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  • 51.
    Roos, Johan
    et al.
    Hult International Business School, US.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Danielsson, Emil
    Solving for X:: Turning Academic Research Into Public Engagement2016In: BizEd, ISSN 2161-8380, no 3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    THE CHALLENGE: In the eyes of the public, academic research is not innovative or engaging, nor does it create an impact on society. One renowned 2007 study claimed that 50 percent of academic papers are read only by their authors and journal editors, and 90 percent are never cited, which signifies that no one finds them useful. At Jönköping International Business School (JIBS) in Sweden, we wanted to challenge this perception. We asked, “How can we translate our faculty’s research into information that’s relevant and valuable to the public discourse?” Our answer was to create a new blogging platform called Vertikals.

  • 52.
    Shutters, Shade T.
    et al.
    Global Security Initiative, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, United States.
    Lobo, José
    School of Sustainability, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, United States.
    Muneepeerakul, Rachata
    Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, United States.
    Strumsky, Deborah
    Arizona State University, Santa Fe Institute Center for Biosocial Complex Systems, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, United States.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Brachert, Matthias
    Department of Structural Change and Productivity, Halle Institute for Economic Research, Halle (Saale), Germany.
    Farinha, Teresa
    Department of Economic Geography, Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Bettencourt, Luís M.A.
    Mansueto Institute for Urban Innovation, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States.
    Urban occupational structures as information networks: The effect on network density of increasing number of occupations2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 5, article id e0196915Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban economies are composed of diverse activities, embodied in labor occupations, which depend on one another to produce goods and services. Yet little is known about how the nature and intensity of these interdependences change as cities increase in population size and economic complexity. Understanding the relationship between occupational interdependencies and the number of occupations defining an urban economy is relevant because interdependence within a networked system has implications for system resilience and for how easily can the structure of the network be modified. Here, we represent the interdependencies among occupations in a city as a non-spatial information network, where the strengths of interdependence between pairs of occupations determine the strengths of the links in the network. Using those quantified link strengths we calculate a single metric of interdependence–or connectedness–which is equivalent to the density of a city’s weighted occupational network. We then examine urban systems in six industrialized countries, analyzing how the density of urban occupational networks changes with network size, measured as the number of unique occupations present in an urban workforce. We find that in all six countries, density, or economic interdependence, increases superlinearly with the number of distinct occupations. Because connections among occupations represent flows of information, we provide evidence that connectivity scales superlinearly with network size in information networks.

  • 53.
    Tavassoli, Sam
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University, and School of Management, RMITUniversity, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    Faculty of Engineering, Department of Industrial Management and Logistics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Strategic entrepreneurship and knowledge spillovers: spatial and aspatial perspectives2017In: The International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, ISSN 1554-7191, E-ISSN 1555-1938, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 233-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature in the Strategic Entrepreneurship (SE) is increasingly embracing the concept and implications of knowledge spillovers. In this paper, we add to the theoretical repertoire on SE and knowledge spillovers by investigating the types of knowledge spillovers and what they imply for various dimensions of SE. On the one hand, we distinguish between spatial and aspatial knowledge spillovers. On the other hand, we distinguish between three dimensions of SE, i.e. inputs, resource orchestration, and output. Finally, we conceptually link the various types of knowledge spillovers and dimensions of SE and discuss the implications. Doing so, we argue that spatial knowledge spillovers (inter-firm) has received the major attention in previous research in increasing the amount of ‘inputs’ dimension of SE, while the aspatial knowledge (either inter-regional or intra-firm) has been relatively neglected not only for ‘inputs’, but also for ‘resource orchestration’ dimension. At the end, the paper provides suggestions for future research.

  • 54.
    Tavassoli, Sam
    et al.
    Centre for Innovation, Research and Competence in the Learning Economy (CIRCLE), Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Institutet för näringslivsanalys. Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS), KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Innovation strategies and firm performance: Simple or complex strategies?2016In: Economics of Innovation and New Technology, ISSN 1043-8599, E-ISSN 1476-8364, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 631-650Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes the effect of various innovation strategies (ISs) of firms on their future performance, captured by labor productivity. Using five waves of the Community Innovation Survey in Sweden, we have traced the innovative behavior of firms over a decade, that is, from 2002 to 2012. We defined ISs to be either simple or complex (in various degrees). We call an IS a simple IS when firms engage in only one of the four types of Schumpeterian innovations, that is, product, process, marketing, or organizational, while a complex IS is when firms simultaneously engage in more than one type. The main findings indicate that those firms that choose and afford to have complex ISs are better off in terms of their future productivity in comparison with those firms that choose not to innovative (base group) and also in comparison with those firms that choose simple ISs. The results are mostly robust for those complex innovators that have a higher degree of complexity and also keep the balance between technological (product and process) and non-technological (organizational and marketing) innovations.

  • 55.
    Tavassoli, Sam
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Persistence of various types of innovation analyzed and explained2015In: Research Policy, ISSN 0048-7333, E-ISSN 1873-7625, Vol. 44, no 10, p. 1887-1901Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes the persistency in innovation behavior of firms. Using five waves of the Community Innovation Survey in Sweden, we have traced the innovative behavior of firms over a ten-year period, i.e., between 2002 and 2012. We distinguish between four types of innovations: process, product, marketing, and organizational innovations. First, using transition probability matrix, we found evidence of (unconditional) state dependence in all types of innovation, with product innovators having the strongest persistent behavior. Second, using a dynamic probit model, we found evidence of "true" state dependency among all types of innovations, except marketing innovators. Once again, the strongest persistency was found for product innovators.

  • 56.
    Tavassoli, Sam
    et al.
    School of Management, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    The role of regional context on innovation persistency of firms2018In: Papers in regional science (Print), ISSN 1056-8190, E-ISSN 1435-5957, Vol. 97, no 4, p. 931-956Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the role of regional context on innovation persistency of firms. Using the Community Innovation Survey in Sweden, we have traced firms’ innovative behaviour from 2002 to 2012, in terms of four Schumpeterian types of innovation: product, process, organizational, and marketing. Controlling for an extensive set of firm-level characteristics, we find that certain regional characteristics matter for innovation persistency of firms. In particular, those firms located in regions with: (i) thicker labour market or (ii) higher extent of knowledge spillover exhibit higher probability of being persistent innovators up to 14 percentage points. Such higher persistency is mostly pronounced for product innovators.

  • 57.
    Warda, Peter
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Johansson, Börje
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Knowledge absorption in the development of export products2017In: Geographies of Growth: Innovations, Networks and Collaborations, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2017, p. 299-329Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Wixe, Sofia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Andersson, Martin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Which types of relatedness matter in regional growth: Industry, occupation and education2013Conference paper (Refereed)
12 51 - 58 of 58
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