating this matter further.

  • 54.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Differentiated supply chain strategy: Building knowledge through case studies2008In: Proceedings of the 4th Railway Logistics Seminar: Cooperation among Transportation Modes in Northern Europe, Kouvola, Finland, 2008, p. 5-28Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays companies usually offer a wide range of products and services in various types of non-coherent business environments. It is becoming apparent that traditional ‘one-size-fits-all’ supply chain strategies does not support a wide range of products sold in a diversity of markets. Consequently, it becomes increasingly necessary to employ different manufacturing and delivery strategies concurrently in order to develop a differentiated supply chain strategy. This paper employs a descriptive multiple case study approach to illustrate how two companies has develop a differentiated supply chain strategy. Case study findings reveal that one efficient method to develop a differentiated supply chain strategy is to combine different manufacturing and delivery strategies into various supply chain solutions. By combining relatively few strategies it is possible to develop several differentiated supply chain solutions.

  • 55.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för teknik och samhälle.
    Differentiated Supply Chain Strategy: Response to a fragmented and complex market2008Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Supply Chain Management (SCM) aims to synchronize the requirements of customers with the flow of materials from suppliers, in order to satisfy the needs of the customers as costefficiently as possible. This has become a difficult task due to several developments in the market, such as increased competition, increased demand variability, increased product variety, increased amounts of customer-specific products, and shortening product life cycles. These developments, due in part to globalization, provide additional management challenges and new practices in which supply chains are designed and managed, and can eventually make the difference between companies staying competitive or not. The overall purpose of this thesis is to investigate how complexity and globalization affect supply chain design and operations. The main emphasis has been on producing descriptive results of the studied phenomenon. This research involves five case studies covering international transportation structures used in SCM, the selection of supply chain strategies in different business environments, and the role of information systems and technology in achieving the objective of SCM. In this thesis it has been concluded that in order to cope with increasingly complex and fragmented markets companies need more differentiated transportation structures, modes, and supply chains. Furthermore, to effectively manage this, information systems and advanced decision support tools are required. In addition, this thesis has shown that current taxonomies for supply chain strategy selection are too simplistic due to three major problems: they mediate that it is a question of choosing one supply chain strategy for the entire company,

    they regard markets as rather homogeneous, and they link each supply chain strategy to a specific business context. Instead, it has been concluded that in order to better satisfy differing customer needs in various markets it is increasingly necessary to develop a differentiated supply chain strategy by utilizing different manufacturing and delivery strategies concurrently. Thus, a need exists for new taxonomies for supply chain strategy selection which recognize that the markets are becoming more fragmented and complex, that customer preferences differ across customer/market segments, and that there is a need to differentiate the supply chain strategy. This thesis also highlights several requirements of a differentiated supply chain strategy. Firstly, extended supply chain collaboration is required, since a differentiated supply chain strategy will involve more supply chain partners than a traditional supply chain strategy. Secondly, there is a need for more transportation mode alternatives, particularly intermodal, both in supply and distribution operations, due to the fact that differentiation requires diversity. In this thesis, intermodal landbridge freight services are highlighted as one interesting avenue, which could potentially facilitate a more differentiated supply chain strategy. Thirdly, more integrated information systems are needed along with decision support tools. This study illustrates that agent based modeling appears to be an interesting method for developing realistic decision support tools in the context of complex supply chains. An interesting aspect for further research is to investigate how different manufacturing and delivery strategies can be used concurrently in international supply chains. Moreover, there are several requirements and opportunities of a differentiated supply chain strategy, and these have to be investigated further

  • 56.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Differentiation focused supply chain design2012In: Industrial management + data systems, ISSN 0263-5577, E-ISSN 1758-5783, Vol. 112, no 9, p. 1274-1291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework for differentiation focused supply chain design (SCD).

    Design/methodology/approach – This research uses a literature review and case study approach to develop a framework for differentiation focused SCD. The proposed framework has been developed based on the literature review and evaluated against the case study. The case study describes SCD at two Swedish companies; one from the appliance industry and the other from the furniture industry, both having a significant international presence. Empirical data have been collected, mainly from in-depth and semi-structured interviews with key persons representing senior and middle management in the case companies.

    Findings – This research suggests that differentiation-focused SCD can be organized into a five-stage process. It is essential that this process is aligned with new product development (NPD), so they exchange information, and operate based on the same segmentation model. The main benefits of a differentiated supply chain are enhanced competitiveness, as supply chain management (SCM) changes from being a cost center to being a value generating function, and increased profitability, by allowing differentiated customer needs to be satisfied cost-efficiently. To succeed with developing a differentiated supply chain, logisticians must be extensively involved with both the NPD process and the strategic marketing process.

    Research limitations/implications – Current models of SCD are simplistic and not well developed. By combining theory with practical applications, this research provides researchers and decision makers with detailed tools for developing a differentiation-focused SCD process. The research is explorative in nature therefore empirical data from similar and other research settings should be gathered to reinforce the validity of the findings.

    Practical implications – This research provides knowledge and insights on how a differentiated supply chain may be developed. The main implication is that SCD needs to be closely aligned with NPD and marketing in order to gain competitive advantage. Companies may also be able to employ labor closer to the consumption market by focusing on supply chain differentiation.

    Originality/value – This research contributes by developing a process for differentiation-focused SCD, and by demonstrating the main benefits and requirements of a differentiated supply chain.

  • 57.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Enterprise resource planning systems in higher education2008In: Proceedings of the 4th Railway logistics Seminar: Co-operation among Transportation Modes in Northern Europe, Kouvola, Finland, 2008, p. 167-180Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information systems and technology are becoming more and more important in the industry. Consequently, it is important to include these in any modern logistics education. This paper describes how ERP-systems are utilized in logistics education programs and courses at University of Skövde (Sweden). The objective of this paper is to highlight the importance of information systems and technology in a modern logistics education.

  • 58. Hilletofth, Per
    How to develop a differentiated supply chain strategy2009In: Industrial management + data systems, ISSN 0263-5577, E-ISSN 1758-5783, Vol. 109, no 1, p. 16-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of supply chain (SC) design and operation by investigating how two case companies have developed and deployed differentiated SC strategies. This study primarily focuses on the operating part of the differentiated SC strategy, that is, how different manufacturing strategies – such as make-to-stock, assembly-to-order, and make-to-order – are used in contemporary manufacturing related SCs. However, this study also includes elements concerning supply and distribution parts.

    Design/methodology/approach – This study employs a descriptive multiple case study approach. The case organizations originate from Sweden, but they have significant international presence. Empirical data have been collected mainly from in-depth interviews with key persons representing senior and middle management in the case companies.

    Findings – This research shows how two case companies have developed and deployed a differentiated SC strategy. The case study findings reveal that both the case companies already are employing several manufacturing strategies and also combine these with different distribution strategies. Up to now, the supply part of the differentiated SC strategy has been neglected but probably will be incorporated in the near future. This implies that one efficient way to develop a differentiated SC strategy could be to combine different supply, manufacturing and distribution strategies into various SC solutions. By combining relatively few strategies, it is possible to develop several differentiated SC solutions.

    Research limitations/implications – The research work is limited to Swedish companies, however, the case companies are in top three in their respective industries measured by sales, which provides ground for the generalization of the research.

    Practical implications – This paper gives an insight to managers and practitioners in how to develop and deploy a differentiated SC strategy.

    Originality/value – Several studies have discussed the appropriate SC strategy issue but failed to address the need to utilize several SC solutions concurrently. However, this paper contributes by discussing how to develop and deploy a differentiated SC strategy and how to manage these multiple SCs.

  • 59.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Supply chain design and differentiation2012In: Building competences, synergy and competitiveness for the future : book of abstracts: Proceeding of the International Conference on Technology Innovation and Industrial Management / [ed] Dr. Zbigniew Pastuszak, Dr. Kongkiti Phusavat, Dr. Agnieszka Sitko-Lutek, Dr. Binshan Lin, Lublin: Maria Sklodowska-Curie University , 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to develop a framework  for differentiation focused supply chain design (SCD). Design/methodology/approach: The framework has been developed based on a literature review and tested against a case study. Empirical data has been collected mainly from in-depth and semi-structured interviews.

    Findings: Differentiation focused SCD can be organized into a five-stage process. It is essential that this process is aligned with new product development (NPD), such that they exchange information, and operate from the same segmentation model.

    Research limitations/implications: The research is explorative in nature thus empirical data from other research settings should be gathered to reinforce the validity of the findings.

    Practical implications: This research provides researchers and practitioners with insights as to how a differentiated supply chain should be developed.

    Originality/value: This research contributes by addressing the lack of research examining how a differentiated supply chain can be developed.

  • 60. Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Aslam, Tehseen
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Multi-agent based supply chain management: Case study of requisites2010In: International Journal of Networking and Virtual Organisations, ISSN 1470-9503, E-ISSN 1741-5225, Vol. 7, no 2/3, p. 184-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Supply Chains (SCs) are becoming increasingly complex, and intensified competition in the end markets has started to create a situation where cooperation requirements between companies are increasing, and old mechanistic operations management solutions are becoming obsolete. In this paper we analyse a real-life situation in Alpha's manufacturing plant in Sweden, which serves northern European countries in consumer markets. Case study findings reveal that the product-mix flexibility requirements are high and lead-time requirements in manufacturing as well as purchasing take weeks or months, not days. Based on the empirical observations, we propose an agent system for this company and discuss different levels of decision making, operative responsibilities and decision time horizons.

  • 61.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Claesson, Frida
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland.
    In-transit distribution strategy: Hope for European factories2010In: Rapid Modelling and Quick Response: Intersection of Theory and Practice / [ed] G. Reiner, Neuchatel, Switzerland, 2010, p. 249-262Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this research the in-transit distribution strategy is investigated by determining and analyzing key principles of the strategy. It is examined through a multiple case study and simulation. This research reveals that the in-transit distribution strategy is about considering goods that are being transported as a mobile inventory and actively dispatching goods to a destination, where there is a predicted demand before any customer orders are received. It can give major competitive advantages by offering rather short lead-times for customers without having to store products locally. This, in turn, gives lower warehousing costs, lower tied-up capital, a less interrupted manufacturing, and steady as well as continous production volumes. It is a workable solution for European manufactures competing in distant market. To be successful with this strategy, it takes good planning, working closely with customers, first-class market kowledge, and a supporting enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. Other highlighted requirements are low variation in demand and predictable distribution lead-time. Simulation study of one hypothetical product group verified case study findings, but we find it interesting that especially manufacturing output variance is very sensitive regarding the overall results. Also increasing average customer demand results in undesired outcomes.

  • 62. Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Ericsson, D
    Demand chain management: Next generation of logistics management2007In: Conradi Research Review, ISSN 1459-0980, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the literature several authors argue that there is a need for a new generation of logistics management since the business environment has changed. This new management philosophy identifies consumers and their requirements as starting point for all supply chain activities and has more properly been termed Demand Chain Management (DCM). The purpose of this paper is to analyze if DCM should be regarded as the next generation of logistics management and furthermore to illustrate its usefulness in practice through case study of Swedish appliance manufacturer.

    Literature review and case study findings show that DCM is not merely a development of the logistics principles, but rather an integration of marketing and supply chain operations. It is needed in volatile and consumer-oriented environments, which require higher levels of customized products, faster product development and commercialization together with supply, manufacturing and distribution on demand.

  • 63. Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Ericsson, D
    Christopher, M
    Demand chain management: A Swedish industrial case study2009In: Industrial management + data systems, ISSN 0263-5577, E-ISSN 1758-5783, Vol. 109, no 9, p. 1179-5577Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to increase the understanding of demand chain management (DCM) by investigating how it has been structured and executed in an international manufacturing company.

    Design/methodology/approach – The main emphasis has been on producing descriptive results and the applied research strategy has been an embedded single case study. The case organization originates from Sweden, but it has significant international presence. Empirical data have been collected mainly from in-depth interviews with key persons representing senior management in the case company.

    Findings – This research shows that DCM is about developing synergies between the demand creation and the demand fulfillment processes. A completely implemented DCM approach should incorporate all the major demand creation and fulfillment processes. This kind of fully implemented approach probably does not exist in real life today but some companies have started to develop versions including some of the major processes, and this research provides an example of this. The ultimate goal of DCM is to gain competitive advantages by differentiating not only the products, but also the delivery process. This is necessary in markets characterized of intensive competition, high product variety, large amounts of customer-adapted products, and short product life cycles. It can be concluded that DCM is not another name for demand driven supply chains (SCs) or a fad. It is rather a way to finally benefit from decade long marketing discussions on how to achieve customer focus. It highlights the interplay between marketing and supply chain management (SCM) as an enabler of value creation.

    Research limitations/implications – This research work is limited to one Swedish company; however, the case company has large international presence and is in top three in their industry measured by sales, which provides some ground for the generalization of the research.

    Practical implications – This paper gives an insight for managers and practitioners to the value of coordinating marketing and SCM to develop a truly customer-driven organization and SC.

    Originality/value – Several studies have addressed the synergies between marketing and SCM but failed to address how to in some detail realize this in practice. This paper contributes by discussing how to realize this coordination in practice.

  • 64.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Dag
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Coordinating demand and supply processes: Towards demand-supply chain management2010In: Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing, 2010, p. 512-521Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research explores and describes the demand-supply chain management (DSCM) concept from both a theoretical and practical perspective by determining what key principles that characterize the concept as well as to illustrate its application in practice. The concept is examined through a literature review combined with a qualitative single case study. The research reveals that DSCM is about coordinating demand and supply processes within a particular company and across the demand-supply chain. It can be defined as the alignment of demand and supply processes across intra and inter-organizational boundaries for the purpose of improving the ability of the particular company and the entire demand-supply chain to enhance overall customer value while utilizing resources cost-efficiently. Key principles that characterize the concept are value creation, value delivery, customer orientation, product and supply chain differentiation, lead-time reduction, information management, and responsiveness with respect to existing products as well as changing customer needs.

  • 65.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Dag
    University College of Borås, Sweden.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland .
    Hedenstierna, Philip
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    New product development in a manufacturing company: A challange for supply chain management2009In: Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing, 2009, p. 1169-1177Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The last decades a new type of business environments has evolved characterized by rapid and volatile demand changes, short product life cycles, and high levels of customized products. The competitiveness of a business in these environments is mostly determined by its responsiveness. This is characterized by the ability to quickly scale up or down the production volume, the presence of an innovative and fast product development, and the quick incorporation of customer requirements into the product development. This paper employs a descriptive single case study approach to illustrate how product development is structured and executed in an international manufacturing company, seeking to realize an innovative, predictable, and efficient product development. The objective is to increase the understanding of how product development and product life-cycles are connected to Supply Chain Management (SCM). Case study findings reveal that the case company after implementing a strategic and structured Product Creation Process (PCP) has improved the efficiency and effectiveness of product development. Findings also reveal that the case company has not yet developed any linkages between product development and SCM. Still, the case company has become aware of this issue due to problems associated with the lack of integration between product development and SCM.

  • 66.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Dag
    University College of Borås, Sweden.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland and University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Ujvari, Sandor
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Differentiated Supply Chains Strategies Based on Customer Insights2008In: Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing (FAIM 2008), Skövde, 30/6-2/7, 2008., 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Supply chains satisfy customers by striving for delivering the right products to the right place at the right time, atthe right quality and at the right quantity within an increasingly faster pace and lower cost. One implication thatcan be made from this is that the nature of markets is the point of departure in both supply chain design andoperations. Given that organizations usually offer a wide range of products and services with different supplyand demand characteristics, one could argue that organizations conduct business in various types of noncoherentbusiness environments. There has been a recognition that ‘one-size-fits-all’ supply chain strategies onlysatisfies a limited number of business environments, and that it is increasingly necessary to develop severaldifferentiated supply chain strategies to satisfy all major business environments in a better way. This paperemploys a descriptive case study approach to illustrate how a case company develops differentiated supplychains based on customer insights. Case study findings reveal that one efficient way to develop differentiatedsupply chain strategies is to combine different supply and delivery methods into supply chain solutions. Bycombining relatively few supply and delivery methods it is possible to develop several differentiated supply chainstrategies.

  • 67.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Dag
    University College of Borås, Sweden.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland and University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Ujvari, Sandor
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Integration and formalization of strategic product development and commercialization in a manufacturing company: A challenge for supply chain management2008In: Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing, Skövde: University of Skövde , 2008, p. 532-539Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The last decades a new type of business environments has evolved characterized by rapid and volatile demand changes, short product life cycles, and high levels of customized products. The competitiveness of a business in these environments is mostly determined by its responsiveness. This is characterized by the ability to quickly scale up or down the production volume, the presence of an innovative and fast product development, and a quick incorporation of consumer requirements into the product development. This paper employs a descriptive case study approach to illustrate how product development and commercialization can be integrated into a product management flow to realize innovative and faster product development. Case study findings reveal that the case company has during a five year period increased the number of successful product introductions. Furthermore, the studied approach proves to be successful in this mature business environment where it is essential to develop products based on the consumer need and behaviour and to differentiate the product assortment. Based on our case study we also recognize that the product management flow does not concern supply chain management (SCM) to some extent in the case company – this indicates that further development is needed in SCM applications to support product life-cycle based managerial processes.

  • 68. Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Eriksson, D
    Lumsden, K
    Coordinating new product development and supply chain management2010In: International Journal of Value Chain Management, ISSN 1741-5357, Vol. 4, no 1/2, p. 170-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Effective implementation of the new product development (NPD) process not only enables management to coordinate the efficient flow of new products, but will also assist to support ramp-up of various supply chain activities and other related activities supporting the commercialisation of the product. Thus, companies need to address all these issues in parallel to be successful and this requires some kind of integrative product development approach. The purpose of this research is to increase the understanding of how NPD is connected to supply chain management (SCM) by investigating how the NPD process is structured and executed in two international manufacturing companies seeking to realise an innovative, predictable and efficient product development. Several essential linkages between NPD and SCM have been derived from case study findings concerning important issues for successful product development.

  • 69.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Eriksson, David
    Coordinating new product development with supply chain management2011In: Industrial management + data systems, ISSN 0263-5577, E-ISSN 1758-5783, Vol. 111, no 2, p. 264-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to form an understanding of how new product development (NPD) relates to supply chain management (SCM), why the two fields should be coordinated, and how this may be done.

    Design/methodology/approach – This research uses a literature review and case study research. The case study considers a Swedish company that operates on a global basis in the furniture industry. Empirical data have been collected mainly from in-depth interviews with key persons representing senior and middle management in the case company.

    Findings – This paper stresses the need to produce innovative, value-adding products, as well as the necessity to quickly deliver them to the market. Companies that face mature business environments may encounter problems due to a high emphasis on either the value-creation processes, or on the value delivery processes. Therefore, NPD activities need to be coordinated with SCM activities on a strategic level, lest competitiveness will be lost.

    Research limitations/implications – The research is limited to one case company; replication studies would enhance understanding of the studied phenomenon. There is a wide need for research exploring how various parts of demand and supply chains should be managed in order to fully utilize the advantages of the consumer-oriented enterprise.

    Practical implications – This paper provides insights for researchers and practitioners on how to coordinate and balance NPD (demand side) with SCM (supply side) activities. It highlights that companies should organize themselves around understanding how consumer value is created and how these processes may be coordinated to provide that value. The two processes must be given equal attention and importance to avoid sub-optimization.

    Originality/value – The need for coordinating NPD and SCM activities has been emphasized in the literature but still remains relatively unexplored. This paper contributes by investigating this issue further.

  • 70.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Eriksson, David
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Coordination of the demand and supply side: A case study from the furniture industry2011In: Modelling Value: Selected Papers of the 1st International Conference on Value Chain Management / [ed] Jodlbauer, Herbert, Olhager, Jan, Schonberger, Richard J., Physica-Verlag GmbH & Co , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research work investigates the occurrence of demand-supply chain management (DSCM) components in a Swedish furniture wholesaler that sources most of its products from China. Three of eight main components proposed in the literature were identified in the case company, and one component was not fully applicable. The case company’s strong focus on new product development (NPD) increased the number of end products, while the case company lost sales. The research shows possible caveats of being purely demand-driven and highlights the need to strike a balance between demand and supply chain imperatives.

  • 71.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Eriksson, David
    School of Engineering, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Kouvola Research Unit, Kouvola, Finland.
    Two Sides of a Token: Coordinating Demand and Supply at Furniture Wholesaler2012In: International Journal of Manufacturing Research, ISSN 1750-0605, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 101-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research work investigates the occurrence of Demand-Supply Chain Management (DSCM) components in a Swedish furniture wholesaler that sources most of its products from China. Three of the eight main components of DSCM were identified in the case company and one component was not fully applicable. The case shows possible caveats of being demand-driven and highlights the need to balance demand and supply sides simultaneously. During economic crisis years 2008-2009, business has experienced extraordinary decline in sales and profitability, while holding considerable amount of inventory at hand. In the long term, supply chain strategy relying on Chinese manufacturing could face increasing challenges in total costs owing to currency changes, transportation costs increase and environmental regulation.

  • 72.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Sollander, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Guldfiskbeslut av Ericsson att flytta ut produktionen2016In: Intelligent logistik : inköp, logistik, produktion, affärer, ISSN 1653-9451, no 6-7, p. 8-9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 73.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Tate, Wendy
    Department of Supply Chain Management, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, United States.
    Kinkel, Steffen
    Institute for Learning and Innovation in Networks (ILIN), Karlsruhe University of Applied Sciences, Karlsruhe, Germany.
    Right-shoring: Making resilient offshoring and reshoring decisions2019In: Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management, ISSN 1478-4092, E-ISSN 1873-6505, Vol. 25, no 3, article id 100540Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this special topic forum is to look at some current literature on the right-shoring debate. The papers that were selected for the special topic form use a range of qualitative and quantitative methodologies to answer specific research questions related to the right-shoring phenomenon. Each of the papers is summarized in this editorial to show the findings, implications and future research directions. The ideas from these manuscripts were used as a foundation to discuss the way in which research in this area should progress. What types of questions should we be asking as we seek to discover the best “shore”? What factors and variables should we consider in our future decisions? Are there differences across regions of the world? Research in this area has continued to progress, largely because of significant global economic, environmental and regulatory changes. The “shoring” decision appears to be an area where research is keeping up with, or potentially leading practice, but there is still more opportunity to advance decision making. The included papers address a number of factors related to specific geographies and factors related to the movement of manufacturing and products and services from one location to another.

  • 74.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hedenstierna, Carl Philip T.
    Cardiff Business School.
    Editorial2012In: International Journal of Services Sciences, ISSN 1753-1446, Vol. 4, no 3/4, p. 211-212Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hedenstierna, Carl Philip T.Cardiff Business School.
    Special Issue on Competing Through Logistics and Supply Chain Capabilities2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 76.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland.
    Editorial2012In: International Journal of Manufacturing Research, ISSN 1750-0591, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 99-100Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 77.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Virtuella system.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Virtuella system.
    ERP Training through Traditional and Intensive Course Formats2009In: Networked Logistics and Production at South-East Finland, St Petersburg and Leningrad Oblast / [ed] Olli-Pekka Hilmola & Eugene Korovyakovsky, Lappeenranta University of Technology , 2009, p. 145-166Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems have a important role in the performance improvement and control of a company and its entire supply chain. Therefore, this system is a vital part of a company’s competitiveness and new approaches for learning are needed to be developed in order to provide knowledge and skills in faster and more efficient manner for employees. Our aim in this manuscript is it to show, how ERP systems could be incorporated in the logistics courses of a university. This environment provides good platform to test new course formats, since most of the university students do not have any previous experience with these systems.

    In this research the structure and contents regarding ERP system usage in certain courses in the logistics curriculum at a Swedish University are being presented. Essentially, a traditional approach, where computer sessions are incorporated in ordinary courses are compared to a new intensive and flexible course format entirely dedicated to ERP systems. Additionally, the two utilized approaches are analyzed through student evaluations based on courses arranged during year 2008.

    Research shows that both of the approaches offer good opportunities; the students appreciated the traditional approach, since it allowed them to receive both theoretical and practical knowledge and skills, while they felt the intensive to be beneficial in developing practical side further. Consequently, the best alternative could be to utilize both of these formats. Still, this research shows that skilled responsible lecturer, among intensive course setting, is quite possibly one route for faster learning and higher productivity oflecturing.

  • 78.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland.
    Role of Emerging Markets in Demand-Supply Chain Management2010In: Proceedings of the 15th Annual Cambridge International Manufacturing Symposium, Cambridge, UK, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 79.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hilmola, Olli-PekkaLappeenranta University of Technology.
    Special Issue on Industrial Case Studies of Demand-Supply Chain Management2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 80. Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Supply chain management in fashion and textile industry2008In: International Journal of Services Sciences, ISSN 1753-1446, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 127-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In fashion and textile business, the demand changes rapidly due to fashion trends and a volatile market situation. This demand is unpredictable and could vary and change completely in a short time, creating high difficulties for supply chain. To create a leagil (lean and agile) supply chain is one observed way for a fashion and textile retailing company to optimise its performance and to remain competitive. One good example from such is fashion retailer Zara, which has adopted leagile approach and combined this with key success factors for fashion retailing. However, in this paper, we argue that the leagile approach is not a universal solution in the fashion and textile business. For some fashion and textile companies, the lean approach is more adequate. Case study findings and simulation results reveal that the lean and leagile approach could coexist as different strategy alternatives – simulation results favour leagile strategy, while five year profitability analysis shows lean apparel retailer H&M to have higher profitability than Zara.

  • 81.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland.
    Lorentz, Harri
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Editorial2013In: World Review of Intermodal Transportation Research (WRITR), ISSN 1749-4729, E-ISSN 1749-4737, Vol. 4, no 2/3, p. 97-98Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 82.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hilmola, Olli-PekkaLappeenranta University of Technology.Lorentz, HarriUniversity of Turku.
    Special Issue on Sustainability and Ethics in Global Transportation Logistics Networks Sustainability and Ethics in Global Transportation Logistics Networks2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 83.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Lappeenranta University of Technology.
    Wang, Yacan
    Beijing Jiaotong University.
    Simulation based decision support systems in the supply chain context2016In: Industrial management + data systems, ISSN 0263-5577, E-ISSN 1758-5783, Vol. 116, no 2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 84.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hilmola, Olli-PekkaLappeenranta University of Technology.Wang, YacanBeijing Jiaotong University.
    Special issue: Simulation based decision support systems in the supply chain context2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 85. Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Hilmola, O-P
    Role of logistics outsourcing on supply chain strategy and management: Survey findings from Northern Europe2010In: Strategic Outsourcing, ISSN 1753-8297, E-ISSN 1753-8300, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 46-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of logistics outsourcing in Northern Europe through survey research. Research work intends to shed more light on logistics outsourcing with other than case-based company examples.

    Design/methodology/approach – Survey was completed during late 2007 and early 2008 in Finland and Sweden for the largest companies in industrial and service sectors. Altogether 34 answers were received, and they were gained mostly from industrial and trading companies.

    Findings – The research results show that warehousing, IT, and customs brokerage outsourcing could have impact on some managerial and strategic aspects of supply chains (SC). Thus, none of the identified difference areas was found to be statistically significant. Potential impact areas of SC strategy and management are integrated IT systems of manufacturing and logistics, reverse logistics procedures, and re-engineering of logistics processes. However, research shows that in-house produced IT function, and potentially outsourced warehousing, have important roles in more international purchasing.

    Research limitations/implications – Altogether, the amount of responses in the survey was relatively low, but treating Finnish and Swedish companies as one group gives us some opportunity for statistical analysis. This grouping might be one limiting factors of our study, and especially in its generalization power; however, our earlier analysis with the data shows that these countries operate in a rather similar interest area. Another limiting factor of our research findings is the difference in respondent profiles – operating principles of logistics and trade companies are different as compared to manufacturing.

    Practical implications – Research shows that IT is potentially having an important role in both, international purchasing emphasis as well as on warehousing outsourcing activities. Contrary to the common view, this research gives some indication that in-house IT is valuable, and more integrated applications are needed for example, when warehousing is being outsourced.

    Originality/value – This is one of the seminal research works regarding North European outsourcing practices, and their affects on SC strategies and management. Both of the countries have an advanced industrial sector, which gives perspective for the readers world wide.

  • 86. Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Hilmola, O-P
    Claesson, F
    In-transit Distribution Strategy: Solution for European Factory Competitiveness?2011In: Industrial management + data systems, ISSN 0263-5577, E-ISSN 1758-5783, Vol. 111, no 1, p. 20-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Research work describes in-transit distribution strategy by determining and analyzing key principles of it as well as by illustrating its application in practice. Emphasis on in-transit distribution strategy is to turn transportation pipeline as a mobile inventory holding place, and actively dispatching goods to a destination, where there is a predicted demand before any customer orders are actually received. The use of this strategy is supported by current trade flows: emerging market trade has increased considerably, but simultaneously Swedish export prices, for example, have significantly decreased. The paper aims to address this issue.

    Design/methodology/approach – In-transit strategy is examined through a multiple case study from industrial companies having main factory operations in Sweden as well as using a system dynamics simulation model, and Monte Carlo analysis. These are supported by the second hand data of trade flows between Sweden, and India and China.

    Findings – In order to be successful with in-transit strategy, the case studies show that excellent planning, working closely with customers, first-class market knowledge, and an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system that is able to support the process sufficiently are required. Other highlighted requirements of this strategy are low variation in demand, and predictable distribution lead-time. Simulation study of one hypothetical product group verified case study findings, but the authors find it interesting that manufacturing output variance especially is very sensitive regarding to the overall results. If variation increases, then in-transit strategy is not able to deliver for customers with the necessary accuracy. Also increasing average customer demand, and longer transportation delays lead to undesired outcomes (e.g. too much inventory or out of stock situations).

    Research limitations/implications – The case study and second hand analysis is limited to one country, and further evidence is needed from other European, and possibly North American companies, to verify these findings.

    Originality/value – There has been a rather limited amount of research works completed from the use of in-transit strategy, even if increased trade activity and lower price of exported items is that of the old west in their exports to emerging markets, and continues to be so in the future (was even strong to China during credit crunch year 2009). Our research is seminal in terms of a developed system dynamics simulation model.

  • 87. Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Hilmola, O-P
    Ujvari, S
    Teaching ERP in logistics curriculum: A case experience from Sweden2010In: International Journal of Business Information Systems, ISSN 1746-0972, E-ISSN 1746-0980, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 295-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of ERP systems in business is commonplace and often a requirement for rapid and efficient operations. The presence of ERP in higher education can be seen as a prerequisite for students to achieve necessary skills and knowledge, but how can the education be achieved in a better way? In this research, the use of ERP systems as a part of two courses of the logistics curriculum in higher education at a Swedish University are presented and analysed. The traditional approach of teaching logistics, where computer sessions are incorporated in ordinary courses, is being compared to a new intensive and flexible course format dedicated entirely to ERP education with a stronger focus on problem-oriented learning. The results show that both approaches offer opportunities, the traditional approach allows students to receive both theoretical and practical knowledge and skills, while the intensive approach provides them with significant practical knowledge and skills. This research results leaves us arguing that the best combination is to utilise both approaches to establish the needed basis for logistics curriculum.

  • 88. Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Jäger, Kerstin
    The role of logistics service providers in the implementation of a differentiated supply chain2011In: International Journal of Shipping and Transport Logistics, ISSN 1756-6517, E-ISSN 1756-6525, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 151-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research investigates the role of logistics service providers in the implementation of a differentiated supply chain. The issue is examined through a multiple case study combined with a literature review. The research shows that logistics service providers can support companies with the implementation of a differentiated supply chain in sourcing and distribution parts by providing services that the company is incapable to provide, by providing certain services more efficiently or by providing complementing services. In some situations, the logistics service provider is even responsible for the entire implementation and should continuously develop the logistics process and customised service according to the company's market situation. Eurasian transportation flows are nowadays an important part of most supply chains and needs to be considered in this differentiation work. Logistics service providers operating in these flows can support the differentiation by providing more customised and differentiated transportation services and there is a demand for more transportation alternatives in these flows.

  • 89. Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Lorentz, H
    Savolainen, V-V
    Hilmola, O-P
    Ivanova, O
    Using Eurasian land-bridge in logistics operations: Building knowledge through case studies2007In: World Review of Intermodal Transportation Research (WRITR), ISSN 1749-4729, E-ISSN 1749-4737, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 183-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research concerns about the use of Eurasia as a landbridge for container traffic. We present case study findings concerning European-Asian transportation, and this reveals that the lead time advantage of landbridges (with respect of its costs) would be suitable for a manufacturer, but malfunctioning parts of harbours and railway transports hinder the potential of this alternative. Findings from demanding manufacturing logistics are further verified with a case study concerning a Finnish retailer having increasingly important presence in Russian markets. Retailer used to favour railways (~early part of Eurasian corridor) but has nowadays configured distribution operations to favour road transports.

  • 90.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    University of Skövde.
    Lättilä, Lauri
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland.
    Agent based decision support in the supply chain context2011In: Proceedings of the 3rd Rapid Modeling Conference, Leuven, Belgium, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research shows that agent based simulation models can form and effective decisionsupport system in the supply chain context. This kind of simulation based decision supportsystems is based on a simulation model, including some interacting agents and performance andrisk indicators, that has been implemented in a simulation software. The simulation model enablesthe decision-maker to iteratively set parameters, run simulations and evaluate the results. Based onthe retrieved information and knowledge the decision-maker can make decisions regarding how tohandle the real system. In essence, this type of decision support system fuses information fromdifferent sources in a synergistic manner into a situation image that provides effective support forhuman decision-making. The research shows that simulation based decision support systems canimprove the understanding of problems in the supply chain domain since they provide a holisticpicture and awareness on how decisions affect the real system.

  • 91.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Lättilä, Lauri
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Kouvola, Finland.
    Agent based decision support in the supply chain context2012In: Industrial management + data systems, ISSN 0263-5577, E-ISSN 1758-5783, Vol. 112, no 8, p. 1217-1235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the benefits and the barriers of agent based decision support (ABDS) systems in the supply chain context.

    Design/methodology/approach – Two ABDS systems have been developed and evaluated. The first system concerns a manufacturing supply chain while the second concerns a service supply chain. The systems are based on actual case companies.

    Findings – This research shows that the benefits of ABDS systems in the supply chain context include the possibility to increase versatility of system architecture, to improve supply chain visibility, to conduct experiments and what-if analyses, to improve the understanding of the real system, and the possibility to improve communication within and between organizations in the supply chain. The barriers of ABDS systems in the supply chain context include the difficulty to access data from partners in the supply chain, the difficulty to access data on a higher level of granularity, and the difficulty to retrieve data from other information systems.

    Research limitations/implications – The research is explorative in nature therefore empirical data from similar and other research settings should be gathered to reinforce the validity of the findings.

    Practical implications – This research provides knowledge and insights on how ABDS systems may be developed and used in the supply chain context and demonstrates its main benefits and barriers.

    Originality/value – This research expands the current research of benefits of ABDS systems to the supply chain domain and also addresses the barriers of ABDS systems to a larger extent than previous research. Comparisons to other simulation based decision support systems are also given.

  • 92.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Lättilä, Lauri
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland.
    Demand and supply chain integration framework2012In: Proceedings of the FAIM 2012 / [ed] Hasse Nylund, Satu Kantti, Ville Toivonen & Seppo Torvinen, Tampere: Tampere University of Technology, 2012, p. 821-828Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All organizations need to coordinate their value creation (demand) and value delivery (supply) processes in order to survive in today’s competitive market environments.In this research, we compare different ways to coordinate the demand and supply chain processes.Current literature has beenanalyzed to develop a framework on demand and supply chain coordination. Thereafter, the framework has been exemplifiedusingacase study. The framework combines multiple research streams and provides a method for decision-makers to estimate different coordination possibilities.

  • 93.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Lättilä, Lauri
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Kouvola Research Unit, Kouvola, Finland.
    Framework for demand chain and supply chain coordination2012In: International Journal of Service Sciences, ISSN 1753-1446, Vol. 4, no 3/4, p. 240-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organisations must coordinate the value creation (demand chain) and the value delivery (supply chain) processes in order to survive in today's competitive market environment. The need to coordinate these processes is well known but not much is known on how the coordination can be achieved. The purpose of this research is to develop a framework for demand chain and supply chain coordination. The framework has been developed based on a literature review and is illustrated through a case study. The framework combines multiple research streams and provides a method for decision-makers to estimate different coordination possibilities.

  • 94.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Lättilä, Lauri
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland.
    Agent-based decision support in manufacturing supply chain2009In: Agent and Multi-Agent Systems: Technologies and Applications: Proceedings of the 3rd International KES Symposium / [ed] Hakansson, Anne, Hartung, Ronald, Springer, 2009, p. 677-686Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Supply Chain Management (SCM) is becoming increasingly complex and an intensified competition in the end-markets has started to create a situation where co-operation requirements between companies in a Supply Chain (SC) are increasing. The old mechanistic operations management solutions are becoming obsolete and advanced decision support is increasingly needed to realize efficient and effective management of complex SCs. The objective of this research is to contribute to the understanding of how Agent Based Modeling (ABM) can advance decision making and to discuss why ABM should be regarded as method to realize Information Fusion (IF). In this research work an agent based model of SCM has been implemented in a simulation platform to provide an approach for evaluation of decision and management alternatives. Research shows that this kind of decision support system is based on IF, since it collects and fuses information from different sources into a situation image that provides effective support for human decision making.

  • 95.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Lättilä, Lauri
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland.
    Ujvari, Sandor
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland.
    Agent-based decision support in maintenance service operations2009In: Proceedings of the 16th International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this research an agent-based decision support system for service related maintenancehas been developed, the maintenance planning is complex including corrective andpreventive tasks of several non-associated plants. This type of problem is well suited formodeling and implementation using Agent-Based Modeling and Simulation (ABMS).The simulation model enables decision-makers to iteratively set parameters, runsimulations and evaluate results. Research shows that this approach can improve theunderstanding of the problem domain and also generate a basis for decision-making.

  • 96.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Rampa, Vittorio
    Politecnico di Milano, IEIIT, Milan, Italy.
    Wen, Yean-Fu
    National Taipei University, Taiwan.
    Wang, Chih-Chien
    National Taipei University, Taiwan.
    Chen, Chien-Chang
    Tamkang University, Taiwan.
    Editorial2016In: International Journal of Ad Hoc and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1743-8225, E-ISSN 1743-8233, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 221-223Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 97.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Rampa, VittorioPolitecnico di Milano, IEIIT, Milan, Italy.Wen, Yean-FuNational Taipei University, Taiwan.Wang, Chih-ChienNational Taipei University, Taiwan.Chen, Chien-ChangTamkang University, Taiwan.
    Special Issue on Advances in Mobile Computing and Applications2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 98.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Reitsma, Ewout
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Coordination of new product development and supply chain management2018In: Innovation and Supply Chain Management: Relationship, Collaboration and Strategies / [ed] Moreira, António Carrizo, Ferreira, Luís Miguel D. F., Zimmermann, Ricardo A., Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 33-50Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New product development (NPD) and supply chain management (SCM) enable companies to respond to new demands in a responsive manner. The scarcity of research addressing the coordination of NPD and SCM is notable. The purpose of this research is to identify and examine linkages between NPD and SCM through a case study that includes a Swedish furniture wholesaler. Several linkages that stress the need of using an integrative NPD process where the design functions are aligned with other main functions of the company were identified. For example, it was observed that a strong focus on the demand side (NPD) has induced high demands on the supply side (SCM) of the case company. Therefore, the NPD process to a larger extend needs to incorporate main supply functions and other sales-related functions that support the commercialization of the product. This promises to create a consumer-oriented business, especially needed in markets where products have short life cycles and where having a short time to market is crucial. Within future research, it will be interesting to expand this research to companies that operate in different markets and/or have different objectives and to provide an inclusive description of the consumer-oriented business model.

  • 99.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Sequeira, Movin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Adlemo, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Three novel fuzzy logic concepts applied to reshoring decision-making2019In: Expert systems with applications, ISSN 0957-4174, E-ISSN 1873-6793, Vol. 126, p. 133-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the possibility of increasing the interpretability of fuzzy rules and reducing the complexity when designing fuzzy rules. To achieve this, three novel fuzzy logic concepts (i.e., relative linguistic labels, high-level rules and linguistic variable weights) were conceived and implemented in a fuzzy logic system for reshoring decision-making. The introduced concepts increase the interpretability of fuzzy rules and reduce the complexity when designing fuzzy rules while still providing accurate results.

  • 100. Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Ujvari, S
    Lättilä, L
    Hilmola, O-P
    Agent-based decision support for maintenance service provider2010In: International Journal of Services Sciences, ISSN 1753-1446, Vol. 3, no 2/3, p. 194-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Operations performed by a maintenance service provider (MSP) can include the entire maintenance function or select activities; these need to be well-balanced in terms of utilisation rate of own resources, maintenance cost incurred and the uptime of the customers' production systems. MSPs face challenges due to the task of planning several non-associated plants and with a frequent lack of reliable information. In this research work, an agent-based decision support system of service-related maintenance has been developed. Research shows that this approach can improve the understanding of the problem domain and also generate a basis for decision-making and structural changes.

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