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  • 51.
    Andersson, Linus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Polsten, Victor
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Effektivisering av två monteringslinor ur ett produktivitetsperspektiv2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Hur kan två automatiserade monteringslinor effektiviseras för att öka antalet färdigmonterade produkter i timmen? Denna fråga ställdes inledandevis vid utformningen av detta examensarbete, som är gjort i samarbete med företaget Thule Sweden AB (Thule). Bakgrunden till detta examensarbete är att Thule anser att två av deras monteringslinor inte når sin fulla kapacitet. Utifrån bakgrunden kom syftet att öka antalet färdigmonterade produkter per timme för respektive monteringslina. För att besvara syftet formulerades tre frågeställningar; Hur kan monteringstakten öka genom kortare upptäcktstider vid larm? Vilka rutiner kan implementeras för att skapa förutsättningar till ökad monteringstakt? Finns det möjlighet till ytterligare ökad monteringstakt? För de båda linorna finns ett mål uppsatt om hur många paketerade kartonger (fyra produkter per kartong) som ska göras i timmen, 90 respektive 100 stycken.

    För att besvarar frågeställningarna och på så vis uppfylla arbetets syfte har datainsamling i form av tidsstudier, observationer och samtal genomförts. Datainsamlingen har sedan analyserats för att skapa en bild av nuläget. Nulägesbeskrivningen ligger sedan till grund för förbättringsarbetet.

    Gällande lina X ansågs den största förbättringspotentialen finnas i linans larmsystem. I dagsläget tar det drygt 20 sekunder för operatörerna att upptäcka larmen. Upptäcktstiden påverkar antalet färdiga kartonger i timmen genom att utrustningen står stilla på grund av att operatörerna är omedvetna om larmen. Upptäcktstiden går troligtvis att sänka genom investeringar i larmsystemet. Under förutsättning att upptäcktstiden sänks till noll sekunder ökar monteringstakten med nästan tio kartonger per timme. Med en upptäcktstid på noll sekunder samt andra förbättringar kan monteringstakten öka med totalt 14,3 kartonger per timme.

    Lina Y:s larmsystem är annorlunda i jämförelse med det som finns på lina X. Upptäcktstiden vid lina Y är endast en sjättedel av upptäcktstiden för lina X, därför ansågs det viktigare att lägga större vikt vid att förbättra andra problemområden. För att förbättra en manuell monteringsstation gjordes en SAM-analys på en ny monteringsmetod. SAM-analysen visade att monteringstiden kan minskas från 8,45 sekunder till 7,37 sekunder. Det finns också en automatiserad station med 8,35 sekunders operationstid. Lyckas Thule reducera denna tid till en operationstid under 7,37 och att den nya monteringsmetoden implementeras kommer de få ut 15,6 fler kartonger per timme. Genomförs också övriga förbättringsförslag kommer monteringstakten öka med ytterligare 7,8 kartonger per timme.         

    Slutsatsen för detta examensarbete är att det går att öka antalet färdigpaketerade kartonger med 14,3 respektive 23,4 kartonger i timmen. Detta förutsatt att Thule implementerar de förslag som tagits fram.

  • 52.
    Andersson, Mattias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
    Aasa, Adam
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
    Component modification: A thesis on an electronic product2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis is including the product development process and it carried out on a Husqvarna Product to improve the function and design. By performing a preliminary study, competitor analysis, brainstorming and development of different concepts, a prototype could be developed. By testing the concepts, a basis for the evaluation process was created. The concepts that had the best performance were combined and implemented in the final prototype. These were then documented as suggestions for improvements in the report. Small and profitable improvements to the product's design were presented in the report's results and discussion chapter.

  • 53.
    Andersson, Mikael
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Andersson, Mattias
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Kartläggning av hälsorisker vid tillverkning av ankel-fot-ortoser2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is part of a bigger project, ORTO - roughly translated to optimized resource efficient manufacturing of orthoses. During the manufacturing of orthopedic aids many different methods are used to manufacture individually adjusted products. Processes, methods and material may vary depending on what end product is going to be produced. The knowledge of how the manufacturing affects the employees long term is not complete from a health-oriented perspective. The purpose of this thesis is to map out the manufacturing processes for rigid and hinged molded ankle-foot orthoses made primarily from carbon fibre composite. This will then be used to identify the potential sources of exposure of hazardous materials that can lead to health issues. To answer the problem statements theory about process mapping has been gathered and observations in the shape of video recordings have been done at Borås Orthotics to map out the current situation, in addition to interviews. The purpose of the process mapping was also to identify potential sources of emission where exposure to hazardous materials was evident. Theory and research about these materials has been gathered about the potential health issues. The exposure times from the sources of emissions has been compiled from the video recordings, where it was deemed to be four possible sources, in the form of dry carbon fibre bands, casting with poly methyl methacrylate, sanding and gluing. The exposure times and the sources of emission has been analyzed and compared with theory and research to investigate if there was any possible health hazards. The discussion has most importantly been about how the manufacturing of hazardous materials can affect the employees in terms of health and how the exposure times can be reduced. The conclusion is that certain sources of emissions run a greater risk to affect the employees negatively and certain measures might be in order to in terms of changing how the work is performed. It might be worth some reconstruction to make the work place safer in addition to reviewing certain methods. In general the regulations are a good idea to abide by since they are intended to prevent exposure for employees that work materials such as carbon fibers. Other practical suggestions of how to reduce the exposure to hazardous materials are included. An example of this could be to install a mirror solution in the fume cupboard at the casting process or to look at the routines and the work methods applied at the sanding process. The regulations should also be compared to how the work is currently performed and applied according to the work environment regulations.

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  • 54.
    Andersson, Moa
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Industrial Design.
    Product development and design of industrial sensors2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    IoT- technology, Internet of Things, is a fast-growing business, it means that more and more products, clothes, even people are provided with sensors that can communicate and perceive the surroundings to create a smarter community. For companies to keep up to date, it is essential to continuously provide products with better components and reduced size. To stand out further, companies should provide revolutionary products, with totally new feature. One of these ideas, of a new kind of product with special features, have been investigated and developed in this thesis.

    The thesis has been conducted with the company CombiQ, located in Jönköping, Sweden. The product that was going to be developed was an industrial sensor, that uses the technology of IIoT, Industrial Internet of Things, that the company develops. At the time when this project took place, CombiQ did not sell any own product, only the technology that was placed inside the products.

    To develop the industrial sensor for CombiQ, not only the functions of the product had to be investigated, further the brand had to be analyzed to create a design expression reflecting the company.

    Through implement several tools and methods, from among other things the product development process and design thinking, a concept of an industrial sensor is presented that fulfill the specific requirements and functions. Where the main-feature is that the sensor should be a modular solution to be adjusted for the specific need of the clients. Furthermore, during the project a visual brand language with design guidelines have been developed to reflect the design aspects of the company CombiQ. Design guidelines can be used for further product for the company in the same manners, which also has been displayed by developing design concept of the rest of the industrial sensor that counts to the same product family as the modular sensor. 

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  • 55.
    Andersson, Moa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Hacksell, Nathalie
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Produktutveckling av Mingelbord2015Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – To come up with a new product within the category of mingling table that provides an expanded area of use. This to be better adapted to individuals and at a home environment. Through an innovative construction and a combination of modulated- and hand made parts is the purpose to create a unique product on the market.

    Method – The first part of the life of a product: the product development process; identify the need, plan the process of the design, identify the customer demands, develop the concept and finally develop the product. 

    Findings – A mingling table has been created and is presented in pictures. These pictures are computer aided visualized. By rending the images is a more realistic feeling given to the table.

    Implications – The results of this thesis shows that tables within the category of mingling tables, through changes in its construction, could broaden its field of use. Through further development of the presented concept additional areas of usage  may be achieved.

    Limitations – This thesis has its focus on the time before the actual manufacturing of the product. This project emphasizes the product development process only.  

    Keywords – Home environment, customizable , functionality, product development, design, mingling table. 

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  • 56.
    Andersson, Molly
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Andersén, Lovisa
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    SVÅRIGHETER VID CERTIFIERING AV KVALITETSLEDNINGSSYSTEMET ISO 9001:2015 FÖR SMÅ FÖRETAG2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Studien syftar till att upptäcka svårigheter vid implementering av kvalitetsledningssystemet ISO 9001:2015 på små företag. För att uppnå studiens syfte samlades teorier om kvalitetsledningssystemet ISO 9001 och dess implementerings- och certifieringsprocess in. En fallstudie genomfördes på två analysenheter för att sedan jämföras mot det teoretiska ramverket och erhålla ett resultat. De mest bidragande faktorerna till icke-certifiering av ISO 9001 hos små företag visade sig vara tidsbrist, resursbrist samt kompetensbrist.

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  • 57.
    Andersson, Oskar
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Bylow, Jacob
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Lean Produktion inom prefabindustrin2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis was executed at Kynningsrud Prefab AB in Uddevalla. The company produces precast elements within the construction industry.  Currently, the company is not fully satisfied with the internal communication or the flow of material or finished products. Thus, Kynningsrud is planning to create a production system, KPS, in order to keep in pace with their current sales expansion.

    Through deliberations and discussions regarding the issue together with the company, a decision was made to focus on the manufacturing of the concrete walls. The conclusion came down to the purpose of the thesis would be to analyze and identify opportunities of improvement and to develop proposals targeted lean production.

    To eliminate non-value adding time as well as working to standardize operations and make the internal communication more efficient the two theories The seven wastes+one and the 5S tool was elected as theoretical framework. The necessary information about each step of the manufacturing process was collected by observing, interviewing and participation in the working process. The information was assembled to six current state descriptions of the production and describes every operation in each step of the processes. Finally, the description was analyzed according to the theoretical framework.

    The analysis resulted in eight improvement proposals that together would eliminate waste with a total time of approximately 12 hours a day for all analyzed operations combined. It meant a cost reduction of about 3,500 Swedish crowns per day. The compilation of the information collected was illustrated through a gap analysis.

    The time duration that was used for the saving calculations were estimated values ​​through observations and interviews with staff members. When calculating the time possible to save the lowest estimated time duration were used and the results may therefore contain numbers of unknown cases. It makes the calculations the theoretically lowest savings that can be made. In reality, the cost reduction could be greater if the improvement proposals were implemented.

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    Lean Produktion inom prefabindustrin
  • 58.
    Andersson, Robin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Persson, Tobias
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Konceptframtagning av komponent: Till handhållen elektrisk produkt2018Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study is performed as a final thesis project at School of engineering, Jönköping University in collaboration with the Professional electric department at Husqvarna. The purpose of the study was to develop a concept proposal that improves the performance of a battery-powered handheld product by developing a new component.

    By evaluating and analyzing the existing product and by discussions with the Husqvarna supervisors, a construction criteria list was created with the requirements to be met. A literature study was conducted to gather information, which gave a broader basis for further work.

    To find a potential solution, a conceptual study was conducted in the form of a brainstorming process. This process resulted in a couple of concepts which were evaluated and screened by the methods "Go / No-Go" and "Pugh's matrix". After evaluation and by simpler tests, a concept was elaborated further and developed into a final prototype.

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  • 59.
    Andersson, Roy
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Quality-driven logistics2007Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall objective of this thesis is to describe and explain how different quality management philosophies can be combined in the supply/demand chain, in order to contribute to its resilience. The analysis is both quantitative and qualitative, based on theory and literature related to TQM, Lean, Agile and Six Sigma, one literature study and three case studies that were performed in companies. The studies are related to four research questions and are presented in four papers. The first research question focuses on similarities and differences between the quality management concepts TQM, Lean and Six Sigma. The findings were that TQM, Six Sigma and Lean have many similarities, but they differ in some areas. For examples Lean addresses process flow and waste, whereas Six Sigma addresses variation and design. The conclusion is that there is a lot to gain if organisations are able to combine these three concepts, as they are complementary. Two case studies and a literature survey supported the findings. The second research question focuses on outcomes in a logistics process if using quality management. The findings were that the quality management approach leads to risks being mitigated, managed and monitored and ensures a more effective, robust and flexible process, very much in line with the Agility philosophy. Solutions for quicker response to customers have also been introduced. The findings were supported by two case studies in seven companies. The third research question focuses on how prepared the transport- and logistics-oriented companies are for the application of quality concepts and quality management philosophy. The findings were that they can be described as being TQM-oriented. The companies do not consider Lean and Six Sigma to be future trends. Focus is on the customer, while they do not focus on variations or removing waste. The findings were supported by a case study in 24 companies. The fourth research question focuses on how quality concepts can contribute to risk control and resilience in an organisation. A combined Lean/Six Sigma approach by using Six Sigma framework and the last phase, Perfection, in the Lean concept, implies that the companies’ resilience, due to their strengthened ability to handle variability, risk management and agility, was improved. The findings were supported by two case studies in seven companies.

  • 60.
    Andersson, Roy
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Supply chain resilience through quality management2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The length and complexity of the supply chain tend to increase, rather than diminish, thereby making the supply chain riskier and less predictable and, hence, more vulnerable. At the same time, customers are becoming increasingly demanding. The challenge to businesses today is to create a resilient supply chain in order to manage and mitigate risk and vulnerability. The purpose of the thesis is to explore, describe and develop the use of a combined quality management philosophy in logistics processes in order to improve supply chain resilience. The findings are supported by six studies, which are presented here in six papers. The studies show that there is a lot to gain if organisations are able to combine quality management philosophies, as they are complementary to one another. TQM places its strongest emphasis on the commitment and involvement of all employees. Lean is a discipline that focuses on process speed and removal of waste in order to increase customer value. Six Sigma benefits from an added focus on variability and design of products/services and processes. It has been indicated that a combined quality management philosophy makes the logistics processes more reliable, flexible, agile and robust while reducing cost. The companies’ risk awareness has increased and their risk management has been improved, thanks to the Six Sigma training programmes and philosophy. Using a combined quality management philosophy, the speed of production could be increased, and the responsiveness and flexibility could be improved, which means quicker response to changes. It has also been indicated that a combined quality management philosophy improves the companies’ resilience, due to their increased agility and strengthened ability to handle variability and risk management. Quality management tools can be very effective in the companies’ efforts to control supply chain risk and to identify risk sources of variation, even outside the focal company. In Six Sigma projects, the root cause of variation is often found outside the focal companies, which requires more collaboration in the supply chain. However, if the companies that use a combined quality management philosophy intend to become more resilient, they must involve suppliers and customers more in their own processes and design products/services and processes together. Collaboration with the suppliers and customers and the notion of how to extend a combined quality management philosophy outside the focal company are of importance in order to make the whole supply chain resilient. This could lead to a problem, especially since the conditions for transport and logistics in regards to the application of quality methods and tools represent a large area, unexploited by the companies. On the other hand, Six Sigma has standardised training courses, and it has been demonstrated how a Six Sigma framework can enable collaboration across companies’ boundaries in the supply chain, with the use of Six Sigma training and the DMAIC-roadmap as a common platform. Even if a combined quality management philosophy is effective and efficient, the companies must re-invest in additional methods, tools and strategies to make the entire supply chain resilient. It could be this re-investment in risk prevention and mitigation solutions that enables faster process responsiveness, the establishment of a risk management culture by creating common values, culture and rules in the supply chain and the use of logistics strategies and methods.

  • 61.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Svensson, Victor
    University of Skövde.
    Preventive maintenance is an enabler for operation excellence in support processes2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    TPM in a Lean office environment can create values both in a business and an employee dimension. In the employee dimension TPM reduces the risk of missing/forgetting areas of responsibility and creates more involvement. In the business dimension objectives such as cost, quality and supporting the reduction of waste improved. Preventive maintenance meetings can be included and performed once a month in the ordinary departmental “stand-up meetings”. Methods like 5S, which need to be updated on a continuous basis, and standardized maintenance should also be connected to the TPM work. But first all employees should be trained in order to have the same direction/behavior.

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  • 62.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Torstensson, Håkan
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    How to Integrate Suppliers by Training in Lean Thinking2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Much research has addressed how to implement lean in a focal company, but little has been published about how to integrate suppliers in strategies and the focal company’s culture, such as lean production or lean thinking. The purpose of the article is to investigate if suppliers can become more integrated in the supply chain by training in lean thinking at the focal company and to explain a possible structure of the training.

    Design/methodology/approach: A multiple-case study has been conducted of the focal com- pany and five of its supply companies. The findings are supported empirically by on-site interviews and by observations, as well as by a binomial two-proportion test that was used to analyse the statistical data of the delivery precision.

    Findings: While the training programme does not show a conclusive result for the supply chain, it has made a difference for all participating suppliers. In most cases the training programme was a trigger that started or boosted the internal work with continuous improvements. In some cases it helped create structured ways of working and improved the internal production flows.

  • 63.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Spatial design supporting the management of radical improvements within the manufacturing industry2013In: Proceedings of the 19th international conference on engineering Design, Seoul, Korea, Dem. Republic of: the Design Society , 2013, p. 129-138Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is important for the manufacturing industry to become more innovative. Doing what we always have done is not enough. External pressure and the required speed of change, requires industry to improve the management of incremental and radical improvement work. There is thus a need for new methods, tools, and processes to improve the innovative capabilities. In this paper we discuss the use of spatial design to support the management of radical improvement within the manufacturing industry. The designs of the physical spaces are in the paper presented as frames that are cultivating, facilitating and enabling radical improvement without imposing a regime of control and forced change. The spatial design enables the process and contributes to an ecosystem supporting radical improvement. To better manage radical improvement processes, one option suggested in this paper is to create five dedicated places - five enabling frames - for five phases in a radical improvement process, firstly to bring attention to the different phases of the process and secondly to support the actions in each part.

  • 64. Andersson, Tobias
    et al.
    Salomonsson, Kent
    Meso-Mechanical Modelling Of Thin Adhesive Layers2004In: ECF15, Stockolm 2004 / [ed] T Svensson, P Johannesson, J de Maré, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A meso-mechanical finite element model for a thin adhesive layer is developed. The model is calibrated to experimental results where the adhesive layer is loaded in monotonically increasing peel or shear, cf. Andersson and Stigh [1] and Alfredsson et al. [2], and to an in situ SEM study of the fracture process. The purpose of the meso-mechanical finite element model is to facilitate the development of constitutive laws for adhesive layers. Ideas developed by Needleman [3], where structural continuum elements are bonded by cohesive elements are used as a basis for the finite element mesh. This thus enables micro cracks to propagate along the finite element boundaries. The simulations are found to be in good agreement with the experiments. The model is also capable of reproducing realistically the deformation observed in both peel [1] and shear [2] experiments.

  • 65.
    André, Felix
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Effektivisering av lagerprocess kopplat till kundbehov2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 66.
    André, Samuel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    The Design Platform Approach –Enabling platform-based development in the engineer-to-order industry2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing companies are continuously faced with requirements regarding technology novelty, shorter time to market, a higher level of functionality, and lower prices on their products. This is especially the case for companies developing and manufacturing highly customized products, also known as engineer-to-order (ETO) companies. The traditional view of the product lifecycle introduces the customer only at the sale and distribution phase, which is often concerned with identifying and transferring customer needs into fixed specifications that guide the development of end-consumer products. In the ETO industry, however, the customer is involved already at the scoping and quotation stage, and a significant amount of engineering needs to be performed for every customer order. Thus, ETO companies cannot work according to the traditional model described above since specific requirements are set directly by the customer, or a detailed requirements specification is missing and must be developed in cooperation with the customer. It is not uncommon that products are developed in joint ventures with the customer and run for several years, during which requirements change.

    Product platform approaches have been generally accepted in the industry to serve a wide product variety while maintaining business efficiency. However, how to apply a product platform approach in ETO companies that face the reality described above is a challenge. Product platform approaches tend to require focused development of the platform, which, in turn, requires some knowledge about the future variants to be derived from the platform. The research presented in this thesis investigates the state of art and practice in the industry regarding the challenges, needs, and current use of product platforms. To respond to the identified need, a product platform approach is proposed that expands the scope of what a product platform has traditionally contained. The purpose of this proposal is to aid the development of highly customized products when physical modules or component scalability do not suffice. The resulting approach, the Design Platform Approach (DPA), provides a coherent model and methodology for heterogeneous engineering assets to be used in product development, supporting the activity of designing and existing solutions. The approach is based on identifying and modelling generic product and process items, which are the generic building blocks of the product, its structure, and the process of designing them. The generic product and process items are associated with the generic assets governing their design. By describing engineering assets that are the outcome of technology and product development, such as finished designs, design guidelines, constraints etc., in a standardized format, the DPA successively evolves.

    This thesis outlines the DPA in detail and presents cases of applications that have focused on different aspects of the approach. Tools to support the DPA are presented and evaluated in different kinds of industries along with the specific methods used and literature summarization.

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    Kappa
  • 67.
    André, Samuel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Towards a Platform Approach Supporting the Interface Between Technology - and Product Development2016In: Proceedings of the DESIGN 2016 14th International Design Conference, Dubrovnik, May 16-19, 2016. / [ed] Marjanović, D., Štorga, M., Pavković, N., Bojčetić, N., Škec, S., The Design Society, 2016, p. 1987-1996Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The separation of technology development (TD) and product development (PD) is adding to the challenge that suppliers face. They are to conduct long term TD and at the same time tailor products when the order arrives. This paper proposes a platform approach in order to describe some conceptual knowledge. An example from the automotive business where early simulations of concepts are performed during TD is presented. The focus is on how these simulations can support the transfer of knowledge from TD to PD and how they are to be described in order to communicate the technology’s ability to adapt.

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  • 68.
    André, Samuel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Creating an ability to respond to changing requirements by systematic modelling of design assets and processes2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    System suppliers, e.g. original equipment suppliers, are important for the success of many products. They design a unique solution, often in close collaboration with other companies, based on different product concepts and/or core technologies. The solution can then be manufactured in different quantities depending on the client’s need. High level of customization is required as the interfaces are not standardized, the performance is not negotiable, requirements are not initially fixed and the specific system interacts with, is affected by, or affects other systems that are simultaneously developed. A system supplier commonly designs and manufactures solutions for different OEMs and must support many models and variants in their product portfolios. Efficiency, short lead-time, continuous technology development, and adaptability are essential for the competitive edge. A product platform approach has been a success for many companies to enable variety at low cost, however, it is not applicable for system suppliers. This work describes the result from a case study where a platform approach enabling a new way of structuring, publishing and managing design assets and processes was introduced at a company with the purpose to improve the ability to respond to changing requirements in the quotation process and the subsequent product development activities.

  • 69.
    André, Samuel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Modeling of transdisciplinary engineering assets using the design platform approach for improved customization ability2018In: Advanced Engineering Informatics, ISSN 1474-0346, E-ISSN 1873-5320, Vol. 38, p. 277-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Original equipment suppliers (OES) that develop unique products are continuously faced with changing requirements during both the quotation and product development processes. This challenge is a different reality from companies that develop off-the-shelf products for the end consumer, which use fixed specifications and where product platforms have been a strong enabler for efficient mass customization. However, product platforms cannot adequately support companies working as OES. The reason is that a high level of customization is required which means that interfaces cannot be standardized, the performance is not negotiable, requirements are not initially fixed, and the specific system interacts with, is affected by, or affects other systems that are simultaneously developed in a transdisciplinary environment. The design platform (DP) approach provides a coherent environment for heterogeneous and transdisciplinary design resources to be used in product development by supporting both designing and off-the-shelf solutions. This research describes the introduction, application and further development of the DP approach at an automotive supplier to support the development of customized solutions when traditional modularity or platform scalability do not suffice. A computer tool called Design Platform Manager has been developed to support the creation and visualization of the DP. The support tool has a connection to a product data management database to link the platform model to the various kinds of engineering assets needed or intended to support variant creation. Finally, the support tool was evaluated by the case company representatives showing promising results. 

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-08-08 00:00
  • 70.
    André, Samuel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Supporting the modelling and managing of relations in the design platform2019In: Proceedings of the 22th International Conference on Engineering Design (ICED), 5-8 August, Delft, The Netherlands, Cambridge University Press, 2019, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 3001-3010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common strategy which has in many cases become a necessity in product developing companies is to apply platform thinking to some extent. Engineer-to-order (ETO) companies are firms that need to invest in a significant amount engineering time in each product ordered by customers. These companies have in the past been known to not be fully able to apply platform strategies. An area of concern to product development is the design and manufacture of machine tools aimed for part manufacturing which is a large investment and a critical bottle neck. As a response to these challenges the design platform (DP) concept was developed which is founded on the re-use of company assets. This paper aims to investigate the application of the DP in a company designing and producing unique high-pressure die casting tools for different applications and customers. To enable companies of this character to utilize platform thinking to a higher degree and thus increase the efficiency in product development, a focus is set on modelling and managing relations within the DP. In addition, a PDM system setup is proposed together with an integrated support application for the realisation in industry.

  • 71.
    André, Samuel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    The design platform – a coherent platform description of heterogeneous design assets for suppliers of highly customised systems2017In: Journal of engineering design (Print), ISSN 0954-4828, E-ISSN 1466-1837, Vol. 28, no 10-12, p. 599-626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Companies developing highly customised products are continuously faced with fluctuating requirements during the early and late stages of the product development (PD) process. This differs from companies that develop end-consumer products, which uses fixed specifications and where product platforms have been a successful enabler for efficient customisation. However, in the past, product platforms have not been able to fully support companies working in an engineer-to-order business environment. This article outlines the results from a three-year collaborative research project between academics within the area of engineering design and practitioners from the engineer-to-order industry. The research introduces a design platform (DP) that aims to support the development of customised products when traditional platform concepts do not suffice. The platform approach provides a coherent environment for heterogeneous design assets to be used in PD by supporting both the design activity and the finished solutions. The needs and abilities regarding such a platform were investigated through a series of interviews and workshops at four companies. Then, the DP was modelled and support tools were developed. Finally, company representatives evaluated the complete DP and its applications, reporting promising results.

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  • 72.
    André, Samuel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    PLM support for the Design Platform in industrialized housing for efficient design and production of customized housesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 73.
    André, Samuel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    A platform model for suppliers of customized systems: Creating an ability to master fluctuating requirements2016In: Proceedings of the ASME 2016 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences & Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2016, Charlotte, August 21-24, 2016., 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Companies developing highly customized products within the supplier industry are continuously faced with fluctuating requirements during both the quotation process and continued development. This research proposes a platform approach to aid suppliers when modularity or platform scalability do not suffice. The platform approach, Design Platform, focuses on descriptions that not only contain information about tangible components and systems but also information, knowledge and methods supporting the actual design of the product. A support system called Design Platform Manager has been developed to aid in using the platform approach and is introduced at a supplier active in the automotive industry. The system enables creation of generic product items that can be structured and instantiated to become product variants as well as Design Elements that are blocks of knowledge that describe a design or supports the activity of designing. A first evaluation is made that overall shows good result according to the company representatives.

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  • 74.
    André, Samuel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Introducing Design Descriptions on Different Levels of Concretisation in a Platform Definition2015In: Product Lifecycle Management in the Era of Internet of Things / [ed] Bouras, A., Eynard, B., Foufou, S., Thoben, K.-D., Springer, 2015, p. 800-810Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product platforms has been widely accepted in industry as a means to reach both high product variety while maintaining business efficiency. For suppliers of highly customised products, however, the development of a platform based upon predefined modules is a challenge. This is due to the large differ-ences between the various systems their products are to be integrated into and the customer's individual preferences. What is common for most platform descriptions is the high level of concretisation, such as predefined modules, they are built upon, but how can companies act when that is not possible? Are there other principles that can be used for the definition of a product platform? This paper presents a concept to incorporate other types of descriptions of different levels of concretisation into a product platform. Parts of the concept has been realised in a computer support tool and tested at a case company in order to improve their quotation process.

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  • 75.
    André, Samuel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Poorkiany, Morteza
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Computer supported engineering design.
    Managing Fluctuating Requirements by Platforms Defined in the Interface Between Technology and Product Development2014In: Advances in Transdisciplinary Engineering: Moving Integrated Product Development to Service Clouds in the Global Economy / [ed] Cha, J., Chou, S.-Y., Stjepandić, J. , Curran, R., Xu, W., Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2014, p. 424-433Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product platforms play an important role for the efficient customisation and variant forming of products in many companies. In this paper four different companies ranging from OEM to B2B suppliers have been interviewed on how they engage in technology and product development, create and maintain product platforms and how they respond to the changing requirements on the platforms and on the products and product families derived from them. The objective is to find how product platforms are used to meet the demands of efficient product customisation. The companies all have identifiable product platforms and established processes for product development. However, there are differences in how they define technology development, how the platforms are created, maintained, replaced and what the platforms contain. The introduction of new technology into the platforms and how the platforms are used from a Lean product development perspective has been of interest in the survey as reported in the paper.

  • 76. Ankarkrona, Jesper
    et al.
    Boldt, Simon
    Can lean and reconfigurability be combined?: From a manufacturing system investment perspective2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 77.
    Appusamy Boopathy, Harish
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Bonthala, Pavan Kumar
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Electrochemical etching and anodizing as key stages of surface treatment of aluminium foil for electrolytic capacitor industry: Application of Electro Chemical Impedance Spectroscopy as non-destructive characterization of etched anode foil with an anodized dielectric oxide layer2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the initial stage, the sample preparation was done by using the techniques of Anodic etching and anodic forming processes where a repeated trial and error method of sample preparation headed towards making out a suitable sample set for characterization. After this step, the set of 2 different industrial samples were introduced and anodic oxide forming process was carried out in different electrolytes.

     

     In the sample preparations, 4 different electrolytes were used 15% wt. Ammonium Adiphate, 1.5% wt. Ammonium Phosphate, 7% wt. Boric acid and 15% Penta Borate at different stages for performing the anodic oxide forming process. Minimum forming voltages of 20V to a maximum of 100V was employed in the sample preparation and to overcome the waiting time in forming the etched samples a higher current of 0.5A was used.

     

    After the samples preparation, Electrochemical Impedance spectroscopy was used as a tool for characterising the various groups of samples and for observing the micro structures of various samples, they were fractured and the observed on the cross section by SEM.

     

    After the analysis of the etched samples was made, an attempt to compare the results of the data of these samples to that of the 2 set of industrial samples was made and found that the resultant data wasn’t stable enough to characterize since huge scattering were occurring and whereby the simulation of the CPE circuit for the chosen circuit in the analysis was not possible.

     

    Under the analysis, a randomly chosen industrial sample was also used and the resultant data was utilised in understanding the response of the system to different electrolytes.

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  • 78.
    Arbabi, Mohammad Reza
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Investigation of volume and product mix flexibility in batch production2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Today’s business environment involves a globalised market, greater than before competition and more challenging customers, all factors which contribute to higher uncertainty and variability. Manufacturing flexibility is becoming more important in order to cope with the complexity of products through frequency volume changes and evaluations of the technological requirements of products.

    The research for this thesis was performed within a subcontractor company, Laserkraft AB, who focus on laser cutting, turning and welding processes in their production. The company utilises a variety of volume and product mixes, which is in correlation with the objective of this study.

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the common source drivers in order to achieve volume and product mix flexibility on batch production systems. First, a literature review was conducted in order to build the framework of common source factors between volume and product mix flexibility. Then, a single case study was conducted to examine the outcomes of framework on batch production. In this case, qualitative techniques included interviews and an observation of the shop floor.

    The analysis of this study was conducted with empirical research on a case study and theoretical framework from literature. From the literature stand point; it was found that flexible manufacturing competencies (FMC) and strategic flexibility approaches are two main elements to determine internal source drivers between volume and product mix flexibility. The groups of common source factors were then analysed with respect to characteristics of batch production systems at the chosen company.

    A comparison between the framework and the empirical findings identified source drivers in order to achieve volume and product mix flexibility. Due to the limited nature of the study, all source factors that have an impact on achieving volume and product mix flexibility might not be presented in this thesis. Besides, it is difficult to generalise the result on a single case study.

    As a result, each organisation and industry refers to their product, process and type of layout, and requires a group of practices to achieve volume and product mix flexibility. This thesis concludes with the top three common source factors between volume and product mix flexibility such as: set-up time reduction, multi-trained employees and advanced manufacturing technology.

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  • 79.
    Arfwedson, Daniel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Isendahl, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Kartläggning och effektivisering av omställningsprocessen2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In a global market, the competition is strong and companies are competing against each other all the time. By obtaining competitive advantages such as flexible production, short delivery times, quality and low prices, a company can attract major customers and create major advantages compared to their competatives.

     

    Kongsberg Automotive AB is a global company operating in the automotive industry and distributing goods to several famous brands. Due to high demands from clients, Kongsberg is working with continuous improvement which helps the company to develop and improve their effectiveness. One problem the company has had under observation for a while is their setup process. The setup process has not had a major change since 1996 when the company introduced a workstation that prepares tools for the production. The company has decided to investigate further into the setup process to see which improvements are possible to carry out the setup process. The investigation covered the setup time reduction through an analysis made by using the SMED-method in the program AviX SMED.

     

    AviX SMED uses video-recorded material were the most representative setup was used as an object. The program offers the possibility to analyze the video-recorded material using categorizations and by splitting up the various elements of the set of workers available. SMED is an elaborate method of setup time reduction which comes from Japan in the 1950´s and follows a number of different steps that should be taken in order to get the desired results.

     

    The investigation resulted in several suggestions for improvement where two different proposals for action was developed. The proposed actions were developed with a main focus on "with investments" and "without investment". The proposal without invesments was used as suggested actions to Kongsberg because investments were not the focus. The ”non investment”-suggestion reduced setup time on average by 29 % in four of the analysed setups. Kongsberg can continue to reduce setup time by technical efficiency but that requires more profound analysis of how complex features work and interact with each other.

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  • 80.
    Arnesson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
    Bengtsson, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
    Usability Evaluation of a Production System Development Framework: A Meta-Study Performed on the Use of a Production System Development Framework in the Development of a New Production System at Xylem2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s competitive global market has placed companies under great pressure and the focus on production systems has been more prominent. Although there are several claimed benefits with using frameworks in the development of production systems, companies are reluctant to use these. Consequently, a relevant question formulation is: Are frameworks in the development of production systems usable?

    The purpose with this thesis work was therefore to evaluate the usability of production system development frameworks (PSDFs) in practice. In order to achieve this purpose, two research questions were established:

    RQ1.  How can usability of frameworks be evaluated?

    RQ2.  How does the use of a framework contribute to the development of a new production system?

    In order to answer the posed research questions, Bellgran and Säfsten’s PSDF was used in the production system development (PSD) process of a new production system at Xylem. Based on the PSD process, a meta-study was performed to evaluate the practical usability of the PSDF. Usability was defined and evaluated based on the five usability terms learnability, memorability, efficiency, effectiveness, and satisfaction.

    The result showed that all the five usability terms contribute to the usability evaluation of PSDFs. However, memorability was considered difficult to use on only one study since the user has to think a step further and make a qualified guess to answer if it is possible to memorize a framework. Therefore, it was considered memorability is only appropriate to use in a multiple study.

    The results also showed that Bellgran and Säfsten’s PSDF contributed most in the beginning of the PSD process by putting emphasis on the planning phase and providing a structure to follow. Due to the nature of a framework (i.e., to serve as a guide for structures to follow), this was not unexpected. However, the contributions from a structure or plan are hard to exactly distinguish. Since companies most often want tangible and accurate evidences, frameworks’ vague contributions are considered to be a major reason to why companies do not use frameworks more frequently. 

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  • 81.
    Arnesson, Thomas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Petersson, Karl
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Kartläggning och analysering av produktionsplanering av order med specialkvalitet hos Stora Enso Packaging AB2006Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This investigation’s task was to map manufacturing of special qualities at Stora Enso Packaging under a certain period, analyze if rules concerning special qualities is followed, which consequences this results in concerning use of paper, waste and costs and to give suggestions on alternative solutions. The goal was to give sugges-tions that help the company to reach its business ratio that the production de-partment uses within use of paper and productivity in the corrugated cardboard machine.

    Stora Enso Packaging is a part of the forest group Stora Enso and is one of Swe-den’s leading producers of corrugated cardboard. Stora Enso Packaging acts pri-mary on the Swedish market, where they have a market share of 25 %.

    To be able to analyze orders with special qualities we did a data collection during two months, where we mapped incoming orders. The period for this mapping was set to 1 February – 31 March 2006. It was considered enough to see it as an aver-age for the whole year, as there were no mentionable season variations.

    There is given written rules for special qualities in Stora Enso Packaging’s manual for quality standard. The rules say that an order shall be at least 5000 m2. 177 of 270 orders in our investigation were less than 5000 m2, while 93 orders fulfilled the demands. The result clearly shows that most of the orders are not following the rules, which is quite remarkable considering the importance of effective plan-ning of the corrugated cardboard in the machine.

    One of Stora Enso Packaging’s four business ratio in the production department is the use of paper. Therefore we examined the use of paper for every single order dur-ing the data collection period and we show the result in three diagrams, partly for all orders and partly for orders over respectively under 5000 m2. The result shows that all orders that have a use of paper less than 50 % has also fewer than 5000 m2. It also shows that most of the orders have a use of paper between 91 100 %.

    The additional cost for the waste of corrugated cardboard was 83 % higher in SEK for orders over 5000 m2, compared with order under the same square meter limit. An important comparison is that orders over 5000 m2 are 7 times bigger in square meters than orders under 5000 m2. Of this comparison one can see that the addi-tional cost is bigger per ordered square meter for orders under 5000 m2. Further-more, the same indication shows when we compared the additional cost for waste with the revenue for every single order. Order under 5000 m2 shows a result of 12,5 %, while the same result for orders over 5000 m2 is 9,5 %. This shows an indi-cation of that orders under 5000 m2 increases the costs and decreases the productiv-ity in the plant.

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  • 82.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Exploring optimal flexible assembly systems2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a prominent part of manufacturing system, assembly system provides a platform for increasing efficiency while delivering various market demands. However, due to the lack of a unified and clear definition of flexibility in assembly systems, the recognition of optimal flexibility in assembly system without clashing with efficiency still remains elusive. In order to establish a sound basis to discuss the characteristics of flexible assembly and to address the question of reaching optimal flexibility, this paper makes use of a case study performed in five manufacturing plants. The study proposes a clear definition for flexible assembly and identifies six enablers for flexibility in assembly systems. Further in this research the applicability of few different types of manufacturing flexibility in assembly system is investigated. The paper concludes with discussions and suggestions for future research.

  • 83.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    The Essential Constituents of Flexible Assembly Systems: A Case Study in the Heavy Vehicle Manufacturing Industry2015In: Global Journal of Flexible Systems Management, ISSN 0972-2696, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 235-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The major challenge of today’s manufacturing industry in tackling demands for a wider range of products with short life-cycle times and meeting customisation requirements has drawn considerable attention towards flexibility in manufacturing systems. As a prominent part of a manufacturing system, an assembly system provides a platform for increasing efficiency while delivering various market demands. However, owing to the dearth of a unified and clear definition of the constituents of flexible assembly systems, in both theory and practice, the recognition of flexibility in assembly systems still remains elusive. In order to establish a sound base for discussing the constituents of flexible assembly systems, this research paper explores the literature concerning flexibility in manufacturing and assembly as well as in flexible systems management domains. To reflect an industrial perspective, a multiple case study of five manufacturing plants in the heavy vehicle industry is performed. By identifying six essential constituents of flexibility in assembly systems, the study proposes a clear definition of flexibility in assembly systems which mainly revolves around mix and volume flexibility. To further enhance the findings, the compatibility of a few previously identified types of manufacturing flexibility in the assembly systems of the case plants is investigated and additional dimensions of flexibility in assembly systems are revealed. Finally, the implications for theory and practice as well as suggestions for future research are discussed.

  • 84.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Drivers of complexity in a flexible assembly system - A case study2015In: 48th CIRP International Conference on Manufacturing Systems (CIRP CMS 2015): Key Enabling Technologies for the Factories of the Future: Proceedings of a meeting held 24-26 June 2015, Ischia, Italy / [ed] Roberto Teti, Elsevier, 2015, p. 189-194Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Various ever-changing market demands have propelled manufacturing companies to offer product variety in an efficient and timely manner. Assembly as a key stage of manufacturing process is used to realise product variety through establishing mixed-product assembly systems. Although establishing a flexible mixed-product assembly system which both offers product variety and absorbs market demands fluctuation is pivotal for maintaining competitive edge in certain industries such as vehicle manufacturing, it is also considered an elaborate task which calls for further investigation. In this paper, complexity in a flexible mixed-product assembly line is investigated and the key drivers of complexity are identified. To fulfil the research objective, a case study during the pilot implementation of a flexible mixed-product assembly concept in a heavy vehicle manufacturing company has been conducted. The results indicate the key factors concerning assembly process, product design, and information and communication technology (ICT) which contribute to complexity in the flexible assembly system. The paper concludes with an outlook for possible future research.

  • 85.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Handling product variety in a mixed-product assembly line: A case study2015In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED, Volume 4, Issue DS 80-04 / [ed] Cantamessa M.,Graziosi S.,Weber C.,Cascini G.,Husung S.,Marjanovic D., The Design Society, 2015, p. 41-50Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s fast-changing global market, using mixed-product assembly lines (MPALs) and mixed-model assembly lines (MMALs) allows manufacturing companies to be flexible and to maintain their competitive edge through product variety. Balancing and sequencing issues have been recognized as the main challenges of MPALs and MMALs, but other practical needs of MPALs remain unclear. Recognizing the practical needs of MPALs helps in identifying related requirements for product design, leading to products that closely align with the MPAL concept. The objective of this paper is to offer an industrial perspective on the needs of MPALs and to identify its requirements vis-à-vis product design. To achieve this objective, a single real-time case study in a heavy-vehicle-manufacturing company has been performed. The results from this industrial case study suggest that in order to handle product variety in MPALs and to reduce the related complexity, certain dimensions of flexibility need to be created in the assembly system, and requirements related to product design should be considered simultaneously in order to support assembly processes.

  • 86.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Identification of the causes of complexity in mixed-product and mixed-model assembly lines2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing demands for product variety have directed manufacturing companies towards accommodating flexibility by establishing mixed-product and mixed-model assembly lines. However, since greater variety leads to increased complexity, establishing these assembly lines becomes complicated. By conducting a case study, this paper investigates the causes of complexity and the applicability of assembly instructions in one mixed-product and four mixed-model assembly lines in a heavy vehicle manufacturing company. The results indicate a set of causes for complexity and highlight the significance of assembly instructions, as the practical implications for development of flexible assembly systems and design of products closely aligned with them.

  • 87.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Västerås, Sweden.
    Jackson, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
    Fundin, Anders P.
    Mälardalens högskola, Västerås, Sweden.
    Implications of realizing mix flexibility in assembly systems for product modularity—A case study2019In: Journal of manufacturing systems, ISSN 0278-6125, E-ISSN 1878-6642, Vol. 52, p. 13-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To enable the production of high product variety, mix flexibility in assembly systems is of paramount importance for manufacturing companies. Mixed-product assembly lines (MPALs) are growing as the key means of realizing mix flexibility in many manufacturing sectors, as they absorb volume fluctuations and offer high product variety. With the increasing product variety in MPALs, these assembly systems are becoming more complex. However, the practical challenges of these assembly systems, in particular those concerning product design, have not been adequately addressed. By performing a case study of a heavy machinery manufacturing company, this paper investigates the implications of realizing mix flexibility in an assembly system for product modularity. The findings pinpoint the low level of product modularity in assembly as the most important challenge in MPALs. Accordingly, realizing mix flexibility in an MPAL impacts product modularity through establishing a common assembly sequence and defining similar module contents across distinct product families. 

  • 88.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Schedin, Joel
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Considering assembly requirement specifications in product development: identification and approach2014In: FAIM 2014 - Proceedings of the 24th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing: Capturing Competitive Advantage via Advanced Manufacturing and Enterprise Transformation, Curran Associates, Inc., 2014, p. 969-976Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the major advantages such as reduced time to market and improved quality at lowered cost, the principles of design for assembly capabilities and concurrent engineering are of great significance when developing new products. However, identifying assembly requirement specifications and considering them in New Product Development (NPD) in a timely manner, while securing efficiency and robustness of assembly processes, still remains a challenging task. In presenting a case study of an NPD project in a manufacturing company, this article focuses on the process of capturing and incorporating the requirements related to the assembly system during the early phases of NPD. Further, the results of the research study indicate the different assembly requirements in the case company and pinpoint the challenges in practices involved in handling them. The assembly requirements identified in this research reflect some of the challenges encountered in handling the requirements, through the investigated requirement practice. Based on the results, the issues of when and how to consider the assembly requirements are highlighted in the conclusions and suggestions for future research are made.

  • 89.
    Ascic, Ivana
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Ascic, Josip
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Competitive manufacturing in a high cost environment2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The movement of production to low cost countries has been a prominent trend during recent decades. The offshoring trend has primarily been cost motivated and has had a negative impact on domestic economic growth. Manufacturing firms operating in a high cost environment must strive to develop core capabilities to enhance competitiveness. In this study, the focus is on operations capabilities and improvement areas in a specific context (i.e. high cost environment).

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to evaluate critical operations capabilities and improvement areas for competitive manufacturing in a high cost environment.

    Method: The research process is based on the evaluation of an existing framework of operations capabilities in a high cost environment. The study adopts a multiple case study approach in which three Swedish manufacturing firms are evaluated. The data collection was conducted through a quantitative part (i.e. questionnaire) and a qualitative part (i.e. workshop discussion).

    Findings: The findings revealed that 16 operations capabilities and ten improvement areas were considered critical in a high cost environment. Four critical capabilities (i.e. total cost, productivity, conformance and customization flexibility) are more prominent and appear in all three cases. Two critical improvement areas, total cost and dependability, are more prominent and have a higher occurrence.

    Implications: The practical implication of the study provides firms with an overview and better understanding of critical operations capabilities and potential improvement areas in a high cost environment. The theoretical implication of the study is that firm characteristics (e.g. size and position in the supply chain) influence the importance of each capability.

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    Competitive manufacturing in a high cost environment
  • 90.
    Ask, Andréas
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Institutionen för innovation, design och produktutveckling.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Factory-in-a-Box: An Enabler to Realize Mass Customization2006In: Proceedings of the international conference on agile manufacturing, ICAM 2006, 2006, p. 44-54Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 91. Athley, Josef
    et al.
    Mauritzson, Gustav
    Concept for stroller chassis2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 92.
    Avdic, Aldin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Kling, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Ledtidsreducering vid Saab Training Systems Ab: Lead time reduction at Saab Training Systems AB2007Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta examensarbete är utfört på Saab Training Systems AB i Huskvarna. Saab Training Systems utvecklar, tillverkar och säljer kompletta militära träningssystem.

    Syftet med arbetet var att minska ledtiderna, då korta leveranstider blir ett allt viktigare konkurrensmedel. Arbetet innebar en kartläggning av nuvarande reserv- och reparationsflöde samt att identifiera problem och komma fram till förbättringsförslag.

    Vidare har vi studerat reservdelslagrets lagernivå och dess kapitalbindning.

    Arbetet genomfördes med hjälp av intervjuer med berörd personal, observationer, enkätundersökning samt statistiska studier. Vi har även arbetat med Supply Chain Operations Reference Model som är en öppen referensmodell med vars hjälp man kan kartlägga, förändra och optimera sin verksamhet.

    Saab Training Systems har som mål att ledtiderna för reservdelsflödet och reparationsflödet skall vara 14 dagar, men i själva verket är det inte så. Dessa ledtider är idag längre, hur långa är dock oklart.

    De långa ledtiderna beror främst på att i flödena förekommer det mycket passiv tid. Tiden uppstår bland annat i väntan på transport men även som en konsekvens av att företaget för tillfället har mycket att göra.

    För att reducera ledtiderna bör Saab Training Systems i första hand reducera den passiva tiden.

    Saab Training Systems bör sänka sina lagernivåer för att frigöra bundet kapital vilket leder till att de minskar risken att produkterna minskar i värde eller blir inkuranta.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 93. Avertoft, Anton
    et al.
    Rudenstam, Carl
    Weed control equipment for battery trimmer2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 94. Avestedt, Alice
    et al.
    Hedström, Anton
    Konceptuell studie av gångjärn i titan för glasögonbågar2017Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This report presents a final thesis in product development and design at Jönköping University. The mission was to design a new hinge for glasses. The report is written by Alice Avestedt and Anton Hedström.

    In the start of the project a pre-study was made on the topic to increase the understanding and to get inspiration from earlier solutions. To create new solutions, the writers looked for similar movements and products in other fields except glasses. This helped making it easier to create new solutions and think outside the box. To gather the information and make it easy to view the writers created both an image board and an idea board.

    After the pre-study the idea and concept generation was made. This part of the work focused on getting solutions to the problem. With help from the idea and image board five concepts was created that was chosen to keep improving. To further test the function and movements of the components mock-ups was created. For concepts that required CAD models, they were created in Solid Works.

    When the concepts were done the writers selected which one to keep working with. The purpose was to find the concept which most fulfilled the requirements from the company. To help make this decision a Pugh’s matrix was used. Here the requirements were weighted based on importance and the concepts were compared to each other.

    The result was a new hinge which can be used on titanium glasses and has a new design solution. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 95.
    Axelsson, Arvid
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Hansen, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Utveckling av testutrustning för långtidsprovning av bensindrivna motorsågar2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 96. Axelsson, Jan
    et al.
    Karltun, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    RULA: en metod för egenutvärdering av arbetsställningar och risker1995Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 97.
    Axelsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Söderberg, Robert
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Värdeflödesanalys på Saab Training Systems i Huskvarna2009Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Saab Training Systems (STS) in Huskvarna is manufacturing material for educationalpurposes to armies worldwide. They are now implementing parts of the Lean productionconcept in their organisation.One part of the work with Lean production is to eliminate waste. To be able to identify waste,value stream mapping is a good tool and also what we used in our thesis. To gain a betterefficiency in the production of Personnel Detector Device (PDD) flow was one of our goals.The PDD is a harness used during battle training which registers if the user is being hit by itsenemy.Our work with the thesis started up with a short education in Lean production and in valuestream mapping (VSM). The work proceeded with a VSM of the production flow of the PDD,interviews were made and studies of literature were done to gain greater knowledge of thesubject and solve the task.The VSM resulted in five areas which were followed up out of those six we identified. Theareas were as followed: to examine why the reliability in a test chamber were down at 83percent, look over batch size and setup time, find out whether two workstations that wereusing the same equipment should be separated or not and also look through the existing layoutand create a new.The results from this were that what took down the reliability in the test chamber was isolatedto a few things which were followed through and visualized in a Pareto diagram.Big batch sizes as a result of few start ups of the order which now will be changed in to moredaily start ups with the actual demand in mind. The setup time is a big part of the change inbatch size. Valuable process time is lost as the operators have to collect material which isbeing needed for the assembling of the products. STS is now going to follow up the processand se how to make for changes.The two stations sharing the same equipment is a kind of a problem in the material flow asproducts some times get stacked up here. To solve this problem the only solution is toseparate them into two different work stations. This will affect the layout in the factory andtherefore a layout for the future was created from the results which are presented above andtheory of how to create a layout.Our work at STS resulted in that the areas mentioned above were followed up and is nowbeing implemented in various scale.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 98.
    Baharmast, Amir Reza
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Exploring purchasing flexibility and its sources: Systematic literature review Exploratory case study2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Several arrays of literature have studied flexibility at different levels of a supply chain in order to define and conceptualise supply chain flexibility (SCF). Purchasing function is the part of a firm that has a crucial contribution in achieving flexibility on the upstream of a supply chain. The purpose of this study is to explore purchasing flexibility and its sources (how flexibility is achieved) in manufacturing companies. In this regard, the study answers two questions: 1. How is purchasing flexibility defined?, 2. How can manufacturers achieve purchasing flexibility?

    Methodology – A systematic literature review was conducted and a total number of 40 academic papers were analysed to define purchasing flexibility and identify its sources in manufacturing companies. Following the systematic literature review, a case study was conducted to explore the purchasing flexibility and its sources in a manufacturing company.

    Findings – The results have described the different definitions used in the literatures to address the purchasing flexibility. Results have shown that different sources of purchasing flexibility are either attributes of the suppliers network or are the result of the purchasing decisions.

    Study delimitations – This study has focused on manufacturing firms. The systematic literature review was performed on English academic articles in major academic databases, which were accessible through Jönköping University network.

    Contributions – The main contribution of this study is taking the systematic approach to identify sources of purchasing flexibility spread in the literature. The exploratory case study confirms that majority of sources are used by the case company to increase the purchasing flexibility. The study serves as a good tool for practitioners by gathering and compiling a list of sources for purchasing flexibility.

    Keywords – Purchasing, supply chain, flexibility, upstream, manufacturing

  • 99.
    Bakalbasic, Dzenan
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Analys av returprocessen på Schenker Logistics AB2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This examination report has been carried out at Schenker Logistics AB where the objective has been to analyze the current return process and then to present possible improvements.

    In order to analyze the return process there was a necessity to obtain information of the present situation. The information has been acquired through observations and interviews with persons that work in the return process. The information that was obtained made it possible to analyze the return process.

    The analysis that was carried out resulted in identification of several shortcomings in the return process. Every of these shortcomings contributed to complications with handling of returns at Schenker Logistics AB. An example of a shortcoming that was identified is that undamaged goods were returned to Schenker Logistics AB without specified reason for the return delivery. Moreover, there was lack of documentation of damaged goods, which contributed that Schenker Logistics AB was unaware of what causes the damages. Additional shortcoming that could be identified in the return process is that waybills with a specific number often disappeared; waybills which are highly important to Schenker Logistics AB in order to handle the returned goods. Furthermore, several unjustified transportations of the return goods took place both internally at Schenker Logistics AB but also externally. This was a risk as the return goods could come in contact with ordinary goods; but also that it could contribute to physical damages on both the return goods and the ordinary goods. In addition to these shortcomings some more is mentioned and explained further in this report.

    The proposed improvements presented in this report include changes which can highly improve the return process at Schenker Logistics AB, but also in the entire supply-chain. The return process would most likely, after an implementation of the improvements, become more controlled and sustainable compared to today's situation. These improvement proposals can reduce the number of scenarios by half, scenarios that arise at Schenker Logistics AB when receiving the return goods. These changes can also contribute to saving in costs, in form of handling costs and administrative costs, at both Schenker Logistics AB and their customer Shell.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 100. Bakowski, M.
    et al.
    Nee, H.-P.
    Belov, Ilja
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing - Surface technology.
    Leisner, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing - Surface technology.
    High temperature electronic systems all in silicon carbide (SiC) for electric vehicles2011In: Workshop för 'Banbrytande IKT 2007, VINNOVA, Stockholm, 1 September 2011, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
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