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  • 51.
    Abidin, Crystal
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Department of Sociology, National University of Singapore, Singapore.
    #Familygoals: Family influencers, calibrated amateurism, and justifying young digital labor2017In: Social Media and Society, ISSN 2056-3051, Vol. 3, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following in the celebrity trajectory of mommy bloggers, global micro-microcelebrities, and reality TV families, family Influencers on social media are one genre of microcelebrity for whom the “anchor” content in which they demonstrate their creative talents, such as producing musical covers or comedy sketches, is a highly profitable endeavor. Yet, this commerce is sustained by an undercurrent of “filler” content wherein everyday routines of domestic life are shared with followers as a form of “calibrated amateurism.” Calibrated amateurism is a practice and aesthetic in which actors in an attention economy labor specifically over crafting contrived authenticity that portrays the raw aesthetic of an amateur, whether or not they really are amateurs by status or practice, by relying on the performance ecology of appropriate platforms, affordances, tools, cultural vernacular, and social capital. In this article, I consider the anatomy of calibrated amateurism, and how this practice relates to follower engagement and responses. While some follower responses have highlighted concerns over the children’s well-being, a vast majority overtly signal their love, support, and even envy toward such parenting. I draw on ethnographically informed content analysis of two group of family Influencers on social media to illustrate the enactment and value of calibrated amateurism in an increasingly saturated ecology and, investigate how such parents justify the digital labor in which their children partake to produce viable narratives of domestic life.

  • 52.
    Abidin, Crystal
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). National University of Singapore, Singapore.
    ‘Just Asian’?: inscribing east Asian ‘mixed race’ in Australia2017In: Mixed Race Identities in Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific Islands / [ed] Kirsten McGavin, Farida Fozdar, New York: Routledge, 2017, p. 84-99Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Abidin, Crystal
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Curtin University, Bentley, WA, Australia.
    The Semiotics of Emoji: The Rise of Visual Language in the Age of the Internet2018In: Discourse & Communication, ISSN 1750-4813, E-ISSN 1750-4821, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 450-453Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Abidin, Crystal
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). National University of Singapore, Queenstown, Singapore.
    Vote for my selfie: Politician selfies as charismatic engagement2017In: Selfie Citizenship / [ed] Adi Kuntsman, Springer, 2017, p. 75-87Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Taking Singaporean Member of Parliament (MP) Baey Yam Keng as a case study, this chapter analyses how charismatic engagement can be mediated through social media and selfie tropes. In the wake of online campaigns since the General Elections 2011, and with the ruling party garnering its lowest share of electoral votes since state independence, MP Baey, aged 47, has emerged as a press-branded 'selfie king', 'social media celebrity' and 'Twitter influencer' for engaging with the online citizenry since publishing his first selfie in March 2013. Drawing on his Instagram and Twitter feed and selfie-related engagements up till 2015, this chapter demonstrates how politician selfies can be exercised to solicit affect and mobilise public sentiment among voters.

  • 55.
    Abidin, Crystal
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Young people and digital grief etiquette2019In: A Networked Self and Birth, Life, Death / [ed] Zizi Papacharissi, Routledge, 2019, p. 160-174Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Abidin, Crystal
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Centre for Culture and Technology (CCAT), Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Cover, Rob
    The University of Western Australia.
    Gay, famous and working hard on YouTube: Influencers, queer microcelebrity publics and discursive activism2019In: Youth, sexuality and sexual citizenship / [ed] P. Aggleton, R. Cover, D. Leahy, D. Marshall, & M. L. Rasmussen, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2019, p. 217-231Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ordinary digital media users who gained large public followings, also known as Influencers, emerged as micro-celebrities in the early 2000s, with many working for a living directly through online content creation and the self-representation of their everyday lives. Capitalising on high visibility, many Influencers also engage in social justice activities. As a result, they have become important nodes in LGBTQ networks online, including through personal and organisational collaborations. In this chapter, we draw on digital ethnography to analyse a gay-identifying Australian YouTube Influencer, Troye Sivan, focussing on how his status as an Influencer creating digital content has fostered queer support by way of a creative work orientation that simultaneously promotes both a rights-based activism and his own career.

  • 57.
    Abidin, Crystal
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). National University of Singapore, Queenstown, Singapore.
    Gwynne, Joel
    National Institute of Education, Singapore.
    Entrepreneurial selves, feminine corporeality and lifestyle blogging in Singapore2017In: Asian Journal of Social Science, ISSN 1568-4849, E-ISSN 2212-3857, Vol. 45, no 4-5, p. 385-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The making of the entrepreneurial self is a dominant trope of contemporary media culture, and a multitude of media formats across divergent national contexts showcase the contemporary obsession with media visibility and the attainment of celebrity status as the most aspirational form of social mobility. In Singapore, commercial lifestyle blogs are prime examples of entrepreneurial identity-making as websites almost exclusively created by young women, showcasing user-generated content oriented around the pleasures of consumption as a means of empowerment, self-actualisation and individualisation. By analysing content on a selection of blogs, this article aims to answer the following questions: To what extent are Singaporean women’s identities contingent upon material consumption as a means of identity creation? How do blogs created by women demonstrate an entrepreneurial investment in their appearance and feminine corporeality as the means of perceived empowerment, even at the expense of more formal and structured forms of individualisation, such as education?

  • 58.
    Abidin, Crystal
    et al.
    University of Western Australia.
    Ots, Mart
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Consumer-led innovation in social media advertising formats2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, and weblogs, consumer activity is increasingly institutionalized, guarded by rules and norms. Consumers take on tasks previously performed by trained media workers, but they also create new activities, emerging as a new breed of media workers, institutionalizing new fields of the media and advertising industries and their associated practices (Dolbec and Fischer 2015). It has been described how amateur workers develop new ethical norms and rules for publishing, by taking journalistic/editorial decisions on what content to publish and how, within their new institutional domain (Abidin & Ots, 2015).

     

    This paper is focused on a specific group of stakeholders – everyday Internet users who manufacture themselves into a new form of social media microcelebrity known as the ‘Influencer’ (Abidin 2015). Since 2005, many young women have taken to social media to craft ‘microcelebrity personas’ as a career – “a new style of online performance that involves people ‘amping up’ their popularity over the Web using technologies like video, blogs and social networking sites” (Senft 2008: 25). In their most basic capacity, Influencers produce advertorials on blogs and social media platforms in exchange for payment or sponsored products and services (Abidin 2015). Owing to their power to shape purchase decisions, their clients have progressed from small home businesses to bluechip companies including Canon, Gucci, and KLM. Until recently, the most effective advertorials are those that are seamlessly woven into the daily narratives Influencers publish on their blogs and social media, such that readers are unable to tell apart ‘paid opinions’ from ‘unpaid’ sentiments (Abidin 2014). However, along with the maturity of the field, there is a gradual standardization of new advertising formats.

     

    The conducted study explores how semi-professional microcelebrity Influencers create advertising market innovations. Researchers have previously described how consumer fans help firms innovate (e.g. Füller et al 2008), and how fan cultures celebrate their favourite brands by creating their own advertisements (Muniz & Schau 2005; for overview see Ots & Hartmann 2015). This paper takes a slightly different approach – rather than seeing consumers as co-creators, it demonstrates how new actors outside the traditional media and advertising industries, make innovations that compete with the incumbents. We focus on these vernacular advertising innovations in the age of social media, and seek to understand how Influencers orientate towards a youth market in the saturated, visually dominated attention economy of Instagram. The findings include a typology of innovative advertising formats emerging outside the traditional media companies, along with their associated publishing rules as defined by the semi-professional Influencers.

     

    The data draws on a larger study of social media Influencers in Singapore since mid-2010, including over a year of intensive participant observation conducted with these Influencers in the flesh in the capacity of various roles. These interactions and observations were archived in extensively detailed field diaries. 120 personal interviews were conducted with Influencers, Influencer management agencies, (prospective) clients, readers, and friends and family of Influencers between December 2011 and July 2013. Social media content from blogs, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, AskFM, and popular public forums was archived until December 2015. Fieldwork entailed continued interaction with other actors involved in the Influencers’ social milieu, including their peers, backend production management, sponsors and advertisers, and readers. As such, although the data is drawn mainly from the textual and visual content of publically accessed blogs and associated social media platforms including Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook, the analysis is highly contextualised and shaped by long-term ethnographic work among these Influencers. 

  • 59.
    Abidin, Crystal
    et al.
    University of Western Australia.
    Ots, Mart
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Influencers Tell All?: Unravelling Authenticity and Credibility in a Brand Scandal2016In: Blurring the lines: Market-driven and democracy-driven freedom of expression / [ed] Maria Edström, Andrew T. Kenyon & Eva-Maria Svensson, Nordicom, 2016, p. 153-161Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter discusses the emerging practices of social media Influencers. In focus are six influential Instagram Influencers who were ‘exposed’ for involving themselves in campaigns aiming to discredit telecommunications providers in Singapore. In the absence of enforced legal boundaries and industry norms regarding advertising formats and advertising ethics, brand scandals are frequent, causing concern among regulators, brand managers, and platform owners. When starting to accommodate commercial brands and contents in social media posts, Influencers are constantly at risk of breaching their contract of trust with their followers. The case study shows how Influencers, followers, and eventually also the brand clients, are sensitive to what they experience as deceptive and unethical behaviours that will put normative pressures onto the Influencers to conform to certain ethical standards.

  • 60.
    Abidin, Crystal
    et al.
    University of Western Australia.
    Ots, Mart
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Microcelebrity influencers and advertorial disclosure: Practicing the advertising/editorial divide on Instagram2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Abidin, Crystal
    et al.
    University of Western Australia.
    Ots, Mart
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    The Influencer’s dilemma: The shaping of new brand professions between credibility and commerce2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new "liquid" media environment involves a range of new professions, practices and practitioners (Deuze 2011). Based on a rich ethnographic study containing personal interviews and participant observation, this paper looks at semi-professional Influencers in the social media marketing industry and asks how these new branding professions and their practices emerge and institutionalize. Specifically, the material draws on data collected between 2011 and 2015 among women Influencers in the ‘lifestyle’ genre in Singapore who advertise products and services in the industry verticals of Fashion, Beauty, and Electronic goods on blogs, Twitter, and Instagram.

  • 62.
    Abildgaard Nielsen, Søren
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Köhler, Florian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Exploring Organizational Identity as a Potential Process: A multiple case study on employee-oriented companies2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore organizational identity as a potential process.

     

    Design/Methodology/Approach: We applied a qualitative method and followed an inductive approach that was applied to a multiple-in-depth-case study for which we conducted semi-structured interviews with 26 members of two organizations, the Swedish consulting company REACH and the Swiss digital agency WONDROUS. Following a narrative approach, both for structuring the empirical findings, as well as conducting the analysis, we used over 16 hours of interviews to create company narratives and subsequently analyzed them in multiple steps in the fashion of a narrative analysis.

     

    Findings: Based on our empirical findings and the empirical analysis, we developed a conceptualization, the Flux Model. We contribute to the existing body of literature by proposing that the Flux Model visualizes the dynamics of how organizational members socially construct organizational identity on the premise of their own (self-)perceptions. By presenting the different parts of the model and their multiple layers, the process of how organizational identity is continuously becoming is illustrated.

     

    Research Limitations/Implications: The scope of our study is restricted to the two case companies in question. If our abstractions from the cases in form of the Flux Model help to better understand the process of organizing, managers become liberated to make deliberate choices about their organizations’ identities. For research this means an even tighter connection to individual psychology and a deepening of the perspective that organizational identity can not only be viewed as something companies have.

     

    Originality/Value: Out of skepticism towards the usefulness of viewing organizational identity as a process, we applied a symbolic interpretivist perspective and allowed for the possibility that we might not find a process after all. The primary value of this study we believe to be found in the extensive presentation of empirical data, together with our narrative analysis and our conceptual contribution (the Flux Model).

  • 63.
    Abolhosseini, Shahrouz
    et al.
    TEMEP, Seoul National University.
    Heshmati, Almas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    The Main Support Mechanisms to Finance Renewable Energy Development2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Considering that the major part of greenhouse gases is carbon dioxide, there is a global concern aimed at reducing carbon emissions. Additionally, major consumer countries are looking for alternative sources of energy to avoid the impact of higher fossil fuel prices and political instability in the major energy supplying countries. In this regard, different policies could be applied to reduce carbon emissions, such as enhancing renewable energy deployment and encouraging technological innovation and creation of green jobs. There are three main support mechanisms employed by governments to finance renewable energy development programs: feed-in-tariffs, tax incentives, and tradable green certificates. Considering that many of the promising technologies to deploy renewable energy require investment in small-scale energy production systems, these mechanisms could be used to enhance renewable energy development at the desired scale. Employing a carbon emission tax or emission trading mechanism could be considered ideal policies to mitigate emissions at the lowest cost. The comparison of feed-in-tariffs and renewable portfolio standard policies showed that the former is good when a policy to develop renewable energy sources with a low level of risk for investors is considered. However, the latter is an appropriate policy when a marketview policy is applied by the government.

  • 64.
    Abolhosseini, Shahrouz
    et al.
    College of Engineering, TEMEP, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea.
    Heshmati, Almas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    The main support mechanisms to finance renewable energy development2014In: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, Vol. 40, p. 876-885Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Considering that the major part of greenhouse gases is carbon dioxide, there is a global concern aimed at reducing carbon emissions. In addition, major consumer countries are looking for alternative sources of energy to avoid the impact of higher fossil fuel prices and political instability in the major energy supplying countries. In this regard, different policies could be applied to reduce carbon emissions, such as enhancing renewable energy deployment and encouraging technological innovation and the creation of green jobs. This study compares three main support mechanisms employed by governments to finance renewable energy development programs: feed-in-tariffs, tax incentives, and tradable green certificates. Considering that many of the promising technologies to deploy renewable energy require investment in small-scale energy production systems, these mechanisms could be used to enhance renewable energy development at the desired scale. Employing a carbon emission tax or emission trading mechanism could be considered ideal policies to mitigate emissions at the lowest cost. The comparison of feed-in-tariffs and renewable portfolio standard policies showed that the former is good when a policy to develop renewable energy sources with a low level of risk for investors is considered. However, the latter is an appropriate policy when a market view policy is applied by the government. Finally, considering technological progress and the cost reduction for power generation by renewable energy sources, we suggest that support mechanism policies should be reconsidered from the financial point of view. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 65.
    Abolhosseini, Shahrouz
    et al.
    Seoul National University.
    Heshmati, Almas
    Sogang University.
    Altmann, Jorn
    International University of Bruchsal.
    The Effect of Renewable Energy Development on Carbon Emission Reduction: An Empirical Analysis for the EU-15 Countries2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The increased concerns about climate change have made renewable energy sources an important topic of research. Several scholars have applied different methodologies to examine the relationships between energy consumption and economic growth of individual and groups of countries and to analyze the environmental effects of energy policies. Previous studies have analyzed carbon emission savings, using renewable energy usage as an individual source or in combination with traditional sources of energy (e.g., hybrid plants) in connection with lifecycle analysis methods. It is shown that after a certain period, economic growth leads to the promotion of environmental quality. However, econometric modelling critiques have opposed the results of these studies. One reason is that the effectiveness of governance-related parameters has previously been neglected. In this research, we analyze the impact of renewable energy development on carbon emission reduction. We estimate a model to evaluate the effectiveness of renewable energy development, technological innovation, and market regulations in carbon emission reduction. The empirical results are based on a panel data estimation using the EU-15 countries data observed from 1995 to 2010. The elasticities of CO2 emissions are estimated, in order to evaluate the effectiveness of each parameter. The findings show that the effects of a negative climate change could be mitigated by governance-related parameters instead of economic development.

  • 66.
    Abolhosseini, Shahrouz
    et al.
    TEMEP, Seoul National University.
    Heshmati, Almas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Altmann, Jörn
    TEMEP, Seoul National University.
    A Review of Renewable Energy Supply and Energy Efficiency Technologies2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Electricity consumption will comprise an increasing share of global energy demand during the next two decades. In recent years, the increasing prices of fossil fuels and concerns about the environmental consequences of greenhouse gas emissions have renewed the interest in the development of alternative energy resources. In particular, the Fukushima Daiichi accident was a turning point in the call for alternative energy sources. Renewable energy is now considered a more desirable source of fuel than nuclear power due to the absence of risk and disasters. Considering that the major component of greenhouse gases is carbon dioxide, there is a global concern about reducing carbon emissions. In this regard, different policies could be applied to reducing carbon emissions, such as enhancing renewable energy deployment and encouraging technological innovations. Two main solutions may be implemented to reduce CO2 emissions and overcome the problem of climate change: replacing fossil fuels with renewable energy sources as much as possible and enhancing energy efficiency. In this paper, we discuss alternative technologies for enhancing renewable energy deployment and energy use efficiency.

  • 67.
    Abolhosseini, Shahrouz
    et al.
    Petr Univ Technol, Natl Iranian Oil Co, Int Affairs, Tehran, Iran.
    Heshmati, Almas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Sogang Univ, Seoul, South Korea.
    Rashidghalam, Masoomeh
    Univ Tabriz, Tabriz, Iran.
    Energy security and competition over energy resources in Iran and Caucasus region2017In: AIMS Energy, ISSN 2333-8326, E-ISSN 2333-8334, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 224-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy security as a dominant factor in international stability is of great importance for major economies. The global energy market with its current level of supply and demand relies on energy sources in the Middle East, Caucasus, Central Asia and Russia. After the Fukushima disaster nuclear powers in Europe view renewable energy sources as a serious alternative. Europe’s energy vulnerability has deteriorated due to the Russia-Ukraine conflict. However, renewable energy sources are not large enough to replace nuclear power completely. This trend will continue with climbing demand especially in the natural gas sector as clean energy. In this research, Caucasus and Iran are considered the main sources and routes for energy transmission to the global market, including Europe. Caucasus plays a key role in bridging Europe and Asia. Also, Iran is an alternative for energy transmission to Europe after lifted sanctions. As part of the European active supply diversification policy Iran has capacity to reduce Europe’s energy dependency on Russia. However, changes in US new administration America First Policy is harmful for the EUs energy security. Caucasus aims to catch a large share of the European energy market since the Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan pipeline has started operations and Iran is also trying to expand its market to become a sustainable source of energy for major consumers. Therefore, Iran and Caucasus are considered reliable energy suppliers for Europe. In this regard, we analyze the best motivation for changing the direction new suppliers’ energy policies towards Europe and suggest alternative solutions to compete with rival countries in order to enhance energy security.

  • 68.
    Abona, Emil
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    The Relationship between Swedish Equity Funds´Management Fees and Performance2007Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing number of people in Sweden and in the rest of the world are becoming more interested in the mutual fund sector. Investments in mutual funds have grown rapidly these past few years. Nilsson (2004) wrote that 85 percent of the Swedish population invested in mutual funds in 2004. The Swedish Investment Fund Association also found an increase in investments in mutual funds; 83 billion Swedish crowns were invested in mutual funds in 2005, an increase from 56 billion in 2004.

    The purpose of this thesis is to evaluate whether or not there is a relationship between low fee, middle fee, and high fee charging Swedish Equity funds and their respective performance (unadjusted and risk-adjusted returns). The Modigliani & Modigliani (1997) risk-adjusted performance measurement was used to calculate the risk-adjusted performance of the 130 mutual funds. And the linear regression was used to analyze whether or not there was a relationship between the variables (management fee vs. returns/risk-adjusted returns). The mutual funds were also divided into three different categories, based on their management fees; low, middle and high fee mutual funds.

    The analysis illustrated that there was no clear relationship between the management fee and the returns/risk-adjusted returns. There was some connection found between the management fee and the low, middle fee category. However, this research confirms that investors should not believe that a mutual fund which charges higher fees necessarily generate higher returns.

  • 69.
    Abosh, Shilan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Law.
    Societas Unius Personae: Is there a need for a new European company form?2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In 2008, the European Commission proposed a regulation for a new European private company, called the Societas Privata Europeaea. This proposal did not get unanimous approval and was therefore withdrawn after five years of attempt to find a compromise. In 2014, the European Commission proposed a directive on single-member private limited liability companies, called the Societas Unius Personae. The aims of the new proposal have a few similarities as the European private company, as will be mentioned in the introduction. However, the proposed directive introduces a few changes, which the European Commission hopes will make this proposal successful.

    The purpose with this thesis is mainly to examine whether there is a need of a new European company form on the market today. The conclusion is taken by examining who would benefit the most with this company form.

    This thesis contains an explanation of the proposed directive, a comparison between this new company form and the corresponding Swedish company, as well as opinions on this directive. In the end there is a discussion regarding this subject and lastly my conclusions.

    The result has shown that there are still great amount of uncertainties that are in need of further discussion in order for this proposal to eventually pass unanimous consent. My conclusions are that there is not an urgent need of a new European company form on the market right now. However, it is a work in progress, and I believe a European company form like this one is a good way towards the aim of uniting the Member States of the European Union.

  • 70.
    Abraham, Ben Mathew
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Kumar, Rohit
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Trust Among Partners in Startups2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 71.
    Abraham, Daniella
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work.
    Moayed Babke, Mariana
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work.
    Varför stannar hon?: En kvalitativ studie av kvarhållande mekanismer i biografiska skildringar av kvinnors erfarenheter av mäns våld i nära relation2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 72.
    Abrahamsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare. University College of Kristianstad,Kristianstad.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Gerdner, Arne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Sense of coherence of reindeer herders and other Samis in comparison to other Swedish citizens2013In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 2242-3982, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 72, p. -20633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Samis are indigenous people in north Europe. In the territory called Sa´pmi (Lapland), reindeer herding is the traditional base for the Sami economy. The relation between living conditions and positive health of the Swedish Samis has been sparsely studied. As health is closely linked to sense of coherence (SOC), an understanding of the background factors to SOC may contribute knowledge that might be useful in promoting living conditions and health.

    Methods. The study examines relations between the level of SOC and background factors from surveys in a Sami population (n=613) in comparison to a non-Sami population (n=525) in Sweden, and in comparison between 2 subsamples of Samis, that is, herders and non-herders.

    Results. There are more similarities than differences between the Sami and non-Sami populations. However, dividing the Sami population, reindeer herders had significantly lower SOC, and in specific the subcomponent manageability, that is, less ability to use available resources to meet different demands in life, compared to non-herders.

    Conclusions. In addition to age and health, predictors of SOC are related to the life form of reindeer husbandry and the belonging to the herding community

  • 73.
    Abrahamsson, Alexander
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. 1994.
    Creutz, Simon
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Stock Market Anomalies: The Day-Of-The-Week-Effect: An empirical study on the Swedish Stock Market: A GARCH Model Analysis2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The day-of-the-week effect has been a widely studied field ever since the concept was introduced in the early 1970s. Historically, negative returns on Mondays have been the most common finding. In line with improved market efficiency, researchers have started to question the existence of this anomaly.

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the weak-form efficiency level within the Swedish stock market by using sophisticated statistical approaches. The authors aim to investigate if the day-of-the-week effect was demonstrated between 2000 and 2017.

    Method: To properly provide answers to this investigation, a quantitative study has been conducted on the OMXS30. The data has been analysed by using different kind of sophisticated statistical methods such as GARCH and TGARCH.

    Conclusion: The results show that the day-of-the-week effect was not demonstrated within the OMXS30 during this time period, providing evidence for improved market efficiency.

  • 74.
    Abrahamsson, Alexander
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Höglund, Isak
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Sponsorship evaluation among local sponsors: An exploratory study of the Cross Country World Cup in Ulricehamn 20172017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, the financial investments into sponsorships have increased. This is also significant on a local level. Both corporations and local authority invest extensively in sponsorships today and a growing interest has risen in sport event sponsorships. Although more financial resources are invested in sponsorships, there is a lack of sponsorship evaluation. There are evaluation methods present, but the literature has neglected to explain how local corporations and local authority evaluates a sponsorship of a international sport event hosted in a local geographical area.

     

    The purpose of this thesis is therefore to explore how local authority and corporate sponsors evaluates their sponsorship investment of a global sport event arranged in a local geographical area. The research method of this thesis was qualitative and the primary data was collected by conducting a multiple case study including four local corporate sponsors and one local authority sponsor of the cross-country World Cup in Ulricehamn 2017.

     

    The findings revealed that the local corporate sponsors evaluated the sponsorship by using non-numerical, hence intangible metrics, while the local authority sponsor used numerical metrics, hence more tangible metrics. 

  • 75.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    Lunds universitet.
    Gremyr, Ida
    Chalmers.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Svenska handelshögskolan i Helsingfors.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala universitet.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Rehn, Alf
    Åbo Akademi.
    Segerstedt, Anders
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Öhman, Peter
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Industriell ekonomi och organisering2016Book (Other academic)
  • 76.
    Abrahamsson, Linus
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication.
    I kölvattnet av Dekaden: En undersökning om hur hållbar utveckling undervisas mot årskurserna 4–62017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable development has since the mid nineteen- nineties gained a stronger position in Swedish society. School is no exception and Education for Sustainable Development [ESD] is today seen as one of three environmental education traditions in Swedish school. Research within ESD is limited within Swedish grades 4–6, (age 10–12) and the teacher must use methods used teaching students in higher grades and further education within ESD are limited. The purpose of this study is twofold. First the study will assess how teachers conduct teaching ESD as well as how teachers describe their ESD within natural sciences or social studies. Secondly, the study will investigate how teachers gain new information within ESD. Through a qualitative study, 4 teachers within 2 southern Swedish municipalities participate in semi-structured interviews. The teachers’ answers are interpreted with the hermeneutic theory to see if their education reach ESD.

    The result shows that the participating teachers’ educations have similarities where discussions, students’ participation and interdisciplinary teaching are part of the education. The study also shows that the teachers asking for more education within ESD to develop their own education since the ESD is based on the teachers’ interest.

    All participating teachers describes an ESD education but the students’ participation within education may develop further. Since no further education within ESD have been implemented in the teachers work, school development within sustainable development can lead to new knowledge.

  • 77.
    Abrahamsson, Linus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication.
    Johansson, Oscar
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication.
    Håller utvecklingen: En studie om hur hållbar utveckling undervisas i årskurserna 4-6.2016Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Undervisningen i hållbar utveckling har sedan mitten av 1990-talet använts som en av tre dominerande miljöundervisningstraditioner i skolan. Hållbar utveckling är idag inget eget ämne, men kursplanen för årskurserna 4-6 lyfter fram begreppet i flertalet ämnen samt att området ska ses ur ett ämnesövergripande perspektiv. Då hållbar utveckling ska undervisas under hela grundskolan har litteraturstudien inriktats på hur undervisningen bedrivs i årskurserna 4-6 och vilken betydelse läraren har för elevernas förståelse. Genom en översikt av aktuell forskning har likheter och skillnader funnits mellan en rad olika arbetssätt. Studien har främst ett fokus på miljöperspektivet inom hållbar utveckling. Studien visar att det finns flera sätt att arbeta med hållbar utveckling som eventuellt kan ha både för och nackdelar. Simulering via datorspel samt utomhuspedagogik är områden forskarna lyfter fram. Studien tar även upp vilka handlingar som är vanligt förekommande i miljöundervisningen. Slutligen presenterar studien en diskussion där resultatet kopplas till våra tidigare erfarenheter och framtida yrkesroll. Något vi finner intressant i studien är avsaknaden av forskning som vänder sig till årskurserna 4-6. 

  • 78. Abrahamsson, Louise
    et al.
    Dufva, Malin
    Management of the Potential Challenges in the Consolidation Phase: A Case Study of a Scandinavian Company2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this thesis is to explore how to manage the potential challenges organizations may face in the consolidation phase, and in order to achieve this, potential challenges need to be identified.

    Methodology: The research has been performed through an abductive case study method to the subject of change management. The empirical data was gathered from semistructured interviews conducted at an international company, Company X, primarily from the electronic commerce department. The authors used a thematic analysis inspired by Boyatzis (1998) when analyzing the data.

    Research Limitation: Due to the limited amount of time, the research is limited to only embrace the consolidation phase of an organizational change process. The case study includes 10 interviews from one organization, which will limit the research. The authors apply anonymity due to the company's desire; however, it is also done in order to protect the respondents from any possible harm that might derive from this study (Waldorf,2006).

    Theoretical Perspective: Literature covering different but highly related areas of change management, and its relation to the consolidation phase constitutes the theoretical foundation of the thesis.

    Results: The authors identified four potential challenges when consolidating change; communication, prioritize consolidation, policies and employee involvement.

    Conclusion: In order for organizations to successfully manage the four identified challenges they have to increase the flow of communication, prioritize the consolidation phase, and thereby also allocate resources, which enables the employees to consolidate changes, set up clear policies for the consolidation phase and involve the employees within all levels, in order to increase the employee motivation.

  • 79.
    Abrahamsson, Philip
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Steerling, Jonas
    Smart Beta based on ROE: is Smart Beta based on ROE a good investment2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Background: Smart beta is one of the most popular investment strategies at the moment and projections show that the money invested in Smart Betas will continue to increase. The reason for the growing popularity is that it is a hybrid between active and passive investment. Where the Smart Beta strategy avoids the flaw of holding too many overvalued stocks in passive investing as well as reducing the management fees that comes with active investments. There are many different ways to construct a Smart beta. Several studies have been done to see if there is a possibility to create a Smart Beta based on ROE and they have all showed positive results. Purpose: The purpose of this thesis is to investigate if a Smart Beta based on ROE would perform better than the Swedish market. This thesis will also investigate which are the optimal weights for the Smart Beta. Method: Three different strategies are used in order to select stocks for the portfolios these portfolios are weighted in three different weightings. The performance of all portfolios are calculated through backtesting and then compared against the benchmark OMXSGI. Conclusion: The average return of the betas is higher than the comparable index, however they have taken a small amount of additional risk. The risk-adjusted measurements show that the extra risk is compensated with additional return, since the Smart Betas have higher average risk-adjusted measurement ratios. Therefore, a Smart Beta based on ROE should be created. The Last ROE strategy shows that the best returns and risk-adjusted returns and the Sharpe weighting (SW) was substantially better than the other weightings. Although, the time-horizon is relative short and it needs more research in order to make a conclusion with more certainty. 

  • 80.
    Acheampong, Faustina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Information Technology and Information Systems (CenITIS).
    Business models for telemedicine services: A literature review2015In: Health Systems, ISSN 2047-6965, E-ISSN 2047-6973, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 189-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Telemedicine has been acknowledged to improve the quality of healthcare. However, many telemedicine services fail beyond the pilot phase. A literature review on business model components for telemedicine services was conducted. Based on specified inclusion criteria, 22 publications were included in the review. To facilitate the analysis of literature, a business model framework with value as its central focus was proposed. Improvement in quality, efficiency and accessibility of care were identified to be the outcomes of telemedicine, with patients and healthcare personnel being the main users of the services, which are delivered through home, institutional and community-based care. Patients, health providers, vendors, payers and government agencies are actors involved in the delivery of telemedicine services, which require investments in resources like videoconferencing technologies, home monitoring devices and other IT infrastructure. Subscriptions, reimbursements and pay-per-use revenue streams were identified as feasible for commercializing telemedicine services.

  • 81.
    Acheampong, Faustina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Information Technology and Information Systems (CenITIS). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Innovating healthcare through remote monitoring: Effects and business model2017In: Health Care Delivery and Clinical Science: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications, IGI Global, 2017, p. 247-268Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Information technology has been suggested to improve patient health outcomes and reduce healthcare cost. This study explored the business model and effects of collaborative innovation between caregivers and patients on healthcare delivery through remote patient monitoring by interviewing caregivers and surveying atrial fibrillation patients. Findings indicate that remote monitoring enhanced early detection of potential risks and quality of clinical decision-making with patients feeling more empowered and involved in their own care. The remote monitoring system which consisted of a home-based ECG and a web-based service and was offered free to patients, brought together caregivers, patients, service provider and the government as actors. The introduction of remote monitoring increased the workload of caregivers and facilitation of timely diagnostics and decision-making were not realized. IT is an enabler of innovation in healthcare, but it must be integrated into work processes with a viable business model to realize potential benefits and sustain it. 

  • 82.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Book review: Managing Media Companies: Harnessing Creative Value (2nd ed.): by Annet Aris and Jacques Bughin, West Sussex, England: Wiley, 2009. ISBN 978-04-70713-95-2 (paperback), 384 pp.2011In: International Journal on Media Management, Vol. 13, p. 149-151Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 83.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Creating a film production cluster in Sweden's west: The case of 'Trollywood'2011In: Media Clusters: Spatial Agglomeration and Content Capabilities / [ed] Charlie Karlsson and Robert G. Picard, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2011, p. 354-376Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 84.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Developing media management scholarship: a commentary to Picard and Lowe’s essay2016In: Journal of Media Business Studies, ISSN 1652-2354, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 117-123Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 85.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Entrepreneurs in media2012In: Encyclopedia of New Venture Management / [ed] Matthew R. Marvel, London: Sage Publications, 2012, p. 154-157Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 86.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Gender and Acquiring Resources2012In: Encyclopedia of New Venture Management / [ed] Matthew R. Marvel, London: Sage Publications, 2012, p. 209-210Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 87.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Internationalization competence of SMEs2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Export has a positive impact on economic growth, and exporting companies often achieve a higher level of productivity than non-exporting companies. Most companies in Sweden are small, and it is of vital importance for the Swedish economy that they successfully develop and grow. In a small home-market economy like Sweden, an important direction for growth is to expand internationally. But many companies do not dare to internationalize due to a perceived lack of competence. This report aims at providing a comprehensive overview of academic research related to different kinds of competences relevant for the internationalization of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The overview leads into recommendations to SMEs regarding what kind of issues they might want to keep in mind when preparing for international business activities, e.g. to develop an appropriate set of resources and competences. In addition, implications relevant to policy-makers are derived from the literature overview.

  • 88.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Media entrepreneurship: Taking stock and moving forward2017In: JMM - The International Journal on Media Management, ISSN 1424-1277, E-ISSN 1424-1250, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This editorial reviews current research about media entrepreneurship and introduces the four papers published in this special issue. These papers move the emerging academic field of media entrepreneurship forward by outlining the relevance of context for enhancing our understanding of entrepreneurial phenomena, by introducing the theoretical concept of ‘entrepreneuring as emancipation’, by analyzing the institutionalization of media entrepreneurship education, and by categorizing different investment types in corporate entrepreneurship. The editorial concludes by calling for continuing efforts to theory-building to further develop the field.

  • 89.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    On the way to continuous growth: The role of entrepreneurial management2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 90.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Selbständigkeit von Frauen: Forschungsperspektiven und -resultate aus dem skandinavischen Raum2014In: Die Vielfalt von Selbständigkeit: Sozialwissenschaftliche Beiträge zu einer Erwerbsform im Wandel / [ed] Claudia Gather, Ingrid Biermann, Lena Schürmann, Susan Ulbricht, Heinz Zipprian, Berlin: Edition Sigma, 2014, p. 49--59Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 91.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    The role of entrepreneurial orientation in combining old and new media2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 92.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Andersson, Svante
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Laurell, Hélène
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Frühe Internationalisierung eines Unternehmens im Hochtechnologiebereich - Treiber und Hindernisse2011In: Zeitschrift für KMU und Entrepreneurship, ISSN 1860-4633, Vol. 59, no 2, p. 125-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SMEs in high-technology industries, such as life sciences, face a fundamental challenge. On the one hand, i.a. high product development costs push firms to early-stage internationalization to speed up the amortization of those investments. On the other hand, a number of factors constitute hinders to internationalization, such as insufficient endowments with financial resources and the need to adapt to local regulations, which differ between countries. To date, little is known about how SMEs in practice master this challenge. Based on a longitudinal, in-depth case study of a young company from a high-technology sector, this paper aims at providing a better understanding of early internationalization processes of startups in these industries. This paper is closely linked to practice, while at the same time is contributing to the literature on international entrepreneurship.

  • 93.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Brundin, EthelJönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Entrepreneurship and SME Management Across Africa: Context, Challenges, Cases2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book series publishes monographs and edited volumes devoted to studies on entrepreneurship, innovation, as well as business development and managementrelated issues in Africa. Volumes cover in-depth analyses of individual countries, regions, cases, and comparative studies. They include both a specific and a general focus on the latest advances of the various aspects of entrepreneurship, innovation, business development, management and the policies that set the business environment. It provides a platform for researchers globally to carry out rigorous analyses, to promote, share, and discuss issues, findings and perspectives in various areas of business development, management, finance, human resources, technology, and the implementation of policies and strategies of the African continent. Frontiers in African Business Research allows for a deeper appreciation of the various issues around African business development with high quality and peer reviewed contributions. Volumes published in the series are important reading for academicians, consultants, business professionals, entrepreneurs, managers, as well as policy makers, interested in the private sector development of the African continent.

  • 94.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Brundin, Ethel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Introduction2016In: Entrepreneurship and SME Management Across Africa: Context, Challenges, Cases / [ed] Leona Achtenhagen, Ethel Brundin, Springer, 2016, , p. 220p. 1-6Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter provides an introduction to this edited volume and its main themes Context, Challenges, and Cases. It briefly introduces the different chapters included in each of these themes.

  • 95.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Brundin, Ethel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Introduction — management challenges in Africa2017In: Management challenges in different types of African firms: Processes, practices and performance / [ed] L. Achtenhagen & E. Brundin, Springer, 2017, p. 1-9Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This introductory chapter addresses manangement challenges across different types of African organizations. Based on a literature review of how management challenges in Africa have been studied to date, it introduces this volume´s three parts - Practices, Processes and Performance. It also gives a brief insight of the chapters that discuss these challenges in detail.

  • 96.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Brundin, EthelJönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Management Challenges in Different Types of African Firms: Processes, Practices and Performance2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book focuses on management challenges in different types of companies, ranging from small to large, from private to public and from service to manufacturing in the African context. With empirical data from countries as diverse as Rwanda, Kenya and Ethiopia, it discusses the increasing economic importance of the African continent, covering relevant topics on sustainability and environmental issues, exports, logistics, HR issues, innovation and financial reporting. Through different conceptual insights and empirical case studies, the research presented serves as a useful resource for academics, students, and policy-makers interested in in-depth studies on management challenges in Africa.

  • 97.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Growth strategies in medium-sized companies - Beyond the dichotomy of organic versus acquired growth2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current research commonly investigates two different growth strategies, organic growth and growth by acquisitions. Studies on acquisition-based growth typically draw on cross-sectional quantitative studies of large US-based firms, treating all types of acquisitions as one mode. Our study takes a different approach, and explores different growth strategies of a smaller sample of medium-sized companies drawing on a longitudinal, qualitative design. This research design allows us to identify eight different growth modes. Thereby, we illustrate that dynamic growth processes in medium-sized firms are much more diverse and complex than commonly assumed.

  • 98.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Patterns of dynamic growth in medium-sized companies: beyond the dichotomy of organic versus acquired growth2017In: Long range planning, ISSN 0024-6301, E-ISSN 1873-1872, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 457-471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current research commonly investigates two different growth modes, organic growth and growth by acquisitions. Studies on acquisition-based growth typically draw on cross-sectional quantitative studies of large firms that treat all acquisitions the same. Our study takes a different approach, and explores different growth modes of a smaller sample of medium-sized companies drawing on a longitudinal, qualitative case-study design. This research design allows us to identify eight different growth modes that companies combine in unique ways over time. Thereby, we illustrate that patterns of dynamic growth in medium-sized firms are much more diverse and complex than commonly assumed.

  • 99.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Ekberg, Sara
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Melander, Anders
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Fostering growth through business development: Core activities and challenges for micro-firm entrepreneurs2017In: Journal of Management and Organization, ISSN 1833-3672, E-ISSN 1839-3527, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 167-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a concept stemming from practice, business development has received scarce academic attention. In this paper, we explore core business development activities of micro-firms and the challenges they perceive in conducting them. Based on interviews with 30 micro-firms, we identify three core business development activities that leverage the firm's resource base, complemented by three support activities that secure and organize the firm's resources. We find the business development activities to be tightly related to the three practices of leveraging, securing and organizing resources. We also identify three important contextual influences on business development in micro-firms: industry, age and if the firm is in an incubator. Our findings contribute to developing a conceptualization and theorization of business development for micro-firms, which is relevant as the vast majority of companies worldwide are micro-firms, but many never embark on a growth path. Based on our results, we outline practical implications, for example, how companies could overcome their perceived lack of time and an agenda for future research encouraging further studies comprising micro-firms with different qualities.

  • 100.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Ericson, Thomas
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Müllern, Tomas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Leadership: The Role of Interactive Strategizing2003In: Innovative Forms of Organizing: international perspectives, London: SAGE , 2003, p. 49-71Chapter in book (Other academic)
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