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  • 51.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Social Work. Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Enebrink, Pia
    Division of Psychology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Solna, Sweden.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Behavioral Studies, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Ferrer-Wreder, Laura
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stålnacke, Johanna
    Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eninger, Lilianne
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eichas, Kyle
    Department of Psychological Sciences, Tarleton State University, Stephenville, TX, United States of America.
    Norman, Åsa
    Division of Psychology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Solna, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Lene
    Department of Global Public Health, Karolinska Institute, Solna, Sweden; Center for Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Region Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gull, Ingela Clausén
    Division of Psychology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Solna, Sweden.
    Hau, Hanna Ginner
    Department of Special Education, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Allodi, Mara Westling
    Department of Special Education, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sedem, Mina
    Department of Special Education, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Study protocol for a non-randomized controlled trial of the effects of internet-based parent training as a booster to the preschool edition of PATHS®: Universal edition of the Parent Web [protocol]2023In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 4, article id e0284926Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Well implemented, universal parental support is often effective in families with younger children, but research on their effects on families with adolescent children is scarce. In this study, a trial of the universal parent training intervention "Parent Web" in early adolescence is added to the social emotional learning intervention Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS®), completed in early childhood. The Parent Web is a universal online parenting intervention based on social learning theory. The intervention aims to promote positive parenting and family interaction through five weekly modules completed over 6-8 weeks. The main hypothesis is that participants in the intervention group will exhibit significant pre- to post- intervention-related benefits relative participants in the comparison group. The aims of this study are: 1) provide Parent Web as a booster aimed at improving parenting support and practices at the transition into adolescence to a cohort of parents whose children have previously participated in preschool PATHS, and 2) examine the effects of the universal edition of Parent Web. The study has a quasi-experimental design with pre- and post-testing. The incremental effects of this internet-delivered parent training intervention are tested in parents of early adolescents (11-13 years) who participated in PATHS when 4-5 years old compared to a matched sample of adolescents with no prior experience of PATHS. The primary outcomes are parent reported child behavior and family relationships. Secondary outcomes include self-reported parent health and stress. The proposed study is one of the few trials to test the effects of universal parental support in families of early adolescents and will therefore contribute to the understanding of how mental health in children and young people can be promoted across developmental periods through a continuum of universal measures. Trial registration: Clinical trials.gov (NCT05172297), prospectively registered on December 29, 2021.

  • 52.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    et al.
    School of Social Work, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ferrer-Wreder, Laura
    School of Social Work, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Eninger, Lilianne
    School of Social Work, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Advancing school-based interventions through economic analysis2014In: New Directions for Youth Development, ISSN 1533-8916, E-ISSN 1537-5781, no 141, p. 117-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Commentators interested in school-based prevention programs point to the importance of economic issues for the future of prevention efforts. Many of the processes and aims of prevention science are dependent upon prevention resources. Although economic analysis is an essential tool for assessing resource use, the attention given economic analysis within school-based prevention remains cursory. Largely, economic analyses of school-based prevention efforts are undertaken as secondary research. This limits these efforts to data that have been collected previously as part of epidemiological and outcomes research. Therefore, economic analyses suffer from gaps in the knowledge generated by these studies. This chapter addresses the importance of economic analysis for the future of school-based substance abuse prevention programs and highlights the role of prevention research in the development of knowledge that can be used for economic analysis.

  • 53.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    et al.
    School of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Fridell, Mats
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    The five-year costs and benefits of extended psychological and psychiatric assessment versus standard intake interview for women with comorbid substance use disorders treated in compulsory care in Sweden2018In: BMC Health Services Research, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Women with comorbid substance use disorders are an extremely vulnerable group having an increased relative risk of negative outcomes such as incarceration, morbidity and mortality. In Sweden, women with comorbid substance use disorders may be placed in compulsory care for substance abuse treatment. Clinical intake assessment procedures are a distinct aspect of clinical practice and are a foundation upon which client motivation and continued treatment occurs.

    Method: The current study is a naturalistic quasi-experiment and aims to assess the five-year costs and benefits of a standard intake interview versus an extended psychological and psychiatric assessment for a group of chronic substance abusing women placed in compulsory care in Sweden between 1997 and 2000. Official register data on criminal activity, healthcare use, compulsory care stays and other services was retrieved and all resources used by study participants from date of index care episode was valued. In addition, the cost of providing the intake assessment was estimated.

    Results: Results show that the extended assessment resulted in higher net costs over five years of between 256,000 and 557,000 SEK per person for women placed in care via the Law on Compulsory Care for Substance Abusers (LVM). Higher assessment costs made up a portion of this cost. The majority of this cost (47-57%) falls on the local municipality (social welfare) and 11.6-13.7% falls on the individual patient.

    Conclusions: Solid evidence supporting the clinical utility or incremental validity of assessment for improving treatment outcomes in this setting was not confirmed. 

  • 54.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    et al.
    Department of Social Work, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Fridell, Mats
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Women with comorbid substance dependence and psychiatric disorders in Sweden: a longitudinal study of hospital care utilization and costs2015In: BMC Health Services Research, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Substance use disorders are regarded as one of the most prevalent, deadly and costly of health problems. Research has consistently found that the prevalence of other psychiatric disorders among those with substance related disorders is substantial. Combined, these disorders lead to considerable disability and health years lost worldwide as well as extraordinary societal costs. Relatively little of the literature on substance dependence and its impact on healthcare utilization and associated costs has focused specifically on chronic drug users, adolescents or women. In addition, the research that has been conducted relies largely on self-reported data and does not provide long-term estimates of hospital care utilization. The purpose of this study is to describe the long-term (24-32 year) healthcare utilization and it's associated costs for a nationally representative cohort of chronic substance abusing women (adults and adolescents) remanded to compulsory care between 1997-2000 (index episode). As such, this is the first study investigating healthcare costs for women in compulsory treatment in Sweden.

    Methods: Women (n∈=∈227) remanded to compulsory care for substance abuse were assessed at intake and their hospital care utilization was retrieved 5-years post compulsory care from national records. Unit costs for ICD-10 diagnoses were applied to all hospital care used from 1975-2006. Attempts are made to estimate productivity losses associated with hospitalization and premature death.

    Results: Upon clinical assessment it was found that a majority of these women had a comorbid psychiatric disorder (primarily personality disorder). The women followed in this study were admitted to hospital five to six times that of the general population and had stays six to eight times that of the general population. Total direct healthcare costs per person over the study period averaged approximately $173,000 and was primarily the result of psychiatric department visits (71%) and inpatient treatment (98.5 %; detoxification and short-term rehabilitation).

    Conclusions: Women placed in compulsory care use more hospital resources than that of the general Swedish population and when compared to international research of hospital care use and substance abuse. Direct hospital costs vary greatly over the life course. Effective services can have significant economic benefit.

  • 55.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    et al.
    Department of Pedagogies, Psychology and Athletic Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Fridell, Mats
    Department of Pedagogies, Psychology and Athletic Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Women with co-occurring substance abuse and mental disorders in Sweden: a longitudinal study of criminal justice system involvement and costs2013In: Mental Health and Substance Use, ISSN 1752-3281, E-ISSN 1752-3273, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 219-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to estimate the cumulative direct criminal justice system costs incurred by age and offending year between 1975 and 2004 by a cohort of women with a co-occurring substance abuse and mental disorder (COD) placed in a compulsory treatment facility for substance abuse between 1997 and 2000. Official register data were obtained for the period 1975–2004 on criminal charges, prosecutions, judgments and sentences by a consecutive sample of 227 women. The 2010 unit price data were applied to resource use and total costs were calculated and reported by age and offending year. A total of 211 women (92.9%) were charged for at least one crime during the period under review. The mean length of criminal career was 8.58 years. Theft and narcotics offenses were the crime categories with the highest number of crimes committed and charges made. The total criminal justice system costs per person averaged 834,897 Swedish crowns (SEK, 2010) over the entire sample. This study provides cost data on the real criminal careers of women with COD which can be used to estimate the potential benefit of targeted interventions at various stages in an individual's criminal career. The results indicate that early, targeted, effective intervention can have substantial benefits.

  • 56.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Social Work. Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    Department of Psychology, University of Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Behavioral Sciences, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Hollertz, Katarina
    Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Starke, Mikaela
    Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skoog, Therése
    Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Advancing Social Intervention Research Through Program Theory Reconstruction2023In: Research on social work practice, ISSN 1049-7315, E-ISSN 1552-7581, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 642-655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Program theory reconstruction is an often-overlooked aspect of social intervention research. In this paper, we argue that intervention research benefits if the research design is informed by the specific intervention's program theory (i.e., the idea of how the intervention is supposed to lead to the intended outcomes). The purpose of this paper is to offer a comprehensive and accessible guide to program theory reconstruction in research on social interventions and to provide arguments as to how program theory reconstruction can be used to benefit intervention studies. First, we summarize what program theory is and its role in intervention research. Second, we provide a direct ?how-to? for researchers, practitioners, and students who may be unfamiliar with the methods of program theory reconstruction but are interested in undertaking a program theory reconstruction. Finally, we conclude with how program theory reconstruction can benefit intervention research.

  • 57.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    et al.
    School of Social Work, Lund University.
    Leifman, Håkan
    Sundell, Håkan
    Hansson, Kjell
    Effective services for alcohol and drug abusing youth: perspectives from Sweden2008In: Crossing frontiers: international developments in the treatment of drug dependence / [ed] A. Stevens, Brighton: Pavilion Publishing, 2008, p. 35-52Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 58.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    et al.
    Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Långström, Niklas
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Solna, Sweden.
    Skoog, Therése
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andrée Löfholm, Cecilia
    National Board of Health and Welfare, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Leander, Lina
    Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Assessment of Social Services, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brolund, Agneta
    Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Assessment of Social Services, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ringborg, Anna
    Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Assessment of Social Services, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nykänen, Pia
    Department of Education, Communication and Learning, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Syversson, Anneth
    Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Assessment of Social Services, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sundell, Knut
    Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Assessment of Social Services, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Systematic review and meta-analysis of noninstitutional psychosocial interventions to prevent juvenile criminal recidivism2021In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, ISSN 0022-006X, E-ISSN 1939-2117, Vol. 89, no 6, p. 514-527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To assess the effectiveness of noninstitutional psychosocial interventions in preventing recidivism among criminal adolescents. Method: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials assessing the impact on recidivism among juveniles aged 12–17. The included studies had a low to medium risk of bias and were published between 2000 and 2019. Standardized mean differences or risk differences were calculated. Results: We included 35 (20 randomized, 15 nonrandomized) studies evaluating 17 unique, noninstitutional psychosocial interventions. A meta-analysis found no significant reductions in recidivism for studied interventions compared to control conditions. Although single studies suggested some positive effects, the evidence provided by these studies was found to have very low certainty. Post hoc analyses indicated that studies including a low-intensity control condition might have stronger relative intervention effects compared to studies with medium or high-intensity control conditions. Conclusion: This systematic review did not find any one noninstitutional psychosocial intervention to be more effective than control treatments in reducing future criminality among juvenile offenders aged 12–17. We discuss the implications of the present findings for social work and child and adolescent psychiatry practices.

  • 59.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Social Work.
    Skoog, Therése
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Introduction to Research on Social Work Practice Special Issue: Program Theory in Social Interventions Developed in Practice Settings2023In: Research on social work practice, ISSN 1049-7315, E-ISSN 1552-7581, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 631-633Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Solving individual, group, or societal problems through social intervention in practice settings is a complex task. The extent to which this end is achieved depends heavily on the effectiveness of the change strategies in use. Increased understanding of how these change strategies work to impact outcomes is at the forefront of the science of social intervention. In this special issue, we have gathered a collection of seven articles that present central issues related to program theory in social interventions developed in practice setting. Our goal is to advance the knowledge of how an understanding of theory in practice can advance social intervention research.

  • 60.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Social Work.
    Skoog, TheréseDepartment of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Special Issue: Program Theory in Social Interventions Developed in Practice Settings2023Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 61. Olsson, Tina M.
    et al.
    Sundell, Knut
    Implementering steg för steg – vad säger forskningen?2008In: Att förändra socialt arbete: forskare och praktiker om implementering / [ed] Maria Roselius & Knut Sundell, Stockholm: Gothia Förlag AB, 2008, p. 30-58Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 62.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Social Work. Department of Social Work, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sundell, Knut
    University of Gävle, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Gävle, Sweden.
    Publication bias, time-lag bias, and place-of-publication bias in social intervention research: An exploratory study of 527 Swedish articles published between 1990-20192023In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 2, article id e0281110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Publication and related biases constitute serious threats to the validity of research synthesis. If research syntheses are based on a biased selection of the available research, there is an increased risk of producing misleading results. The purpose fo this study is to explore the extent of positive outcome bias, time-lag bias, and place-of-publication bias in published research on the effects of psychological, social, and behavioral interventions. The results are based on 527 Swedish outcome trials published in peer-reviewed journals between 1990 and 2019. We found no difference in the number of studies reporting significant compared to non-significant findings or in the number of studies reporting strong effect sizes in the published literature. We found no evidence of time-lag bias or place-of-publication bias in our results. The average reported effect size remained constant over time as did the proportion of studies reporting significant effects.

  • 63.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    et al.
    School of Social Work, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Sundell, Knut
    Medical Management Center, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management & Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Research that guides practice: Outcome research in Swedish PhD theses across seven disciplines 1997-20122016In: Prevention Science, ISSN 1389-4986, E-ISSN 1573-6695, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 525-532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The core of evidence-based practice (EBP) as advocated for within the practice arms of the health and social sciences is to promote the routine incorporation of the best available research evidence into practice efforts. This requires discipline-specific education that is not only grounded in professional practice but also prepares would-be scientists in the application of the sophisticated techniques that characterize today’s high research standards. Doctoral-level education is an important primer for future scientific endeavors across disciplines. This study examined 2334 theses published across Sweden in public health, criminology, nursing, psychiatry, psychology, social work, and sociology during the period 1997-2012. Of the theses reviewed, 13%aimed to investigate the effects of interventions. The highest percentage of effectiveness studies was found in nursing, public health, and psychology. The percentage of outcome research increased during the period. Controlled studies (with comparison group and pre-and post-test) occurred primarily within public health, nursing, psychiatry, and psychology. Of the 296 theses that included an intervention effectiveness study, 131 (44 %), or 5.6 % of all theses reviewed, met all four assessment criteria for quality. PhD education across seven disciplines in Sweden may be producing a professional core of scientists that is ill prepared to produce the type of research that is necessary to inform practice of the effects of its interventions as exposure to the rigors of quality effectiveness research is all but non-existent. This has implications for the advancement of an evidence-based practice and intervention science more broadly.

  • 64.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    et al.
    Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg.
    Sundell, Knut
    Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Assessment of Social Services, Sweden.
    Leander, Lina
    Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Assessment of Social Services, Sweden.
    The devil is in the details: Unpackaging the systematic in systematic reviews: Short reply to reconsidering the effectiveness of mentoring for prevention of juvenile criminal recidivism2022In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, ISSN 0022-006X, E-ISSN 1939-2117, Vol. 90, no 8, p. 652-654Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Replies to a comment made by DuBois (see record 2022-98051-005). The systematic review is an important tool for decision makers, intervention researchers, and practitioners to gain a clear and comprehensive overview of the available evidence on a given topic. We would, in this short reply, like to raise the two additional issues of critical appraisal and research synthesis. 

  • 65.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Social Work. Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden; Medical Management Center, LIME, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hasson, Henna
    Medical Management Center, LIME, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Unit for Implementation and Evaluation, Center for Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Region Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vira, Emily G.
    Medical Management Center, LIME, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Mental Health and Suicide, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
    Sundell, Knut
    Department of Social Work and Criminology, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Adapted, Adopted, and Novel Interventions: A Whole-Population Meta-Analytic Replication of Intervention Effects2023In: Research on social work practice, ISSN 1049-7315, E-ISSN 1552-7581Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    A challenge to implementation is management of the adaptation-fidelity dilemma or the balance between adopting an intervention with fidelity while assuring fit when transferred between contexts. A prior meta-analysis found that adapted interventions produce larger effects than novel and adopted interventions. This study attempts to replicate and expand previous findings.

    Methods

    Meta-analysis was used to compare effects across a whole-population of Swedish outcome studies. Main and subcategories are explored.

    Results

    The 523 studies included adapted (22%), adopted (33%), and novel (45%) interventions. The largest effect was found for adapted followed by novel and adopted interventions. Interventions in the mental health setting showed the highest effects, followed by somatic healthcare and social services.

    Conclusions

    These results replicate and expand earlier findings. Results were stable across settings with the exception of social services. Consistent with a growing body of evidence results suggest that context is important when transferring interventions across settings.

  • 66.
    Skoog, T.
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Bergström, M.
    School of Social Work, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Karlsson, M.
    Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Social Work. Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Study protocol for leaving care: A comparison study of implementation, change mechanisms and effectiveness of transition services for youth2024In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 19, no 2, article id e0293952Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Youth placed in out-of-home care is a large and highly vulnerable group at high risk of negative developmental outcomes. Given the size and extent of negative developmental outcomes for youth placed in out-of-home care, interventions to help this vulnerable group navigate successfully towards independent living and promote wellbeing across a spectrum of outcome areas are needed. To date, there is a lack of such interventions, particularly in Sweden. Importing interventions from other societies and cultures is associated with difficulties. The aim of the research project is to implement, test, and evaluate interventions that have been recently developed in Swedish practice to close this gap. Methods The project has an ambitious and complex data collection and analysis strategy using qualitative, quantitative, and multiple information methods (hybrid effectiveness-implementation study) over the course of two years. Both the implementation and effectiveness of the interventions will be evaluated. The recently developed My Choice-My Way! leaving care program for youth aged 15+ will be the primary focus of the project and will be compared to usual services. Conclusions The project has the potential to offer novel insights into how society can promote wellbeing across a spectrum of outcome areas for the high-risk group of youth transitioning from out-of-home care to independent living. As such, the project will have important implications for both research and practice.

  • 67. Starke, M.
    et al.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    Hollertz, K.
    Pathways to the labor market for long-term unemployed persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 68. Sundell, K.
    et al.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    Short-term outcomes of MST in Sweden2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 69. Sundell, Knut
    et al.
    Hansson, Kjell
    Andrée Löfholm, Cecilia
    Socialstyrelsen.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    Gustle, Lars-Henry
    Kadesjö, Christina
    Multisystemisk terapi för ungdomar med allvarliga beteendeproblem: resultat efter sex månader2006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Multisystemisk terapi (MST) är en strukturerad familje- och närmiljöbaserad öppenvårdsbehandling som vänder sig till familjer som har ungdomar med beteendeproblem. MST har utvecklats i USA som ett alternativ till placering utom hemmet. MST har fått sitt namn av att interventionerna riktar sig mot de viktigaste system som en ung människa finns i – familjen, skolan och kamratkretsen – och behandlingen lägger vikt vid att arbeta med alla dessa system samtidigt. Arbetet styrs av konkreta behandlingsmål som i sin tur bestämmer valet av interventioner. Behandlingsplanerna utvärderas regelbundet genom intervjuer med föräldrarna. MST-arbetet organiseras och utförs inom små team bestående av tre till fyra terapeuter och en teamledare. Varje terapeut arbetar med tre till sex familjer under tre till fem månader. Terapeuterna/teamet finns tillgängliga dygnet runt.

    I den här rapporten beskrivs hur MST fungerar jämfört med mer traditionella insatser inom socialtjänsten (t.ex. placering, samtalsstöd, familjeterapi). Undersökningsgruppen utgörs av 156 ungdomar mellan 12 och 17 år med en allvarlig beteendestörning (eng. conduct disorder) som fördelats till MST eller traditionell behandling genom randomisering. Utvärderingen berör 27 kommunala förvaltningar och sammanlagt sex MST-team från Göteborg, Halmstad, Malmö och Stockholm. Totalt har tolv olika instrument använts för att beskriva ungdomarnas psykiatriska problem, antisociala beteende (inkl. kriminalitet), drogbruk, sociala förmågor, förhållande till kamrater, familjerelationer, känsla av sammanhang, föräldrars psykiatriska hälsa samt tillfredsställelse med socialtjänstens insatser. Dessutom har information inhämtats från socialtjänstens akter. Den här rapporten beskriver situationen vid förmätning och efter sex månader.

  • 70.
    Sundell, Knut
    et al.
    Institute for Evidence-Based Social Work Practice, National Board of Health and Welfare, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hansson, Kjell
    School of Social Work, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Löfholm, Cecilia Andrée
    Institute for Evidence-Based Social Work Practice, National Board of Health and Welfare, Stockholm, Sweden; School of Social Work, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    Unit for Research and Development, Gothenburg Region, Gothenburg, Sweden; School of Public Administration, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gustle, Lars-Henry
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Kadesjö, Christina
    Unit for Research and Development, Gothenburg Region, Göteborg, Sweden.
    The transportability of multisystemic therapy to Sweden: Short-term results from a randomized trial of conduct-disordered youths2008In: Journal of family psychology, ISSN 0893-3200, E-ISSN 1939-1293, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 550-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    his randomized clinical trial assessed the effectiveness of multisystemic therapy (MST) for 156 youths who met the diagnostic criteria for conduct disorder. Sweden's 3 largest cities and 1 small town served as the recruiting area for the study. A mixed factorial design was used, with random allocation between MST and treatment as usual groups. Assessments were conducted at intake and 7 months after referral. With an intention-to-treat approach, results from multiagent and multimethod assessment batteries showed a general decrease in psychiatric problems and antisocial behaviors among participants across treatments. There were no significant differences in treatment effects between the 2 groups. The lack of treatment effect did not appear to be caused by site differences or variations in program maturity. MST treatment fidelity was lower than that of other studies, although not clearly related to treatment outcomes in this study. The results are discussed in terms of differences between Sweden and the United States. One difference is the way in which young offenders are processed (a child welfare approach vs. a juvenile justice system approach). Sociodemographic differences (e.g., rates of poverty, crime, and substance abuse) between the 2 countries may also have moderating effects on the rates of rehabilitation among young offenders. 

  • 71.
    Sundell, Knut
    et al.
    Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Assessment of Social Services, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Social Work.
    Social Intervention Research2017In: Oxford Bibliographies in Social Work / [ed] E. Mullen, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is about social intervention research. A general definition of intervention is any interference that would modify a process or situation. In social work, interventions are intentionally implemented change strategies which aim to impede or eradicate risk factors, activate and/or mobilize protective factors, reduce or eradicate harm, or introduce betterment beyond harm eradication; thus social work intervention encompasses a range of psychotherapies, treatments, and programs. Interventions may be simple or complex. Yet simple interventions may have multiple elements that contribute to their effectiveness. Although social intervention research is an essential aspect of social work as a profession and research discipline, it is clearly multidisciplinary in its nature. The current knowledge base of social intervention research draws on knowledge gained from a wide variety of behavioral, psychological, and health interventions as well as from disciplines as diverse as psychology, education, medicine, public health, social work and other caring sciences. Social intervention research is vital to social work practice as professional decisions should be informed by evidence of both the potential benefits and harms of alternative interventions. Social intervention research focuses on the effects of an intervention under study. Of primary importance is understanding changes in the health and well-being of a target population. Subsequent results are then, ideally, used for decisions on future service provision. The goal of social intervention research is to bring about change in individuals, groups, or entire communities, and requires research methods that are most appropriate for achieving this goal.

  • 72.
    Sundell, Knut
    et al.
    Statens beredning för medicinsk och social utvärdering.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    Göteborgs universitet, institutionen för socialt arbete.
    Svenska effektutvärderingar av beteendemässiga, psykologiska och sociala insatser: 1990–20192021Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I dag används en mängd beteendemässiga, psykologiska och sociala insatser i Sverige, men vi vet lite om effekterna av dessa. I december 2019 gav Forte i uppdrag till två forskare att kartlägga svenska effektutvärderingar av beteendemässiga, psykologiska och sociala insatser som publicerats mellan 1990–2019. Resultatet av arbetet presenteras i denna rapport.

    Det är viktigt att veta om socialtjänstens och psykiatrins insatser för att bistå och hjälpa personer i behov av stöd har avsedd effekt, om de saknar effekt eller till och med är skadliga. Få av de insatser som genomförs i dag är dock utvärderade genom kontrollerade studier, vilket gör att det är oklart om de är effektiva eller inte.

    Syftet med den här rapporten är att beskriva utvecklingen av svenska effektutvärderingar av beteendemässiga, psykologiska och sociala insatser, både när det gäller antal och vetenskaplig kvalitet. Syftet är också att ge förslag om hur flera och metodologiskt bättre effektutvärderingar kan komma till stånd i Sverige för att bidra till större kunskap om de insatser som genomförs inom socialtjänsten och psykiatrin. Undersökningen baseras på svenska effektutvärderingar som publicerats mellan 1990–2019.

    Rapporten visar bland annat att antalet svenska effektutvärderingar av beteendemässiga, psykologiska och sociala insatser har ökat kraftigt mellan 1990 och 2019. Även om forskningen har ökat snabbt saknas det vetenskaplig kunskap om tillstånd och sakområden som berör några av samhällets mest utsatta och högprioriterade grupper. Exempel på områden där få insatser har utvärderats är våld i nära relationer, stöd till barn i social dygnsvård samt insatser för att förhindra hemlöshet och arbetslöshet. Exempel på områden där det helt saknas effektutvärderingar är familjerätt och flyktingmottagning.

  • 73. Thomas, S.
    et al.
    Eninger, L.
    Ferrer-Wreder, L.
    Herkner, B.
    Smedler, A.-C.
    Allodi Westling, M.
    Ginner Hau, H.
    Trost, K.
    Domitrovich, C. E.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    Preliminary results from the Swedish preschool PATHS trial – Culturally appropriate assessment as a foundation for rigorous testing of intervention effects and the development of such assessments for the measurement of preschool social-emotional competence2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 74.
    Tingberg, K.
    et al.
    The City of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Khoo, E.
    Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Social Work.
    Children who disclose physical abuse: A retrospective cross-sectional study of Swedish social workers’ assessments of risk, need, and decisions on service2024In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the challenges facing child welfare services (CWS) in Sweden is offering equal services to all children in need of protection and support. International research has suggested that unequal access to CWS exists but in Sweden the research evidence is weaker. This retrospective cross-sectional study of child welfare investigations focuses on the extent to which differences exist in social workers’ assessment of risk, need and decisions on services for children suspected of exposure to physical violence by a parent, which cannot be explained by the individual child’s documented risk exposure. A random sample of reports during the period 2018–2020 was drawn from seven CWS offices. Frequencies for background characteristics were obtained and comparisons between groups were performed using Chi2 and t-test. We carry out statistical analyses of the relationship between child and family characteristics and social workers’ determination of risk, need, and decision on services. We also investigate the relationship between documented risk factors and social workers’ determination of risk, need, and decision on services. Our study did not find any clear evidence of unequal provision of services based on child or family characteristics. Results indicate that cumulative risk and marital status appear to be the main determining factors for assessments of risk, need and decision on services. However, after adjusting for several background factors, the main explanatory variables underlying decisions on services are accumulated risk and economic stress. Although we must interpret these findings with caution, these results are in line with previous studies.

  • 75.
    Turner, Russell
    et al.
    Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Vira, Emily G.
    Department of Learning, Informatics Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Mental Health and Suicide, Norwegian Institute of Public, Oslo, Norway.
    Bergström, Martin
    School of Social Work, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Social Work. Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Cultural Adaptation of Interventions and the a Priori Assessment of Intervention Fit: Exploring Measurement Invariance for American and Swedish Youth Leaving Care2023In: Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work, ISSN 1543-3714, E-ISSN 1543-3722, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 306-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: There is a growing literature on the importance of cultural adaptation of research-supported social work interventions. Few studies have however offered systematic methods for the a priori assessment of intervention fit in a new context. The current study explores the use of measurement invariance analyses to help identify whether key theoretical constructs in an intervention’s theory of change may fit differently in a new context.

    Methods: We draw on data on 13 measures of key constructs in an intervention for youth leaving out-of-home care designed and trialed in the US context (N = 295; 53.1% girls, mean age 17.3) compared to Swedish adolescents (N = 104; 41% girls, mean age 17.5).

    Results: In general, the results found all the measures to be invariant between US and Swedish samples.

    Discussion: The original intervention (US) is likely to have a good fit in the new (Swedish) context in terms of the measurement and functionality of its key constructs. There are, however, some indications that certain aspects of the original key constructs may function differently in the Swedish context, highlighting a need to review either measurement or intervention design. A broader conclusion is that measurement invariance can provide a useful tool for research-supported social work practice, namely the systematic a priori assessment of the transferability of an intervention’s theory of change. Some limitations and methodological issues are discussed.

  • 76.
    Unenge Hallerbäck, Maria
    et al.
    Region Värmland; Örebro universitet.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    Institutionen för socialt arbete, Göteborgs universitet.
    Salari, Raziye
    Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    Silfverdal, Sven Arne
    Umeå universitet; Region Västerbotten.
    Wiklund, Stefan
    Institutionen för socialt arbete, Stockholms universitet.
    Wilhsson, Marie
    Institutionen för vårdvetenskaper, Högskolan i Skövde.
    Program för att förebygga psykisk ohälsa hos barn: En systematisk översikt och utvärdering av medicinska, hälsoekonomiska, sociala och etiska aspekter2021Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I den här rapporten utvärderar vi program för att förebygga psykisk ohälsa hos barn upp till 18 års ålder. Med program avser vi standardiserade manualbaserade insatser som syftar till att påverka ett beteende eller ett tillstånd. Rapporten täcker program som förmedlas till barnet självt i skolan eller som ges till föräldrarna eller hela familjen.

    Vi har avgränsat psykisk ohälsa till dels utagerande dels inåtvända problem och beteenden. Till utagerande beteenden hör aggressivitet och störande uppförande. Vi avgränsade inåtvända problem till ångest och depressivitet. Kortsiktiga mål för den här typen av program är att minska nivån av problem på gruppnivå. Långsiktiga mål är att förebygga svåra problem och diagnoser som normbrytande beteenden, uppförandestörning, ångest och depression och att minska risken för långsiktiga konsekvenser av psykisk ohälsa som till exempel kriminalitet, våld och suicid.

    För att ett program skulle ses som förebyggande krävde vi att effekterna följdes upp efter minst sex månader, i enlighet med internationella riktlinjer.

    Förebyggande program kan ges på flera nivåer. Universella program förmedlas brett, till exempel till hela skolor medan selektiva program erbjuds till grupper av barn som på gruppnivå har en förhöjd risk för psykisk ohälsa. Indikerade program ges riktat till barn som visar tidiga tecken på psykisk ohälsa. Studier där barnen uppfyllde kriterier på en diagnos och där målet var att snabbt få en förbättring, det vill säga snarast behandling, ingick inte i utvärderingen.

    Syftet med projektet var att uppdatera en tidigare SBU-rapport från år 2010 om program för att förebygga psykisk ohälsa hos barn. Uppdateringen är en del av ett regeringsuppdrag om psykisk hälsa bland barn och unga (S2020/01043/FS). Rapporten består av systematiska översikter om programmens effekter och risker, de erfarenheter som finns av programmen och deras kostnadseffektivitet samt en diskussion om etiska och sociala aspekter på användningen av program. 

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