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  • 51.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University/County Council of Gävleborg, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    How are the activity and participation aspects of the ICF used? Examples from studies of people with intellectual disability2015In: NeuroRehabilitation (Reading, MA), ISSN 1053-8135, E-ISSN 1878-6448, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 45-49Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Interdisciplinary differences regarding understanding the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) concepts activity/participation may hinder its unifying purpose. In the ICF model, functioning (and disability) is described as a tripartite concept: 1) Body structures/functions, 2) Activities, and 3) Participation. Activities refer to an individual perspective on disability that does not tally with the basic structure of social models.

    OBJECTIVE: To review how activity and participation are actually used in studies of intellectual disability (ID).

    CONCLUSION: Based on 16 papers, four different usages of activity/participation were found. 1) Theoretical reference to tripartite ICF concept with attempts to use it. 2) Theoretical reference to tripartite ICF concept without actual use of activities. 3) "Atheoretical" approach with implicit focus on participation. 4) Theoretical reference to bipartite concept with corresponding use of terms. The highlighted studies have in common a focus on participation. However, the usage of the term "activity" differs both within and between studies. Such terminology will probably confuse interdisciplinary communication rather than facilitating it. Also, the use of an explicit underlying theory differs, from references to a tripartite to references to a bipartite concept of disability. This paper is focused on ID, but the discussed principles regarding the ICF and interdisciplinary disability theory are applicable to other diagnostic groups within rehabilitation practices.

  • 52.
    Augustine, Lilly
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Kristianstad University, Sweden.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Linking youths’ mental, psychosocial, and emotional functioning to ICF-CY: Lessons learned2018In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 40, no 19, p. 2293-2299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Linking ready-made questionnaires to codes within the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version with the intention of using the information statistically for studying mental health problems can pose several challenges. Many of the constructs measured are latent, and therefore, difficult to describe in single codes. The aim of this study was to describe and discuss challenges encountered in this coding process.

    Materials and methods: A questionnaire from a Swedish research programme was linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version and the agreement was assessed.

    Results: Including the original aim of the questionnaire into the coding process was found to be very important for managing the coding of the latent constructs of the items. Items from the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version chapters with narrow definitions for example mental functions, were more easily translated to meaningful concepts to code, while broadly defined chapters, such as interactions and relationships, were more difficult.

    Conclusion: This study stresses the importance of a clear, predefined coding scheme as well as the importance of not relying too heavily on common linking rules, especially in cases when it is not possible to use multiple codes for a single item.

    • Implications for rehabilitation
    • The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version, is a useful tool for merging assessment data from several sources when documenting adolescents’ mental functioning in different life domains.

    • Measures of mental health are often based on latent constructs, often revealed in the description of the rationale/aim of a measure. The latent construct should be the primary focus in linking information.

    • By mapping latent constructs to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version, users of the classification can capture a broad range of areas relevant to everyday functioning in adolescents with mental health problems.

    • The subjective experience of participation, i.e., the level of subjective involvement, is not possible to code into the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version. However, when linking mental health constructs to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version codes, the two dimensions of participation (the being there, and the level of involvement) need to be separated in the linking process. This can be performed by assigning codes focusing on being there as separate from items focusing on the subjective experience of involvement while being there.

  • 53.
    Axelsson, Anna Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Wilder, Jenny
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Engagement in family activities: a quantitative, comparative study of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities and children with typical development2013In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 523-534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Participation is known to be of great importance for children's development and emotional well-being as well as for their families. In the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health – Children and Youth version participation is defined as a person's ‘involvement in a life situation’. Engagement is closely related to involvement and can be seen as expressions of involvement or degree of involvement within a situation. This study focuses on children's engagement in family activities; one group of families with a child with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) and one group of families with children with typical development (TD) were compared.

    Methods

    A descriptive study using questionnaires. Analyses were mainly performed by using Mann–Whitney U-test and Spearman's rank correlation test.

    Results

    Engagement in family activities differed in the two groups of children. The children with PIMD had a lower level of engagement in most family activities even though the activities that engaged the children to a higher or lesser extent were the same in both groups. Child engagement was found to correlate with family characteristics mostly in the children with TD and in the children with PIMD only negative correlations occurred. In the children with PIMD child engagement correlated with cognition in a high number of listed family activities and the children had a low engagement in routines in spite of these being frequently occurring activities.

    Conclusions

    Level of engagement in family activities in the group of children with PIMD was lower compared with that in the group of children with TD. Families with a child with PIMD spend much time and effort to adapt family living patterns to the child's functioning.

  • 54.
    Backman, Ellen
    et al.
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Karlsson, Ann-Kristin
    Department of Research and Development, Region Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Documentation of everyday life and health care following gastrostomy tube placement in children: a content analysis of medical records2019In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Everyday routines play a vital role in child functioning and development. This study explored health professionals' documentation of everyday life and health care during the first year following gastrostomy tube placement in children and the content of intervention goals.

    METHODS: The medical records of 39 children (median age 38 months, min-max: 15-192) in one region of Sweden were analysed. A content analysis approach was used with an inductive qualitative analysis supplemented by a deductive, quantitative analysis of documented intervention goals following the ICF-CY.

    RESULTS: One overall theme, "Seeking a balance", captured the view of life with a gastrostomy and the health care provided. Two categories, "Striving for physical health" and "Depicting everyday life" with seven sub-categories, captured the key aspects of the documentation. Twenty-one children (54%) had intervention goals related to the gastrostomy, and these goals primarily focused on the ICF-CY component "Body functions".

    CONCLUSIONS: To some extent the medical records reflected different dimensions of everyday life, but the intervention goals clearly focused on bodily aspects. Understanding how health care for children using a gastrostomy is documented and planned by applying an ecocultural framework adds a valuable perspective and can contribute to family-centred interventions for children using a gastrostomy. Implications for Rehabilitation There is a need for increased awareness in healthcare professionals for a more consistent and holistic healthcare approach in the management of children with gastrostomy tube feeding. This study suggests that an expanded focus on children's participation in everyday mealtimes and in the healthcare follow-up of gastrostomy tube feeding is important in enhancing the intervention outcome. Multidisciplinary teams with a shared bio-psycho-social understanding of health would contribute to a situation in which the everyday lives of households adapt to living with gastrostomy. Routine care for children with gastrostomy should follow a checklist combining crucial physiological aspects of gastrostomy tube feeding with seemingly mundane family functions in order to achieve a successful gastrostomy tube feeding intervention.

  • 55.
    Bartolo, Paul A.
    et al.
    University of Malta.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Giné, Climent
    Universitat Ramon Llull.
    Kyriazopoulou, Mary
    European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education.
    Ensuring a Strong Start for All Children: Inclusive Early Childhood Education and Care2016In: Implementing Inclusive Education: Issues in Bridging the Policy-Practice Gap / [ed] Amanda Watkins,Cor Meijer, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016, p. 19-35Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter highlights the importance of providing all children, and particularly those at risk, vulnerable children and children with disabilities, with opportunities for a quality inclusive Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC). It first sets out the evidence that quality inclusive ECEC provision is essential for all children to develop their potential and lifelong learning competencies that will ensure their successful participation in school and adult life. It then describes the main international and European policies for inclusive ECEC. A more detailed account is given of the five key principles for action towards improving the quality of ECEC provision developed by the thematic working group of the European Commission (2014) ‘Quality Framework for Early Education and Care’ that are also very similar to those proposed by the OECD (2015) ‘Starting Strong IV’. The concluding section underlines the need to address more strongly the provision of enabling opportunities for accessibility to ECEC of children at risk of exclusion. More importantly, it highlights the need to research and improve not only these children’s presence in ECEC but also their level and quality of active participation and engagement in the social and learning activities of early childhood inclusive provision. The chapter reflects the research and policy development work being undertaken by the European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education in its (2015–2017) project on Inclusive Early Childhood Education (IECE) led by the present authors.

  • 56.
    Bartolo, Paul
    et al.
    European Agency of Special Needs and Inclusive Education.
    Björck-Åkesson, EvaJönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.Giné, ClimentUniversitat Ramon Llull, Barcelona, Spain.Kyriazopoulou, MaryEuropean Agency of Special Needs and Inclusive Education.
    Inclusive Early Childhood Education: An analysis of 32 European examples2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Batsopoulou, Meropi Aliki
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Examining play behaviors of children with internalized emotional disturbances in preschool context: A systematic literature review2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Child initiated play appears as a means for children to express their inner world and personality and works as a milestone promoting their overall development. Internalized emotional disturbances constrain children’s functioning and have an impact on their general behavior, hindering their development. Most of the times, it appears challenging for teachers to identify a child with internalizing problems in the preschool classroom and most interventions are targeting children with externalized problems. Since play is a way for children to express, observations of children’s behavior while playing, provide information about their inner thoughts and concerns. The aim of the present study was to identify play behaviors and tendencies in types of play that children with typical and atypical internalized emotional disturbances show in free play situations in preschool. A systematic literature review was conducted in order to reach this goal. Six articles were included in which five internalized emotional disturbances were mentioned -one typical and four atypical. Findings revealed eight overt play behaviors, with prevalent these of non-play, solitary-passive behavior, unconscious play activity and desire for peer play but no attempt for it. Regarding engagement in play types, children exhibiting internalized problems were more prone to constructive and creative play and less engaged in symbolic play, which can be possible indicator of developmental delays. This study works as a tool for professionals in order to identify play behaviors of children with internalized emotional disturbances in preschool child initiated play. Subsequently, the findings assist interventionists on providing adequate support and clinicians on shedding light on the dubious field of emotional and behavioral disorders in early childhood.

  • 58.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Relationships between physical education (PE) teaching and student self-efficacy, aptitude to participate in PE and functional skills: with a special focus on students with disabilities2018In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 387-401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Students with disability show an increasing incidence of school failure. Quality teaching and appropriate support may foster high self-efficacy, a predictive factor for successful school outcomes. Physical Education (PE) can provide students with a context in which self-efficacy and participation are promoted leading to improved academic achievement. The transition into secondary school can be challenging for many students with increased educational demands, developmental changes and individual social identification coinciding. A disability may add to the challenge of success.

    Methods: Three groups of students, aged 13 years and enrolled in Swedish mainstream schools were targeted (n = 439). Groups included students with 1. A diagnosed disability, 2. Low grades in PE (D–F) and 3. High grades (A–C) in PE. Questionnaires were collected and analyzed from 30/439 students with a diagnosed disability (physical, neuro-developmental and intellectual) from 26 classes, their classmates and their PE-teachers (n = 25). Relationships between student self-reports and PE-teachers’ self-ratings were investigated. Also examined was the potential to which students’ functional skills could predict elevated general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. Results were compared with the total sample and between the three target groups (n = 121).

    Results: For students with disabilities, better self-rated teaching skills were related to lower student perceived general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. The impact of classroom climate in PE was more obvious among students with disabilities. Perceived functional skills were associated with elevated general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. Better socio-cognitive functional skills had an overall positive effect on all outcomes. Students with disabilities reported results similar to the total sample, the D–F group scored lower and the A–C group higher than the total sample and the disability group. Elevated self-efficacy in PE is six times less probable in students with disabilities, compared to the A–C group.

    Conclusions: Our findings that better teacher planning and grading skills, are detrimental to students disadvantaged by disability is contradictive. Improving the establishment and communication of adapted learning standards at the transition to secondary school is a crucial and a predictive factor for promoting positive school experiences for students with disability. Students with disabilities need to be assured that the intended learning outcomes can be reached by doing activities differently than their typically functioning peers. Consideration of class composition is suggested as a means of promoting a positive learning climate, which would particularly benefit students with disabilities. Allocation of resources to support student socio-cognitive skills would improve experiences for the D–F group and likely promote a positive learning environment.

  • 59.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Praktiknära utbildningsforskning (PUF), Didactics in Social Sciences.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Augustine, Lilly
    School of Education and Environment, Kristianstad university, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Measuring self-efficacy, aptitude to participate and functioning in students with and without impairments2018In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 572-583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Including vulnerable groups of students such as students with learning disabilities in mainstream school research, require ethical considerations and questionnaire adaptation. These students are often excluded, due to low understanding or methodologies generating inadequate data. Students with disability need be studied as a separate group and provided accessible questionnaires. This pilot study aims at developing and evaluating student self-reported measures, rating aspects of student experiences of school-based Physical Education (PE). Instrument design, reliability and validity were examined in Swedish secondary school students (n = 47) including students, aged 13, with intellectual disability (n = 5) and without impairment and test–retested on 28 of these students. Psychometric results from the small pilot-study sample were confirmed in analyses based on replies from the first wave of data collection in the main study (n = 450). Results show adequate internal consistency, factor structure and relations between measures. In conclusion, reliability and validity were satisfactory in scales to measure self-efficacy in general, in PE, and aptitude to participate. Adapting proxy ratings for functioning into self-reports indicated problems. Adequacy of adjustments made were confirmed and a dichotomous scale for typical/atypical function is suggested for further analyses.

  • 60.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Praktiknära utbildningsforskning (PUF), Didactics in Social Sciences.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Education and Environment, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Student engagement and high quality teaching in PE2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 61.
    BILGIN, IDIL
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    The consequences of perceived discrimination on internalizing mental health outcomes for immigrant adolescents in OECD countries: A systematic literature review2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the last few decades the focus of immigration flows has been predominantly toward member countries of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Immigration is a process full of challenges, and perceiving as being discriminated by host country natives is one of the biggest difficulties for the immigrants. This challenge is especially represented in immigrant adolescent population due to their higher sensitivity of perception of others. Thus, perceived discrimination characterized as being a significant negative consequence resulting internalizing mental health outcomes for immigrant adolescents. Therefore, the aim of this study is to conduct a systematic literature review in order to identify and discuss the findings of the existing studies that focus on the consequences of perceived discrimination on internalizing mental health outcomes for immigrant adolescents in OECD countries. The systematic review included 16 studies for data extraction. The results showed that perceived discrimination has significant negative consequences on internalizing mental health outcomes for immigrant adolescents in OEDC countries resulting in higher levels of: depression, anxiety, psycho-somatization, post-traumatic stress disorder, and obsession-compulsion symptoms. However, within this relationship, there are also moderating and mediating variables. Self-esteem, familism and cognitive appraisal of discriminatory events were characterized as mediators. Parental support, adherence to traditional family values, acculturation, transcultural identity, older age, higher socioeconomic status (SES), and ethnic identity were characterized as moderators. It is recommended that the negative consequences of perceived discrimination on internalizing mental health outcomes should be taken into consideration on societal levels and in mental health fields when planning interventions and therapies for immigrant adolescents. Additionally, further research in this field should be conducted in other OECD countries with different immigrant groups in order to increase the generalizability of the findings.

  • 62.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Att ge och ta emot: samspel med små barn med rörelsehinder och kommunikations-handikapp1987Report (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Cooperation with families: A Swedish Intervention Model2000In: Proceedings 9es. Jornades Internacionals dÁtencio Precoc: 28/6 – 1/7, 2000. Barcelona, 2000, p. 1-15Conference paper (Other scientific)
  • 64.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Från en differentierad förskola och skola till delaktighet i lärandemiljöer som anpassas till olika förutsättningar och behov2009In: Specialpedagogisk tidskrift - att undervisa, ISSN 2000-429X, no 4, p. 8-9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 65.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Functional activities and participation2003In: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology: European Academy for Childhood Disability, conference, Oslo, 2003Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 66.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    ICF for children and youth2002In: Invited presentation at the third Nordic Baltic Conference on ICF. Helsinki, Finland, 2002Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 67.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    ICF for children and youth2002In: Invited presentation at ICF-meeting, Västerås, Sweden, 2002Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 68.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    ICF for children and youth: Field trial in Sweden2003In: Invited presentation at ICF-meeting, Washington, USA, 2003Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 69.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    ICF for children and youth. Field trial in Sweden2004In: Invited presentation at ICF-meeting, Pädagogische Hochschule Zürich, Switzerland, 2004Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 70.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    ICF for children and youth. Field trial in Sweden2003In: Invited presentation at ICF-meeting, Durban, South Africa, USA, 2003Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 71.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    ICF in communication intervention2004In: 11th Biennial Conference of the Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication. Natal, Brazil, 2004Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 72.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health for Children and Youth ICF-CY2006In: Invited presentation MHADIE meeting: Ljubljana, Slovenia, November 22-24th 2006, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 73.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health for Children and Youth ICF-CY2006In: Invited presentation MHADIE meeting: Prague, Tjeckien, June 2006, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 74.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health for Children and Youth ICF-CY2005In: Invited presentation at Center for Disease-Control and Prevention, CDC-meeting, Atlanta, 2005Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 75.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health for Children and Youth ICF-CY: Fieldtrials and current research in Sweden2005In: Invited presentation at ICF-meeting, UNESCO, Bangkok, Thailand, 2005Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 76.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health for Children and Youth ICF-CY: Fieldtrials and current research in Sweden2005In: Invited presentation at WHOmeeting, Geneva, 2005Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 77.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    International Classification of functioning: Swedish field trial in child and youth habilitation2001In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology: European Academy of Childhood Disability, Abstracts, 2001, 2001, p. p 41-Conference paper (Other scientific)
  • 78.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Internationell Klassifikation av funkrionstillstånd: Funkrionshinder och Hälsa för Barn och Ungdom (ICF-CY)2006In: 10:e Forsknings- och utvecklingskonferensen: Habiliteringens Forskningscentrum & Örebro Universitet. Örebro, 4-5 april, 2006, 2006, p. s 24-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 79.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Interventions for pre-school children in the ”grey-zone” of neurodevelopmental risk2007In: Paper presented at Research in Education and Rehabilitation Science: 7th International Scientific conference & The 2nd ISEI Conference, University of Zagreb, Croatia, June 14-16th, 2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 80.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    It takes two to communicate1998In: Our children – their future: Proceedings of the Folke Bernadotte International Memorial Conference. Our Children - Their Future. Children And Young Persons With Disabilities, 1998, p. 16-19Conference paper (Other scientific)
  • 81.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Kartläggning: En del av interventionen och en förutsättning för individualisering2001In: FUR-BladetArticle in journal (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 82.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Kunskapsfrukt utan kärna2008In: Pedagogiska magasinet, ISSN 1401-3320, no 2, p. 32-35p. 32-35Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 83.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Measuring Sensation Seeking1990Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
  • 84.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    New Technology for Children in Early Attention2000In: Proceedings 9es. Jornades Internacionals dÁtencio Precoc: 28/6 – 1/7, 2000. Barcelona, 2000, p. p 6-Conference paper (Other scientific)
  • 85.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Samspel mellan små barn med rörelsehinder och talhandikapp och föräldrar: En longitudinell studie1992Book (Other academic)
  • 86.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Samspel och inflytande: Barnet och familjen1999In: Dokumentation: Människa, handikapp, livsvillkor, 7:e forskningskonferensen, Örebro den 13 och 15 april 1999, 1999, p. 101-102Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 87.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Specialpedagogik: Ett kunskapsområde med många dimensioner2007In: Reflektioner kring specialpedagogik: sex professorer om forskningsområdet och forskningsfronterna, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2007, p. 85-99Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 88.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    ”Specialpedagogik i en skola för alla”: Vad behövs för att kunna erbjuda varje barn det stöd och den miljö som behövs för en god start i livet?2005In: Konferens kring lärande, Utbildningsvetenskapliga nämnden. Mälardalens Högskola, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 89.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Specialpedagogik i förskolan2009In: Med sikte på förskolan: barn i behov av särskilt stöd / [ed] Anette Sandberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2009, p. 17-35Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 90.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Specialpedagogiken: Ett mångfacetterat kunskapsfält2001In: Att Undervisa, ISSN 0345-0384, no 5, p. 13-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 91.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    The ICF-CY and collaborative problem solving in inclusive Early Childhood Education and Care2018In: An emerging approach for education and care: Implementing a worldwide classification of functioning and disability / [ed] S. Castro & O. Palikara, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 134-146Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The wide-ranging educational, economic and social benefits of Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC), at both individual and societal levels, are increasingly acknowledged in large parts of the world. Major changes in physical, socio-emotional and cognitive areas of development occur during these years, and meaningful educational experiences have been shown to have long-lasting effects upon a child’s cognitive development, socio-emotional development and learning (Pianta, Barnett, Burchinal, & Thornburg, 2009; Shonkoff & Phillips, 2000; Sylva, 2010). International and European communities (EU, 2011; OECD, 2014; UNESCO, 2015; UN, 2015) regard quality of ECEC as a foundation for later school achievement, success in the modern knowledge based economy and lifelong learning.

  • 92.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    The issue of the developing person; critical areas of changes2007In: Invited presentation at the conference ICF-CY - A common language for the health of children and youth: Venezia, October 25-26th 2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 93.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Utility and feasibility of ICF-CY in early intervention/habilitation settings for children2007In: Invited presentation MHADIE meeting: Zurich, Schwitzerland, May 30-June1st 2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 94.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Vilka konsekvenser får WHO’s nya definition av handikapp2003In: Nordisk Specialpedagogisk kongress, Västerås, 7-9 augusti, 2003Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 95.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Where is Early Attention going to?: Current Trends and Future Perspectives2000In: Proceedings 9es. Jornades Internacionals dÁtencio Precoc: 28/6 – 1/7, 2000. Barcelona, 2000, p. 7-12Conference paper (Other scientific)
  • 96.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Bailey, D.B
    Simeonsson, R.J
    Kartläggning av familjen vid tidig intervention: Översättning och anpassning till svenska förhållanden av [translation of and adaptation to Swedish]1991In: Family Assessment in Early InterventionArticle in journal (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 97.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Brodin, Jane
    Fälth, Inga-Britt
    Åtgärder, samspel, kommunikation: en modell för tidig familjeorienterad intervention1997Report (Other academic)
  • 98.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Carlhed, C
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    The impact of early intervention on the family system: perspectives on process and outcome1999In: Proceedings of the 4th European Symposium of EURYLAID: Equal opportunities and quality of life for families with a young disabled child. October 14th - 17th, 1998, Butgenbach, Belgium, 1999Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 99.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Eliasson, A-C
    Folkesson, C
    Holmberg, A-S
    Karlsson, M
    Sanner, G
    Westbom, L
    Svensk fältprövning av WHO:s förslag till Internationell klassifikation av funktionstillstånd och funktionshinder, ICIDH-2: Användbarhet för barn och ungdom2002Report (Other scientific)
  • 100.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Ferm, Ulrika
    Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Ahlsén, Elisabeth
    Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Conversational Topics Between a Child with Complex Communication Needs and her Caregiver at Mealtime2005In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 19-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Naturalistic mealtime interactions between a child with complex communication needs and her caregiver (focus dyad) and a child without disabilities and her caregiver (comparison dyad) were investigated. An activity-based communication analysis was used to outline the contextual background factors of the dyads' activities, and the dyads' conversational topics were analyzed. For the child and her caregiver (the focus dyad), the natural mode of communication at mealtime was unaided. Communication mostly concerned immediate mealtime issues. Other, shorter, topics were introduced but were also anchored to immediate issues. In contrast, the child and caregiver who comprised the comparison dyad conversed about a variety of personal topics that extended beyond the present. Topic patterns are exemplified using discourse excerpts and are discussed in relation to aided communication and development.

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