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  • 51. Arno, P.
    et al.
    Strypstein, E.
    Naniopoulos, A.
    Bekiaris, E.
    Nalbantis, D.
    Panou, M.
    Gemou, M.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Gregersen, N.P.
    Hellsten, H.
    Pardo, J.
    Dols, J.
    Rothermel, S.
    Breker, S.
    Ruspa, C.
    Pilot Evaluation2003Report (Other academic)
  • 52.
    Arnold, Samuel R. C.
    et al.
    Department of Developmental Disability Neuropsychiatry (3DN), UNSW Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
    Foley, Kitty-Rose
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Hwang, Ye In (Jane)
    Department of Developmental Disability Neuropsychiatry (3DN), UNSW Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
    Richdale, Amanda L.
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Uljarevic, Mirko
    Stanford Autism Center, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Stanford University.
    Lawson, Lauren P.
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Cai, Ru Ying
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Lennox, Nick
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Urbanowicz, Anna
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Trollor, Julian N.
    Department of Developmental Disability Neuropsychiatry (3DN), UNSW Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
    Cohort profile: The Australian Longitudinal Study of Adults with Autism2019In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 12, article id e030798Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: There is a significant knowledge gap regarding the lives of adults on the autism spectrum. Some literature suggests significant health and mental health inequalities for autistic adults, yet there is a lack of comprehensive longitudinal studies exploring risk factors. Further, most research does not include the perspective of autistic adults in its conduct or design. Here, we describe the baseline characteristics and inclusive research approach of a nationwide longitudinal study. ​

    PARTICIPANTS: The Autism Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism's Australian Longitudinal Study of Adults with Autism (ALSAA) is a questionnaire-based longitudinal study of autistic adults (25+ years old) with follow-up at 2-year intervals. Autistic advisors were involved in each stage of research apart from data analysis. Three questionnaires were developed: self-report, informant report (ie, proxy report) and carers (ie, carer experiences and characteristics). ​

    FINDINGS TO DATE: An inclusive research protocol was developed and agreed with autistic advisors. Baseline data were collected from 295 autistic adults (M=41.8 years, SD=12.0) including 42 informant responses, 146 comparison participants and 102 carers. The majority of autistic participants (90%) had been diagnosed in adulthood (M=35.3 years, SD=15.1). When compared with controls, autistic adults scored higher on self-report measures of current depression and anxiety. Participant comments informed ongoing data gathering. Participants commented on questionnaire length, difficulty with literal interpretation of forced response items and expressed gratitude for research in this area.

    ​FUTURE PLANS: A large comprehensive dataset relating to autistic adults and their carers has been gathered, creating a good platform for longitudinal follow-up repeat surveys and collaborative research. Several outputs are in development, with focus on health service barriers and usage, caregivers, impact of diagnosis in adulthood, further scale validations, longitudinal analyses of loneliness, suicidal ideation, mental illness risk factors and other areas. Baseline data confirm poorer mental health of autistic adults. The ALSAA demonstrates a working approach to inclusive research.

  • 53.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Centre for Research and Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden.
    Dada, Shakila
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Imms, Christine
    Centre for Disability and Development Research, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Bornman, Juan
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Elliott, Catherine
    School of Occupational Therapy, Speech pathology and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Content validity and usefulness of Picture My Participation for measuring participation in children with and without intellectual disability in South Africa and Sweden2020In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 336-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Participation comprises attendance and involvement in everyday situations. Picture My Participation (PmP) is an instrument intended to measure participation in children with disabilities, particularly in low and middle income countries.

    Aim: To investigate content validity and usefulness of PmP for measuring participation in children with intellectual disability (ID) in South Africa and Sweden.

    Methods: A picture supported interview with 149 children, 6?18 years, with and without ID. Twenty everyday activities were provided. The three most important activities were selected by the child. Attendance was rated on all activities. Involvement was rated on the most important.

    Results: All activities were selected as important by at least one child with ID in both countries. There were similarities in perceived importance between the children with and without ID from South Africa. The children from South Africa with ID were the only subgroup that used all scale points for rating attendance and involvement.

    Conclusion: The 20 selected activities of PmP were especially relevant for children with ID in South Africa. The usefulness of the scales was higher for the children with ID in both countries. PmP is promising for assessing participation across different settings but psychometrical properties and clinical utility need further exploration.

  • 54.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University, Gävleborg, Sweden.
    Dada, Shakila
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, Faculty of Humanities, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Imms, Christine
    Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medical, Dental and Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
    Shi, Lin Jun
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Nursing, Tianjin Medical University, Heping District, China.
    Kang, Lin Ju
    Graduate Institute of Early Intervention, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan.
    Hwang, Ai-Wen
    Graduate Institute of Early Intervention, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Structural validity and internal consistency of Picture My Participation: A measure for children with disability2021In: African Journal of Disability, ISSN 2226-7220, Vol. 10, article id a763Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Picture My Participation (PMP) intended to measure participation, defined as attendance and involvement in everyday situations, of children with disabilities, particularly in low- and middle-income settings.

    Objectives: To explore structural validity of PMP by identifying possible subcomponents in the attendance scale and examining internal consistency of the total score and each subcomponent.

    Method: A picture-supported interview was conducted with 182 children, 7–18 years, with and without intellectual disability (ID). Frequency of attendance in 20 activities was rated on a four-point Likert scale (never, seldom, sometimes and always).

    Results: An exploratory principal component analysis extracted four subcomponents: (1) organised activities, (2) social activities and taking care of others, (3) family life activities and 4) personal care and development activities. Internal consistency for the total scale (alpha = 0.85) and the first two subcomponents (alpha = 0.72 and 0.75) was acceptable. The two last subcomponents alpha values were 0.57 and 0.49.

    Conclusion: The four possible subcomponents of PMP can be used to provide information about possible domains in which participation and participation restrictions exist. This study provided further psychometric evidence about PMP as a measure of participation. The stability and the utility of these subcomponents needed further exploration.

  • 55.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    The Relationship Between Intelligence Quotient and Aspects of Everyday Functioning and Participation for People Who Have Mild and Borderline Intellectual Disabilities2018In: JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, ISSN 1360-2322, E-ISSN 1468-3148, Vol. 31, no 1, p. e68-e78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    This study explored the relationship between intelligence quotient (IQ) and aspects of everyday functioning/participation in individuals (age 16–40) who have a mild/borderline intellectual disability (IQ 55–85).

    Method

    Correlations were examined between IQ and (i) self-rated (n = 72) ability, participation as performance (how often an activity is performed), important participation restriction (not/seldom performing an activity perceived as important) and general well-being and (ii) proxy-rated (n = 41) ability and participation as performance.

    Results

    No significant correlations between IQ and any of the explored measures were found. However, the effect sizes of the correlations between IQ and ability were considered as small but not negligible.

    Conclusions

    The results support the notion that IQ is a poor predictor of general aspects of everyday functioning in persons with mild/borderline intellectual disability. The result indicates that self-ratings partly generate other information than proxy ratings which may be important for assessments of supportive requirements and diagnosis.

  • 56.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Rheumatology, Linköping University, Linköping , Sweden.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro , Sweden.
    Important aspects of participation and participation restrictions in people with a mild intellectual disability2014In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 36, no 15, p. 1264-1272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study explored a possibility to assess the concepts of participation and participation restrictions in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) by combining self-ratings of the perceived importance with the actual performance of different everyday activities in people with a mild intellectual disability.

    Method: Structured interviews regarding 68 items from the ICF activity/participation domain were conducted (n  = 69). The items were ranked by perceived importance, performance and by combined measures. Furthermore, the measures were related to a single question about subjective general well-being.

    Results: Rankings of performance highlighted about the same items as “important participation”, while rankings of low performance addressed quite different items compared with “important participation restriction”. Significant correlations were found between subjective general well-being and high performance (r = 0.56), high performance/high importance (important participation) (r = 0.56), low performance (r = –0.56) and low performance/high importance (important participation restriction; r = –0.55).

    Conclusions: The results support the clinical relevance of the ICF and the studied selection of 68 items. Although performance only may sometimes be a relevant aspect, knowledge about the relationship between the perceived importance and the actual performance is essential for clinical interventions and for research aiming to understand specific needs regarding participation.

  • 57.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Rheumatology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University.
    International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories explored for self-rated participation in Swedish adolescents and adults with a mild intellectual disability2012In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 44, no 7, p. 562-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To explore internal consistency and correlations between perceived ability, performance and perceived importance in a preliminary selection of self-reported items representing the activity/participation component of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF).

    DESIGN: Structured interview study.

    SUBJECTS: Fifty-five Swedish adolescents and adults with a mild intellectual disability.

    METHODS: Questions about perceived ability, performance and perceived importance were asked on the basis of a 3-grade Likert-scale regarding each of 68 items representing the 9 ICF domains of activity/participation.

    RESULTS: Internal consistency for perceived ability (Cronbach’s alpha for all 68 items): 0.95 (values for each domain varied between 0.57 and 0.85), for performance: 0.86 (between 0.27 and 0.66), for perceived importance: 0.84 (between 0.27 and 0.68). Seventy-two percent of the items showed correlations > 0.5 (mean = 0.59) for performance vs perceived importance, 41% > 0.5 (mean = 0.47) for perceived ability vs performance and 12% > 0.5 (mean = 0.28) for perceived ability vs perceived importance.

    CONCLUSION: Measures of performance and perceived importance may have to be based primarily on their estimated clinical relevance for describing aspects of the ICF participation concept. With a clinimetric approach, parts of the studied items and domains may be used to investigate factors related to different patterns and levels of participation, and outcomes of rehabilitation.

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  • 58. Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Thyberg, M
    Factors related to self-fated participation in adolescents and adults with mild intellectual disability: A systematic literature review2008In: JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, ISSN 1360-2322, E-ISSN 1468-3148, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 277-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Self-rated participation is a clinically relevant intervention outcome for people with mild intellectual disability. The aim of this systematic review was to analyse empirical studies that explored relationships between either environmental factors or individual characteristics and aspects of participation in young adults with mild intellectual disability. Method Four databases were used, 756 abstracts examined and 24 studies were evaluated in-depth. Results Four aspects of participation were found: involvement, perceptions of self, self-determination and psychological well-being. Reported environmental factors were: social support, choice opportunity, living conditions, school, work and leisure, attitudes, physical availability and society. Reported individual characteristics were adaptive and social skills. Conclusions There is a relative lack of studies of factors influencing self-rated participation and existing studies are difficult to compare because of disparity regarding approaches, conceptual frameworks, etc. For adequate interventions, it seems important to study how profiles of participation are influenced by different patterns of environmental factors and individual characteristics.

  • 59. Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Thyberg, M
    Factors with a positive relation to self rated participation in adolescent and adult people with mild intellectual disability: a systematic literature review2007In: Oral presentation 30 min: The international summit for an alliance on social inclusion, AAMR Montréal, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 60.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University/County Council of Gävleborg, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    How are the activity and participation aspects of the ICF used? Examples from studies of people with intellectual disability2015In: NeuroRehabilitation (Reading, MA), ISSN 1053-8135, E-ISSN 1878-6448, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 45-49Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Interdisciplinary differences regarding understanding the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) concepts activity/participation may hinder its unifying purpose. In the ICF model, functioning (and disability) is described as a tripartite concept: 1) Body structures/functions, 2) Activities, and 3) Participation. Activities refer to an individual perspective on disability that does not tally with the basic structure of social models.

    OBJECTIVE: To review how activity and participation are actually used in studies of intellectual disability (ID).

    CONCLUSION: Based on 16 papers, four different usages of activity/participation were found. 1) Theoretical reference to tripartite ICF concept with attempts to use it. 2) Theoretical reference to tripartite ICF concept without actual use of activities. 3) "Atheoretical" approach with implicit focus on participation. 4) Theoretical reference to bipartite concept with corresponding use of terms. The highlighted studies have in common a focus on participation. However, the usage of the term "activity" differs both within and between studies. Such terminology will probably confuse interdisciplinary communication rather than facilitating it. Also, the use of an explicit underlying theory differs, from references to a tripartite to references to a bipartite concept of disability. This paper is focused on ID, but the discussed principles regarding the ICF and interdisciplinary disability theory are applicable to other diagnostic groups within rehabilitation practices.

  • 61.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wennberg, Birgitta
    Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lidström-Holmqvist, Kajsa
    University Health Care Research Center, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Holmefur, Marie
    School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hayat Roshanay, Afsaneh
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Evaluation of the group intervention “Let’s Get Organized” for improving time management, organisational, and planning skills in people with mild intellectual disability2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 1257-1266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Limited time management skills cause problems in daily life for people with mild intellectual disability (ID) and “Let’s Get Organized” (LGO) is a promising manual-based occupational therapy group intervention aiming to support management skills.

    Aims/Objectives: To evaluate the applicability of the Swedish version of LGO-S by i) exploring enhancements in time management skills, satisfaction with daily occupations, and aspects of executive functioning in people with time-management difficulties and mild ID, and ii) describing clinical experiences of using the LGO-S for people with mild ID.

    Material and methods: Twenty-one adults with mild ID were included. Data were collected pre-/post-intervention and at 3- and 12-month follow-ups with: Swedish version of Assessment of Time Management Skills (ATMS-S), Satisfaction with Daily Occupation (SDO-13), and Weekly Calendar Planning Activity (WCPA-SE). There were few follow-up participants (n = 6-9).

    Results: Significant change in time management skills that maintained at 12-months follow-ups. Significant increase in regulation of emotions at 12-month follow-up. Results at 12-months follow-up indicated sustainability in outcomes as measured by ATMS-S. A non-significant positive trend was observed in other outcomes between pre- and post-intervention.

    Conclusions and significance: LGO-S seems applicable for improving skills in time management, organisation and planning also for people with mild ID.

  • 62.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Centre for Research & Development, Region Gävleborg.
    Storfors, T.
    Wilder, J.
    Department of Special Education, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    IDENTIFICATION OF POSSIBLE LEARNING PROBLEMS IN CHILDREN WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES2023In: The Routledge Handbook of Inclusive Education for Teacher Educators: Issues, Considerations, and Strategies, Taylor & Francis, 2023, p. 256-265Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    All children have the right to become equal citizens of the society. Children with intellectual disabilities have difficulties in learning and may need support to reach that equality, and some extra resources may be needed. Compared to children with typical development, children with intellectual disabilities have problems in three cognitive areas that are essential for learning activities: Abstract thinking. Understanding/using abstract symbols (text, numbers, money, and time) and imagining non-experienced things and situations. Several-steps thinking. Understanding multiple-level instructions and connections between cause and effect. Simultaneous handling of information. Nuanced considerations/comparisons, risk considerations and problem solving that manifest in complex social situations. Endorsing an interactive bio-psycho-social understanding of intellectual disabilities implies that learning limitations are the discrepancy between abilities and the level and/or quality of support, and according to this an inclusive approach to learning should be based on knowledge about abilities rather than dis-abilities. Two inclusive classroom strategies for learning are presented and discussed in this chapter. These strategies seek ways of providing universal, inclusive learning situations where children with intellectual disability can interact with any children and the most important role for a teacher is to find ways to support the children in that interaction.

  • 63.
    Arzoo, Pakeeza Shaiq
    et al.
    Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Klar, Joakim
    Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bergendal, Birgitta
    National Oral Disability Centre, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Norderyd, Johanna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Dahl, Niklas
    Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    WNT10A mutations account for ¼ of population-based isolated oligodontia and show phenotypic correlations2014In: American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A, ISSN 1552-4825, E-ISSN 1552-4833, Vol. 164, no 2, p. 353-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A large proportion (>50%) of patients with isolated oligodontia were recently reported with WNT10A mutations. We have analyzed a population-based cohort of 102 individuals diagnosed with non-syndromic oligodontia and a mean of 8.2 missing teeth. The cohort included 94 families and screening of WNT10A identified that 26 probands (27.7%) had at least one WNT10A variant. When we included the MSX1, PAX9, AXIN2, EDA, EDAR, and EDARADD genes, 38.3% of probands were positive for a mutation. Biallelic WNT10A mutations were strongly associated with a larger number of missing teeth (11.09) when compared to both monoallelic WNT10 mutations (6.82) and the group without mutations in WNT10A, MSX1, PAX9, AXIN2, EDA, EDAR, or EDARADD (7.77). Genotype–phenotype analysis of individuals with WNT10A mutations showed that premolars were the most common missing teeth. Furthermore, biallelic WNT10A mutations were associated with absence of maxillary and mandibular molars as well as mandibular central incisors. Maxillary central incisors were always present. Thus, our study indicates that WNT10A mutations are associated with both the type and numbers of missing teeth. Furthermore, we show that this population-based cohort of isolated oligodontia had a considerably lower frequency of mutated WNT10A alleles and a lower mean number of missing teeth when compared to patients recruited from dental specialist centers.

  • 64.
    Augustine, Lilly
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Bjereld, Y.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning (IBL), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Turner, R.
    Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The Role of Disability in the Relationship Between Mental Health and Bullying: A Focused, Systematic Review of Longitudinal Studies2022In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Having both a disability and being bullied increases the risk of later mental health issues. Children with disabilities are at greater risk of being bullied and therefore at greater risk of adverse mental health outcomes. We conducted a limited systematic review of longitudinal studies focusing on the role of disability in relation to bullying and mental health problems. Twelve studies with an initial measure of mental health or disorder, measured no later than 10 years of age, were found. Ten of these twelve studies suggested that having a disability before victimisation increased the impact of mental health problems measured after bullying experiences. The conclusion is that children with a disability, such as behavioural problems, have an increased risk of later mental health problems through bullying victimization. Children with two risk factors had significantly worse mental health outcomes. These additional mental health problems may be alleviated through reduced bullying victimisation.

  • 65.
    Augustine, Lilly
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Bjereld, Ylva
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Turner, Russell
    Department of Social Work, Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Bullying and its relationship with mental health in school children – with a special focus on children with disabilities2021In: Abstract book, 2021, p. 109-110Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 66.
    Augustine, Lilly
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    The utility of the International Classification of Functioning construct as a statistical tool – operationalizing mental health as an indicator of adolescent participation2022In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 44, no 16, p. 4220-4226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The ICF provides a common scientific language for the study of health and functioning. Adolescent mental health, operationalized as engagement in life situations, is one aspect of functioning. Engagement as mental health has a bi-directional relation with environmental factors.

    Aim

    To test the statistical utility of the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) classification in coding adolescent mental health and mental health problems.

    Methods

    Using data measuring mental health in a representative Swedish sample of 12-13-year-olds linking responses to the classification codes. The internal structure of the classification system constructs was tested using factor analysis.

    Results

    A factorial solution could be found for most chapters indicating that the ICF framework and coding system could be used; however, the variance explained was quite low. Linking worked better at code-level, rather than chapter level. Items measuring risk behavior or risk factors are loaded in separate constructs.

    Conclusions

    When coding items for statistical purposes, code-level rather than chapter level is to be preferred. Also, participation in risk behavior loads in separate factors indicating that these behaviors are separate from other types of participation.

    Implications for rehabilitation

    Considering some challenges with varying level of detail in the ICF-CY's chapters, the framework can be used to identify the content of mental health questionnaires to be used in rehabilitation. To provide more detailed information in rehabilitation addressing mental health, a code-level solution is more appropriate than a chapter level solution. Despite the use of same ICF-CY codes, negative participation, i.e., risk behavior, measures a different dimension than positive participation, is especially relevant in rehabilitation addressing mental health.

  • 67.
    Augustine, Lilly
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Trajectories of participation, mental health, and mental health problems in adolescents with self-reported neurodevelopmental disorders2022In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 44, no 9, p. 1595-1608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Having a neurodevelopmental disorder (NDD) increases the risk of mental health problems and lower participation. We investigated the trajectories of mental health problems and participation in adolescents with NDD and compared these with trajectories for peers without NDD. In addition, the relationship between participation, mental health (well-being), and mental health problems were investigated.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data from a Swedish longitudinal survey study (LoRDIA) was used and adolescents with and without self-reported NDD were followed from 12/13 to 17 years, in three waves. Mental health problems were measured using the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire, and well-being was measured with the Mental Health Continuum short form.

    RESULTS: Adolescents with NDD experience more mental health problems than adolescents without NDD. Hyperactivity, a key feature of NDD, remains stable, while emotional problems and psychosomatic complaints, increase over time for girls, independent of NDD. Participation is stable over time but is more related to well-being than to NDD or mental health problems.

    CONCLUSIONS: Gender is an important factor with girls exhibiting more problems. Mental health explains more of the variation in participation than mental health problems and NDD. Probably participation intervention can enhance mental health which may protect from mental health problems.

    Implications for rehabilitation

    • Mental health, i.e., emotional-, social-, and psychological well-being is more strongly related to participation and to reduced levels of mental health problems than having an NDD or not, thus assessing mental health separately from measuring NDD is important.
    • Interventions focusing on participation may lead to higher mental health and having high mental health (flourishing) may facilitate participation.
    • Girls with self-reported NDD seem to have a higher burden of mental health problems, especially if they also are languishing, i.e., having low mental health, therefore a strong focus on this group is needed both in research and clinical practice.
    • Half of all adolescents are flourishing, independently of NDD or not, even if they are experiencing some symptoms of mental health problems, adolescents with NDD who are also languishing, have much higher ratings of mental health problems.
  • 68.
    Augustine, Lilly
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Kristianstad University, Sweden.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Linking youths’ mental, psychosocial, and emotional functioning to ICF-CY: Lessons learned2018In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 40, no 19, p. 2293-2299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Linking ready-made questionnaires to codes within the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version with the intention of using the information statistically for studying mental health problems can pose several challenges. Many of the constructs measured are latent, and therefore, difficult to describe in single codes. The aim of this study was to describe and discuss challenges encountered in this coding process.

    Materials and methods: A questionnaire from a Swedish research programme was linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version and the agreement was assessed.

    Results: Including the original aim of the questionnaire into the coding process was found to be very important for managing the coding of the latent constructs of the items. Items from the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version chapters with narrow definitions for example mental functions, were more easily translated to meaningful concepts to code, while broadly defined chapters, such as interactions and relationships, were more difficult.

    Conclusion: This study stresses the importance of a clear, predefined coding scheme as well as the importance of not relying too heavily on common linking rules, especially in cases when it is not possible to use multiple codes for a single item.

    • Implications for rehabilitation
    • The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version, is a useful tool for merging assessment data from several sources when documenting adolescents’ mental functioning in different life domains.

    • Measures of mental health are often based on latent constructs, often revealed in the description of the rationale/aim of a measure. The latent construct should be the primary focus in linking information.

    • By mapping latent constructs to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version, users of the classification can capture a broad range of areas relevant to everyday functioning in adolescents with mental health problems.

    • The subjective experience of participation, i.e., the level of subjective involvement, is not possible to code into the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version. However, when linking mental health constructs to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version codes, the two dimensions of participation (the being there, and the level of involvement) need to be separated in the linking process. This can be performed by assigning codes focusing on being there as separate from items focusing on the subjective experience of involvement while being there.

  • 69.
    Axelsson, Anna Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities and their participation in family activities2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Families are essential parts of any community and throughout childhood one’s family serves as the central setting wherein opportunities for participation are offered. There is a lack of knowledge about participation of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) in family activities and how improved participation can be reached. Gathering such knowledge could enable an improvement in child functioning and wellbeing and also ease everyday life for families of a child with PIMD.

    Aim. The overall aim of this thesis was to explore participation seen as presence and engagement in family activities in children with PIMD and to find strategies that might facilitate this participation.

    Material and Methods. The research was cross-sectional and conducted with descriptive, explorative designs. First a quantitative, comparative design was used including questionnaire data from 60 families with a child with PIMD and 107 families with children with typical development (TD) (I, II). Following that, a qualitative, inductive design was used with data from individual interviews with parents of 11 children with PIMD and nine hired external personal assistants (III). Finally a mixed method design was conducted where collected quantitative data was combined with the qualitative data from the previous studies (IV).

    Results. It was found that children with PIMD participated less often, compared to children with TD, in a large number of family activities, however they participated more often in four physically less demanding activities. Children with PIMD also participated in a less diverse set of activities. Additionally, they overall had a lower level of engagement in the activities; however, both groups of children showed higher engagement in enjoyable, child-driven activities and lower engagement in routine activities. The motor ability of the child with PIMD was found to be the main child characteristic that affected their presence in the family activities negatively and child cognition was found to be the personal characteristic that affected their engagement in the activities. The child’s presence and engagement were influenced to a lesser extent by family socio-economic factors when compared to families with children with TD. Parents and hired external personal assistants described several strategies to be used to improve participation of the children with PIMD, such as by showing engagement in the activities oneself and by giving the child opportunities to influence the activities. The role of the hired external personal assistant, often considered as a family member for the child, was described as twofold: one supporting or reinforcing role in relation to the child and one balancing role in relation to the parents/the rest of the family, including reducing the experience of being burdened and showing sensitivity to family life and privacy.

    Conclusion. A child with PIMD affects the family’s functioning and the family’s functioning affects the child. Child and environmental factors can act as barriers that have the result that children with PIMD may experience fewer and less varied activities that can generate engaged interaction within family activities than children with TD do. Accordingly, an awareness and knowledge of facilitating strategies for improved participation in family activities is imperative. There needs to be someone in the child’s environment who sets the scene/stage and facilitates the activity so as to increase presence and engagement in proximal processes based on the child’s needs. The family, in turn, needs someone who can provide respite to obtain balance in the family system. External personal assistance includes these dual roles and is of importance in families with a child with PIMD.

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  • 70.
    Axelsson, Anna Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    The role of the external personal assistant for children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities working in the children’shomeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 71.
    Axelsson, Anna Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    The role of the external personal assistants for children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities working in the children's home2015In: JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, ISSN 1360-2322, E-ISSN 1468-3148, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 201-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities need support to function in an optimal way. However, there is a limited knowledge about the role of external personal assistants working in the children's home. Materials and Methods A mixed method study was performed including qualitative data from interviews with 11 Swedish parents and nine external personal assistants and quantitative data from questionnaires answered by 60 families. Results For the child, the assistant's role was one of reinforcing, meaning supportive and empowering, and the child needed a high level of assistance. For the family, the role was one of balancing and the external personal assistant was more often found to assist in activities away from home while parents tended to assist within home and in family unit activities. Conclusion In planning and implementation of external assistance, the child's needs as well as considerations of the whole family should be regarded.

  • 72.
    Axelsson, Anna Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Wilder, Jenny
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Engagement in family activities: a quantitative, comparative study of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities and children with typical development2013In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 523-534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Participation is known to be of great importance for children's development and emotional well-being as well as for their families. In the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health – Children and Youth version participation is defined as a person's ‘involvement in a life situation’. Engagement is closely related to involvement and can be seen as expressions of involvement or degree of involvement within a situation. This study focuses on children's engagement in family activities; one group of families with a child with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) and one group of families with children with typical development (TD) were compared.

    Methods

    A descriptive study using questionnaires. Analyses were mainly performed by using Mann–Whitney U-test and Spearman's rank correlation test.

    Results

    Engagement in family activities differed in the two groups of children. The children with PIMD had a lower level of engagement in most family activities even though the activities that engaged the children to a higher or lesser extent were the same in both groups. Child engagement was found to correlate with family characteristics mostly in the children with TD and in the children with PIMD only negative correlations occurred. In the children with PIMD child engagement correlated with cognition in a high number of listed family activities and the children had a low engagement in routines in spite of these being frequently occurring activities.

    Conclusions

    Level of engagement in family activities in the group of children with PIMD was lower compared with that in the group of children with TD. Families with a child with PIMD spend much time and effort to adapt family living patterns to the child's functioning.

  • 73.
    Axelsson, Anna Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Imms, Christine
    Australian Catholic University, Melbourne.
    Wilder, Jenny
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Strategies that facilitate participation in family activities of children and adolescents with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities: parents’ and personal assistants’ experiences2014In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 36, no 25, p. 2169-2177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Participation throughout one's life plays a significant role for development and emotional well-being. For this reason, there is a need to identify ways to facilitate participation in family activities for children and adolescents with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD).

    Methods: The study design was qualitative and explorative, based on semi structured interviews with 11 parents and 9 personal assistants of children with PIMD.

    Results: The interviews revealed participation-facilitating strategies relating to the children's/adolescent's proximal environment, such as "Availability and acceptability of the activity", "Good knowledge about the child" and a "A positive attitude of people close to the child", as well as strategies related to the children/adolescents themselves: "Sense of belonging", "Possible for the child/adolescent to understand", "Opportunities to influence" and "Feeling of being needed".

    Conclusions: Children and adolescents with PIMD are dependent on support obtained through their environment. The identified strategies, individually adapted through awareness and knowledge by the parents and the personal assistants, provide important evidence to assist our understanding in gaining understanding about how to improve participation in family activities of children and adolescents with PIMD.

    Implications for Rehabilitation Participation-facilitating strategies related to the child/adolescent and his or her proximal environments are identified to improve participation in children and adolescents with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). Examples of strategies for the child's/adolescents' proximal environment include "good knowledge about the child/adolescent", and, for the child/adolescent, include creating "sense of belonging" and "opportunities to influence". Identifying and making these strategies explicit may assist in enhancing the participation of children and adolescents with PIMD in family activities. People in the child's/adolescent's proximal environment need to set the scene for participation.

  • 74.
    Axelsson, Anna Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    Academy of Health, Care and Welfare, Mälardalens University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Ödman, Pia
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    A Swedish cultural adaptation of the participation questionnaire Functional Scale of the Disability Evaluation System - Child version2022In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 44, no 9, p. 1720-1727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose 

    The aim was to culturally validate a questionnaire about children's/youth's participation to be used in a Swedish context.

    Methods

    FUNDES-Child, based on the well-established CASP, was chosen. Questions about engagement and hindering factors were added to the existing questions about frequency and independence in 20 activity areas. Using a qualitative, explorative design, 16 interviews with children/youths/caregivers were made to explore opinions about the questionnaire. Follow-up interviews confirmed the result of the revised questionnaire. Qualitative content analysis was performed.

    Results

    The interviews provided support for the questionnaire's relevance by being a tool to assess important aspects of participation, to gain insights into one's own/the child's participation, and to promote ideas about what causes the degree of participation. To achieve comprehensiveness, no activity area was found to be missing nor superfluous. However, some examples were needed to be modified where "parades" are unusual in Sweden and therefore removed, while "singing in choir" was added. In search for comprehensibility, opinions about the layout of the first version were raised and a varying degree of understanding of wording and concepts were found and thus taken into account.

    Conclusions

    The questionnaire can be used for establishing meaningful goals and to potentially increase children's participation.

    Implications for rehabilitation

    • Participation is of great importance for children's functioning, well-being, and development.
    • Cultural validation of well-established participation questionnaires is a priority and questions about important aspects of participation need to be included.
    • Interviews with children/youth and caregivers guided revisions to reach relevance, comprehensiveness, and comprehensibility of the Swedish FUNDES-Child (FUNDES II-SE).
    • Children/youths, caregivers, and others may increase their awareness concerning the child's/youth's participation by responding to the questionnaire.
  • 75.
    Axelsson, Anna Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Wilder, Jenny
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Mälardalens Högskola.
    Frequency of Occurrence and Child Presence in Family Activities: A Quantitative, Comparative Study of Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities and Children with Typical Development2014In: International Journal of Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 2047-3869, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 13-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The objective was to investigate the performance aspect of participation, operationalized as the frequency of occurrence of family activities and child presence in these activities for children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) and children with typical development (TD). The focus was also on how family and child characteristics are related to the frequency of occurrence of family activities. This is part of a larger research project investigating facilitating factors for participation in children with PIMD.

    Methods: A descriptive, comparative study was performed using a questionnaire developed for the purpose.

    Results: In the families with a child with PIMD, the majority of activities occurred less often than in families with children with TD. In both groups, relationships were found between the frequency of occurrence of family activities and total family income, as well as the educational level of the parents. For children with PIMD, motor ability, cognition, health, and behaviour, were related to frequency of occurrence. Moreover, the presence of the children in the activities differed in the two groups; the children with PIMD were present in the activities less often.

    Discussion: Considering a long-term perspective, low occurrence of family activities and child presence may affect child development and everyday functioning. Knowledge about factors related to the occurrence of family activities and child presence in them, as well as an understanding of its causes, can promote the provision of everyday natural learning opportunities for children with PIMD.

  • 76.
    Backman, Ellen
    et al.
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Karlsson, Ann-Kristin
    Department of Research and Development, Region Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Documentation of everyday life and health care following gastrostomy tube placement in children: a content analysis of medical records2020In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 42, no 19, p. 2747-2757Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Everyday routines play a vital role in child functioning and development. This study explored health professionals' documentation of everyday life and health care during the first year following gastrostomy tube placement in children and the content of intervention goals.

    METHODS: The medical records of 39 children (median age 38 months, min-max: 15-192) in one region of Sweden were analysed. A content analysis approach was used with an inductive qualitative analysis supplemented by a deductive, quantitative analysis of documented intervention goals following the ICF-CY.

    RESULTS: One overall theme, "Seeking a balance", captured the view of life with a gastrostomy and the health care provided. Two categories, "Striving for physical health" and "Depicting everyday life" with seven sub-categories, captured the key aspects of the documentation. Twenty-one children (54%) had intervention goals related to the gastrostomy, and these goals primarily focused on the ICF-CY component "Body functions".

    CONCLUSIONS: To some extent the medical records reflected different dimensions of everyday life, but the intervention goals clearly focused on bodily aspects. Understanding how health care for children using a gastrostomy is documented and planned by applying an ecocultural framework adds a valuable perspective and can contribute to family-centred interventions for children using a gastrostomy. Implications for Rehabilitation There is a need for increased awareness in healthcare professionals for a more consistent and holistic healthcare approach in the management of children with gastrostomy tube feeding. This study suggests that an expanded focus on children's participation in everyday mealtimes and in the healthcare follow-up of gastrostomy tube feeding is important in enhancing the intervention outcome. Multidisciplinary teams with a shared bio-psycho-social understanding of health would contribute to a situation in which the everyday lives of households adapt to living with gastrostomy. Routine care for children with gastrostomy should follow a checklist combining crucial physiological aspects of gastrostomy tube feeding with seemingly mundane family functions in order to achieve a successful gastrostomy tube feeding intervention.

  • 77.
    Backman, Ellen
    et al.
    Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden; Region Halland, Kungsbacka, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Karlsson, Ann-Kristin
    Region Halland, Kungsbacka, Sweden.
    Parental perspectives on family mealtimes related to gastrostomy tube feeding in children2021In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 31, no 9, p. 1596-1608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Built on the important functions daily routines serve families and child health, this study aimed to explore parents' descriptions of mealtimes and food-related challenges when living with a child using a gastrostomy feeding tube. The study was informed by ecocultural theory and based on in-depth interviews combined with stimulated recall. The interviews of 10 parents were inductively analyzed by means of qualitative content analysis. Four main categories comprised the parents' descriptions: "One situation, different functions," "On the child's terms," "Doing something to me," and "An unpredictable pattern," with one overarching theme. The analyses showed that the parents strived to establish mealtimes in line with their cultural context, although they struggled to reach a point of satisfaction. The study highlights the importance of health care professionals to address the medical aspects of caring for a child with a G-tube, but also the potential psychological and social consequences for ordinary family life.

  • 78.
    Balton, Sadna
    et al.
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden.
    Dada, Shakila
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Test-retest reliability of Picture My Participation in children with intellectual disability in South Africa2022In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 315-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Picture My Participation (PmP) is a promising instrument for measuring the participation in everyday situations of children with intellectual disability (ID), particularly in low- and middle-income countries.

    Aim

    To explore test-retest reliability of PmP by comparing two repeated measurements of children with ID in an urban context in South Africa.

    Methods

    A picture-supported interview with 31 children with ID, aged 7-17 years, was conducted twice, two weeks apart. The children rated their participation, operationalised as attendance and involvement, in 20 everyday activities. Analyses were completed for total scores, for the four subcomponents and at item level.

    Results

    Test-retest agreement at an item level for both attendance and involvement showed slight/fair agreement for most activities (Kappa = 0.01-0.40), and moderate agreement for some activities (Kappa = 0.41?0.60). Moderate agreement was shown for the total scale and at component level (ICC = 0.5?0.75), except for (firstly) attendance of and involvement in 'Family Activities' (ICC = 0.26 for attendance, 0.33 for involvement), and (secondly) involvement in 'Personal Activities' (ICC = 0.33).

    Conclusion

    The result indicates that PmP can reliably be used at component level and as a screening tool for intervention planning to identify participation and participation restrictions in children with ID.

  • 79. Barnett, A.
    et al.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Blank, R.
    New international clinical recommendations on Developmental Coordination Disorders (DCD): focus on adolescents and adults2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 80. Bedrosian, J
    et al.
    Calculator, S
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Light, J
    Mirenda, P
    Schlosser, R
    Issues in AAC efficacy research1998In: Proceedings from the eight biennal ISAAC conference, 1998Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 81. Bekiaris, E.
    et al.
    Panou, M.
    Gemou, M.
    Nalbantis, D.
    Arno, P.
    Tavares, G.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Foerst, K.
    Ruspa, C.
    New driver training curricula, best practice, design guidelines and recommendations to authorities.2003Report (Other academic)
  • 82.
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Building a community: Disability and identity in the Qur’an2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 210-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article elaborates on disability and the Qur’an and accentuates how a grand narrative of moral codes held the community together and enforced a collective identity of the ummah, in which disability was interlaced with the shaping of an in-group grounded in a common set of values. This process of identity making in turn had implications for people with disabilities, since they could have trouble fulfilling religious requirements, something that was met with counter mechanisms of solidarity within the community of Muslim believers.

  • 83.
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    For society and the individual: Disability and work in post-war Sweden2023In: Disability and labour in the twentieth century: Historical and comparative perspectives / [ed] R. H. Dinu & S. Bengtsson, London: Routledge, 2023, p. 88-103Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter takes the Swedish Committee for People with Limited Work Ability, appointed in 1943 by the Swedish government, as a starting point to provide a close reading of widespread political stances on labour and disability during the post-war period. It analyses the committee's understanding of the mechanisms of the free market and the consequences of this for people with disabilities, which is seen in relation to an expanding welfare state. The liberal idea of encouraging self-help had long been an important part of the Swedish system that surrounded people with disabilities. Integrating people into the workforce was thus seen as a cornerstone of Swedish society and this was also expressed by the committee that was appointed to address these issues.

  • 84.
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Funktionshinder i historien2021In: Leva som andra: Ett biopsykosocialt perspektiv på funktionsnedsättning och funktionshinder / [ed] L. Kilman, J. Andin, H. Hua & J. Rönnberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2021, p. 329-343Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 85.
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Out of the frame: disability and the body in the writings of Karl Marx2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 151-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How disability as a phenomenon is to be understood has been widely discussed within the field of disability research. Influenced by a Marxist perspective, the social model has reinforced the view that disability results from the organization of society rather than from individual premises. This article elaborates on these issues by exploring the writings of Karl Marx and his views concerning disability. The analysis pinpoints bodily normality in Marx’s reasoning and how the economic system shapes the premises for participation and roles, but also how people with disabilities were left out of the progressive call for social change. 

  • 86.
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    The nation’s body: disability and deviance in the writings of Adolf Hitler2018In: Disability & Society, ISSN 0968-7599, E-ISSN 1360-0508, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 416-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article takes its starting point in the Nazi ideology as it appears in the writings of Adolf Hitler, and discusses how disability and the body can be understood in the context of Mein Kampf. The article underlines how disability and bodily infirmities, alongside race, featured significantly in Hitler’s demagogic message. Although the overall image of disability was related to a sense of threat–and a culture gone wrong–Mein Kampf also contains a mixed interpretation of disability as a phenomenon, in which different and opposing disability narratives took part in the construction and the image of the body as a national property. 

  • 87.
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Kalin, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Marknadsorienteringen och välfärdssystemens legitimitet2021In: Socialt arbete - rörelse, motstånd, förändring / [ed] M. Dahlstedt, S. Gruber, M. Herz & P. Lalander, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2021, p. 165-186Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 88.
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jonkoping Univ, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Panican, Alexandru
    Lund Univ, Lund, Sweden..
    Ulmestig, Rickard
    Linnaeus Univ, Vaxjo, Sweden..
    Activation measures through the lens of governmentality2022In: Critical and radical social work An international journal, ISSN 2049-8608, E-ISSN 2049-8675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on young unemployed people in Sweden involved in two activation measures. Using the analytical framework of governmentality, it analyses how the participants perceive and value activation measures as government-driven interventions aimed at bringing young people into the labour market based on a neoliberal discourse of the welfare state. The article highlights that the welfare system tries to not only promote behavioural changes, but also change the way people think. At the centre of the study are the people-changing technologies embedded in the Swedish norms of a strong work ethic. The analysis underlines how these technologies are internalised and even become a part of the participant's own free will.

  • 89.
    Bergendal, Birgitta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. National Oral Disability Centre for Rare Disorders, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Norderyd, Johanna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. National Oral Disability Centre for Rare Disorders, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Zhou, Xiaolei
    Uppsala University, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Klar, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Dahl, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Abnormal primary and permanent dentitions with ectodermal symptoms predict WNT10A deficiency2016In: BMC Medical Genetics, E-ISSN 1471-2350, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The WNT10A protein is critical for the development of ectodermal appendages. Variants in the WNT10A gene may be associated with a spectrum of ectodermal abnormalities including extensive tooth agenesis.

    METHODS: In seven patients with severe tooth agenesis we identified anomalies in primary dentition and additional ectodermal symptoms, and assessed WNT10A mutations by genetic analysis.

    RESULTS: Investigation of primary dentition revealed peg-shaped crowns of primary mandibular incisors and three individuals had agenesis of at least two primary teeth. The permanent dentition was severely affected in all individuals with a mean of 21 missing teeth. Primary teeth were most often present in positions were succedaneous teeth were missing. Furthermore, most existing molars had taurodontism. Light, brittle or coarse hair was reported in all seven individuals, hyperhidrosis of palms and soles in six individuals and nail anomalies in two individuals. The anomalies in primary dentition preceded most of the additional ectodermal symptoms. Genetic analysis revealed that all seven individuals were homozygous or compound heterozygous for WNT10A mutations resulting in C107X, E222X and F228I.

    CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that tooth agenesis and/or peg-shaped crowns of primary mandibular incisors, severe oligodontia of permanent dentition as well as ectodermal symptoms of varying severity may be predictors of bi-allelic WNT10A mutations of importance for diagnosis, counselling and follow-up.

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  • 90.
    Bergström, Maria
    et al.
    Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Department of Rheumatology, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Börsbo, Björn
    Division of Community Medicine, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Sweden.
    ‘Like the worst toothache you’ve had’ – How people with rheumatoid arthritis describe and manage pain2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 468-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease often associated with disability. Despite new treatments, pain and activity limitations are still present.

    Objectives: To describe how persons with RA experience and manage pain in their daily life.

    Methods: Seven semi-structured focus groups (FGs) were conducted and analyzed using content analysis.

    Results: The analysis revealed four categories: 1) Pain expresses itself in different ways referred to pain as overwhelming, aching or as a feeling of stiffness. 2) Mitigating pain referred to the use of heat, cold, medications and activities as distractions from the pain. 3) Adapting to pain referred to strategies employed as coping mechanisms for the pain, e.g. planning and adjustment of daily activities, and use of assistive devices. 4) Pain in a social context referred to the participants’ social environment as being both supportive and uncomprehending, the latter causing patients to hide their pain.

    Conclusions: Pain in RA is experienced in different ways. This emphasizes the multi-professional team to address this spectrum of experiences and to find pain management directed to the individual experience that also include the person’s social environment.

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  • 91.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Inclusive teaching skills and student engagement in physical education2019In: Frontiers in Education, E-ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 4, article id 74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Including students with disabilities in school-based Physical Education (PE) is common practice. However, little is known about students’ engagement and interaction in this environment and how it is related to PE teaching skills. Student engagement and interaction patterns were therefore observed. A multiple time-sampling method was used to perform observations of individual, contextual and environmental aspects of student engagement in school-based PE lessons. Three groups of students, aged 14 (n = 94), with: (1) Disabilities (n = 23), (2) Low grades (n = 27), and (3) High grades (n = 44) were compared. Students, independent of group, showed relatively high engagement in PE. The observed frequency of linking lesson content to PE syllabus in combination with using a vibrant affective tone when instructing was used as an indicator of high-/low-level teaching skills. Higher student engagement was observed in environments with high-level PE teaching skills, which included more whole group teaching, a higher frequency of student-teacher communicative proximity and more instructions. Students with disabilities and with low grades were more often observed in whole group activities, students with high grades in small group activities. The primary type of support provided to students with disabilities in PE seemed to consist of communicative proximity to the teacher. They were more often observed to be close to the teacher. Our results suggest that proximity to the teacher may serve as an indicator of inclusive teaching. In high-level teaching environments, teachers were more frequently in communicative proximity to all students, which facilitates learning. Lessons were also more focused (physically and academically) and technical devices and music were used for teaching purposes. More complex lesson content requires more instructions and our results show that, despite more instructions, all student groups were more on-task. Implied from our observations is that lesson complexity, the structuring of whole/small group formats, teacher proximity, and student engagement are aspects to consider when studying school-based PE. More instructions, closer communicative proximity and higher student engagement in high-level teaching provide students with more learning opportunities and facilitate feed-back and feed-forward, and individual support to students with disabilities.

  • 92.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Augustine, Lilly
    School of Education and Environment, Kristianstad university, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Measuring self-efficacy, aptitude to participate and functioning in students with and without impairments2018In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 572-583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Including vulnerable groups of students such as students with learning disabilities in mainstream school research, require ethical considerations and questionnaire adaptation. These students are often excluded, due to low understanding or methodologies generating inadequate data. Students with disability need be studied as a separate group and provided accessible questionnaires. This pilot study aims at developing and evaluating student self-reported measures, rating aspects of student experiences of school-based Physical Education (PE). Instrument design, reliability and validity were examined in Swedish secondary school students (n = 47) including students, aged 13, with intellectual disability (n = 5) and without impairment and test–retested on 28 of these students. Psychometric results from the small pilot-study sample were confirmed in analyses based on replies from the first wave of data collection in the main study (n = 450). Results show adequate internal consistency, factor structure and relations between measures. In conclusion, reliability and validity were satisfactory in scales to measure self-efficacy in general, in PE, and aptitude to participate. Adapting proxy ratings for functioning into self-reports indicated problems. Adequacy of adjustments made were confirmed and a dichotomous scale for typical/atypical function is suggested for further analyses.

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  • 93.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Education and Environment, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad.
    Quality teaching and student perceived self-efficacy, function and aptitude to participate in PE2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Students with disability show a trajectory of higher incidence of school failure. High quality teaching and proper support may foster high self-efficacy, as protective factors for successful school outcomes. Physical Education (PE) can provide students with a context in which self-efficacy is promoted. At transition into high school with higher cognitive stakes, developmental changes and individual social identification coinciding, a disability may add to the challenge of success. Investigating self-efficacy as a predictor of achievement operationalized as grade points, student perceived self-efficacy, function and aptitude to participate in PE, and teacher rated teaching quality are examined.

    Method: Three groups were studied, students with 1. Diagnosed disability, 2. Low grades and 3. High grades in PE in year 6. Questionnaires were completed by students in 26 classes including classmates (n=450, 228 boys) and their PE-teachers (n=25). Correlations were analyzed, differentiating groups of students.

    Results: Students with disabilities experience lower general self-efficacy and in PE, and are less apt to participate in PE. Their PE self-efficacy is higher if the classroom climate is good. PE-teachers systematic work with grading has positive effects on academic and movement self-efficacy for students with low grades and on health self-efficacy for students with high grades. Highest effect of perceived socio-cognitive function is displayed in students with low grades, the correlation is stronger in general self-efficacy than in self-efficacy in PE. Students with high grades have higher self-efficacy in general and in PE.

    Conclusions: Student perceived socio-cognitive function is of major importance to students experience of self-efficacy. Most impact is seen on subscales measuring academic and movement self-efficacy.

  • 94.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Education and Environment, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Student engagement and high quality teaching in PE2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 95.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Student Self-Efficacy and Aptitude to Participate in Relation to Perceived Functioning and Achievement in Students in Secondary School With and Without Disabilities2021In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 12, article id 607329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    School-based Physical Education (PE) is important, especially to students with disabilities whose participation in physical activities out of school is limited. The development over time of participation-related constructs in relation to students' perceived functioning and achievement is explored. Students in mainstream inclusive secondary school self-rated their PE-specific self-efficacy, general school self-efficacy, aptitude to participate in PE, and perceived physical and socio-cognitive functional skills at two timepoints, year 7 and year 9. Results were compared between three groups of students with: disabilities (n = 28), high grades (n = 47), or low grades (n = 30) in PE. Over time, perceived physical skills of students with disabilities became strongly associated with self-efficacy and aptitude to participate. Perceived socio-cognitive skills in the study sample improved and had a positive effect on PE-specific self-efficacy. Efforts should be made to limit the accelerated negative impact of perceived restricted functioning of students with disabilities. Grading criteria need to be developed to comply with standards adapted to fit abilities of students with disabilities. Meaningful learning experiences appear to be created when participation is promoted and capacity beliefs (PE-specific self-efficacy) are boosted. Allocating resources to support the development of students' socio-cognitive skills seem to have potential for overall positive school outcome.

  • 96.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    SIDR, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Education and Environment, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad.
    Quality teaching and student perceived self-efficacy, function and aptitude to participate in Physical Education2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 97.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Relationships between physical education (PE) teaching and student self-efficacy, aptitude to participate in PE and functional skills: with a special focus on students with disabilities2018In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 387-401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Students with disability show an increasing incidence of school failure. Quality teaching and appropriate support may foster high self-efficacy, a predictive factor for successful school outcomes. Physical Education (PE) can provide students with a context in which self-efficacy and participation are promoted leading to improved academic achievement. The transition into secondary school can be challenging for many students with increased educational demands, developmental changes and individual social identification coinciding. A disability may add to the challenge of success.

    Methods: Three groups of students, aged 13 years and enrolled in Swedish mainstream schools were targeted (n = 439). Groups included students with 1. A diagnosed disability, 2. Low grades in PE (D–F) and 3. High grades (A–C) in PE. Questionnaires were collected and analyzed from 30/439 students with a diagnosed disability (physical, neuro-developmental and intellectual) from 26 classes, their classmates and their PE-teachers (n = 25). Relationships between student self-reports and PE-teachers’ self-ratings were investigated. Also examined was the potential to which students’ functional skills could predict elevated general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. Results were compared with the total sample and between the three target groups (n = 121).

    Results: For students with disabilities, better self-rated teaching skills were related to lower student perceived general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. The impact of classroom climate in PE was more obvious among students with disabilities. Perceived functional skills were associated with elevated general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. Better socio-cognitive functional skills had an overall positive effect on all outcomes. Students with disabilities reported results similar to the total sample, the D–F group scored lower and the A–C group higher than the total sample and the disability group. Elevated self-efficacy in PE is six times less probable in students with disabilities, compared to the A–C group.

    Conclusions: Our findings that better teacher planning and grading skills, are detrimental to students disadvantaged by disability is contradictive. Improving the establishment and communication of adapted learning standards at the transition to secondary school is a crucial and a predictive factor for promoting positive school experiences for students with disability. Students with disabilities need to be assured that the intended learning outcomes can be reached by doing activities differently than their typically functioning peers. Consideration of class composition is suggested as a means of promoting a positive learning climate, which would particularly benefit students with disabilities. Allocation of resources to support student socio-cognitive skills would improve experiences for the D–F group and likely promote a positive learning environment.

  • 98.
    Bjereld, Ylva
    et al.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Thornberg, Robert
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Measuring the prevalence of peer bullying victimization: Review of studies from Sweden during 1993–20172020In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 119, article id 105528Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research into the prevalence of bullying is important to enable the correct allocation of resources to prevent and end bullying. One problem when gathering knowledge in how prevalent bullying is, is the considerable variation in percentage points in research studies. The aim of this study was to analyze how the estimated prevalence in Swedish national population-based studies of peer bullying victimization is related to how it is defined and measured.

    The analysis focused on national population-based studies in Sweden, in order to ensure that the sampling and cultural aspects of data collection were similar throughout the period. Data came from three sources: 1) a scoping review of peer bullying victimization in Sweden, 2) reports from Swedish government agencies and non-government organizations that were not included in the scoping review, and 3) data from the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) Sweden 1993–2017 study.

    The results showed that although the estimated levels of bullying victimization depend on the measurement method, they all followed a similar pattern over time with a higher prevalence of bullying in recent years. The study raised conceptual inconsistencies between bullying, peer aggression, and peer victimization, which are further discussed in relation to prevalence and measurement. 

  • 99.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Carlhed, C
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    The impact of early intervention on the family system: perspectives on process and outcome1999In: Proceedings of the 4th European Symposium of EURYLAID: Equal opportunities and quality of life for families with a young disabled child. October 14th - 17th, 1998, Butgenbach, Belgium, 1999Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 100.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Changing perspectives in early intervention for children with disabilities in Sweden1997In: Infants and young children, ISSN 0896-3746, E-ISSN 1550-5081, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 56-68Article in journal (Refereed)
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