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  • 51.
    Kammerlind, A-S
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Ernsth Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Test-retest reliability of the Swedish version of the Life-Space Assessment Questionnaire among community-dwelling older adults2014In: Age well: Challenges for individual and society, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Mobility is a vitally important activity throughout life. Advanced age carries increased risk of experiencing decreased mobility, with associated activity limitations and participation restrictions in social events. The Life-Space Assessment (LSA), originally developed by Sawyer Baker and colleagues in the U.S.A., has been used to measure mobility in community dwelling older adults. The LSA includes six levels of life-space, ranging from the person's bedroom to places beyond the person's hometown. A total LSA score is obtained by multiplying the life-space level reached by a value for independence and a value for the frequency of transportations. Three additional measures of life-space levels can be calculated: the independent life-space level; the assistive life-space level; and the maximal life-space level. Objective: To examine the test-retest reliability of the Swedish version of the Life-Space Assessment Questionnaire. Methods: At two test sessions, two weeks apart, 298 community-dwelling subjects between 75 and 90 years of age were asked about their life-space mobility during the past four weeks, and how often and whether they were independent from another person or equipment to reach different life-space levels. Results: None of the four scoring methods showed significant differences between test sessions. The mean total scores were 65 out of the maximum possible score of 120 at both test sessions. High levels were also found for independent, assisted, and maximal life-space at both sessions. ICC coefficients and weighted Kappa values between 0.84-0.94 were found for the total score, the independent and the assisted life-space levels indicating good to excellent reliability. The method error values showed that a change of 10 in the total score and a change of one level in any of the three life-space levels can be considered to indicate a real change in clinical practice. Conclusion: The Swedish version of the Life-Space Assessment Questionnaire can be reliably used among community-dwelling older adults.

  • 52.
    Kassberg, Fanny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Antonsson, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Skillnaden i det dorsala böjmomentet vid MTP, utan rullsula och med två olika styvheter på rullsulan2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rocker soles are used to compensate for joint stiffness, reduce high plantar pressure and reduce the bending of the toe joints. Despite this, few studies have investigated if the rocker shoe really reduce the joint movement at the forefoot. There is also a lack of information regarding the importance of the rocker shoes stiffness for the bending moment of the forefoot, at the third rocker.

     

    Method: Five healthy women (n=5) walked with three different pairs of shoes, two pairs were modified with the same rocker shape with different stiffness and one pair without a rocker. Five repeated measurements for the three different shoes were collected for all the participants. The dorsal bending moment was analyzed with a sensor sole (VebitoSCIENCE) that replaced the shoes insole.

     

    Result: The dorsal bending moment was reduced for all participants with a rocker shoe. Significant reduction of the dorsal bending moment at MTP1, for all participants, when the stiff rocker was compared to the shoe without rocker (94,4 – 20,1 Nmm) and between the stiff and flexible rocker for participants 1,2,4 and 5 (68 -22,2 Nmm).

     

    Conclusion: The dorsal bending moment was significantly reduced for MTP 1 and MTP 5 when a rocker shoe was used by healthy women, the study has also shown that the stiffness has an importance in order to achieve a reduction of the dorsal bending moment at MTP.

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  • 53.
    Kjellström, Sofia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Status and trends of research ethics in Swedish nurses' dissertations2010In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 383-392Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research ethics is increasingly formally regulated, but little is known about how ethical considerations are reported in dissertations. The aim of this literature study was to describe the status and trends of ethical considerations in Swedish doctoral dissertations written by registerednurses. A total of 77 dissertations from 1987, 1997, and 2007 met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed by descriptive statistics. Ethical considerations were mostly overlooked in 1987, but almost ubiquitous by 2007. All dissertations in 2007, except one, had a section on ethical considerations; however, these were short, lacking in references, and short on content. The most common topic was informed consent and approval from research ethics review boards, followed by confidentiality and ethical aspects of methodological issues. Our results imply that the quantity and quality of ethical considerations must be improved in order to assure ethical soundness for participants, patients, researchers, and society.

  • 54. Lager, Ida
    et al.
    Lundahl, Ida
    Patienters personliga upplevelser av mikroprocessorstyrda protesknäleder: En kvalitativ studie2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: A lot of quantitative research has been performed on the differences between mechanical and microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knees. Limited research is availed on personal experiences of using different types of prosthetic knees. The aim of this study is to examine how three people using a transfemoral prosthetis have experienced the change from a mechanical prosthetic knee to a microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee.

    Method: Three participants using transfemoral prostheses who have used both mechanical and microprocsessor-controlled prosthetic knees have been interviewed. The interviews have been transcribed and analyzed with an interpretative phenomenological method. To clarify the results interesting phenomena have been coded using ICF.

    Results: The participants experienced a greater sense of security with microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee. This primarily affected the ability to walk down slopes. The participants also feel that walking is easier and the gait more symmetrical. There are however differences in how the participants feel these improvements have affected them and which aspects of their lives are changed.

    Conclusions: Participants experiences vary. In order to decide which prosthetic knee joint is most suited for an individual the clinical practicioner should get to know the person and identify their needs.

  • 55.
    Lenrick, Raymond
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    A potential for further enhancing obstetrical safety: Patient harm measurement with the global trigger tool in the south-east health-care region of Sweden2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A decade of heightened awareness concerning safety issues in healthcare since the Institute of Medicine’s awakening call has resulted in a string of counteroffensive measures. The pace of improvement has been slow and not altogether clear. Rates of patient harm are in general now measured by voluntary reporting and indicator measurements. The use of triggers or clues in random nurse-based reviews to enable identification of patient harm is a more effective method for measuring the overall rate of harm in a health care organisation. Measured actual overall rates of patient harm, their variations and patterns during delivery in the south-east health-care region of Sweden are not previously known. Measurement is important to patient safety improvement, as a foundation for accountability, effort selection and keeping track of results. The patient’s voice must also be much clearer in quality and safety improvement efforts in healthcare. The Institute of Healthcare Improvements Global Trigger Tool for measuring adverse events was used to review 1137 deliveries during 2011 in the seven departments (10% of all cases). Mother and new-born were both evaluated. Thirty eight patient harm events per 1000 patient days were identified, correlating to 13% of admissions. Presupposed rates among staff were double this value. Current patient safety indicators are half this value. One third of patient harm events at birth affected the new-born. Twenty different categories of harm were found. This study shows significantly higher rates of patient harm than previously reported. The nurse reviewers defined the method as valuable and a useful method for measuring harm at delivery. Limitations at this stage are no observed changes in health care delivery or clinical outcomes and that value assessment is based entirely on the judgement of the data-abstractors.

     

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  • 56.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Resursrikedom och balans i livet ger god munhälsa hos 19-åringar2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet var att undersöka hälsoorienterade resurser bland 19-åringar och hur dessa interagerar med orala hälsorelaterade attityder och beteenden.Deltagare, 19-åringar som bor i Jönköping, var strategiskt utvalda i samband med den årliga undersökningen på Folktandvården. En strukturerad enkät besvarades innehållande bakgrundsfaktorer och Antonovskys livsfrågeformulär som mäter "känsla av sammanhang" (KASAM), följt av en tematiserad djupintervju. Den kvalitativa analysmetoden var Grounded Theory. Nio informanter (fyra kvinnor) har hittills tagits med i studien.Den preliminära analysen visar en kärnkategori, "Resursrikedom och balans i livet", som tycks vara avgörande för hälsosamma val som påverkar orala hälsorelaterade attityder och beteenden. Denna kärnkategori bygger på fem inbördes relaterade teman som beskriver olika dimensioner av hälsorelaterade resurser. Trygghet och stöd från familj och vänner, interna resurser såsom självtillit men också olika strategier för att hantera vardagen lyftes fram som centrala resurser. Värderingar och förväntningar, egen erfarenhet och behov, men också tankar om framtida orala hälsotillstånd, var viktiga för motivation till hälsosamma val. Dessutom ansågs tillgången till samhällets resurser såsom stormarknader, möjlighet till självhushåll, en hälsosam kost,  men också hälsobudskap från media, skola och tandvård samt den psykosociala miljön som påverkande faktorer för hälsosamma val.Slutsats: Samspelet mellan olika externa och interna resurser beskrevs som avgörande för hälsosamma val och oral hälsa. Fokus på individens resurser kan vara en framgångsfaktor i förebyggande och munhälsofrämjande åtgärder.

  • 57.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Abrahamsson, Kajsa H.
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Oral health-related resources - a salutogenic perspective on Swedish 19-year-olds2015In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 56-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to explore health-oriented resources among 19-year-olds and, specifically, how these resources interact with oral health-related attitudes and behaviour. To represent individuals with various psychosocial environments and socioeconomic areas, the participants were selected from different geographical locations of the Public Dental Service clinics in the county of Jönköping, Sweden. A structured questionnaire was distributed, including the instrument ‘sense of coherence’, for description of the study group, followed by a semi-structured thematized interview. The qualitative method used for sampling and analyses was grounded theory. Data sampling and analysis were performed in parallel procedures and ended up in a sample of ten informants (five women). In the analysis of interview data, a core category was identified, ‘Resources of Wealth and Balance in Life – a Foundation for Healthy Choices’, describing the central meaning of the informants’ perceptions of resources with an essential beneficial impact on oral health. The core category was built on five themes, which in turn had various subthemes, describing different dimensions of resources interacting with beneficial oral health-related attitudes and behaviour: ‘Security-building Resources and Support’, ‘Driving force and Motivation’,Maturity and Insight’,Health Awareness’ and ‘Environmental influences.’ The results elucidate personal and environmental health-oriented resources with influence on oral health-related attitudes and behaviours of young individuals. Such beneficial recourses should be recognized by dental personnel to promote oral health.

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  • 58.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    H Abrahamsson, Kajsa
    Odontologiska fakulteten, Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Resources of Wealth and Balance in life – Essential for Oral health among Swedish 19-year olds2013In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene: Abstracts for the International Symposium on Dental Hygiene, Cape Town, South Africa, August 14–17, 2013 / [ed] Öhrn, Kerstin, 2013, Vol. 11, p. 163-164Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim was to explore health oriented resources among 19-year olds and in specific how these health oriented recourses interacts with oral health related attitudes and behaviors.Methods: Participants, 19-year olds living in Jönköping, were strategically selected in connection with the annual examination at the Public Dental Service. A structured questionnaire included background factors and Antonovsky´s 13-items Life-orientation questionnaire measuring ‘Sense of coherence’ (SOC), followed by a thematized in-depth interview. The qualitative method chosen was Grounded Theory (GT). In accordance with GT, datasampling and analyses is performed in a parallel procedure that continues until new data do not bring anything vital into the analysis model. Nine informants (four women) have so far been included in the study.

    Preliminary results: The preliminary analysis model suggests a core category labeled ‘Resources of Wealth and Balance in Life’ which seemed to be essential for healthy choices influencing oral health related attitudes and behaviors. This core category is built on five interrelated themes describing different dimensions of health related recourses. Security and support from family and friends, internal resources such as self-efficacy but also different strategies to coop with everyday life were highlighted as central resources.  Values and expectation within life context, your own experience and needs but also thoughts about future oral health conditions, were important for motivation towards healthy choices. Moreover, availability to community resources such as supermarkets, opportunity for self-cooking and a healthy diet, but also health messages from media, school and dental care as well as the psychosocial environment were described as influencing factors for healthy choices.  Conclusions: The interplay between different external and internal resources were described as essential for healthy choices and oral health. Focusing on such beneficial resources could be a success factor in prevention and oral health promotion strategies. 

  • 59.
    Lorentzen, Line Harboe
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics.
    Fleckner, Lisbeth Dauerhøj
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics.
    The effect on the self-selected gait velocity caused by the subjects’ position when walking on a self-paced dual-belt treadmill in a virtual reality environment while performing a color-word Stroop task: a pilot study2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: When people walk while performing a cognitive dual-task, a decrease in gait velocity will occur because of the demand for some of the same cognitive resources. However, in a previous study they found an increase instead of a decrease in gait velocity when subjects walked on a self-paced treadmill while performing a color-word Stroop task. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine if the increase found in gait velocity in the previous study was a consequence of the subjects’ position. Additionally, it was investigated whether real-time feedback about the subjects’ position could substitute the lack of a reference point. Method: Position and gait velocity was measured in twelve healthy subjects during a trial consisting of eight control conditions and eight different interventions. Results: A significant difference was found in gait velocity between the interventions where the accelerations-line was moved furthest to the front and back (IzerolineA, IzerolineB) and in position between the original intervention and one with a neutral zone (Iorginal1, Ineutralzone). No differences were found in position or velocity with any of the feedback systems. Conclusion: From the results it could be concluded that the increase in gait velocity was a consequence of the subjects positioning themselves further in the forward direction on the treadmill. No conclusions could be drawn with the feedback systems.

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  • 60.
    Lunde, Hilde
    et al.
    Department of Behavioural Science, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Interprofessional education in sexual health, VSEX7100 encourages individualized professional development for staff in schools, health and social care2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Lunde, Hilde
    et al.
    Department of Behavioural Science, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.
    Bakke, Anne
    Department of Behavioural Science, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Increasing competence in sexual health and research methodology through new teaching interventions in social education2019In: NACS 2019: Abstract book, 2019, p. 23-23Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sexual health is a new and important area for social educator students to address, but the topic is often included in the education to a small extent. Therefore it is valuable to find new perspectives of including sexual health in various ways in the courses in the social educators program. Integration of ongoing research projects in sexual health when teaching scientific theory can improve students' subject-related skills, expertise in research methodology, and critical assessment of research results. The intervention also presents an opportunity to deepen reflections on social educator students´ attitudes towards addressing sexual health with users.

    The triple aim of this pilot study was to test research-oriented teaching, enhance learning about sexual health, and to explore the validity of the SASH-Ext questionnaire.

    Integration with theoretical education, of the research project was carried out alongside testing of face validity and content validity, as well as a group discussions with social educator students. A teaching session on sexual health was also conducted. The psychometric results of the study were presented to the students after the psychometric tests.

    The students appreciated the research-oriented teaching and the results showed educational needs concerning sexual health, and were useful for the psychometric development of SA-SH-Ext.

    The study shows promising findings both with regard to the students' learning outcomes, and the validation of SA-SH-Ext, but must be followed up by additional research.

  • 62.
    Ma, Christina Zong-Hao
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Interdisciplinary Division of Biomedical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.
    Zheng, Yong-Ping
    Interdisciplinary Division of Biomedical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.
    Lee, Winson Chiu-Chun
    School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong.
    Vibrotactile Wearable Biofeedback System Integrated with Force Sensors at Plantar Foot Could Relieve Foot Varus Deformity in Patients with Stroke2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUNDPlantar sensory input is a crucial component of proprioceptive system, which is important for maintaining balance and gait control. Foot orthoses are traditionally prescribed to correct/compensate foot deformity and relieve foot pain in patients. Adding some electronic components at insoles to capture the plantar force information and providing corresponding feedback information could compensate sensory loss in patients and amputees [1-3], this may further be applied to help improve lower limb motor control.AIMTo investigate the effect of instant biofeedback of plantar pressure distribution at medial and lateral forefoot on alteration of foot inversion and push-off forces during stance phrase in patients with hemiplegic stroke.METHODThis study was conducted in a university locomotion laboratory. Convenience sampling approach was adopted to recruit 8 patients with hemiplegic stroke (7M+1F, age 54±10 years, height 175±6 cm, weight 72±11 kg) in this study. All participants walked with visible foot inversion and seven of them walked with visible foot plantarflexion in swing phrase. The foot inversion and plantarflexion deformities were flexible and can be corrected by external forces.A vibrotactile biofeedback system was developed and evaluated, which integrated two force sensors at plantar surface of foot in a pair of flat insoles measuring the plantar forces at medial and lateral forefoot, and wirelessly sent instant control signals to one vibrator at wrist when the magnitude of detected plantar force at medial-side forefoot was lower than 50% of the lateral-side’s.A three-dimensional motion capture system (3D) motion capture system (Vicon Nexus 1.8.1, Vicon NexusTM, Vicon Motion Systems Ltd., UK) and an in-shoe plantar pressure measurement system (novel pedar-x system, PedarTM, novel GmbH, Munich, DE) were used to measure each subject’s spatial-temporal gait parameters and plantar pressure distribution during walking in each of the two experimental conditions with randomized sequences: 1) with biofeedback system turned-off, and 2) with biofeedback system turned-on.RESULTSUpon turning on the biofeedback system, the medial-side plantar pressure at both forefoot and midfoot of the affected limb increased significantly and became close to that of the sound limb, while the plantar pressure at rearfoot and lateral-side midfoot of the affected limb decreased significantly in subjects (Figure 1, p<0.05). The subjects adjusted their gait pattern by significantly decreasing the foot external rotation and hip flexion, and increasing the pelvic backward rotation of both limbs during stance phrase (p<0.05). Although no significant difference was found, subject’s affected limb also revealed notable reduction of foot inversion in stance phrase and increase of plantar-flexion in terminal stance phrase during walking upon using the device.

    DISCUSSION & CONCLUSIONInstant vibrotactile biofeedback of plantar pressure distribution at medial and lateral forefoot helps relieve the foot inversion, facilitate initiation of swing phrase, and additionally increase weight-bearing symmetry in stance phrase during walking in patients with stroke. The positive results of this study shed new lights on future research of wearable plantar force-based biofeedback system for improving gait in people with impaired lower-limb motor control. It further allows the targeted gait training and improvement of motor control to be conducted in both indoor and outdoor environments.

  • 63.
    Magnusson, Lina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Lunds universitet.
    Ramstrand, Nerrolyn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Malawian prosthetic and orthotic users' mobility and satisfaction with their lower limb assistive device2013In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 385-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate patients’ mobility and satisfaction with their lower limb prosthetic or orthotic device and related service delivery in Malawi and to compare groups of patients regarding type and level of device and demographics.

    METHODS: Questionnaires were used to collect self-report data from 83 patients.

    RESULTS: Ninety percent of prostheses or orthoses were in use by patients, but approximately half of these needed repair. Thirty-nine percent reported pain when using their assistive device. The majority of patients were able to rise from a chair (77%), move around the home (80%), walk on uneven ground (59%) and travel by bus or car (56%). However, patients had difficulties walking up and down hills (78%) and stairs (60%). In general, patients were quite satisfied with their assistive device (mean of 3.9 out of 5) and very satisfied with the service provided (mean of 4.4 out of 5). Access to repairs and servicing were rated as most important, followed by durability and follow-up services. Lack of finances to pay for transport was a barrier to accessing the prosthetic and orthotic centre.

    CONCLUSION: Patients were satisfied with the assistive device and service received, despite reporting pain associated with use of the device and difficulties ambulating on challenging surfaces.

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  • 64. Nguyen Thi, Thu
    Determination of thyroid volume by ultrasound 2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Ultrasound is safe and painless, produces pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves (not use ionizing radiation), thus there is no radiation exposure to the patient. The thyroid gland is among the most commonly imaged glands using ultrasound due to the limitation of clinical examination.

    The Radiographers' skills in ultrasound differ according to the country and the basic formations. And throught this study we want to emphasize about the role of radiographer.

    Aim: The porpuse of this study is determine the volume and morphological characteristics of normal thyroid order to get reference values for young adults.

    Material and Method: We selected 204 students consist of male and female from Danang University of Medical Technology And Pharmacy were studied. Mean age of our subjects was 22 (range 18-25) all of them were healthy and with normal thyroid gland status. Descriptive statistics and analytic statistic was used.

    Results: In our study, the thyroid volume between female and male is different. The total thyroid volume significantly correlated with individual’s height, weight, body surface area and body mass index. The mean of total thyroid volume was 7.44 ± 2.09ml (range 3.51-14.57). The thyroid volume was best correlated with height (r = 0.44; p = 0.0001).

    Conclusion: Knowledge about the size of the thyroid gland is important in following the thyroid diseases and the examination of the gland.

    The radiographer's role is very important in determining the volume of thyroid.Radiographer is an important member of the diagnostic health care team.

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  • 65.
    Ottosson, Ann
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Minimera separation av föräldrar och nyfött barn med neonatal andningsstörning och maximera hudnära vård2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    At Södersjukhuset the mother and her newborn with transient tachypnoea (TTN) have two separate care chains. This leads to newborns with TTN being separated from their mothers as they are admitted to the neonatal unit to receive CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure) therapy.

    The aim of the improvement work is to minimise the separation of mother and newborn with TTN, during the time when the mother still requires obstetric care. The change idea consists of a mobile neonatal team who cares for the newborn with TTN on its mother’s chest skin-to-skin, wherever she currently is in her care chain. The study of the improvement aims at investigating how parents and neonatal care staff experience the new work procedure and the care form with a mobile neonatal team.

    During the period from 1 November 2017 until 30 April 2019 a total of 103 newborns with TTN have received care from the mobile team. These newborns have a shorter average length of stay and CPAP therapy duration and an earlier start of breastfeeding compared to the newborns with TTN who have received care in the neonatal unit. The healthcare staff in the neonatal unit experience that the reduced flow of patients contributes to an improvement of the working environment and the care environment. Parents express a feeling of high participation and security as well as a facilitated attachment to their child.

  • 66.
    Persson, Sofia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Sundqvist, Helena
    Jönköping University, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    "Det kostar på, det tar lite tid...": Studie av ett förbättringsarbete inom microsystemet för patienter som genomgår elektiv höft- och knäplastik2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 67.
    Pettersson, Tobias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Rania, Yousef
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Röntgensjuksköterskors syn på jobbglidning: En enkätstudie2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Vissa av röntgensjuksköterskans arbetsuppgifter kan utföras av andra professioner som sjuksköterska eller undersköterska detta kallas för jobbglidning mellan yrkesroller. Jobbglidning kan ske på grund av många olika orsaker som brist på personal, ökad befolkning vilket gör att mer personal behövs inom vården. Att undersköterska eller sjuksköterska utför vissa av röntgensjuksköterskans arbetsuppgifter kan påverka patientsäkerheten. Syfte: Att undersöka röntgensjuksköterskors syn på att arbetsuppgifter inom professionen utförs av sjuksköterska eller undersköterska. Metod: En kvantitativ enkätstudie med 53 deltagare som är legitimerade röntgensjuksköterskor från fyra sjukhus i två olika regioner. Resultat: Majoriteten av deltagarna anser att det är negativt att sjuksköterskor utför arbetsuppgifter inom mammografi och angiografi. Medan flera av deltagarna tycker det är bra om sjuksköterskor kan beräkna GFR inför undersökningar. Deltagarna anser att det är dåligt om undersköterskor utför konventionella röntgenundersökningar och att ge information om kontrastmedel till patienten medan de anser att det var mycket bra om undersköterskor tar in patienter på undersökningsrummet. Slutsats: Studien visar att röntgensjuksköterskorna generellt har negativ syn på att lämna deras arbetsuppgifter till de andra professionerna, utan de vill behålla deras kompetens inom områden som angiografi, mammografi och konventionell röntgen.

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  • 68. Pilström, Anna
    et al.
    Ringheim, Anna
    Att modellera för ett lärande - unga vuxna, närstående och medarbetare utvecklar former för erfarenhetsbaserat förbättringsarbete i hematologisk vård: Ett aktionsforskningsprojekt2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Experience based design is a model which is used to make patients and their friends and family involved in the development of care. When the EBD model is analyzed from an action research perspective, it becomes apparent that there is a possibility to extend patients’ participation in the design and implementation of the model.

     

    Aim: The aim of improvement work is to model a working method, on the basis of EBD and action research, together with the young adults with serious blood disease*, their friends and family and hospital employees. The goal is to take advantage of experiences and improve care in the Haematology department at Sahlgrenska University Hospital. The study of the improvement work aims to increase the knowledge of participants´ involvement in the improvement process and create learning about the success factors and obstacles.

     

    *blood cancer and serious blood disease

     

    Method: The modelling was carried out using an action research approach in PDSA cycles during the improvement work’s different steps, which created continuous learning. Experiences were collected from 22 young adults and their friends and family and areas for improvement were identified and prioritised. Individual interviews with young adults, their friends and family and hospital employee were carried out to increase knowledge about the participation and involvement in improvement as well as to create knowledge about success factors and obstacles.

     

    Results and conclusions: Young adults and their friends and family willingly engaged in efforts to model a working method for sharing their experiences in order to develop care. Action research used in conjunction with EBD created a high level of participation and a clear partnership. Lessons learned on how young adults and their friends and family can be involved to improve care resulted in the proposal of a model. As a result of the project, 14 areas for improvement were identified using the method, and four improvement efforts have been initiated as of now.

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  • 69.
    Pless, Mia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala , Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Implementation of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and the ICF Children and Youth Version (ICF-CY) within the context of augmentative and alternative communication2012In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 11-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the implementation of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), and the ICF version for Children and Youth (ICF-CY), within the context of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). First, the use of the ICF and the ICF-CY in AAC research is analyzed. Second, examples of training and implementation of ICF from other contexts besides AAC are provided. Finally, we synthesize data to provide directions for future implementation of the ICF and ICF-CY in the field of AAC. We conclude that, within AAC, organizational routines and intervention documents need to be adapted to the universal language and classification framework of the ICF and ICF-CY. Furthermore, examples are needed to demonstrate how factors affect implementation at organizational and individual levels.

  • 70.
    Rada, Daniel-Ion
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Påverkan av oral hälsa hos patienter behandlade för huvud- och halscancer2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 71.
    Ramstrand, Nerrolyn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Zügner, Roland
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Larsen, Louise B.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Tranberg, Roy
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Evaluation of load carriage systems used by active duty police officers: Relative effects on walking patterns and perceived comfort2016In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 53, no Part A, p. 36-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This study aimed to examine the effects of two different load carriage systems on gait kinematics, temporospatial gait parameters and self-reported comfort in Swedish police.

    Methods: 21 active duty police officers were recruited for this crossover study design. Biomechanical and self-report data was collected on two testing occasions. On occasion 1, three dimensional kinematic data was collected while police wore a/no equipment (control), b/their standard issues belt and ballistic protection vest and c/a load bearing vest with ballistic protection vest. Police then wore the load bearing vest for a minimum of 3 months before the second testing occasion.

    Results: The load bearing vest was associated with a significant reduction in range of motion of the trunk,´pelvis and hip joints. Biomechanical changes associated with the load bearing vest appeared to reduce with increased wear time. In both the standard issue belt condition and the load bearing vest condition, police walked with the arms held in a significantly greater degree of abduction. Self-report data indicated a preference for the load bearing vest.

    Conclusion: The two load carriage designs tested in this study were found to significantly alter gait kinematics.

    The load bearing vest design was associated with the greatest number of kinematic compensations however these reduced over time as police became more accustomed to the design. Results from this study do not support selection of one load carriage design over the other and providing individuals with the option to choose a load carriage design is considered appropriate.

  • 72.
    Revenäs, Åsa
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Martin, Cathrine
    Uppsala universitet.
    Opava, Christina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Brusewitz, Maria
    Swedish Rheumatic Association.
    Keller, Christina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Åsenlöf, Pernilla
    Uppsala universitet.
    A mobile internet service for self-management of physical activity in people with reumathoid arthritis: Challenges in advancing the co-design process during the requirements specification phase2015In: JMIR Research Protocols, ISSN 1929-0748, E-ISSN 1929-0748, Vol. 4, no 3, article id e111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: User involvement in the development of health care services is important for the viability, usability, and effectiveness of services. This study reports on the second step of the co-design process.

    Objective: The aim was to explore the significant challenges in advancing the co-design process during the requirements specification phase of a mobile Internet service for the self-management of physical activity (PA) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

    Methods: A participatory action research design was used to involve lead users and stakeholders as co-designers. Lead users (n=5), a clinical physiotherapist (n=1), researchers (n=2) with knowledge in PA in RA and behavioral learning theories, an eHealth strategist (n=1), and an officer from the patient organization (n=1) collaborated in 4 workshops. Data-collection methods included video recordings and naturalistic observations.

    Results: The inductive qualitative video-based analysis resulted in 1 overarching theme, merging perspectives, and 2 subthemes reflecting different aspects of merging: (1) finding a common starting point and (2) deciding on design solutions. Seven categories illustrated the specific challenges: reaching shared understanding of goals, clarifying and handling the complexity of participants’ roles, clarifying terminology related to system development, establishing the rationale for features, negotiating features, transforming ideas into concrete features, and participants’ alignment with the agreed goal and task.

    Conclusions: Co-designing the system requirements of a mobile Internet service including multiple stakeholders was a complex and extensive collaborative decision-making process. Considering, valuing, counterbalancing, and integrating different perspectives into agreements and solutions (ie, the merging of participants’ perspectives) were crucial for moving the process forward and were considered the core challenges of co-design. Further research is needed to replicate the results and to increase knowledge on key factors for a successful co-design of health care services.

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  • 73.
    Rodewald, Linda
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics.
    Bäckman, Sandra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics.
    Statistik över protesbrukares aktivitetsnivåer.: Vilka är de bakomliggande orsakerna till den angivna aktivitetsnivån?2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: For prosthetic users it is important to stay physically active in order to maintain good health. In Sweden there are no statistics regarding activity levels among prosthetic ambulators. This study has subsequently focused on investigating the causes and extent to which persons using a lower limb prosthesis participate in physical activity.

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate how many prosthetic users are physically active or inactive and reasons for their activity level. A further aim was to investigate if sport prostheses affect the activity level of prosthetic users.

    Design: Cross-sectional study.

    Methods: This study was based on a survey involving questions related to prosthetic users’ activity level. The survey was sent out via prosthetic and orthotic departments. Responses were analyzed using frequency tables and Fisher’s Exact Test.

    Participants: The survey was sent to 48 prosthetic users between the ages of 18-65 years.

    Results: The response rate was 52,1% of which 50% was used in the study. Results show that the activity level of prosthetic users could be estimated to be at the same level as the rest of population. Despite this, no significant association could be found between a sport specific prosthesis and the activity level of prosthetic users.

    Conclusion: This study has investigated the extent to which prosthetic users are physically active or inactive and also the underlying reasons for their level of activity. Since there were no significant associations, further research should be done to gain deeper knowledge of issues which promote physical activity in prosthetic users.

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  • 74.
    Rowlands, Charity
    et al.
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon , USA.
    Fried-Oken, Melanie
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon , USA.
    Steiner, Sam
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon , USA.
    Lollar, Donald
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon , USA.
    Phelps, Randall
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon , USA.
    Simeonsson, Rune J.
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina , USA.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Developing the ICF-CY for AAC profile and code set for children who rely on AAC2012In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 21-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the ICF-CY for AAC Profile, a tool to integrate information about the multiple factors affecting communication skill development and use in school-aged children with complex communication needs. The Profile uses the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health − Children & Youth Version (WHO, 2007) as its framework. We propose that the ICF-CY for AAC Profile constitutes a code set for AAC users and discuss the iterative process of code-set development. The Profile is one component of a proposed process to guide the development of educational goals for children in Grades kindergarten-12 who currently or potentially rely on AAC.

  • 75.
    Rudholmer, Elin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Inlärningseffekten på Limits of Stability på Transtibialt Amputerade Protesbrukare2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study is to examine the learning effect of Limits of Stability (LoS) test concerning transtibially amputated prosthetic users and a healthy control group. Seven transtibially amputated prosthetic users and a control group of seven healthy males repeated the LoS test five times during four sessions, one in the morning and one in the afternoon in two consecutive days. Two forceplates and 69 reflex markers were used to collect the data. The test subjects were placed with on the foot on each forceplate and were instructed to move their center of pressure by leaning the body from the ankles towards eight targets presented on a screen along with their center of pressure. The targets were selected in random order. The data was analyzed with Friedmans test, since the data wasn’t normally distributed, to see if there was any discrepancy between the repetitions and between the sessions. There were some significant discrepancies between repetitions and between sessions mainly involving the first repetition and the first session. However the results weren’t distinct enough to draw any concrete conclusions. Further studies are recommended. 

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  • 76.
    Salmiranta, Elin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    The child’s own Quality Improvement project: An improvement project and study resulting in a co-production framework of increasing participation and Shared Decision Making for children with long-term illness2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abbreviations

    SDM = Shared Decision Making

    GAS = Goal Attainment Scaling

    QI = Quality Improvement

     

    Introduction

    Participation and SDM are important for the health of children with a long-term illness. Most healthcare decisions for these children take place at home or in school.

     

    Aim of the QI project

    Create possibilities for children and parents to jointly engage in day-to-day health decisions, with the aim to increase GAS for the participating children with 100 % until 31 of March 2018.

     

    Aim of the interview study

    Increase the understanding of participation and SDM in families regarding day-to-day health decisions.

     

    Methods

    In the QI project, the Model for Improvement was used together with children and parents. Interviews with parents of children with a long-term illness were analyzed in a hermeneutical study.

     

    Results

    Three children planned their own mini QI-project and the GAS scores increased by 99, 123 and 123 %.

     

    The interview study resulted in the themes insight, ownership and environmental factors.

     

    Discussion and conclusions

    The results are presented in a framework showing the importance of co-production partnerships between children and parents to improve health outcomes. The framework can be used to identify, plan and evaluate projects. Future interventions should focus on promoting decision making for children to create better conditions for child-initiated and directed projects.

  • 77.
    Schichtel, Franziska
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Interventions with the focus on refugee children´s mental health: A systematic literature review2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 78.
    Schmidt, Manuela
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle.
    Umans, Timurs
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Avdelningen för Ekonomi.
    Experiences of well-being among female doctoral students in Sweden2014In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 9, p. 23059-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore how female PhD students experience and perceive their well-being. Focus groups were conducted with female PhD students employed at a Swedish university. The study was performed using a phenomenological hermeneutic approach based on the concept of the lifeworld, used as both a philosophical perspective and a methodology. Three main themes emerged from the analysis: being true to oneself, being in the sphere of influence, and performing a balancing act. By unfolding these themes, the study shows that perceptions and experiences of well-being in female PhD students are a multifaceted phenomenon and materialize through interaction of different aspects of ‘‘self ’’ (agent) and ‘‘others’’ (structure). As well as illustrating these perceptions and experiences, the study also presents female PhD students’ conceptualization of their well-being, expressed in terms of a white-water rafting metaphor.

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  • 79.
    Shafie, Maryam
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Förbättrad metod för tidig mobilisering av planerat kejsarsnittförlösta En kvalitativ studie av patienternas upplevelser2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 80.
    Sidenvall, Josef
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Gustavsson, Matilda
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Påverkar skon styvheten i ankel-fotortoser?: En funktionell analys2018Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Variation in stiffness against dorsal- and/or plantarflexion in an ankle-foot orthosis (AFO) can affect the kinematics and kinetics of the knee and ankle in people with cerebral pares and post-stroke. The knowledge of whether the shoe influence the overall stiffness in a limb-AFO-shoe-complex is limited. A previous study has investigated the subject but used a bench-analysis to address the question.

    Objective: The objective of the study was to use functional-analysis to investigate the influence of shoe-choice on the overall stiffness in a limb-AFO-shoe-complex in the sagittal-plane.

    Study Design: Crossover study.

    Methods: Gait analysis was performed on five healthy participants who wore three different AFO-shoecombinations. Data about the ankleangle and anklemoment was extracted to calculate the stiffness of each AFO-shoecombination. The stiffness’ were compared in four different intervals.

    Results: There was a difference in stiffness between the AFO-shoecombinations. The stiffness’ varied between 0,0314–0,1652 Nm/° during the different intervals. Which AFO-shoecombination that had the highest stiffness also varied during the extracted phase. The biggest difference in stiffness between two shoes was 49,6%.

    Conclusions: Stiffness in a limb-AFO-shoe-complex may depend on the shoechoice in healthy individuals. Only small differences were observed between the different AFO-shoecombinations, thus the results’ clinical relevance can be questioned.

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  • 81.
    Stenebrand, Agneta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Wide Boman, Ulla
    Department of Behavioral and Community Dentistry Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Department of Behavioral and Community Dentistry Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dental anxiety and symptoms of general anxiety and depression in 15-year-olds2013In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 99-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives:  The objective of the study was to analyse the relationship between dental anxiety and symptoms of general anxiety and depression among 15-year-old individuals. Methods:  The sample analysed included 221 randomly selected 15-year-old individuals living in the city of Jönköping, Sweden. One questionnaire captured sociodemography and dental history, while dental anxiety was assessed by the Dental Fear Survey (DFS) and symptoms of general anxiety and depression by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Results:  About 6% of the adolescents were classified as dentally anxious. Symptoms of general anxiety and depression were significantly correlated with dental anxiety in both the bivariate and multivariate analyses. The latter analyses were adjusted for gender and previous painful experiences of dental care. Individuals with high dental anxiety showed general anxiety scores on a clinical level (mean = 9.8, SD = 4.3). Conclusions:  Symptoms of general anxiety and depression were shown to be significantly correlated with dental anxiety among 15-year-old individuals.

  • 82.
    Strand, Filip
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics.
    Thomasson, Lina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics.
    Den transhumerala protesens biomekaniska påverkan på stående och gång.2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: People with transhumeral amputation have an asymmetrical anatomy. The influence of this asymmetry on gait and standing has not been well studied, neither has the potential problems that this could cause.

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate if any difference in standing posture and gait kinematics occur when people with transhumeral amputation use a prosthesis compared to when they don’t. Furthermore, the aim is to investigate if back problems are prevalent among people with this amputation level.

    METHODS: Two transhumeral amputees participated in this study. Static and gait analysis was conducted with and without prosthesis. The participants completed a survey regarding musculoskeletal problems.

    RESULTS: No major difference has been found in thorax tilt and pelvic kinematics when the subjects walk with compared to without prosthesis. However we have found a thorax obliquity towards the amputated side during walking, which is reduced when the subjects use their prosthesis. The subjects are leaning towards the amputated side when standing without prosthesis. When using the prosthesis the obliquity is reduced. The subjects do not suffer from any back problems.

    CONCLUSIONS: Use of an arm prosthesis seems to give people with transhumeral amputation a more upright posture during walking and standing.

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    Den transhumerala protesens biomekaniska påverkan på stående och gång
  • 83.
    Svensson, Tommy
    et al.
    Institutionen för lärande och beteendevetenskap, Linköpings universitet.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Focus on Health, Motivation, and Pride: A discussion of three theoretical perspectives on the rehabilitation of sick-listed people2010In: Work, ISSN 1051-9815 (Print) 1875-9270 (Online), Vol. 36, no 3, p. 273-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decades sickness absence from work has become a great societal problem. Questions of how rehabilitation processes should become successful and how peoples’ ability to work can be improved have become of great public interest. In this paper we discuss three well-known theoretical perspectives regarding their usefulness when it comes to research on rehabilitation for return to work. The three perspectives are: Antonovsky’s salutogenic model of health, Kielhofner’s model of human occupation and Scheff’s sociological theory of “shame and pride”. Each of these can be applied to increase understanding and knowledge concerning sickness absence and return to work. We discuss points of affinity among the three perspectives, as well as significant differences, and we propose that a very essential common denominator is the importance of self-experience.

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  • 84.
    Tang, Julia
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Chen, Nigel T M
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia; Curtin Autism Research Group, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia .
    Bölte, Sven
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia; Curtin Autism Research Group, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia; Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Centre for Psychiatry Research; Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet & Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Stockholm Health Care Services, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Girdler, Sonya
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia; Curtin Autism Research Group, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia .
    Atypical visual processing but comparable levels of emotion recognition in adults with autism during the processing of social scenes2019In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 49, no 10, p. 4009-4018Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the underlying visual scanning patterns of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) during the processing of complex emotional scenes remains limited. This study compared the complex emotion recognition performance of adults with ASD (n = 23) and matched neurotypical participants (n = 25) using the Reading the Mind in Films Task. Behaviourally, both groups exhibited similar emotion recognition accuracy. Visual fixation time towards key social regions of each stimuli was examined via eye tracking. Individuals with ASD demonstrated significantly longer fixation time towards the non-social areas. No group differences were evident for the facial and body regions of all characters in the social scenes. The findings provide evidence of the heterogeneity associated with complex emotion processing in individuals with ASD.

  • 85.
    Thidell, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Kvalitetssäkring av utbildningar vid Hälsohögskolan2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Från och med 2016 tillämpas ett nytt sätt att utvärdera utbildningar på högre nivå i Sverige. Universitetskanslersämbetet (UKÄ) har ansvar för uppdraget efter beslut i Sveriges riksdag. Fokus kommer att till stor del att ligga på lärosätenas egna kvalitetssäkringssystem. ESG, European Standards and Guidelines for Quality Assurance in the European Higher Education Area, kommer att ligga som grund för det nya systemet. Förbättringsarbetet som i denna rapport är utfört på mesosystemnivå vid Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, har inneburit att dels följa utvecklingen nationellt från UKÄ:s sida, dels att kartlägga det kunskapsläge som programansvariga vid HHJ har om kvalitetsfrågor. Det övergripande syftet med förbättringsarbetet har varit att vara med och förbättra Hälsohögskolans arbete med kvalitetssäkring samt vara delaktig i förberedelsen inför nytt granskningssätt. Det specifika syftet är att säkerställa att HHJ skall kunna arbeta med bästa möjliga kvalitet i det nya kvalitetssäkringssystemet samt att programansvariga har stöd i sitt kvalitetssäkringsarbete.

    En baslinjemätning i form av en fokusgruppsintervju har utförts och analyserats. Resultatet av analysen sade att kunskap och intresse finns för kvalitetsfrågor men att stöd från ledningen saknas i dessa frågor. Utifrån detta resultat rekommenderades det att ett kvalitetsutskott skapades inom HHJ som kan vara just detta stöd.

     

    Syftet med studien av förbättringsarbetet var att undersöka om förbättringsarbetet leder till ett ökat dagligt kvalitetsarbete för HHJ programansvariga. För att studera detta utfördes individuella intervjuer med programansvariga för att avgöra ifall genomförda förändringar lett till förbättringar. Resultatet efter analys blev att genomförda åtgärder sannolikt kommer leda till nya rutiner och ökad medvetenhet när det gäller kvalitetssäkringsarbete samt att förändringarna kan anses som förmodade förbättringar. HHJ står redo för implementering av nytt kvalitetssystem för att klara utvärdering från UKÄ. 

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  • 86.
    Thureson, Jenny
    Jönköping University, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Reducing the turnaround time in the histopathology service: - Experiences of an improvement process2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today great efforts are made to record and reduce waiting times in cancer care. Long and variable turnaround times (TATs) delay the start of treatment and waiting contributes to mental anguish. The purposes of the QI intervention were to establish an effective and streamlined histopathology process with shorter TATs, to extend customer collaboration and to build knowledge of internal processes in order to lay the foundation for a learning environment. The goal was to raise the proportion of reported tissue samples from 50% to 90% within a 15 day period, ending 31th December 2014. The study of the QI intervention intended to identify factors that affect the introduction of novel working methods. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used to achieve the goals. Improvement knowledge was combined with lean-inspired methods, and two focus groups were arranged in which data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    The goal to report 90% of tissue samples within 15 days was not achieved for all sample types, but improved TATs were clearly noted. Customer collaboration and visualisation of the processes had a positive effect on staff. The study resulted in six key factors important working with QI interventions; competence, compliance, feedback, interaction, patient- and customer focus and resources. Having motivated and dedicated staff is a key success factor for improvement work, in contrast to a lack of resources, and people that oppose change. To achieve future ambitious goals requires continuous improvement initiatives that involve optimisation of both human resources and equipment.

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  • 87.
    Tunér, Hans
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Rätt temperatur på maten: En fallstudie av ett förbättringsarbete på ett sjukhus med brickdukningssystem2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Tasty and hygienically safe food is essential to the treatment and comfort of the patient. Patients are commonly weak or impaired and more vulnerable to infections. Food hygiene is a matter of patient safety in hospitals where food temperature is the single most important factor. Meal tray as food distribution system in hospitals offers many advantages but one disadvantage is its ability to maintain proper temperature of the food. Measurements at the studied hospital display substantial variations and significant deviations from acceptable temperatures. Hence, an improvement project was completed in order to improve and stabilize temperatures.

    Purpose

    The improvement project was studied in order to describe what phenomena was important to the success for the improvement, according to staff involved and also how patients experience of the food. The aim of the improvement project was to achieve a stable process with proper food temperatures.

    Methods

    The quality improvement completed with the PDSA improvement model as overarching theory and method The study was conducted as a descriptive case study with an inductive approach and deductive ingredients. Focus group interview and questionnaires was used for data collection. Qualitative content analysis an descriptive statistics was used for analysis of data.

    Results

    The improvement project resulted in substantially temperature improvement, a stable process with desired temperatures was achieved. Yet the focus and the aims for the improvement were adjusted under the project period, the original aims were not achieved completely. The improved temperatures decreased the risk for patients getting infected with food poisoning. The study displayed phenomena that to a great extent are within the influence of the microsystem, as important for the success of the improvement. These where summarized in four categories: Utilization of resources, Interaction and communication, Improvement capability and Participation/involvement.

    Conclusions

    A hospital with meal tray distribution system can achieve substantial improvements in food temperature using structured improvement methods. The results of the changes were mainly affected by phenomena that already are described in the quality improvement litterature. Future studies may combine inductive, qualitative approaches with deductive comparisons to phenomena described in literature.

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  • 88.
    Törnered, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Bytestid på operation: En beskrivning av medarbetarnas förväntningar på ett kommande förbättringsarbete2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 89.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    et al.
    Health Care Sciences Postgraduate School, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet Neuropediatric Unit, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital Q2:07, Solna, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology, Mälardalens University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena
    Health Care Sciences Postgraduate School, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet Neuropediatric Unit, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital Q2:07, Solna, Sweden.
    Cultural validity of the Children's assessment of participation and enjoyment/Preferences for activities of children (CAPE/PAC)2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 428-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate whether the activity items of the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment/Preferences for Activities of Children (CAPE/PAC) were relevant for Swedish children.

    Subjects: A total of 337 typically developed children aged 6–17 years old.

    Methods: The CAPE/PAC was translated into Swedish in accordance with accepted translation procedures. By means of 14 group interviews with children with and without disabilities aged 6–15 years old and parents, available leisure activities were listed. These were matched to the items in the CAPE/PAC. Sixteen new potential activities were added and tested on 337 typical developed children from different regions of Sweden. A cutoff level of activities performed by >10% was set to identify relevant activities. Differences between the original and a proposed Swedish version were analysed using paired-samples t-tests of standardized mean scores.

    Results: Three new activity items were included, for 10 items new activity examples were added, and three not relevant items were excluded. In the Swedish version the outcome of standardized mean diversity score was significantly higher compared with the outcome of the original version. Conclusions:When using instruments in new contexts, it is not enough simply to translate; validation of the item relevance to the new context is essential.

  • 90.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Neuropediatric unit, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bult, Maureen
    Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience and Center of Excellence for Rehabilitation Medicine, University Medical Center, Utrecht and Rehabilitation Center De Hoogstraat-Network for Childhood Disability Research in the Netherlands, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
    Nyquist, Anna
    Norwegian School of Sport Science, Department of Physical Education and Beitostølen Healthsport Centre, Beitostølen, Norway.
    Ketelaar, Marie
    Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience and Center of Excellence for Rehabilitation Medicine, University Medical Center, Utrecht and Rehabilitation Center De Hoogstraat-Network for Childhood Disability Research in the Netherlands, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
    Jahnsen, Ranvig
    Oslo University Hospital, Department of Neuroscience for children, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
    Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Neuropediatric unit, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalens University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    An international comparison of patterns of participation in leisure activities for children with and without disabilities in Sweden, Norway and the Netherlands2012In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 369-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate whether there are differences in participation in leisure activities between children with and without disabilities in Sweden, Norway and the Netherlands and how much personal and environmental factors explain leisure performance.

    Methods: In a cross-sectional analytic design, the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment, CAPE, was performed with 278 children with disabilities and 599 children without disabilities aged 6–17 years. A one-way between-groups ANOVA explored the differences in participation between the countries. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis assessed if age, gender, educational level, living area and country of residence explained the variance in participation.

    Results: Scandinavian children with disabilities participated in more activities with higher frequency compared to Dutch children. The strongest predictor was country of residence. For children without disabilities, differences existed in informal activities, the strongest predictor was gender.

    Conclusion: Differences in school- and support systems between the countries seem to influence patterns of participation, affecting children with disabilities most.

  • 91.
    van Dijk, Lieselotte
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Interventions reducing anxiety in hospitalized children: A systematic literature review from 2010 to 20172017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A medical procedure is a threatening and stressful experience for many children. The consequent increased feelings of anxiety in hospitalized children can negatively affect their healing process, their psychological health, and their behavioural, cognitive, emotional and academic development. To limit these negative results, knowledge about interventions that could contribute to a decrease in anxiety in hospitalized children is needed. The aim of this review was to examine interventions aiming at reducing anxiety in hospitalized children that undergo a medical procedure. A systematic literature was conducted in three databases that has resulted in 10 articles that met the inclusion criteria. The 10 selected articles included a total of 11 interventions for this review. The results showed that the intervention technique Distraction was effective in reducing anxiety for most hospitalized children. The intervention technique Information provision showed both significance and non-significance and the intervention techniques Medication and Modelling showed a non-significant change in anxiety. Besides, an active distraction form and a longer duration of the intervention might contribute to the effectiveness in reducing the hospitalized child’s anxiety level. Future research needs to focus on the anxiety level of both children and their parents, in addition to the upcoming intervention use of multimedia applications. Furthermore, the characteristics of the hospitalized child and the collaboration with the child and parents should be taken into account before applying interventions aiming at reducing anxiety in hospitalized children.

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    Master thesis by Lieselotte van Dijk
  • 92.
    Velic, Mersiha
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Upplevelser i samband med akuta tandvårdsbesök: En jämförelse mellan syriska asylsökande och svenska patienter samt den behandlade personalen2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 93.
    Westergren, Robert
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics.
    Nasser, Mehdi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics.
    Patient satisfaction and mobility with their assistive device and service2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To gather knowledge related to patient satisfaction and mobility with lower limb prosthetic and orthotic devices and to investigate satisfaction with services received. Another purpose of this study is to analyze potential differences between orthotic and prosthetic patients in relation to patient satisfaction and mobility.

    Design: Cross-sectional study

    Subjects: 21 participants with a mean age of 58 (SD 16) with an average duration of use of devices of 10 (SD 10) years. 12 out of the 21 participants were orthotic users and 9 were prosthetic users.

    Methods: Patients were asked to complete two questionnaires, one regarding satisfaction with assistive device and service (QUEST 2.0) and one regarding mobility.

    Results: Patients mean score regarding satisfaction with assistive device and service were 4.0 (SD 0.8) and 4.2 (SD 1.0) respectively. 91% reported that they had the ability to walk at least 100 meters with their assistive device. The areas where participants experienced most difficulties were walking on uneven ground (70%), walking up and down a hill (57%) and walking on stairs (57%).

    Conclusion: Overall this study demonstrates that participants were quite satisfied with their assistive device and the service received by the P&O clinic. No statistically significant differences regarding satisfaction with assistive device and service, or mobility, were found between prosthetic and orthotic participants.

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  • 94.
    Xenaki, Leda
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication.
    A comparison of young children’s and mothers’ ratings about cancer related health issues2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In serious health conditions, like childhood cancer, parent proxy reports are used for obtaining information. Previous studies have shown controversial results on agreement between children’s and parents’ ratings. In addition, there is lack of proxy studies in research including young children. The aim of the present thesis is (a) to examine how young children as self-raters and mothers as proxy-raters report over time on cancer related health issues, and (b) to explore the factors that may affect the agreement of each mother-child pair.

    Method: A longitudinal quantitative research design was chosen. Eight young children with cancer aged three to six years and their mothers were followed with questionnaires every six months for four time points. One measure on children’s feelings about their health situation and one measure on perceptions of their everyday functioning were completed by children and mothers at each time point. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis.

    Results: Higher frequency of agreement was found in T4 (18 months after the diagnosis) for both measures. Between the two measures, higher frequency of agreement was found for the functioning measure. The mother’s educational level was found to be correlated with higher frequency of agreement (functioning measure).

    Conclusion: The time progress, the mother’s educational level, the number of siblings, the specific shared experience, like preschool, and the concrete and observable issues, like “functioning” rather than “feelings”, were found to be correlated with higher frequency of agreement between young children with cancer and their mothers. The convenient and small sample imposes the need for further research.

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  • 95.
    Åström, Frida Marie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Khetani, Mary
    Department of Occupational Therapy, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA.
    Axelsson, Anna Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Young Children's Participation and Environment Measure: Swedish Cultural Adaptation2018In: Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, ISSN 0194-2638, E-ISSN 1541-3144, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 329-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To culturally adapt and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Young Children's Participation and Environment Measure (YC-PEM) for use by caregivers of Swedish children with and without disabilities, aged 2–5 years.

    Methods: Thirteen cognitive interviews and two focus groups with caregivers of children with and without disabilities were conducted to evaluate the cultural relevance of YC-PEM content for use in Sweden. Per participant feedback, a revised version of the Swedish YC-PEM was created and pilot tested with caregivers of children with disabilities (n = 11) and children with typical development (n = 22).

    Results: User feedback informed content revisions to 7% of items. Internal consistency estimates of the Swedish YC-PEM pilot version were acceptable and ranged from .70 to .92 for all but two of the YC-PEM scales. Mean percentage agreement between raters ranged from 47% to 93% across YC-PEM scales for inter-rater, and 44% to 86% for test-retest. One of twelve YC-PEM scales revealed significant group differences between young children with and without disabilities.

    Conclusions: This study contributes preliminary evidence for the use of some scales within a culturally adapted YC-PEM in Sweden. Further validation with larger samples will allow for parametric testing to evaluate its psychometric properties.

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