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  • 51.
    Norderyd, Johanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Faulks, D.
    Molina, G.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Klingberg, G.
    What determines dental caries treatment under general anaesthesia in children with disabilities: number of cavities, child functioning or dental organisation?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 52.
    Norderyd, Johanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. National Oral Disability Centre for Rare Disorders, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Faulks, Denise
    CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Service d'Odontologie, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
    Molina, Gustavo
    Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Cordoba, Argentina.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Klingberg, Gunilla
    Departement of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Which factors most influence referral for restorative dental treatment under sedation and general anaesthesia in children with complex disabilities: Caries severity, child functioning or dental service organisation?2018In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 71-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child gives all children right to the highest standard of services for treatment and rehabilitation. For children with disabilities, sedation and general anaesthesia (GA) are often indicated for dental treatment; however, accessibility to this varies. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health – Child and Youth version (ICF-CY) enables a biopsychosocial description of children undergoing dental treatment.

    Aim

    To investigate conscious sedation and GA in children with complex disabilities and manifest caries and analyse how caries, child functioning, and dental service organisation relate to dental GA (DGA), comparing Argentina, France, and Sweden using the ICF-CY.

    Design

    Quantitative, cross-sectional; data collected through structured interviews, observation, and dental records.

    Results

    Sedation and DGA were common. Children with limitations in interpersonal interactions and relationships were more likely to have had DGA (OR: 5.3, P = 0.015). Level of caries experience was strongly correlated with experience of DGA. There were significant differences between countries regarding caries prevalence, sedation, DGA, and functional and environmental factors.

    Conclusions

    Although caries experience and child functioning are important, dental health service organisation had the most impact on the incidence of DGA, and for the use of conscious sedation, for children with complex disabilities.

  • 53.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Ringnér, Anders
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing, Umeå, Sweden.
    The Pediatric Inventory for Parents - Swedish Translation and Psychometric Testing.2018In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 42, p. E97-E102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Pediatric Inventory for Parents (PIP) measures parental stress related to caring for a child with an illness. However, no Swedish translation is available.

    PURPOSE: This study reports a Swedish translation of the PIP and psychometric properties of the instrument.

    DESIGN AND METHODS: This is a descriptive/methodological paper. The PIP was translated and culturally adapted to Swedish, and comprehensibility was tested. Data were collected twice from 48 parents of children with different illnesses, and initial psychometric properties of the instrument were examined. The IES-R (Impact of Event Scale-Revised) was used for concurrent validity.

    RESULTS: The Swedish version of the PIP demonstrated good correlations with the IES-R, and temporal changes were similar. Endorsement frequencies and test-retest were also satisfactory. When comparing groups of parents, the parents of children with cancer were statistically significantly more distressed, both on total score and for emotional distress and role function. Discriminative validity was demonstrated by comparing parents of children with cancer with parents of children with other diseases.

    CONCLUSIONS: The Swedish version of the PIP seems to be a valid and reliable instrument. However, as we used relatively small sample, for the future, we suggest further testing with larger samples.

    PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Clinicians and researchers seeking to measure parental distress in chronic illness could use the Swedish version of the PIP.

  • 54.
    Olsson, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Children with mild intellectual disability and their families – needs for support, service utilisation and experiences of support2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on service utilisation among children with mild ID and their families, their needs for support and their experiences of support.

    Aims

    The overall aim of the thesis was to explore and describe service utilisation patterns among families of children with mild ID from a systems perspective.

    Methods

    A cross-sectional, descriptive and comparative quantitative design was used to describe the extent of service utilisation among 84 children with mild ID and their families (paper I and II). The types and number of services utilised were investigated in relation to the child’s age, gender and school setting. Data concerning the services utilised were collected from the organisational records of social services and paediatric habilitation units. In paper III, a descriptive questionnaire design was used to describe the support needs of families of 38 children with mild ID. A confirmatory design was used to examine the relation between family needs for support and (a) parental self-efficacy and (b) parents’ control over services. A confirmatory design was also used to examine the relation between parents’ experiences of the helpfulness of the support and (a) parental self-efficacy and (b) parents’ control over services. In paper IV a longitudinal, comparative and confirmatory design was used to investigate whether social service utilisation patterns differ over time when children with mild ID in self-contained classes are compared with those integrated into mainstream classes (n=405).

    Results

    In total, 60% of the families utilised paediatric habilitation services, and 40% of the families used disability-related services provided by social services. The most commonly utilised services were services concerned support outside of the home, such as respite care and services to improve children’s participation in society. Approximately 25% of the families utilised social problems-related services provided by social services. The most commonly utilised services concerned those to support parents in their parenting roles and financial assistance. In contrast to older children, younger children were more likely to utilise paediatric habilitation services. Older children utilised a higher number of disability-related service types provided by social services. Few differences were found between males and females. The majority of families did not utilise such services that are provided by social services. It was rare for families to use both disability-related services and those that address social problems during the same year.

    Commonly reported family needs concerned information about what services are available for their child, their child's impairment, how to respond to their child's behaviour and how to teach their child skills. Other common needs included access to parent support networks, to find suitable leisure activities for the child, and more alone time for parents. In contrast to families with mothers who did not participate in paid work, families with mothers who were employed expressed a lower requirement for support such as counselling, contact with other parents of children with impairments, more friends and more alone time for parents. Similar results werefound for families with mothers with higher levels of education. Parents with higher levels of perceived self-efficacy reported a lower need for information, as did also parents with higher levels of control over services. Parents with higher levels of control over services experienced the support as being more helpful.

    Children with mild ID who attended self-contained classes were more likely to utilise paediatric habilitation services than children integrated in mainstream classes. The same pattern was found for utilisation of disability-related services provided by social services. Integrated children who changed school setting to attend self-contained classes were more likely to begin to utilise disability-related services in comparison with those children who continued to be integrated. The former also had a higher likelihood of increasing the number of disability-related service types utilised.

    Conclusions

    In addition to disability-related problems, families of children with mild ID may also be at a higher risk of experiencing social problems when compared with the general population. Furthermore, very few families utilised both disability-related services and services addressing social problems. This implies that collaboration flaws exist between those professionals concerned with child welfare services and those concerned with disability-related services. A strong predictor of service utilisation was the type of school setting: children attending self-contained classes had a higher rate of service utilisation than those attending mainstream classes. This indicates that service systems outside of school are designed to collaborate with groups of pupils in special classes rather than individual children in mainstream classes. The strong need for information by families indicates that an ecological framework should be used to identify those factors that affect information availability and effectiveness. To increase parents’ perceived level of control over services, HSO professionals need to work in a capacity building manner with the explicit goal to enhance parental self-efficacy.

  • 55.
    Olsson, Lena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Elgmark Andersson, Elisabeth
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Integration of pupils with mild intellectual disability in mainstream school settings - goog or bad for social service utilisation? A longitudinal study among children with mild intellectual disability in SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Petersson, Christina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Using health-related quality of life instruments for children with long-term conditions: On the basis of a national quality registry system2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: There has been a continuous development of new technologies in healthcare that are derived from national quality registries. However, this innovation needs to be translated into the workflow of healthcare delivery, to enable children with long-term conditions to get the best support possible to manage their health during everyday life. Since children living with long-term conditions experience different interference levels in their lives, healthcare professionals need to assess the impact of care on children’s day-to-day lives, as a complement to biomedical assessments.

    Aim: The overall aim of this thesis was to explore and describe the use of instruments about health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in outpatient care for children with long-term conditions on the basis of a national quality registry system.

    Methods: The research was conducted by using comparative, cross-sectional and explorative designs and data collection was performed by using different methods. The questionnaire DISABKIDS Chronic Generic Measure -37 was used as well as semi-structured interviews and video-recordings from consultations. Altogether, 156 children (8–18 years) and nine healthcare professionals participated in the studies. Children with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) (n 131) answered the questionnaire DISABKIDS and children with rheumatic diseases, kidney diseases and T1D (n 25) were interviewed after their consultation at the outpatient clinic after the web-DISABKIDS had been used. In total, nine healthcare professionals used the HRQOL instrument as an assessment tool during the encounters which was video-recorded (n 21). Quantitative deductive content analysis was used to describe content in different HRQOL instruments. Statistical inference was used to analyse results from DISABKIDS and qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the interviews and video-recordings.

    Results: The findings showed that based on a biopsychosocial perspective, both generic and disease-specific instruments should be used to gain a comprehensive evaluation of the child’s HRQOL. The DISABKIDS instrument is applicable when describing different aspects of health concerning children with T1D. When DISABKIDS was used in the encounters, children expressed positive experiences about sharing their results with the healthcare professional. It was discovered that different approaches led to different outcomes for the child when the healthcare professionals were using DISABKIDS during the encounter. When an instructing approach is used, the child’s ability to learn more about their health and how to improve their health is limited. When an inviting or engaging approach is used by the professional, the child may become more involved during the conversations.

    Conclusions: It could be argued that instruments of HRQOL could be used as a complement to biomedical variables, to promote a biopsychosocial perspective on the child’s health. According to the children in this thesis, feedback on their results after answering to web-DISABKIDS is important, which implies that healthcare professionals need to prioritize time for discussions about results from HRQOL instruments in the encounters. If healthcare professionals involve the child in the discussion of the results of the HRQOL, misinterpreted answers could be corrected during the conversation. Concurrently, this claims that healthcare professionals invite and engage the child.

  • 57.
    Petersson, Christina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Åkesson, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Children's experiences about a structured assessment of health-related quality of life during a patient encounter2016In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 424-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    It has been stated that care for children with chronic health conditions tends to focus on condition-specific issues rather than how these children experience their health and everyday life functioning.

    Aim

    The aim of this study was to explore children's experiences about a structured assessment of health-related quality of life applied during a patient encounter.

    Methods

    Prior to the start of the study, a clinical intervention based on the questionnaire DISABKIDS Chronic Generic Measure (DCGM-37) was performed. A qualitative explorative design was chosen, and 25 children between 10–17 years of age were interviewed after the consultation at four different paediatric outpatient clinics. Data were analysed according to qualitative content analysis.

    Results

    The results were twofold: children experienced that the assessment was providing them with insights about their health, which motivated them to make lifestyle changes. When outcomes were discussed and requested, the children felt encouraged.

    Conclusions

    The use of an assessment of health-related quality of life may promote insights about health and encourage children with chronic health conditions to discuss their outcomes with healthcare professionals.

  • 58.
    Petersson, Christina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Åkesson, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Golsäter, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    To promote child involvement – healthcare professionals' use of a health-related quality of life assessment tool during paediatric encounters2017In: European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare, ISSN 2052-5648, E-ISSN 2052-5656, Vol. 5, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Children and healthcare professionals should be provided with easy-to-use tools which could lead to actionable results.

    Objectives: There is increasing interest in the use of patient reported outcomes to aid management of individual care; therefore, the use of health-related qualityof life (HRQOL) assessments during consultations need to be studied. The aim of this study was to explore how healthcare professionals use a HRQOL assessment tool during paediatric encounters.

    Design: A descriptive, explorative design with a qualitative approach based on video recordings was chosen.

    Methods: Twenty-one video recordings, from nine different healthcare professionals’ consultations where an assessment tool of HRQOL were used were analysed by content analysis.

    Results: The healthcare professionals were using different strategies and when they combined these strategies three approaches emerged. The instructing approach was characterized by healthcare professionals giving a summary of the results, leading to children becoming passive bystanders in the encounter. Based on an inviting approach, the children’s perceptions of their situation were requested while the items were explored. This resulted in involving the children in the conversations. In the engaging approach, an open dialogue and a common interpretation were sought to guide further care which was interpreted as children becoming actively involved.

    Conclusions: The child’s involvement could be facilitated depending on which approach is being used. When an inviting and engaging approach is used, actions in a non-linear set of interactions is co-produced with the child.

    Relevance to practice: The use of an HRQOL assessment tool change the management during consultations and could promote child involvement dependent on which approach the healthcare professionals are using.

  • 59.
    Rydén, Anna
    et al.
    Division of Paediatrics and Diabetes Research Centre, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Division of Paediatrics and Diabetes Research Centre, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Fredriksson, Mats
    Linköping Academic Research Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    General immune dampening is associated with disturbed metabolism at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes2014In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 75, no 1, p. 45-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a serious diagnosis with the prospect of grave short- and long-term complications and even death if poorly managed. An attempt has been made to describe how clinical and immunological deviations might influence each other close to the diagnosis of T1D.

    Methods:

    Sixty-nine newly diagnosed T1D children were studied together with a reference group of 30 healthy children. Cytokines (interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α) were detected in in vitro culture by multiplex fluorochrome technique. Information of clinical status of the patients such as BMI, weight loss, pubertal stage, duration of symptoms, previous and/or ongoing infections, insulin requirement, and ketoacidosis were gathered together with the analysis of C-peptide and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c).

    Results:

    In general, low cytokine secretion was found at diagnosis of T1D. However, high C-peptide, short duration of symptoms, or an infection prior to diagnosis was associated with increased immune activity including proinflammatory, Th2-associated, and Tr1-associated cytokines. In contrast, ketoacidosis and later pubertal stage at onset of disease were more related to a Th1-prone response.

    Conclusion:

    There is a general immune dampening at diagnosis of T1D, which appears to be related to the metabolic state close to diagnosis.

  • 60. Schertz, M.
    et al.
    Zuk, L.
    Green, Dido
    Tel Aviv University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Occupational Therapy, Ramat Aviv, Israel.
    Long-term neurodevelopmental follow-up of children with congenital muscular torticollis2013In: Journal of Child Neurology, ISSN 0883-0738, E-ISSN 1708-8283, Vol. 28, no 10, p. 1215-1221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Congenital muscular torticollis is a common condition, but long-term neurodevelopmental follow-up is lacking. This study reports on neurodevelopmental outcome of 68 children, aged 7 to 9 years, with a history of congenital muscular torticollis, excluding children with torticollis due to other conditions. Thirty-eight children were examined for presence of neurodevelopmental disorders. Telephone interview data were available for an additional 30 children. Of those examined, 22/38 (57.9%) had or were at risk for a developmental disorder (attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), developmental coordination disorder, language impairment, autistic spectrum disorder) on at least 1 of the assessments administered, 23/38 (60.5%) had received developmental treatment during childhood. One child, based on a telephone interview, had a history of developmental treatment. Therefore, 30/68 (44.1%) children of the total sample demonstrated a developmental delay/disorder, currently (22/68) or previously (8/68). Our findings suggest congenital muscular torticollis to be a significant risk factor for later neurodevelopmental conditions with disorders presenting at different stages of development.

  • 61.
    Schichtel, Franziska
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Interventions with the focus on refugee children´s mental health: A systematic literature review2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 62.
    Sjöman, Madeleine
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Social interactions and change in children’s engagement and externalizing behavior difficulties in preschoolManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Sjöman, Madeleine
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Axelsson, A.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Mälardalens högskola.
    Danielsson, H.
    Social interactions - predictor of children’s engagement and hyperactivity in preschoolManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 64.
    Sonmark, Kristina
    et al.
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Department of Sociology, Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Godeau, Emmanuelle
    Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse, France.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Bygren, Magnus
    Department of Sociology, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Modin, Bitte
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Department of Sociology, Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Individual and contextual expressions of school demands and their relation to psychosomatic health a comparative study of students in France and Sweden2016In: Child Indicators Research, ISSN 1874-897X, E-ISSN 1874-8988, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 93-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the health-related implications of both individual students’ and class-level concentrations of perceived demands in terms of pressuring, difficult and tiring schoolwork in France and Sweden, two countries with substantial differences in their educational systems and recent notable differences in PISA-results. Data come from Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (2001/02, 2005/06 and 2009/10) and comprise a total of 33,243 students aged 11, 13 and 15. Findings show that feeling under pressure from schoolwork is less prevalent in Sweden than in France among 11 and 13-year olds, but almost twice as common among 15-year olds. Yet its correlation with 15-year olds’ psychosomatic complaints is stronger in France than in Sweden. Feeling tired by schoolwork is equally common for 11- and 13-year olds in the two countries, but more frequent among 15-year olds in Sweden. It is also a stronger predictor of psychosomatic complaints in Sweden than in France across all age-groups. While it is more common at all ages to perceive the schoolwork as difficult in France, its relationship with psychosomatic complaints is stronger among students in Sweden. The proportion of classmates reporting high school demands is also linked to poorer student health, but these effects were largely confined to girls in both countries.

  • 65.
    Taylor, Susan
    et al.
    Faculty of Computing Health and Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia.
    McLean, B.
    School of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. School of Occupational Therapy and Social work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Carey, L.
    Neurorehabilitation and Recovery, The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne, Australia.
    Girdler, S.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Elliott, C.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Blair, E.
    Population Sciences, Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, Australia.
    Does somatosensation change with age in children and adolescents? A systematic review.2016In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 809-824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Somatosensory modalities, such as touch, proprioception and haptic ability, greatly influence the achievement of developmental milestones for children. Describing somatosensory impairment, natural variability and typical or expected developmental changes across age groups will help establish frameworks for intervention in clinical populations. This systematic review aimed to determine how different somatosensory modalities develop across childhood into adolescence to use as a point of reference for children at risk of somatosensory impairment.

    METHODS: Searches of five electronic databases were undertaken through EBSCO-host (MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SPORTDiscus and ERIC) for studies measuring at least one somatosensory modality in typically developing individuals between birth and 18 years and analysed by age. Characteristics of studies were collected including country of origin, sample size, demographics and outcome measure used. Quality assessment and data extraction were performed by two independent reviewers.

    RESULTS: Twenty three cross-sectional studies were included from a total of 188 articles retrieved: 8 examined aspects of touch, 5 proprioception and 10 haptic ability. Variability of study designs and variation in assessment tools precluded any formal meta-analysis.

    CONCLUSIONS: Somatosensation matures through childhood into adolescence; however, the present review found the pattern of somatosensory development varied depending on the assessment tool used and the aspect of somatosensation being measured, making it difficult to describe typical performance. There is a need for comprehensive assessment batteries to measure the somatosensation, including touch, proprioception and haptic ability, of children at risk of somatosensory impairment to aid in the development of effective interventions.

  • 66.
    Tennstedt, Frida
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics.
    Mastoraki Karlsson, Linnea
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics.
    Barns intryck av omgivningen på en ortopedteknisk avdelning: -      En kvalitativ studie om hur barn uppfattar miljön och mötet på en ortopedteknisk avdelning2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To achieve good child centered care in the field of prosthetics/orthotics, information about how children perceive a meeting with a prosthetist/orthotist is needed. Knowing children’s thoughts, opinions and suggestions about the situation can help increase knowledge about how to set up the environment and meetings. Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate how children experience the interactions with health professionals and the environment when meeting a prosthetist or orthotist. Method: A qualitative method called “draw and tell” was used. Eight children aged between 6 to 12 years were interviewed after a meeting with a prosthetist/orthostist. The interviews were transcribed and a content analysis was performed. Result: Too much talk without engaging the child and long waiting times were found as negative factors and activities such as books and toys and that the prosthetist/orthotist was kind were found as positive factors during the meeting. Multiple suggestions were given about what kinds of activity could be available to children when waiting these included computer games and books. Conclusion:  This study shows that it is important for a prosthetist/orthoptist to engage children in the meetings and that possibilities for activities are available when children are waiting to see the clinician.

     

    Keywords: Children’s experience, Prosthetics, Orthotics,  Enviroment, Consultation

  • 67.
    Wigston, Christine
    et al.
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Parsons, Richard
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Participation in extracurricular activities for children with and without siblings with autism spectrum disorder2017In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 25-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To compare the number, frequency, enjoyment and performance in extracurricular activities of siblings of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) to their typically developing (TD) peers, and to identify differences between actual and desired participation.

    METHODS:

    A case-control study with 30 siblings of children with ASD and 30 siblings of TD children was conducted using the Paediatric Interest Profiles and a questionnaire.

    RESULTS:

    Siblings of children with ASD participated in fewer extracurricular activities than those with TD siblings. ASD symptoms were significantly associated with the sibling participating in fewer extracurricular activities. Children with TD siblings had higher enjoyment scores in relaxation activities than children with siblings with ASD.

    CONCLUSION:

    While results were mainly positive, some differences indicated that having a sibling with ASD may impact participation in extracurricular activities. Assessments of participation barriers, as well as support to minimise participation restrictions among siblings of children with ASD are required.

  • 68.
    Wilder, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Axelsson, Anna Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Carlsson, Maggan
    Föreningen JAG.
    Jag är med! Om personlig assistans och barns delaktighet i familjeaktiviteter2013Book (Other academic)
  • 69. Wilson, B. N.
    et al.
    Crawford, S. G.
    Green, Dido
    Guy’s & St Thomas’ Foundation Trust & Kings College London Biomedical Research Centre, Strand, London, UK.
    Roberts, G.
    Aylott, A.
    Kaplan, B. J.
    Psychometric properties of the revised Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire2009In: Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, ISSN 0194-2638, E-ISSN 1541-3144, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 184-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire (DCDQ) is a parent-completed measure designed to identify subtle motor problems in children of 8 to 14.6 years of age. The purpose of this study was to extend the lower age range to children aged 5 to 7 years, revise items to ensure clarity, develop new scoring, and evaluate validity of the revised questionnaire. Additional items with improved wording were generated by an expert panel. Analyses of internal consistency, factor loading, and qualitative/quantitative feedback from researchers, clinicians, and parents were used to select 15 items with the strongest psychometric properties. Internal consistency was high (alpha = .94). The expanded questionnaire was completed by the parents of 287 children, aged 5-15 years, who were typically developing. Logistic regression modeling was used to generate separate cutoff scores for three age groups (overall sensitivity = 85%, specificity = 71%). The revised DCDQ was then compared to other standardized measures in a sample of 232 children referred for therapy services. Differences in scores between children with and without DCD (p < .001) provide evidence of construct validity. Correlations between DCDQ scores and Movement Assessment Battery for Children (r = .55) and Test of Visual-Motor Integration (r = .42) scores support concurrent validity. The results provide evidence that the revised DCDQ is a valid clinical screening tool for DCD.

  • 70.
    Zielinski, Ingar M.
    et al.
    Behavioural Science Institute, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Department of Sport and Health Science, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Rudisch, Julian
    Department of Sport and Health Science, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Jongsma, Marijtje L. A.
    Behavioural Science Institute, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
    Aarts, Pauline B. M.
    Department of Pediatric Rehabilitation, Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
    Steenbergen, Bert
    Behavioural Science Institute, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
    The relation between mirror movements and non-use of the affected hand in children with unilateral cerebral palsy2017In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 59, no 2, p. 152-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:

    In children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP), it is widely believed that mirror movements contribute to non-use of the affected hand despite preserved capacity, a phenomenon referred to as developmental disregard. We aimed to test whether mirror movements are related to developmental disregard, and to clarify the relation between mirror movements and bimanual function.

    Method:

    A repetitive squeezing task simultaneously measuring both hands' grip-forces was developed to assess mirror movements by using maximum cross-correlation coefficient (CCCmax) as well as strength measures (MMstrength). Developmental disregard, bimanual performance, and capacity were assessed using a validated video-observation method. Twenty-one children with unilateral CP participated (Median age 10y 7mo, interquartile range [IQR] 10y 1mo–12y 9mo). Outcome measures of mirror movements were correlated to developmental disregard, bimanual performance, and capacity scores using Spearman's correlations (significance level: α&lt;0.05).

    Results:

    Mirror movements were not related to developmental disregard. However, enhanced mirror movements in the less-affected hand were related to reduced performance (CCCmax: ρ=−0.526, p=0.007; MMstrength: ρ=−0.750, p<0.001) and capacity (CCCmax: ρ=−0.410, p=0.033; MMstrength: ρ=−0.679, p<0.001). These relations were only moderate (performance:MMstrength: ρ=−0.504, p=0.010), low (capacity: MMstrength: ρ=−0.470, p=0.016) or absent for mirror movements in the affected hand. Additionally, seven children showed stronger movements in their less-affected hands when actually being asked to move their affected hand.

    Interpretation:

    These findings show no relation between mirror movements and developmental disregard, but support an association between mirror movements and bimanual function.

  • 71.
    Åkesson, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Ryhov City Hospital, Jönköping.
    Hanberger, Lena
    Linköping University Hospital.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Linköping University Hospital.
    The influence of age, gender, insulin dose, BMI, and blood pressure on metabolic control in young patients with type 1 diabetes2015In: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 581-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To explore the relationship between certain clinical variables and metabolic HbA1c at diagnosis correlated to HbA1c at follow-up (p < 0.001). There was a clear gender difference regarding HbA1c. Girls had higher values both at diagnosis and at follow-up (p < 0.001). Girls also had lower BMI and pH at diagnosis than boys (p < 0.001). In contrast, girls with the highest body mass index (BMI) at follow-up had higher mean HbA1c at follow-up in 2010 (p < 0.001). Having a mother and/or a father with high BMI implied higher HbA1c at diagnosis (p < 0.003).

    Conclusions

    HbA1c at diagnosis seems to predict metabolic control years later. There is a gender difference at diagnosis as female patients have higher HbA1c than males at diagnosis as well as at follow up. As metabolic control is very much correlated to complications there is a need to early identify patients at risk of poor metabolic control. Even though we do not know whether a high HbA1c level is mainly due to severity of the disease or to behavioral patterns, new ways to treat and support these children, especially girls, are needed.

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