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  • 51.
    Lundberg, Olof
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Industrial design.
    CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT OF CARGO MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR PRIVATE CARS2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This master thesis deals with concept development of a cargo management system for private cars. It has been carried out at the master program of industrial design at Jönköping University in collaboration with the design consultancy Dacat located in Gothenburg.

    When storing cargo in car trunks a common problem is that the cargo falls over, causing it to break or create disturbance by moving around. Existing solutions are often complicated because they require several steps to secure the cargo and take up much space when not used. Many of the solutions are made as original equipment for specific cars.

    The aim of this thesis has been to work around the standards of specific car brands or models in order to find a solution that can be used for different brands. Furthermore, the ambition has been to come up with a solution that does not require any extra steps in the cargo securing process and does not take up space when not used.

    The work has been carried out using the Bootcamp Bootleg method for design processes. Following this method, the report describes research in the Empathize stage, moving on to Define, Ideate and finally Prototype.

    The result is a concept fulfilling the aims of the project as described earlier and is presented as a full scale prototype.

  • 52.
    MEHTA, ADVAIT
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Subramanian, Mahalingam
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Investigating the barriers to increase Levels of Automation.: A case study in pre-assembly of tap changer assembly line.2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The overarching goal of this thesis is to investigate and explore the barriers that a company would face while increasing the Levels of Automation (LoA), in the preassembly production unit. To achieve the primary goal of investigating the barriers this study takes a threefold approach.

    Firstly, the current LoA was measured for the preassembly workstations. This measurement was conducted by incorporating an existing methodology adapted from the literature review known as DYNAMO++ methodology. This method is incorporated such that, the current LoA of the preassembly workstations could be measured and analysed.

    The current LoA of the preassembly workstations are analysed to investigate the potential workstations where LoA could be increased, in line with the company’s triggers for implementing automation. For this, experiences of the personnel’s belonging to the operational level of preassembly workstations were incorporated, to find the scope of improvements for increasing the LoA. Additionally, the company’s triggers for implementing automation was investigated from the managerial level.

    The research questions were answered by adapting an explorative, single case study method. Additionally, four types of data collection techniques were used, such as – interviews, focus groups, observations, and document analysis. Subsequently, source triangulation was adapted to analyse the data collected; to develop a comprehensive understanding of the barriers identified.,

    Finally, the barriers faced by the company to increase LoA are identified by considering the implications that the improvement opportunities would impose upon the production systems environment.

    The identified barriers were then categorised further based on factors that exist internal as well as external to the production systems environment.

    The barriers identified in this study highlights various factors that the management must consider beforehand while initiating automation decisions in future automation projects in the preassembly area. Regardless of the barriers faced by the company, there are more opportunities to improve manufacturing processes through automation technologies. This thesis contributes to the knowledge of the factors that restrain the implementation of automation technologies and how companies could deal with it.

  • 53.
    Müller, J. R.
    et al.
    Department of Industrial and Materials Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Isaksson, O.
    Department of Industrial and Materials Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Landahl, J.
    Department of Industrial and Materials Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Raja, V.
    Department of Industrial and Materials Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden & GKN Aerospace Sweden AB, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Panarotto, M.
    Department of Industrial and Materials Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Levandowski, C.
    Department of Industrial and Materials Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Raudberget, Dag
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. Department of Industrial and Materials Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Enhanced function-means modeling supporting design space exploration2019In: Artificial intelligence for engineering design, analysis and manufacturing, ISSN 0890-0604, E-ISSN 1469-1760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One problem in incremental product development is that geometric models are limited in their ability to explore radical alternative design variants. In this publication, a function modeling approach is suggested to increase the amount and variety of explored alternatives, since function models (FM) provide greater model flexibility. An enhanced function-means (EF-M) model capable of representing the constraints of the design space as well as alternative designs is created through a reverse engineering process. This model is then used as a basis for the development of a new product variant. This work describes the EF-M model's capabilities for representing the design space and integrating novel solutions into the existing product structure and explains how these capabilities support the exploration of alternative design variants. First-order analyses are executed, and the EF-M model is used to capture and represent already existing design information for further analyses. Based on these findings, a design space exploration approach is developed. It positions the FM as a connection between legacy and novel designs and, through this, allows for the exploration of more diverse product concepts. This approach is based on three steps-decomposition, design, and embodiment-A nd builds on the capabilities of EF-M to model alternative solutions for different requirements. While the embodiment step of creating the novel product's geometry is still a topic for future research, the design space exploration concept can be used to enable wider, more methodological, and potentially automated design space exploration. 

  • 54.
    Nafisi, Mariam
    et al.
    School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Granlund, Anna
    School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Manufacturing engineering requirements in the early stages of new product development — A case study in two assembly plants2019In: Advanced applications in manufacturing engineering / [ed] M. Ram & J. P. Davim, Elsevier, 2019, p. 141-167Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interface between the product development function and the manufacturing function is one key dimension in new product development (NPD) projects. Hard and soft requirements for manufacturability are defined and communicated to product development teams early in the NPD project to ensure the new products are fit for the manufacturing system. In this chapter, we determined what requirements are important for a manufacturing system and how these requirements are handled during an NPD project by analyzing two industrial cases. The results showed that requirements communicated from the manufacturing function to the design function had different sources and effects on different aspects of the manufacturing system. They were communicated and integrated to various degrees and through various mechanisms. There was a tendency to rely on the personal and verbal communication of requirements, as opposed to using more formal structured methods. This way of working was sufficient when product change was incremental and not radical. The case studies showed that the manufacturing function needed to employ more efficient methods to define and communicate their requirements in large and complex NPD projects.

  • 55.
    Natarajan, Shri guru
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Asalavaraja, Ajithkumar
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Model-based improve-ment of in-night distribu-tion logistics system: a case study in logistics2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the present world, managing supply chain management is complicated by a single organization. So, the industry is ready to adjust its work module to win over the com-petition. The performance of the supply chain operation has different aspects such as location, on-time delivery, quality, dependability, and cost. Logistics is one of the high demands labor industry. The main role of logistics as a supply chain factor is to sort the incoming goods without any error within a minimum amount of time. Each distribution center has different techniques for incoming goods. The technique is varied from each distribution center according to the volume of the package delivered every day.The single case study takes place in a warehouse located in Jonkoping. The warehouse deals with the in-night distribution method, which means delivery the package as soon as possible before 7 AM on the next day. The purpose of the paper is to find the diffi-culties during sorting and find the possible ways to reduce the error. This paper focuses on a single case study to target the volume of handled parcels in the sorting zone.To access the warehouse strategies, a meeting was conducted with the warehouse su-pervisor and required data was collected for deeper analysis. The data were collected by interviews with the workers and observed the employees' work and found related literature for future improvement. This study says, the problem faced in the in-night material flow in one terminal and provides a suitable method or technique were sug-gested for a better outcome.

  • 56.
    Nordqvist, Daniel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Mät- och provbänk för axelmedbringare: Konceptstudie för en ny arbetsstation2018Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis has been put together by a student at School of Engineering in Jönköping. The thesis was executed at Spicer Nordiska Kardan AB where the purpose was to construct a new workbench. The purpose was to improve the usage of yoke shafts when testing and measuring.

    The report starts with a terminology following a brief description about the company and why the area is relevant. This also includes a product description of the yoke shaft and its function in the prop shafts. The prop shaft is available in different sizes and models.

    It is followed by the aim of the project as well as questions answered with the literature from previous courses during the education of Mechanical Engineering, web pages and scientific articles. The project has been delimited to develop a conceivable concept.

    The Theoretical framework answers the questions using sources concerning Ergonomics, lighting and requirement specification.

    The process was conducted with a pre study to investigate the area where the workbench would take place. As a method, functional analysis, concept study, Pugh’s matrix, requirement specification, market analysis and modeling were used.

    During the concept generation, idea generation was done using CAD-system. This would be the basis for a CAD model of the bench. Generated model was also basis for load simulation.

    The result is presented with answers from the functional analysis, pre study and a requirement specification that was presented during the course of the work. Pictures of the final test bench where existing components, drawings on parts that must be manufactured, pictures of products that must be ordered and an order list can be found here.

    The work is summarized in Discussion and Conclusions on clarification of the results, how the requirements have been met, recommendations and further work. The thesis ends with References and Attachments.

  • 57.
    Odicho, Marwa
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Polymerutvärdering med hänsyn till genomsläpplighet av radiofrekvensvågor2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 58.
    Olofsson, Jakob
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Cenni, Riccardo
    Imola, Italy.
    Cova, Matteo
    Imola, Italy.
    Bertuzzi, Giacomo
    Imola, Italy.
    Salomonsson, Kent
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Multidisciplinary shape optimization of ductile iron castings by considering local microstructure and material behaviour2018In: Structural and multidisciplinary optimization (Print), ISSN 1615-147X, E-ISSN 1615-1488, Vol. 57, no 5, p. 1889-1903Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the casting process and solidification of ductile iron castings, a heterogeneous microstructure is formed throughout the casting. This distribution is strongly influenced by the item geometry and the process related factors, as chemical composition and local solidification conditions. Geometrical changes to the geometry of the casting thus alters the local mechanical behavior and properties, as well as the distribution of stresses and strains when the casting is subjected to load. In order to find an optimal geometry, e.g. with reduced weight and increased load-bearing capacity, this interdependency between geometry and local material behavior needs to be considered and integrated into the optimization method. In this contribution, recent developments in the multidisciplinary integration of casting process simulation, solidification and microstructure modelling, microstructure-based material characterization, finite element structural analyses with local material behavior and structural optimization techniques are presented and discussed. The effect and relevance of considering the local material behavior in shape optimization of ductile iron castings is discussed and evidenced by an industrial application. It is shown that by adopting a multidisciplinary optimization approach by integration of casting simulation and local material behavior into shape optimization, the potential of the casting process to obtain components with high performance and reliability can be enabled and utilized. 

  • 59.
    Omerovic, Semir
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Utveckling av häftpistol R4532019Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 60.
    Pahlberg, Tobias
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Campus Skellefteå, Skellefteå, Sweden.
    Thurley, Matthew
    Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Popovic, Djordje
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Hagman, Olle
    Luleå University of Technology, Campus Skellefteå, Skellefteå, Sweden.
    Crack detection in oak flooring lamellae using ultrasound-excited thermography2018In: Infrared physics & technology, ISSN 1350-4495, E-ISSN 1879-0275, Vol. 88, p. 57-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, a large number of people are manually grading and detecting defects in wooden lamellae in the parquet flooring industry. This paper investigates the possibility of using the ensemble methods random forests and boosting to automatically detect cracks using ultrasound-excited thermography and a variety of predictor variables. When friction occurs in thin cracks, they become warm and thus visible to a thermographic camera. Several image processing techniques have been used to suppress the noise and enhance probable cracks in the images. The most successful predictor variables captured the upper part of the heat distribution, such as the maximum temperature, kurtosis and percentile values 92–100 of the edge pixels. The texture in the images was captured by Completed Local Binary Pattern histograms and cracks were also segmented by background suppression and thresholding. The classification accuracy was significantly improved from previous research through added image processing, introduction of more predictors, and by using automated machine learning. The best ensemble methods reach an average classification accuracy of 0.8, which is very close to the authors’ own manual attempt at separating the images (0.83).

  • 61.
    Persson, Kasper
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    User-centered design of an attachable battery pack for arborists2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Globe Group, a company under the brand Greenworks Tools, is one of the industry leaders in battery-powered outdoor equipment, developing tools that deliver the performance of a gasoline-powered tool without the hassle and emissions associated with it. Gasoline-powered tools are still prevalent in the field of arboriculture where arborists work daily with chainsaws while performing tree felling and pruning.

    Now a new type of chainsaw is in development by Globe Group which is characterized by its lightweight and large battery capacity, which brings extraordinary battery life. This feature is possible by redesigning the chainsaw to support an external battery, which is housed in a separate battery pack instead of placing the battery directly inside the tool. The aim of the project is to adapt and design the battery pack for arborists by using a user-centered design approach with focus on ergonomics. This is done by having a close cooperation with the arborists during the whole project, from pre-study to final concept evaluation, to explore and fulfill the needs of the user. By using a wide range of research and design methods, a final concept is developed to reach the needs of the user and company.

  • 62.
    Petersson, Rickard
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Managing product family variance: Development of product family architecture and its realization in a PLM system2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 63.
    Poorkiany, Morteza
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Integrating knowledge objects and design descriptions to support maintenance of design automation systems2019In: Transdisciplinary engineering for complex socio-technical systems: Proceedings of the 26th ISTE International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering, July 30 – August 1, 2019 / [ed] K. Hiekata, B. Moser, M. Inoue, J. Stjepandić, & N. Wognum, IOS Press, 2019, p. 561-570Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design automation systems are implemented by many manufacturing companies to automate the repetitive and time-consuming design tasks. By automating such tasks, the designers have more time to focus on creativity and offer more customized solutions to the customers.

    To automate a design task, first, the design knowledge should be captured from designers. This type of knowledge which is usually understandable by humans should be structured and formalized. Next, computer codes and scripts (that are mostly understandable by computers/expert persons) are created to execute the knowledge and provide the desired output.

    To support maintenance of computer codes and scripts in a design automation system, it is necessary to know what, how and why about that piece of code/script. In order to support maintenance of the systems, we represent the system’s knowledge in form of knowledge objects. Knowledge objects are executed in run time and consist of two parts: computer readable and human readable. The focus in this paper is on the human readable which we call it “design description”. A MOKA-based framework is provided to create design descriptions for the computer readable parts. The design descriptions help engineers to understand and if needed update the computer readable parts, which in a wider aspect support maintenance of the whole system. E-books were used as a way to represent the design descriptions and a case study is provided to explore the results of the research.

  • 64.
    Poorkiany, Morteza
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Support reuse and maintenance of design information in a development process of custom engineered product2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper a method is introduced that supports reuse and maintenance of design information. The method allows sharing design information in different levels of details tailored for the stakeholders according to their needs. In addition, it is possible to share the information in multiple formats to suite different purposes. The results are demonstrated in an industrial partner which is a supplier of tooling for manufacturing industry.

  • 65.
    Popovic, Djordje
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Off-site manufacturing systems development in timber house building: Towards mass customization-oriented manufacturing2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for housing in Sweden has been showing a constant increase over the past couple of years. However, this situation might change in 2018 since there are indications that the increase in demand will reach its peak. On the other hand, the use of timber as a load bearing structure has become more popular in the multi-family house building sector. It is competing with concrete and steel frames, and its market share might even reach 50% by the year of 2025. Adding the involvement of customers in house design decisions and a high level of customization, the conclusion is that timber house building must continue the development towards mass customization. There is a lack of knowledge on how mass customization is developed and implemented regarding off-site manufacturing systems. In this thesis, a contribution is made to manufacturing system development in timber house building by proposing a novel approach to aligning off-site manufacturing systems to the requirements of production strategy, market needs, product design, and manufacturing processes. The proposed conceptual framework is a synthesis of the knowledge gained from three empirical studies and different methods found in theories of changeable manufacturing systems, mass customization, and manufacturing system development. The research purpose addressed by the presented work, is to increase the knowledge on how the development potential of off-site manufacturing systems can be identified in mass customization-oriented timber house building. Case study research was applied to gather the empirical data. The data collection and analysis methods used in the empirical studies can be useful when discussing the potential improvements. However, these data are not comprehensive enough in terms of presenting a holistic view of off-site manufacturing and consideration of the market as well as variation in product and processes. Therefore, a comprehensive set of requirements is proposed in the conceptual framework together with a step by step description of how the development potential of off-site manufacturing systems can be identified.

  • 66.
    Popovic, Djordje
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Product and manufacturing systems alignment: a case study in the timber house building industry2019In: 10th Nordic Conference on Construction Economics and Organization / [ed] Irene Lill & Emlyn Witt, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2019, p. 357-364Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the alignment between current product and manufacturing systems and how it could be achieved.

    Design/Methodology/Approach

    Case study research method was chosen for the collection and analysis of empirical data. The data was of qualitative nature and was collected using research techniques such as observations through video recordings of processes, documents and open and semi-structured interviews.

    Findings

    The variation of outer side sub-element of the exterior wall element was found to not be aligned with its corresponding assembly. A hybrid assembly of outer side sub-elements characterised by flexibility and reconfigurability can be developed.

    Research Limitations/Implications

    The study is limited to the exterior wall element and corresponding manufacturing system. Practical Implications The presented approach was formulated with the aim to be used both for the analysis of existing products and manufacturing systems as well as for the design of new manufacturing systems.

    Originality/Value

    So far, this is the first study in the context of timber house building where the alignment between product and manufacturing systems was investigated by considering product variety and flexibility of manufacturing systems.

  • 67.
    Popovic, Djordje
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Thajudeen, Shamnath
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Vestin, Alexander
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Smart manufacturing support to product platforms in industrialized house building2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish house building companies currently face many challenges in terms of fluctuating market demand, need for flexible product offering, non-uniform governmental regulations, high costs, and long lead times. These challenges affect both internal and external efficiency of companies. Product platforms have been used for more than a decade in this industry to improve both internal and external efficiency. However, the industry is still criticized for its inefficient and costly process. Smart manufacturing has emerged as means to improve the efficiency of internal processes and the question is if and how smart manufacturing can complement and support product platforms in industrialized house building. The aim of this study is to explore the potential of smart manufacturing to complement and support product platforms in theory and practice in the context of industrialized house building. A literature review and a multiple case study were chosen to fulfill the study objective. In total fourteen semi-structured interviews were conducted in two timber house building companies. The data was analyzed within and across cases using four platform assets for categorization: components, processes, knowledge and relationships. The results show that the smart manufacturing technologies are in both theory and practice mainly supporting the process platform asset through developing vertical and horizontal IT systems integration, definition and digitalization of flexible building systems, and transferring explicit drafting and engineering knowledge into parametric modelling tools.

  • 68.
    Rath Olsen, Christoffer
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Olsson, Kaspar
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Konstruktion av plattform, montering och drivning av höghastighetskameror2019Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 69.
    Raudberget, Dag
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    André, Samuel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Modularisation in two Global Product Developing Companies: Current State and Future Outlook2018In: Proceedings of NordDesign: Design in the Era of Digitalization, NordDesign 2018, Linköping: The Design Society, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modularisation and platform strategies enable efficient utilization of resources through economies of scale and are therefore increasingly important for manufacturing companies. On the product side, modules are often considered the basis of product platforms by enabling a variety of product variants by combining interchangeable modules into different products. On the process side, modularisation enables faster and cheaper development of new product variants by reusing physical components, interfaces, and production equipment.

    The benefits of product platforms and modularisation have led two global product developing and manufacturing companies to initiate research projects within this field. The companies have previously made unsuccessful attempts to implement modularisation founded on a componentbased approach and the firms are now searching for other methods to get the benefits of modularisation.

    This paper describes the initial state of practice in modularisation and product platforms in the two companies in their attempts to move from a purely physical approach to modularisation into the universal view that is presented in the Design Platform approach. Here, a platform is viewed as an evolutionary entity involving several company assets such as processes, knowledge, methods, and relationships which are essential to gain the benefits of platforms also in the development phase. The Design Platform contains various concrete resources such as the geometry of physical components, but also inhomogeneous resources such as design rules, processes, methods and design automation.

    The results point to specific barriers that the companies experience when trying to adopt a modularisation strategy. Several barriers are experienced by both companies while some are specific for one of the companies. Through several workshops, the concepts of the Design Platform and a flexible view on modularisation are introduced, and their possibilities are elaborated and appreciated by the workshop participants.

  • 70.
    Raudberget, Dag
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Improving Modularization in Industry by Introducing a New Model for Module Classification2019In: 2018 IEEE International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management, IEEE Computer Society, 2019, p. 1337-1341, article id 8607720Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modules are often considered the basis of product platforms by enabling a variety of product variants based on interchangeable modules. In this way, modules enable efficient utilization of resources through economies of scale. The purpose of this work is to improve the product realization process by introducing a new model for module classification that enable companies to structure their assets and formalizing them in the development system. The modules developed following this methodology contains both physical resources and non-physical resources that can be reused in a structured way, thereby improving the efficiency of the development process. 

  • 71.
    Raudberget, Dag
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Ström, Mikael
    Swerea IVF AB, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Supporting innovation and knowledge transfer from individual to corporate level2018In: Transdisciplinary Engineering Methods for Social Innovation of Industry 4.0: Proceedings of the 25th ISPE Inc. International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering / [ed] Margherita Peruzzini, Marcello Pellicciari, Cees Bil, Josip Stjepandić, Nel Wognum, IOS Press, 2018, p. 576-585Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In most development processes, there is an early phase dedicated to creative concept development aiming at finding solutions to the problem at hand. To arrive at a high-quality solution, several ideas may be conceived and evaluated. However, emerging information and knowledge about product concepts is often not shared on a corporate level since only the final result is documented. This can lead to a significant waste, especially in Set-based design. This paper presents a pragmatic way to structure emerging design information, transferring individual design knowledge to a corporate level. It introduces the Concept Dashboard to track the progress of the concept development and uses an industry standard project workflow system to store and retrieve emerging concept knowledge.

  • 72.
    Rosenberg, Sofia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Bogren, Elin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Framtagning av Kontorspendel2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 73.
    Rosén, Sara
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Industrial design.
    Tool unit designed for equine dentistry2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Most people have experienced toothache and know how much it effects the health. It hurts to eat, it ́s hard to sleep and sometimes a small gesture as a smile is avoided because it pains to much. Of course animals have the same issue and feel pain but they can’t tell us how they feel, instead we have to look for signs from their behavior. The recommendation to regularly check the horse’s teeth does minimize the risk of pain. The knowledge within the field of equine dentistry is on the rise and educations and regulations is developing to give the best dental care possible. This has created a need of the right tools adopted to this specific field and this is where a company like Accesia has a chance to be at the forefront of this development. Accesia is a company that have developed tools and educations about the animal dental profession since 2009. Until now the focus has been on smaller animals like cats, dogs and rodents but now they are widening their customer field and develops for this new market, equine dentistry. To get a understanding of this new customers some field studies has been performed and needs that are separate from the previous customer needs has been identified. It ́s not only the size that differs from the dentist working with cats and dogs, it ́s also the working environment and the anatomic conditions that looks completely different.

    For this thesis the main goal has been to identify how a unit for the tools used by equine dentists should be structured and what parts that should be included to endure the transportation and environment where it will be used. To gain this information, several interviews were conducted with the main users and the experts working on Accesia. The gathered information where later analyzed, concretized and explored in a product concept.

    This report will go through the different stages in the design process that led to a final design concept which were presented with a prototype and posters at a thesis fair organized by Jönköping University.

  • 74.
    Rösiö, Carin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Aslam, Tehseen
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science, Högskolevägen, Skövde, Sweden.
    Srikanth, Karthik Banavara
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Shetty, Savin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Towards an assessment criterion of reconfigurable manufacturing systems within the automotive industry2019In: 7th International conference on Changeable, Agile, Reconfigurable and Virtual Production (CARV2018) / [ed] C. da Cunha, A. Bernard, M. Zäh, H. ElMaraghy, & W. ElMaraghy, Elsevier, 2019, Vol. 28, p. 76-82Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To increase changeability and reconfigurability of manufacturing systems, while maintaining cost-efficiency and environmental sustainability they need to be designed in accordance to the need for change. Since companies often need to convert existing manufacturing systems to handle variation, implementation of reconfigurable manufacturing systems calls for an analysis of the current system to understand to what extent they fulfil reconfigurability characteristics. This requires an assessment of the needs for reconfigurability as well as assessment of the existing ability to reconfigure the manufacturing system. Although a lot of reconfigurable manufacturing system assessment models are proposed in theory there is an evident knowledge gap pertaining to what extent the existing systems in the industry are in achieving reconfigurability. The purpose with this paper is to propose an assessment criterion for existing manufacturing systems to measure reconfigurability and their readiness to change with respect to products and volume variations. Based on a literature review of existing reconfigurability assessment models and a case study within the automotive industry, a criterion is developed and tested to analyze how reconfigurable a system is and to decide which parameters that need more attention to achieve higher degree of reconfigurability.

  • 75.
    Salim, Roaa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Automation decisions in investment projects: A study in the Swedish wood products industry2018In: Procedia Manufacturing, Elsevier, 2018, Vol. 25, p. 255-262Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to study which aspects are considered when automation decisions are being made in the wood products industry. The aspects were identified in several decision areas of manufacturing. The data collection was based on participation in meetings of an ongoing investment project. The findings demonstrate that in the first phases of an investment project, where the project idea is evaluated, the most critical aspect for decision makers is economic benefits. This paper will provide further insights on the underlying reasoning for decisions on automation of manufacturing in investment projects in the wood products industry. 

  • 76.
    Sege, Victoria
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Balta, Pelda
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Benefits & barriers of implementing reconfigurable jigs: A study in offsite manufacturing of unique house elements in Sweden2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to identify the enablers, barriers and benefits of implementing reconfigurable jigs in the off-site manufacturing of unique house elements. Due to de- mands on customization, volume and lowering the cost, there is a need to increase flex- ibility in the industry. The paper focuses on mainly two phases of implementation, which are manufacturing, design and engineering.

    The research questions are answered by applying a single case study method, taking place in a Swedish house manufacturing company. The study consists of four different techniques – interviews, time study, observations, and questionnaire which are sup- ported with an additional literature review. Hence, research questions are answered from a triangulation approach providing nuanced and dynamic perspectives.

    From observations and time study it is concluded that in current situation, changeover in manufacturing is time-consuming due to the difference in complexity of product var- iants, along with a complex and inefficient setup process that is not responsive to a changeable environment. Findings imply that the barriers in both phases include lack of knowledge about reconfigurability, communication, current capabilities of CAD sys- tems as well as training and education. Enablers are found to be awareness of the needs of improvements, long-term mindset and working with product platforms. The benefits of implementing reconfigurable jigs include a reduction of setup time in manufacturing, better storage and sharing of information along with a better interpretation of that in- formation, a better structure in the organisation.

  • 77.
    Sharma, Utpal
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Testing and Evaluation of Recycled Plastic Materials for Automotive Exterior Trim ApplicationsRecycled Plastics2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 78.
    Singh, Shivansh
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Knowledge Base Engineering Design Methodology and Integration with PLM System Part Factory2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Companies are trying to decrease product expenses while customizing product according to customers requirements. So to satisfy the customers’ requirements, companies must adapt their business to mass customisation.  Mass customization final product goes through all flexible company production technology process, which can lead to being expensive and time-consuming and because of this, a product configuration system is developed to reduce product cost and reduce time. The primary focus of this thesis is to develop a KBE prototype using constraint-based techniques of product configurations. For developing KBE implementation of  UML/OCL, XML, Backtracking search is used. Then prototype expert configurator is developed using OCL constraints.

  • 79.
    Sivasubramanian, Sriramkumar
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Optimization and simulation of formed suction cup to position aerospace CFRP parts during milling.2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 80.
    Stolt, Roland
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    André, Samuel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Introducing Inserts for Die Casting Manufactured by Selective Laser Sintering2018In: Global Integration of Intelligent Manufacturing and Smart Industry for Good of Humanity / [ed] Dušan Šormaz, Gürsel Süer, F. Frank Chen, Elsevier, 2018, p. 309-316Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The advances in additive manufacturing (AM) for high grade steels has in some cases made it possible to manufacture die inserts for demanding processes like high pressure die casting (HPDC). However, several challenges remain before this becomes commonplace. There is still a need of secondary manufacturing steps on the insert after printing. Also, extensive design changes must be made on the die inserts to fully utilize the advantages of AM. Further, the die insert is only one of many parts needed in the die assembly. Much of the die manufacturing will still be done by conventional methods. In this paper, several companies involved in the manufacturing and use of dies for HPDC have been interviewed on that they think is the future role of AM in their business. The result is that the effect of just printing the inserts would will be quite limited at present. Bringing down the time spent on die manufacture is important since that time then could be spent on improving the manufacturability of the parts.

  • 81.
    Stolt, Roland
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Heikkinen, Tim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Design and Evaluation of Aerospace Components for SLM2019In: Transdisciplinary engineering for complex socio-technical systems: Proceedings of the 26th ISTE International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering, July 30 – August 1, 2019 / [ed] K. Hiekata, B. Moser, M. Inoue, J. Stjepandić & N. Wognum, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2019, p. 147-156Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, the additive manufacturing process SLM (selective laser melting) is of high interest in the aerospace industry for the manufacture of jet engine components. This is driven by several factors such as reducing weight and minimizing the variation in the manufacturing process. In the paper, the state of practice in designing SLM parts is examined showing that there is plenty of opportunity to adapt designs to the process. However, this is often too time consuming in the early stages. By examining the state of art in SLM part design, the paper and identifies the variant specific cost drives that are proposed to be used to rank the manufacturability of different design alternatives for turbine frame aerospace components.

  • 82.
    Stolt, Roland
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Jarfors, Anders E.W.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Challenges and Support when Introducing AM in HPDC Tooling2019In: Transdisciplinary engineering for complex socio-technical systems: Proceedings of the 26th ISTE International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering, July 30 – August 1, 2019 / [ed] K. Hiekata, B. Moser, M. Inoue, J. Stjepandić & N. Wognum, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2019, p. 147-156Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When manufacturing tooling inserts for HPDC (High Pressure Die Casting), several manufacturing steps such as milling, heat treatment, electro discharge machining and finally surface treatment are involved. By instead manufacturing the insert by SLM (Selective laser melting), the process is expected to be quicker and with less material waste compared to the traditional manufacturing. Examples of other expected advantages is higher product variant flexibility and the possibility of making conform cooling channels, extending the die life. However, the insert is part of a die system involving many components. The insert cannot be designed and manufactured without considering the complete die system. This paper seeks how to integrate the insert design in the die assembly design. This is done via an example component and in cooperation with die manufacturing firms. The result is that the printing is a minor step of the total manufacturing process and that special design considerations needs to be taken for an SLM insert. New die concepts are needed that will minimise the amount of material, reduce the tolerance and surface demand and support the subdivision of the die into several printed parts.

  • 83.
    Stolt, Roland
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Heikkinen, Tim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Integrating Additive Manufacturing in the Design of Aerospace Components2018In: Transdisciplinary Engineering Methods for Social Innovation of Industry 4.0: Proceedings of the 25th ISPE Inc. International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering / [ed] Margherita Peruzzini, Marcello Pellicciari, Cees Bil, Josip Stjepandić, Nel Wognum, IOS Press, 2018, p. 145-154Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the aerospace industry, Additive Manufacturing (AM) is quickly gaining ground. When optimizing the design of an AM component, all life-cycle aspects need to be considered. It is by no means limited to the classic weight / stiffness optimization of the topology alone. The AM component design must comply with an array of requirements on for example assembly, maintenance and inspection. In addition, there are the manufacturability requirements and constraints of the printing procedure itself, including component orientation and support structures. In this paper, a proposal on how to integrate the AM design of components with the design of the complete engine structure is presented. To find how the current design process is conducted, an interview study involving design and manufacturing experts has been made at an aerospace company, forming a base for the proposal. The result is that a primary design procedure for the AM component must be made as a separate step involving a limited set of design considerations prior to making a multidisciplinary evaluation of the proposed engine structure.

  • 84.
    Swaroop, Rajagopal
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Concept Development of an Inflatable Roof Box using Drop-Stitch Fabric2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this project is to design a roof box for Urban users living in modern houses. Usually, the compactness of these houses does not allow the luxury of owning traditional hard-shelled roof boxes. Taking inspiration from the inflatable technology used in stand-up paddleboards and kayaks, this project explores the possibility of implementing the drop-stitch material for fabricating an inflatable roof box.

    The drop stitch fabric was first developed in the early 1950s by Goodyear for their inflatable aeroplanes. Although most of its early applications were classified by the military, the drop stitch material is presently being implemented in various products such as Kayak, AirTrack, Inflatable Cooler etc.

    The scope of this thesis remains within concept design, which is an early phase of product development. Following the three stages, background research, concept generation, and concept evaluation, the project implements various conventional and intuitive research methods, such as literature review, brainstorming, prototyping, testing etc.

    The project was a collaboration between Industrial Design and Product Development, which made it possible to view the project from different perspectives. It explores various design aspects, such as shape, form, curvatures, ergonomics etc. and engineering aspects, such as strength, stiffness and structural integrity.

  • 85.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Linköpings universitet.
    Forskningsmetodik: för ingenjörer och andra problemlösare2019Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I den här boken beskrivs hela forskningsprocessen: från problemformulering till presentation och granskning av resultat. Den är avsedd för metodkurser inom tekniska utbildningar, med utgångspunkt i ingenjörsutbildningens vetenskapstradition och ingenjörens bildningshistoria. Boken redogör för ett urval av forskningsmetoder tillsammans med ingenjörsvetenskapliga perspektiv på vetenskapsteori, forskningsmetod och tekniker för datainsamling. Utöver att förklara och ge exempel på centrala begrepp i det metodologiska landskapet behandlar boken också etik, kvalitet och kommunikation.

    Boken handlar om planering, genomförande och granskning av examensarbeten och andra vetenskapliga undersökningar. Genom flera praktiska exempel på hur vetenskapliga undersökningar kan genomföras inom ingenjörsvetenskapen ökar boken förståelsen för forskningsmetodik som är relevant för just ingenjörer.

    Forskningsmetodik – För ingenjörer och andra problemlösare kan även användas som grundbok i metod för andra utbildningsinriktningar, med problemlösning i fokus. Boken fungerar såväl under utbildningens tidigare delar som på forskarnivå.

    [Från förlagets produktinformation]

  • 86.
    Thajudeen, Shamnath
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Challenges and critical success factors for the design phase in Swedish industrialised house building2019In: Proceedings of the 35th Annual ARCOM Conference, 2-4 September 2019, Leeds, UK / [ed] Gorse & C. J. Neilson, Association of Researchers in Construction Management (ARCOM), 2019, p. 34-43Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The house building industry has been characterised as less productive compared to the manufacturing industry with numerous and challenging activities including a complex integration process. For the last 20 years, industrialised house building has gained increased research and industry attention and is identified as a potential way to improve the overall house building productivity. In the overall process, the design phase has been identified as the bottleneck with several disciplines which have to be coordinated to generate a design solution that meets various customer and market requirements. Many aspects of a building's performance depend on the decisions taken in the early design process. These decisions can have a substantial impact on the overall design, lead time, cost and quality of the final product. However, there are many other important factors which need to be considered by designers during the design phase. Less attention has been paid to the identification of these factors within the design phase of the industrialised house building. Thus, the main purpose of this paper is to identify challenges and outline the critical success factors to be considered in the design phase of the Swedish industrialised house building. Qualitative research was conducted in combination with literature reviews and multiple case studies linking three Swedish house building companies. Empirical data were gathered from 20 semi-structured interviews. The study identified common challenges in the house building industry and 20 critical factors that should be addressed in the design phase from both literature and practitioners view. The result shows that fixed production is crucial for identifying the critical factors rather than a building system. Also, many challenges identified from this study could be managed by developing a platform-based approach with support tools and methods for critical factors in the design phase.

  • 87.
    Thajudeen, Shamnath
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Impact on the Design Phase of Industrial Housing When Applying a Product Platform Approach2018In: Proceedings of 26th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction / [ed] Vicente A. González, Chennai, India, 2018, p. 527-537Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With a glulam-based post-beam building system, a variety of building solutions is offered on the market for multi-story buildings. The building system must be adaptable to the demands of each project. However, short lead-time, efficient manufacturing and assembly must be ensured. The use of product platforms has been acknowledged as an enabler to manage external (customer) and internal (production) efficiency. The building system cannot be locked to a set of standard components as a high level of customisation is required. A set of methods and tools is needed to support the design work and to ensure that solutions stay inside the boundaries of the platform definition. The aim of this work is to map the state-of-practice in the design phase for a glulam building system from a platform theory perspective and outline a path forward for applying a sustainable platform development in companies where a component-based product platform does not suffice. Empirical data were gathered from an on-going product platform development including interviews and document analysis. The results show the lack of definition in platform-based product development from a theoretical perspective and need for development of support methods for design that align with different production strategies

  • 88.
    Tharayil Pradeep, Ambareeksh
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Baradaran, Mohammadali
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    HPDC Die design for Additive Manufacturing: Simulation and Comparison of Thermal Stresses in HPDC die designed for Additive Manufacture2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Additive manufacturing has a great potential to benefit die manufacture by shortening the lead time considerably and lifting the limitations on design complexity imposed by conventional manufacturing techniques. However, AM has its own requirements that together are known as Design for Additive Manufacturing and account for the process limitations. One of the significant requirements is mass efficiency of the design (it should be as light as possible). If it’s not fulfilled, AM won’t be able to make an economical solution or substitution despite having outstanding benefits. The present investigation has been framed with respect to such concern.

    This investigation attempts to draw a comparison between the performance of two design variants. Additionally, it has been tried to study the employed method, document implementation of the approach, and identify the challenges in accordance with design for additive manufacturing.

    Simulation of thermal stresses generated in die inserts for a given component during one cycle of high pressure die casting is presented. Initial design of the die inserts is subjected to redesign with the intention of mass reduction by incorporating honeycomb structure. Temperature evolution and resultant thermal stresses are analyzed for redesign and compared to those of original design.

    Simulation of high pressure die casting was carried out in MagmaSoft to obtain temperature history of die inserts and cast. Implicit nonlinear elastic fully coupled thermal displacement model was setup in Abaqus in which Magma results were used as input for stress calculation.

    Results show that according to our specific design, HPDC die with thin walled feature cannot withstand the thermal and mechanical load. However, with iterative analysis and proper topology optimization, a lightweight complex geometry die can be successfully made.

  • 89.
    Ullal, Pratheek
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Development of Fluidity Measurement Technique and Automation of Measurement Station: Developing the existing Fluidity Measurement Station by automating the operation and measuring the fluidity digitally with MATLAB Image Processing Tools.2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Bryne AB has invented a device called Loop for measuring the fluidity of molten metal. Loop is made up of refractory fiber material and has a dimension of 196 sq.mm within which there is an engraved spiral shaped runway for the molten metal to flow. The distance traveled by the molten metal in the spiral determines its fluidity and is measured visually by the operator with the help of the spiral scale printed on the Loop. A workstation is used to support the Loop for an easier and better working environment. At present, the entire operation of fluidity measurement is done manually. The aim of the thesis is to develop an automatic workstation for the fluidity measurement and find a technique to measure the fluidity without human visual aid. Further, an attempt has been made to find a way to store and retrieve the measured values for future use.

     

    The automation of the workstation is done with the help of Arduino Uno circuit board for electrical connections and Arduino IDE for programming the circuit. MATLAB image processing tool is used for measuring the fluidity digitally.

     

    The prototype of the automated workstation is built and showcases the ability to reduce the time and operational errors. The automation of the unplugging operation saves up to 7 seconds.  The digital measuring of the fluidity with FLIR thermal camera and MATLAB image processing tool does not show significant improvement in accuracy in measurement, but it reduces the dependency on the expertise of the operator. There is an error of 12.7% from the actual fluidity value.

  • 90.
    Vanaja Murugesapillai, Anoop
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Industrial design.
    HANDLE CONCEPT FOR STRING TRIMMER2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    String trimmers or weed cutter or strimmer is one of the inevitable tool for a professional gardener. They are helping gardeners for maintaining the lawn and farmland. These machines have been used by human for a quite long time. Professionals normally uses the bike handle type string trimmer and the amateurs who has small gardens normally uses loop handle one. The bike handle models are more powerful and gives more comfort for long time working. While performing the trimming process users are using the handles to steer and control the machine. Handle is the main touch point of the machine and it needs to provide enough comfort and assist the functions.Cramer, a German garden tools brand owned by The Globe Group, is focusing on researching and developing Garden power tools for amateurs as well as professional users. For them it is important to satisfy the customer and improve the user experience of their products.This project is focused only on the handle of the string trimmer to improve the overall user experience. This project mainly deals with the ergonomic aspects of the handle for a larger percentile of population. It is very important to make a handle were the professional users are going to use longer period of time. Along with the comfort this project put stress on increase the user experience by giving modern, friendly and premium expression visually as well as physically. Even though the project is to develop a handle concept, it needs to go along with the overall brand language.

  • 91.
    Vestin, Alexander
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Löfving, Malin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Träcentrum Nässjö Kompetensutveckling AB, Nässjö, Sweden.
    On the way to a smart factory for single-family wooden house builders in Sweden2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    To remain competitive, single-family wooden house builders might create smart wooden house factories. Smart factories and smart production are recent concepts used to denote ideas that support competitiveness in for example the automotive industry. In the housing sector, a concept introduced to increase competitiveness is industrialized house-building. The aim of the study presented here was to investigate whether industrialized house-building characteristics could be a step toward a smart factory for wooden house builders. In this paper, ideas of the smart wooden house factory are synthesized, and challenges for the single-family wooden house builder are identified. The study is founded on empirical data from one single-case study. A challenge identified was the maturity level of the culture and organization to commit to and utilize modern technology and modern working methods. The concept of the smart wooden house factory is still in its infancy and needs further research.

  • 92.
    Vijayakumar, Vivek
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Tom, Arun
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Lead a concept proof to use RFID technology in tracing of bulky goods in logistics: Bring Logistics, Torsvik2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 93.
    Warren, Brendan
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Industrial design.
    The Design and Development of a Modular Cargo Pedelec: A pragmatic approach to a multifaceted product design and development process2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Working in collaboration with Spirit Design – Innovation and Brand GmbH in Vienna, Austria, this thesis project aimed to design and develop a modular cargo pedelec for immediate implementation into the European market.

    The vehicle, named Carr/e (pronounced, “carry”), is designed to be an electrically assisted (e-assist) pedaled urban cargo vehicle with versatile applications ranging from parcel delivery toprivate consumer use. Modularity was necessitated in order to accommodate all use cases. Sustainability and reducing socioeconomic pressures from urban congestion were a focus within the design methodology.

    The development of the project involved elements of design and engineering with holistic, value-driven, development strategies; a pragmatic approach was emphasized. Additionally, a brand was devised for the pedelec. The aim of the brand is to facilitate consumer recognition and, thus, market prevalence. Ultimately, an empirically validated product with a market-driven design was devised. Next steps will be to physically validate the pedelec with working prototypes before it is introduced into the European market.

  • 94.
    Winroth, Mats
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Research Results Improve Learning and Understanding in Master Courses - The use of a manufacturing strategy tool2018In: Procedia Manufacturing, Elsevier, 2018, Vol. 25, p. 47-54Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The analytical STRATEGO-tool has been used in total 48 project groups in master courses at Chalmers University of Technology from spring term of 2015. The project trains the students in applying theoretical tools at real organizations with a specific interest in analyzing their use of operations strategy. This paper presents the outcome from these courses and specifically discusses its usability as a pedagogic tool in different contexts, even though the intention with the tool initially was to constitute a tool for SMEs who wanted to develop their manufacturing strategies. 

  • 95.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Management of the industrialisation process in distributed geographical and organisational contexts2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Management of new product development (NPD) is one of the most critical capabilities of original equipment manufacturers (OEMs). The industrialisation process plays a major role in NPD, where the final verification of the product and production system takes place. It is during the industrialisation process that various disturbances arise; if these are not managed, they can delay the production start and prolong production ramp up.

    Based on two dimensions, geographical and organisational distribution, the following four different types of contexts are defined in this thesis: industrialisation in the local and intra-organisational context (type 1), industrialisation in the local and inter-organisational context (type 2), industrialisation in the international and intra-organisational context (type 3) and industrialisation in international and inter-organisational context (type 4). This thesis addresses types 2–4 and contributes to the literature, which has primarily dealt with the type 1 context. The purpose of the research presented in the thesis is expanding the knowledge on the industrialisation process in distributed geographical and/or organisational contexts with a focus on challenges and mechanisms; this will serve to control the challenges during the industrialisation process.

    The findings are based on data from three studies in the manufacturing industry, covering both single and multiple case studies. They reveal that there are some similarities between the type 2–4 contexts and challenges and mechanisms previously identified for the type 1 context. However, several unique challenges and mechanisms are found for the type 2–4 contexts. The findings also show that the challenges can be characterised as internal and external. Internal challenges appear in a single industrialisation site and are associated with internal organisational capabilities at the site. External challenges originate from the research and development (R&D) site and the integration between the R&D and industrialisation sites.

    The findings also reveal that the identified challenges disrupt the industrialisation process in various ways and create uncertainty and equivocality during the industrialisation process. The studies presented in this thesis show that, to deal with challenges that create uncertainty and equivocality, it is wise to allow ad hoc mechanisms to be used. One of the key conclusions is that when the industrialisation processes are carried out in type 2–4 contexts, there is a need to allow for flexibility regarding the use of mechanisms depending on the dynamics associated with the specific context.

  • 96.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Ahlin, Peter
    Husqvarna AB, Huskvarna, Sweden.
    Visual representations for communication in geographically distributed new product development projects2019In: Journal of engineering design (Print), ISSN 0954-4828, E-ISSN 1466-1837, Vol. 30, no 8-9, p. 385-403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study addresses the role of visual representations in supporting communication between an R&D team and geographically distributed suppliers for a new product development (NPD) project. It specifically focuses on the design and use of visual representations as a feasible way for communication between the distributed actors when they face communication challenges originating from differences in skills in the English language, but also from differences in work experiences. Relying on empirical materials from a Swedish manufacturing company in the mechanical engineering industry, this paper makes the following contributions to the literature. First, it shows that visual representations are effective boundary objects able to support process-oriented and product-oriented communication in distributed NPD projects. Second, it illustrates that visual representations do not necessarily have to follow graphic design principles, but can still be effective if distributed actors share the same project context. Finally, it highlights the need for a dynamic and context-dependent perspective on communication in NPD projects. 

  • 97.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Johansson, G.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Managing disturbances during the industrialisation process from a supplier perspectiveManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 98.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Original equipment manufacturer (OEM)-supplier integration to prepare for production ramp-up2019In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 506-530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Although prior research provides evidence that production ramp-up is often disrupted by supplier-related problems, it fails to discuss how the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and various types of suppliers integrate their functions and operations to secure preparations for production ramp-up. The purpose of this paper is to investigate OEM–supplier integration in a new product development (NPD) project to prepare for production ramp-up.

    Design/methodology/approach: The results presented in this paper are based on a real-time, longitudinal study of a single collaborative NPD project in the mechanical engineering industry. The NPD project involves seven suppliers and it is carried out in a large Swedish company (the OEM) and fits the theory-elaborating approach of this research.

    Findings: This study argues that the aspect of timing in OEM–supplier integration, the OEM’s research and development (R&D) attitude toward collaboration and the OEM’s (R&D) operating procedure are challenges affecting the preparation for production ramp-up. The following three mechanisms to facilitate OEM–supplier integration in order to prepare for production ramp-up are also discussed: the mediator’s role, the OEM’s face-to-face meeting at the project level and suppliers’ formal face-to-face meetings with the OEM and internally.

    Originality/value: This paper elaborates on and extends prior research on production ramp-up by conducting an empirical analysis that incorporates supplier integration in NPD. It bridges the gap between the literature on production ramp-up and on supplier integration in NPD and clearly indicates that supplier integration is an important prerequisite for successful production ramp-up. 

  • 99.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna.
    Integration of Suppliers’ Workflows in the OEMs’ New Product Development Process2018In: Procedia Manufacturing, E-ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 25, p. 479-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research explores integration of the suppliers’ workflows in the OEM’s new product development (NPD) process, to support the production ramp-up. Based on multiple-case study approach, incorporating both the OEM and the supplier perspective, this research explains critical aspects for the integration of suppliers’ workflows in the OEM’s NPD process, and when these aspects need to be addressed. The results show that face-to-face meeting on a project level, standardized work model, readiness of the component specifications, role of Supplier Quality Assurance (SQA) engineer, quality assurance document provided to the suppliers, etc. are critical aspects.

  • 100.
    Wognum, Nel
    et al.
    Technical University of Delft, The Netherlands .
    Bil, Cees
    RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Peruzzini, Margherita
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy .
    Stjepandić, Josip
    PROSTEP AG, Germany.
    Verhagen, Wim
    Technical University of Delft, The Netherlands .
    Transdisciplinary Engineering Research Challenges2018In: Transdisciplinary Engineering Methods for Social Innovation of Industry 4.0: Proceedings of the 25th ISPE Inc. International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering / [ed] Margherita Peruzzini, Marcello Pellicciari, Cees Bil, Josip Stjepandić, Nel Wognum, IOS Press, 2018, p. 753-762Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transdisciplinary research (TDR) has been the subject of discourse in the past few decades, but has not been studied much in the context of engineering problems. Many engineering problems can be characterized as ill-defined, like open innovation, adoption of new technology, business development, and the adoption of the Industry 4.0 concept. Transdisciplinary engineering research (TDER) is also performed in large projects by multi-disciplinary teams, as in TDR projects, including stakeholders and people from practice. Such projects may last long, often years. In such large projects, the involved disciplines should include both engineering disciplines as well as disciplines from social sciences. In this paper we address the challenges that exist in adopting a TDER approach. Universities need to prepare students to work in TDER projects. We discuss the current situation in transdisciplinary engineering education (TDEE) and identify challenges that need to be addressed for including TDEE in curricula. The paper ends with a summary and ideas for further research.

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