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  • 51.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Inwinkl, Petra
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Björktorp, Jacob
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Källenius, Robert
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    More than two decades after the Cadbury Report: How far has Sweden, as role model for corporate-governance practices, come?2018In: International Journal of Disclosure & Governance, ISSN 1741-3591, E-ISSN 1746-6539, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 235-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to follow up on the ‘comply-or-explain’ principle more than two decades after the Cadbury Report was published. We investigate the rate of compliance and quality of explanations provided in case of non-compliance in the context of Sweden. This country has been pointed out as a role model for corporate-governance practices. The empirical study comprises the 241 companies listed on Nasdaq OMX Stockholm in 2014. We analyze the quality of the explanations in the light of the Swedish Corporate Governance Code. Our findings confirm that the comply-or-explain principle in Sweden is effective. Around half of the companies use the possibility to deviate from the Code. A clear majority of the explanations, 71.8%, are informative. This study provides insights for academic scholars and policy-makers alike how the comply-or-explain principle works in a country that is viewed as a role model for how corporate governance should be implemented. In addition, the high-quality explanations provided by listed companies on Nasdaq OMX Stockholm can serve as an inspiration for other listed companies in European countries, thereby outlining a contribution to business practice.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-10-29 00:00
  • 52.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Johannisson, Bengt
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Linné University.
    Context and ideology of entrepreneurship education in practice2014In: Becoming an Entrepreneur / [ed] Susanne Weber, Fritz K. Oser, Frank Achtenhagen, Michael Fretschner, Sandra Trost, Rotterdam: Sense Publishers, 2014, p. 91-107Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Johannisson, Bengt
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Games in entrepreneurship education to support the crafting of an entrepreneurial mindset2013In: New Pedagogical Approaches to Game Enhanced Learning: Curriculum Integration / [ed] Sara de Freitas, Michela Ott, Maria Magdalena Popescu & Ioana Stanescu, Hershey: IGI Global, 2013, p. 20-37Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays, an increasing number of education institutions, including many universities and colleges, are offering entrepreneurship education. This development is driven by the hope that more entrepreneurs could be ‘created’ through such efforts, and that these entrepreneurs through their newly founded ventures will contribute to economic growth and job creation. At higher education institutions, the majority of entrepreneurship courses rely on writing business plans as a main pedagogical tool for enhancing the students’ entrepreneurial capabilities. In this chapter, we argue instead for the need for a pedagogy which focuses on supporting students in crafting an entrepreneurial mindset as the basis for venturing activities. We discuss the potential role of games in such entrepreneurship education, and present the example of an entrepreneurship game from the Swedish context, which was developed by a group of young female entrepreneurs. We describe the game and discuss our experiences of playing it with a group of novice entrepreneurship and management students at the master’s level, and we review the effectiveness of the game in terms of how it supports students in crafting an entrepreneurial mindset. We conclude the chapter by outlining how entrepreneurship games could be integrated into a university curriculum and suggest some directions for future research.

  • 54.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Johannisson, Bengt
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    The making of an intercultural learning context for entrepreneuring2013In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Venturing, ISSN 1742-5360, E-ISSN 1742-5379, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 48-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Departing from the standpoint that internationalisation needs to become a more explicit part of assessing the quality of academic activity (i.e., education, research, and (business) community interaction), we elaborate upon how the intercultural composition of a student cohort could be leveraged as a road to the advancement of entrepreneurship education at the graduate level. We argue that the very heterogeneity of the students with respect to their socio-cultural background and personal experiences offers a rich potential for mutual social learning that reinforces formal education activities. Creating awareness of this collective resource opens up for self-organising processes among the students as they craft an entrepreneurial identity which guides them in their learning throughout the master programme.

  • 55.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Johannisson, Bengt
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    The reflexivity grid: Exploring conscientization in entrepreneurship education2018In: Revitalizing Entrepreneurship Education: Adopting a Critical Approach in the Classroom, Taylor and Francis , 2018, p. 62-81Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Entrepreneurship education has witnessed a shift from teaching about entrepreneurship in different forms towards encouraging the action and activity-based training of students for entrepreneuring through business plan writing on fictitious or concrete ventures to enacting these ideas in real life. For example, Ollila and Williams-Middleton (2011) describe ways in which a venture creation approach allows students to “test the waters” while reflecting on real-life situations and while exploring entrepreneurial behaviours (see also Williams-Middleton & Donnellon, 2014). Though there has been a growing focus on simulating or experiencing entrepreneurial behaviours through entrepreneurship education, little space has been given to students’ reflexivity in positioning themselves as learning subjects beyond educational settings. Yet very often questions posed by our students in the classroom, for example when listening to entrepreneurs telling them about their venture journeys, start with a “why” statement, clearly expressing their desire to engage with reflexivity. Reflexivity is then not only understood as a kind of generalized self-awareness (Swan, 2008, p. 393) but also as a concern for the world at large (Swan, 2008, p. 394). 

  • 56.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Laurell, Helene
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Andersson, Svante
    Höskolan i Halmstad.
    The internationalization challenge: managing a new venture from the medical technology sector2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Melander, Anders
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Open innovation in the construction industry with a specific focus on Swedish wood-construction companies2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report aims to deascribe the present status of open innovation in general and more specifically in small and medium sized companies and the construction industry (part 1). Further the aim is to provide an illustrative overview of the present status of open innovation activities among Swedish wooden construction companies (part 2) and finally to discuss how the application of more open innovation activities in the Swedish construction industry could enhance product development (part 3). We are aware that this report only represent the first step in a process and we hope it will, in a true open innovation style, enhance future activities in order to develop our joint knowledge.

  • 58.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Melander, Anders
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Rosengren, Alexandra
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Standoft, Andrea
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    High-growth firms and the use of formalised planning and control systems2014In: International Journal of Management and Decision Making, ISSN 1462-4621, E-ISSN 1741-5187, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 266-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has argued that with growing size firms increasingly rely on more formalised planning and control systems. This paper addresses what kind of systems high-growth companies use and perceive as most beneficial for their growth. A pilot study served to identify which planning and control systems medium-sized firms most commonly employ as well as how these are perceived in relation to business growth. Findings from the pilot study were translated into an e-mail survey administered to the entire population of medium-sized high-growth firms ('gazelles') in Sweden, generating a response rate of 35.2%. In the pilot study, three formalised planning and control systems were identified as most commonly used. A clear majority of the surveyed gazelles use one or several of these systems and perceive them as important for achieving continuous growth. However, the integration of these systems (strategic planning, management systems, and enterprise resource planning) was rather low. Overall, strategic planning was the system relied on the most, while management systems were used the least. The originality of this paper lies in the exploration of the use of different formalised planning and control systems and their perceived relation to high-growth.

  • 59.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Melesko, Stefan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Ots, Mart
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Upholding the 4th estate—exploring the corporate governance of the media ownership form of business foundations2018In: JMM - The International Journal on Media Management, ISSN 1424-1277, E-ISSN 1424-1250, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 129-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whereas media ownership issues have interested scholars for decades, research has largely ignored the implications of specific ownership forms on the corporate governance of media companies, that is, how these companies are directed and controlled. This article attempts to address this gap by exploring the corporate governance of the ownership form of business foundations—a type of ownership that is increasing in different countries around the world. We analyze the corporate governance of three business foundations in the Swedish newspaper sector that together hold 26% of the market and outperform their industry peers. The control function, which is at the heart of corporate governance, is typically performed by companies’ owners. However, foundations do not have a physical person as owner; thus, this control function is replaced by the foundation’s charter, which stipulates the aim of the foundation’s business activities. When steered by professional top management, the charter’s long-term orientation facilitates the careful implementation of strategic directions without short-term performance pressures. We conclude the article by outlining several advantages and disadvantages of this ownership form for the media industry. 

  • 60.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Managing the Homogeneity-Heterogeneity Duality2003In: Innovative Forms of Organizing: international perspectives, London: SAGE , 2003, p. 301-328Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 61.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Müllern, Tomas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Learning and Continuous Change in Innovating Organizations2003In: Innovative Forms of Organizing: international perspectives, London: SAGE , 2003, p. 72-94Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 62.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Naldi, Lucia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Dynamics of Business Models - Strategizing, Critical Capabilities and Activities for Sustained Value Creation2013In: Long range planning, ISSN 0024-6301, E-ISSN 1873-1872, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 427-442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much progress has been made recently in developing the business model concept. However, one issue remains poorly understood, despite its importance for managers, policy makers, and academics alike, namely, how companies change and develop their business models to achieve sustained value creation. Companies which manage to create value over extended periods of time successfully shape, adapt and renew their business models to fuel such value creation. Drawing on findings from a research program on continuously growing firms, this paper identifies three critical capabilities, namely an orientation towards experimenting with and exploiting new business opportunities; a balanced use of resources; as well as achieving coherence between leadership, culture, and employee commitment, together shaping key strategizing actions. Moreover, we illustrate how each of these capabilities is supported by different sets of specific activities. Jointly, these three capabilities, their activities and the strategizing actions act as complementarities for value creation. We conclude the paper by suggesting implications for research and practitioners, providing a tool for managers which allows them to reflect on and identify critical issues relevant for changing and developing their business model to sustain value creation.

  • 63.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Mierzejewska, Bozena
    Fordham University.
    The development of media management as an academic field: Tracing the contents and impact of its three leading journals2016In: Managing Media Firms and Industries: What's So Special About Media Management? / [ed] G.F. Lowe & C. Brown, Berlin: Springer, 2016, p. 23-42Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Naldi, Lucia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Mapping media entrepreneurship of young European companies2011In: Managing media economy, media content and technology in the age of digital convergence / [ed] Zvezdan Vukanovic and Paulo Faustino, Lisboa: Media XXI , 2011, p. 191-212Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 65.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Naldi, Lucia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    "Business growth": do practitioners and scholars really talk about the same thing?2010In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 289-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current growth literature has stalled over which measures to use in empirical studies, causing a fragmented theory base. This paper claims that there is a third issue that further curbs efforts in developing a better understanding of business growth. Based on a thorough literature review, a quantitative, and a qualitative study, we find that academic scholars and entrepreneurs do not talk about the same thing when they say “business growth.” For practitioners, growth is a more complex phenomenon — with a strong emphasis on internal development — which differs from the simplified conceptualization of growth used in empirical studies.

  • 66.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Norbäck, Maria
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Entertainment Firms and Organization Theories2010In: Handbuch Unterhaltungsproduktion: Beschaffung und Produktion von Fernsehunterhaltung / [ed] K.-D. Altmeppen, K. Lantzsch, A. Will, Wiesbaden: VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften , 2010, p. 52-66Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 67.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Picard, Robert G
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Challenges and Success Factors in Media Cluster Development: A Review of Contemporary Knowledge2009In: Uddevalla Symposium 2009: the geography of innovation and entrepreneurship : revised papers presented at the 12th Uddevalla Symposium, 11-13 June, 2009, Bari, Italy / [ed] Iréne Bernhard, Trollhättan: Department of Economics and IT, University West , 2009, p. 9-26Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 68.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Price Schultz, Cindy J.
    University of Wyoming.
    Invisible struggles: The representation of ethnic entrepreneurship in US newspapers2015In: Community Development, ISSN 1557-5330, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 499-515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How entrepreneurship is portrayed in media can play an important role for how attractive it is perceived as a career and/or investment option. Communities need people of all ethnicities to be interested in starting businesses because economic development is tied so closely to community development. To date, little to no community development literature has been published about how newspapers frame ethnic minority entrepreneurs and how that might affect the community. This article examined such framing and its implications. This article presents a textual analysis of how ethnic minority entrepreneurship is represented in US newspapers included in the LexisNexis Academic Database from 2003 to 2008. Overall, ethnic minority entrepreneurship, including the struggles the entrepreneurs face, is almost invisible in the newspapers, despite its importance for the economy. From the articles that were published in this field, important patterns were identified. The article concludes with suggestions about how community development officials can assist ethnic minority entrepreneurs.

  • 69.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Raviola, Elena
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Balancing tensions during convergence: duality management in a newspaper company2009In: JMM - The International Journal on Media Management, ISSN 1424-1277, E-ISSN 1424-1250, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 32-41Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Tillmar, Malin
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Studies on women's entrepreneurship from Nordic countries and beyond2013In: International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 1756-6266, E-ISSN 1756-6274, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 4-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    – The purpose of this paper is to direct attention to recent research on women's

    entrepreneurship, focusing on Nordic countries.

    Design/methodology/approach

    – The paper encourages research that investigates how context, at the micro, meso and macro level, is related to women's entrepreneurship, and acknowledges that gender is socially constructed.

    Findings

    – This paper finds evidence that recent calls for new directions in women's entrepreneurship research are being followed, specifically with regard to how gender is done and how context is related to women's entrepreneurial activities.

    Originality/value

    – This paper assesses trends in research on women's entrepreneurship, mainly from the Nordic countries.

  • 71.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth . Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    "Surfing the Ironing Board" - The representation of women’s entrepreneurship in German newspapers2011In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 23, no 9-10, p. 763-786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite extensive attempts to enhance women's entrepreneurship in Germany, a gender gap continues to exist. This article sets out to analyse the representation of women's entrepreneurship in German media, by analysing how it is depicted in newspapers and how this changes over time. Images transported in media might regulate the nature of women's entrepreneurship, as they contain information about ‘typical’ and ‘socially desirable’ behaviour of women as well as of entrepreneurs. This article contributes to developing an understanding of the relevance of media representation of the entrepreneurship phenomenon for influencing the propensity towards entrepreneurial activity.

  • 72.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth .
    "Unternehmergeist, komm aus der Flasche": der Entrepre­neurship-Diskurs in deutschen Zeitungen2008In: Stand und Perspektiven der deutschsprachigen Entrepreneurship- und KMU-Forschung / [ed] Sascha Kraus and K. Gundolf, Köln: Ibidem-Verlag, 2008, p. 135-150Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    zu Knyphausen-Aufsess, Dodo
    Fostering Doctoral Entrepreneurship Education in Germany2008In: Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, ISSN 1462-6004, E-ISSN 1758-7840, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 397-404Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 74.
    Acs, Zoltan J.
    et al.
    LSE, London, UK, George Mason University, Faifax, USA.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    Swedish Entrepreneurship Forum, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS). Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Philippe Aghion: recipient of the 2016 Global Award for Entrepreneurship Research2017In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Professor Philippe Aghion is the 2016 recipient of the Global Award for Entrepreneurship Research, consisting of 100,000 Euros and a statuette designed by the internationally renowned Swedish sculptor Carl Milles. He is one of the most influential researchers worldwide in economics in the last couple of decades. His research has advanced our understanding of the relationship between firm-level innovation, entry and exit on the one hand, and productivity and growth on the other. Aghion has thus accomplished to bridge theoretical macroeconomic growth models with a more complete and consistent microeconomic setting. He is one of the founding fathers of the pioneering and original contribution referred to as Schumpeterian growth theory. Philippe Aghion has not only contributed with more sophisticated theoretical models, but also provided empirical evidence regarding the importance of entrepreneurial endeavours for societal prosperity, thereby initiating a more nuanced policy discussion concerning the interdependencies between entrepreneurship, competition, wealth and growth.

  • 75.
    Adam, Liljeroos
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Hjalmarsson, Gabriel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Valuation of Amenities in the Housing Market: A Hedonic Price Approach2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper intends to examine what fraction of house prices can be accredited to the distance between residential properties and proximity to parks, water and city centers. Although a large body of work on the subject of amenities and house prices using a hedonic model already exists, we wish to contribute with an in-depth analysis on these variables of focus. The empirical analysis uses a dataset concerning 8319 single family house purchases in the Swedish municipality of Jönköping, collected during the years 2000 to 2011. The main findings show that house prices are negatively effected as the distance increases to amenities and that by testing for land value as the dependent variable, we highlight the importance of geographical location while ignoring charac-teristics surrounding the house.

  • 76.
    Adestam, Carina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Gunnmo, Sofia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    CSR: Structure for Responsibility2008Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Magister), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Many organisational flaws are consequences of unsuitable structure arrangements that do not support the organisation in its work towards goal accomplishment. The appropriateness of the structure is determined by how well it allows the organisation to respond to the environment in which it is active. Furthermore, an organisation is divided into parts with their own requirements on the structure. CSR is a concept that enables for a wider perspective of how to conduct business, thereby strengthening the link between the organisation and the external society. It addresses the issues of how a company can create sustainable wealth through behaving in a responsible way where a high responsiveness to the environment is crucial. The purpose of this thesis is therefore to describe and analyse how the organisational social structure of the CSR work can help and enhance such engagement.

    An abductive approach have steered the authors when conducting this study. Qualitative data is explicitly used, gathered through interviews with representatives from ABB and Skanska. The data derived from these interviews provides a picture of what, why and how the two companies have chosen to work with CSR issues as well as how they have chosen to structure the work. Using the theoretical frame and the empirical data an analyse of the characteristics and arguments for CSR and the cultural, motivational and structural aspects led to the identification of requirements that this work place on the structure and how ABB and Skanska handle these requirements.

    The objective of CSR is to be able to assess the business impact on the society and from that standpoint create a way to handle those impacts. Therefore the work is different from company to company but with common requirements on the structure where some are, local responsiveness, creativity and unified work. To answer to these requirements the structure should preferable have the characteristics of horizontal differentiation and specialisation on group level, an integration based on both human interaction and documents where standardisation should be avoided. This implies that the requirements of CSR are best met when the mechanic and the organic structure meet. An organic organisation needs mechanical traits to allow for the guidelines, directives and responsibilities to be defined in order to reach a unified picture. The mechanical on the other hand needs organic characteristics to support and allow for continuous improvements and work that takes local conditions into account.

  • 77.
    Adestam, Carina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Finance.
    Gunnmo, Sofia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Finance.
    Hedberg, Anne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Finance.
    CleanTech - a sector too risky for Swedish venture capital2008Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    CleanTech is the sector where technologies intended to reduce the harmful effect that our current lifestyle has on the environment are found. In Sweden the companies developing these technologies has not yet managed to get their deserved part of Swedish venture capital. A number of venture capitalists do invest in CleanTech, however the majority is hesitant. The hesitation is to a large extent said to be born in the many risks associated to a CleanTech investment. This thesis attempts to address this issue by describing and analyzing how venture capitalists reduce risks when investing in a CleanTech company. An abductive approach has been used to conduct the study, mainly based on primary, qualitative data. The data was gathered through six face-to-face interviews with Swedish venture capitalists active within the CleanTech sector.

    The different risks expected to be found in a CleanTech investment are first presented grouped into three broad risks groups; Agency risk, Business risk and Innovation risk. This is followed by a framework covering methods and tools that can be applied by venture capitalists in an attempt to reduce risks in their investments. These being; Convertible equity, Syndication, Information system, Monitoring, Milestones, Bonding, Share options, Stage financing and Intellectual property rights.

    The respondents do not view the risks associated to CleanTech as high as generally perceived. They acknowledge that the risks exists but not to any larger extent than in any other investment. When reducing risk in their investment the respondents make use of commonly known and generally used methods and tools. These are not deliberately chosen in order to reduce a specific risk but rather to safeguard the investment as a whole. It is not just the tools in themselves that leads to a successful reduction of risk, but rather when combined with the respondent’s as well as the entrepreneurs skills and experiences.

  • 78.
    Adewumi, Sarumi
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    The Impact of FDI on Growth in Developing Countries: An African Experience2007Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Magister), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The paper examines the contribution of foreign direct investment to economic growth in Africa using graphical and regression analysis. Data for the entire continent and data for eleven countries within the continent were used for the empirical analysis. The time series data is from 1970-2003. It was discovered that the contribution of FDI to growth is estimated to be positive in most of the countries but not significant.

  • 79.
    Adiguna, Rocky
    University of Luxembourg.
    Organisational culture and the family business2015In: Theoretical perspectives on family businesses / [ed] Mattias Nordqvist, Leif Melin, Matthias Waldkirch and Gershon Kumeto, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, p. 58-77Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter aims to review the extant research on organizational culture in family business by covering its origin in organization studies along with its application in family business context. The review reveals that, despite the rich body of literature, the application of cultural perspectives in family business seemed to be one-sided—that is, dominated by those of positivistic and managerialist interests. In the attempt to rebalance the course of research in family business culture, this chapter discusses the different approaches in studying family business culture and, as a conclusion, proposes alternatives to advance our knowledge in both ways: to understand family business through cultural theories, as well as to understand culture through family business context.

  • 80.
    Adiguna, Rocky
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Shah, Syed Fuzail Habib
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Exploring Transnational Entrepreneurship: On the Interface between International Entrepreneurship and Ethnic Entrepreneurship2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Transnational entrepreneurship (TE) has been in the spotlight as an emerging field during the last decade. Previously being viewed from international entrepreneurship (IE) and ethnic entrepreneurship (EE) perspectives, TE has recently demarcating its own territory. However, the exact boundary in which TE differs from IE and EE is yet to be studied. This research is aiming to explore the interface of TE, IE, and EE through the entrepreneurs’ sets of resources—economic, social, cultural, and symbolic capital. By studying the case of ten immigrant entrepreneurs in Jönköping context, we found four key features that distinguish TE with the rest: access to the sets of resources, economic and social development, ownership structure, and business operations.

  • 81.
    Adiguna, Rocky
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Sharif, Abshir
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    After the Ground Stopped Shaking: Socioemotional Wealth and Social Capital in Post-Disaster Recovery of Small Family Businesses2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study is the first to measure the interaction of socioemotional wealth (SEW) and social capital, consisting of community and institution, and their impact in post-disaster recovery of small family businesses. Hierarchical multiple regression is used based on a sample of 79 small family businesses in Indonesia. Our findings suggest that family firms in post-disaster situation are able to pursue both SEW goals and economic gains, thus breaking the trade-off between SEW vs. economic benefits. More specifically, we found that SEW—as a strategic decision making tool—shows its prominence on the interaction between SEW-community and SEW-institution. This implies that small family businesses need to find synergy between socioemotional endowments and social capital to help them to bounce back and recover after a disaster. 

  • 82.
    Adil Ali, Hagar
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Djärv, Tony
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Lease Accounting Modification: A qualitative study about how Swedish listed companies are preparing as well as adapting to the proposed amendments in IAS 17 Leases2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    A common source of financing businesses is through leasing. Currently there are two types of leasing, financial and operating. While financial leases are capitalized similarly to owning an asset, operating leases are completely left out of the balance sheet and as a result related assets and debts are not visible for third party users. Therefore, leasing standards have been criticized for not providing a fair view of a company’s financial positions. Considering this, IASB and FASB are collaborating on a joint project that would require capitalization of all lease contracts, and that was the core in their latest Exposure Draft 2013/6. 

    Purpose

    This study aims to examine the listed companies on Swedish Stockholm stock exchange in which one way or another deal with operating leases contracts. In particular investigating the Swedish Mid and Small Cap companies’ perceptions regarding this proposal and amendments implied in the ED 2013/6.

    Method

    A qualitative method with an abductive approach has been used for the purpose of this study. The process of selecting the acquiring information to fulfil that has been mainly collected through the interviews made with representatives from the Swedish Mid and Small Cap companies. The interviews which consisted of semi-structured with an open-ended questions style were performed through telephone between Wednesdays 25th of March 2015 – Tuesday 7th of April 2015.

    Conclusions

    Considering that the proposed amendments in the IAS 17 Leases are not yet effective and based on the results as well as the analysis from this study it is shown that some of the examined companies are not aware of the ED 2013/6, and therefore not preparing for those requirements in the new ED. Further, the examined companies whom are aware argue that the new ED include to a great extent more administrative work and complicated calculations, thus they would rather avoid the realization of such new standard. In conclusion, the findings indicate that all companies using operating leases will at some extent be affected by the amendments, although most Mid and Small Cap companies will not have a dramatic consequence emerge their balance sheets.

  • 83.
    Adilson, Leite Cancino
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Chatzidakis, Nikolaos
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    The Influence of Internal and Externalfactors on the Supplier Selection: A study in the Swedish Furniture Industry2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 84.
    Adinugrahan, Sapto
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Ridwan, Mochamad
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Efficiency of Foreign Debt Portfolio Management in Emerging Economies2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Fluctuation of exchange rate has affected the increasing burden of foreign debt payment in emerging economies. This issue has negatively influenced the economic growth. It has been a severe obstacle considering that governments have to issue public debt denominated in foreign currency to finance the budget deficit. Hence, there is an urgent necessity to implement an efficient public debt management to minimize the exchange rate exposure. This thesis analyses how efficient the foreign debt portfolio management is in the 14 emerging economies under examination in the period of 1990-2013. Panel Dynamic Fixed-effect Estimator and Granger Causality approach are applied to analyze how responsive the currency composition of foreign debt portfolio to the exchange rates movement. The thesis examines the four biggest foreign debt shares that are denominated in US dollar, Euro, British pound, and Japanese yen, and the related exchange rates movement in the economies under consideration. The observation concludes that the foreign debt portfolio management in these emerging economies is not efficient or not optimal. The evidences prove that changes in the exchange rates of Euro, British pound, and Japanese yen relative to US dollar Granger cause changes in respected debt shares. It means that there is no substitution effects from the appreciation of the currencies vis-à-vis the US dollar during the year of observation.

  • 85.
    Adlemo, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Tarasov, Vladimir
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Fuzzy logic based decision-support for reshoring decisions2018In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Operations and Supply Chain Management, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 86.
    Adlemo, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Tarasov, Vladimir
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Knowledge intensive decision support for reshoring decisions2018In: Proceedings of the 30th Annual NOFOMA Conference: Relevant Logistics and Supply Chain Management Research, Kolding, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 87.
    Adlemo, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Tarasov, Vladimir
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Reshoring decision support in a Swedish context2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a decision-support system for reshoring decision-making based on fuzzy logic. The construction and functionality of the decision-support system are described, and the functionality is evaluated in a high cost environment exemplified through a Swedish context. Ten different reshoring scenarios, provided by Swedish reshoring experts, are entered into the decision-support system and the decision recommendations provided by the system are presented. The confidence that can be put on the recommendations is demonstrated by comparing them with those of the reshoring experts. The positive results obtained indicate that fuzzy logic is both feasible and that the quality of the results are sufficiently good for reshoring decision-making.

  • 88.
    Adler, Niclas
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Att använda företrädare för de empiriska miljöerna i validering av forskningsresultat1997Report (Other academic)
  • 89.
    Adler, Niclas
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Breaking the Code of Management Reflexivity: R&D on Management for Competitive Advantage2003Report (Other academic)
  • 90.
    Adler, Niclas
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Captured in Extrapolation by the Legacy of Scientific Legitimacy and Scientific Validity2004In: Paper presented at the The Academy of Management (AOM) 2004 Annual Meeting, New Orleans, USA, August 6-11, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 91.
    Adler, Niclas
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Ericsson Radar Electronics1995In: Organisatoriskt lärande: en antologi från projektet Utveckling av nyckelkompetenser för individer och företag, Göteborg: Institute for Management of Innovation Technology , 1995Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 92.
    Adler, Niclas
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Formation of Corporate Strategies in Science and Technology-based Companies: Managing the Dynamic Interplay between the Logics of Exploration and Exploitation2001Report (Other academic)
  • 93.
    Adler, Niclas
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Förutsättningar för hög prestation och organisatoriskt lärande i utvecklingsarbete: En komparativ studie av två olika utvecklingsorganisationer i telekommunikationsbranschen1995Report (Other academic)
  • 94.
    Adler, Niclas
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Gränsöverskridande kunskapsbildning: FoU som möjliggör forskare och praktikers gemensamma lärande?2003Report (Other academic)
  • 95.
    Adler, Niclas
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Management Reflexivity and the Search for R&D on Management and Management Innovations2004In: Paper presented at the The Academy of Management (AOM) 2004 Annual Meeting, New Orleans, USA, August 6-11, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 96.
    Adler, Niclas
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Managing Complexity1996In: Proceedings of the 5th European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management (EISAM) Conference, Paris, France, June 1996, 1996Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 97.
    Adler, Niclas
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Managing the Dynamic Interplay between Corporate and Regional Innovation Systems2002Report (Other academic)
  • 98.
    Adler, Niclas
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Next Generation Product Realization: Efficiency, Effectiveness and Flexibility2002Report (Other academic)
  • 99.
    Adler, Niclas
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Next Generation R&D Organization2003Report (Other academic)
  • 100.
    Adler, Niclas
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    The Art & Science of Business Creation2001In: Paper presented at the 1st International Consortium for Electronic Business (ICEB) Conference, Hong Kong, December 19-21, 2001, 2001Conference paper (Other academic)
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