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  • 451.
    Wendt, Lill-Kari
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Koch, G
    Birkhed, D
    Long-term evaluation of a fissure sealing programme in Public Dental Service clinics in Sweden.2001In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 61-65Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 452.
    Wendt, Lill-Kari
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Koch, G
    Birkhed, D
    Replacements of restorations in the primary and young permanent dentition.1998In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 149-155Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 453.
    Wendt, Lill-Kari
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Koch, G
    Hallonsten, A L
    Parental awareness of dental caries in toddlers.1996In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 161-164Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 454.
    Wendt, Lill-Kari
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Svedin, C G
    Hallonsten, A L
    Larsson, I B
    Infants and toddlers with caries: Mental health, family interaction, and life events in infants and toddlers with caries.1995In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 19, no 1-2, p. 17-27Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 455. Wernersson, Josephine
    et al.
    Danielsson Niemi, Lisa
    Einarson, Susanne
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Hernell, O
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Effects of human milk on adhesion of Streptococcus mutans to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite in vitro2006In: Caries Research, ISSN 0008-6568, E-ISSN 1421-976X, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 412-417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adhesion of bacteria to pellicle-coated tooth surfaces is the first step in biofilm formation on teeth. The aim of this study was to explore whether human milk prevents or promotes adhesion of cariogenic Streptococcus mutans to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite (HA) using an in vitro model system. S. mutans binding to HA coated with human parotid saliva (s-HA) or human milk was studied, in addition to binding inhibition to s-HA by human milk. S. mutans did not bind to HA coated with milk. S. mutans binding to s-HA was inhibited by milk from 15 (71 %) of 21 women, whereas milk from the remaining 6 mothers enhanced binding of S. mutans to s-HA. Inhibition of S. mutans binding correlated with bacterial binding to s-HA (r = 0.76). Human milk does not mediate adhesion of S. mutans to HA in vitro, but affects adhesion in an individually varying fashion. Phenotypic variations in milk and saliva glycosylation may explain the inhibitory capacity and possibly affect susceptibility to colonization by S. mutans in childhood. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  • 456.
    Widbom, T
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Bergendal, T
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Kvint, S
    Possible sites for cylinder implants in Swedish individuals aged 20-70 years: A comparative radiological inventory in 1983 and 1993.2000In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 24, no 1-2, p. 13-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the number of possible sites for cylinder implants in an epidemiological sample of adult individuals and to compare these results with those from a similar inventory performed 10 years earlier. This study, which comprised individuals 20-70 years old, is part of two larger epidemiological dental studies of individuals from the community of Jönköping, Sweden, performed in 1983 and 1993. Random samples of 579 and 575 individuals respectively were examined and classified according to the Eichner index. The radiographic examination included an orthopantomogram and a full-mouth intra-oral examination. Only existing spaces anterior to the second molars were considered as possible implant sites. Cylinder implants with a diameter of 3.75 mm and a length between 7 and 20 mm were plotted on the radiographs. Result: The most striking result from this study was the reduction by almost a half of the total number of possible implant sites between 1983 and 1993. A certain proportion of existing tooth gaps had been treated with conventional fixed prostheses, usually in small tooth gaps, and this tendency had increased between 1983 and 1993. The need for implants in the anterior frontal region was small but constant (less than 1%) in 1983 and 1993. In the future, implants will be a treatment option in young individuals, most likely in cases of trauma and tooth agenesis. Further it may be assumed that implant treatment in edentulous jaws will continue to increase in relative terms, i.e. the percentage of edentulous jaws that have been treated with implants will increase. In absolute terms, however, the frequency of the treatment will decrease because fewer individuals will be edentulous. Instead, the proportion of partially dentate subjects treated with implants will increase.

  • 457.
    Wirefeldt, Amanda
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Cao, Van
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Patienters upplevelser av tandhygienisters bemötande inom tandvården2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background A way to measure the patients’ experiences regarding treatment is to measure the satisfaction. Treatment includes humanistic view and professional approach. According to the competence description, dental hygienists should treat all people equally with respect. Patient satisfaction can be increased through good care. Aim To investigate patients’ degree of satisfaction from dental hygienists’ in the Public Dental Service, and how patients experienced their professional approach. Method The study was a quantitative cross-sectional study. The sample consisted of people ≥ 18 years old. Five dental clinics were chosen strategically by cluster selection. Descriptive statistics was conducted to map background variables. Age, self-perceived oral health and waiting time were compared with chi-square tests. Results Most of the participants were satisfied with the dental hygienists’ treatment. All participants stated that they were treated in a respectful and considerate manner. Statistically significant difference regarding waiting time was detected. The group where the visit started on time was more satisfied than those who had to wait. Through self-assessment of Humanism Scale showed that dental hygienists’ treatment was based on humanistic approach. Conclusion Most of the participants showed satisfaction with the dental hygienists' treatment and professional approach. Waiting time affected the degree of satisfaction.

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  • 458.
    Wohlfahrt, J. C.
    et al.
    Department of Periodontology, Institute of Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Evensen, B. J.
    Private Practice, Tønsberg, Norway.
    Zeza, B.
    Department of Dental and Maxillofacial Sciences, Section of Periodontology, Sapienza, University of Rome, Rome, Italy.
    Jansson, Henrik
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Pilloni, A.
    Department of Dental and Maxillofacial Sciences, Section of Periodontology, Sapienza, University of Rome, Rome, Italy.
    Roos-Jansåker, A. M.
    Department of Periodontology, Public Dental Health Service, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Di Tanna, G. L.
    Center for Primary Care and Public Health, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK.
    Aass, A. M.
    Department of Periodontology, Institute of Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Klepp, M.
    Private Practice, Stavanger, Norway.
    Koldsland, O. C.
    Department of Periodontology, Institute of Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    A novel non-surgical method for mild peri-implantitis- a multicenter consecutive case series2017In: International Journal of Implant Dentistry, E-ISSN 2198-4034, Vol. 3, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect on peri-implant mucosal inflammation from the use of a novel instrument made of chitosan in the non-surgical treatment of mild peri-implantitis across several clinical centers.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS:

    In this 6-month multicenter prospective consecutive case series performed in six different periodontal specialist clinics, 63 implants in 63 patients were finally included. The subjects had mild peri-implantitis defined as radiographic bone loss of 1-2 mm, pocket probing depth (PPD) ≥4 mm and a positive bleeding on probing (mBoP) score. The patients were clinically examined at baseline and after 2, 4, 12 and 24 weeks, and radiographs were taken at baseline and at 3 and 6 months. Treatment of the implants with the chitosan brush seated in an oscillating dental drill piece was performed at baseline and at 3 months. Reductions in the clinical parameters (PPD and mBoP) were compared between baseline and the later examination time points.

    RESULTS:

    Significant reductions in both PPD and mBoP were observed at all time points compared with the baseline clinical measurements (p < 0.001). The mean PPD and mBoP at baseline were 5.15 mm (4.97; 5.32) and 1.86 (1.78; 1.93), respectively, whereas the mean PPD and mBoP at 6 months were 4.0 mm (3.91; 4.19) and 0.64 (0.54; 0.75), respectively. Stable reductions in PPD and mBoP were evident up to 6 months after the initial treatment and 3 months after the second treatment. All 63 implants were reported to have stable radiographic levels of osseous support.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    This case series demonstrated that an oscillating chitosan brush is safe to use and seems to have merits in the non-surgical treatment of dental implants with mild peri-implantitis. To measure the effectiveness of the method, a multicenter randomized clinical trial needs to be undertaken.

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  • 459.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    et al.
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Institute for Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Johnston, Venerina
    School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, Saint Lucia, Australia.
    Rolander, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Social Work. Futurum, Academy for Health and Care, Region Jönköping, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Work and health characteristics of oral health providers who stay healthy at work – a prospective study in public dentistry2022In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 349-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    Research into work-related factors that positively influence Oral Health Providers (OHPs) health is scarce. This study aimed to analyse which OHPs in dental services remain healthy over time in relation to work- and health-related factors.

    Methods

    OHPs took part in this prospective cohort study (n=168). In 2012 and 2014 they answered a questionnaire featuring questions about demographics, health indicators, work and organisational factors.

    Results

    OHPs were classified into three subgroups; healthy group (n=66), semi-healthy group (n=45) and unhealthy group (n=57). The healthy group reported no sick leave or sickness presence in 2012 or 2014. Factors that explained a greater likelihood of belonging to the healthy group were: good work ability, not having neck pain, perceived low exertion at the end of the working day, not having sleeping problems. They scored higher on health indicators than OHPs in the unhealthy group.

    Conclusions

    OHPs with no sick leave or sickness presence report much better salutogenic health, better physical work ability and lower perceived exertion at the end of their workday compared with unhealthy group of OHPs. Understanding the relationship between working conditions and well-being is crucial to target interventions for OHPs which improve work conditions and health.

  • 460.
    zahra, Sharifi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Mahdia, Wahab
    Arbetsrelaterad stress hos tandvårdspersonal: En litteraturstudie2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To investigate how work-related stress affects the health of dental staff. Method: A general literature study with 10 scientific articles was performed through the databases Medline and DOSS. Articles were quality reviewed and graded based on low, medium and high quality. Results: Studies showed that the presence of work-related stress gave rise to fatigue syndrome, physical pain and mental illness. In the long run, work-related physical illness can cause chronic musculoskeletal disorders in the neck, shoulder, hand, wrist and lower back. Mental illness was manifested in the form of anxiety, depression and difficulty concentrating which can lead to several sick leave in staff. Conclusion: Work-related stress affects the health of dentists and dental hygienists negatively and can lead to chronic and irreversible diseases in the long run. Therefore, the employer should pay attention to know the early signs and identify the risk factors at an early stage.  

  • 461.
    Zasciurinskiene, Egle
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Lund, H.
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Odontology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindsten, Rune
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Departments of Orthodontics, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Sweden.
    Jansson, Henrik
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Periodontology, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Sweden.
    Bjerklin, K.
    Departments of Orthodontics, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Sweden.
    Outcome of orthodontic treatment in subjects with periodontal disease. Part III: a CBCT study of external apical root resorption2019In: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 575-582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    No evidence is present on the risk for external apical root resorption (EARR) during orthodontic treatment (OT) of adult patients with periodontal disease.

    AIM:

    To examine EARR after OT in subjects with periodontal disease and to analyse how intrusion and change in inclination of the most proclined maxillary incisors influence EARR.

    METHODS:

    The study included 50 patients with periodontal disease. Sub-gingival debridement by ultrasonic instrumentation supplemented with hand instruments was performed by experienced dental hygienist after baseline examination for all patients. For the control group, final periodontal treatment (PT) was performed before orthodontic tooth movement. For the test group patients, final PT was performed after levelling and alignment phases were finished, before the active space closure with elastic chain and/or inter-arch elastic traction for sagittal correction was started. OT was performed with a straight-wire appliance. Micro-implants or implants were used for posterior anchorage. Cone beam computed tomography examinations were performed before and after OT. EARR of all single-rooted teeth were measured. EARR of the most proclined maxillary incisor was related to intrusion and change in inclination angle.

    RESULTS:

    EARR after OT was observed in median 80.7 per cent (interquartile range 22.02) of single-rooted teeth [mean 1.2 (standard deviation 0.44) mm]. In 82.3 per cent of teeth, EARR was 2 mm or less. Severe EARR was found in 8 per cent of patients and five maxillary incisors (less than 1 per cent of all teeth). The amount of intrusion and change in inclination angle of the most proclined maxillary central incisor influenced the extent of EARR. Mean EARR was significantly higher when OT lasted more than 18 months (P = 0.02).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    OT in conjunction with PT in periodontal patients resulted in EARR in 81 per cent of all single-rooted teeth. Intrusion and change in inclination angle of the most proclined maxillary central incisor influenced the extent of EARR, as did longer OT. 

  • 462.
    Zasciurinskiene, Egle
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Lund, H.
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Odontology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindsten, Rune
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Departments of Orthodontics, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Sweden.
    Jansson, Henrik
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Periodontology, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Sweden.
    Bjerklin, K.
    Departments of Orthodontics, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Sweden.
    Outcome of periodontal-orthodontic treatment in subjects with periodontal disease. Part II: a CBCT study of alveolar bone level changes2019In: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 565-574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    To examine alveolar bone level (ABL) changes before (T1) and after (T2) orthodontic treatment (OT) in subjects with periodontal disease.

    METHODS:

    The study included 50 subjects with periodontal disease. All patients received subgingival debridement following baseline examination. Control group patients received final periodontal treatment before the start of OT. For the test group patients final periodontal treatment was performed simultaneous to OT. OT was performed with a straight-wire appliance. Micro-implants or temporary crowns on implants were used for posterior anchorage when needed. ABL measurements of 3821 tooth surfaces were performed on cone beam computed tomography images.

    RESULTS:

    No difference was observed between mean ABL at T1 and T2. ABL remained unchanged on 69 per cent of surfaces. A mean of 15.6 (SD 7.4) per cent of surfaces experienced ABL gain, and a mean of 15.1 (SD 7.5) per cent was found with ABL loss. Small significant median ABL difference was observed on mesial and distal surfaces (P < 0.001). A significant difference was found between median ABL changes on mesial/distal in comparison to buccal/lingual surfaces (P < 0.01). Significantly more buccal (17.9 %) and lingual (18.5 %) surfaces experienced ABL loss when compared with mesial (11.3 %) and distal (12.0 %) surfaces (P < 0.001). Significant difference was found in the median ABL change of intruded (0.5 (IQR 0.94) mm) and non-intruded (-0.4 (IQR 1.07) mm) maxillary incisors (P = 0.04). Significant median ABL gain was found on the lingual surface of maxillary incisors, which were retroclined more than 8.6 degree and intruded more than 1.6 mm.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    ABL changes after periodontal-orthodontic treatment in patients with periodontal disease were small. ABL gain was more observed on mesial and distal surfaces and ABL loss on buccal and lingual surfaces. Larger orthodontic movements of maxillary incisors influenced ABL gain. 

  • 463.
    Zasčiurinskienė, Eglė
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Department of Orthodontics, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Basevičienė, Nomeda
    Department of Dental and Oral Pathology, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Lindsten, Rune
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Department of Orthodontics, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Slotte, Christer
    Department of Periodontology, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Jansson, Henrik
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Bjerklin, Krister
    Department of Orthodontics, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Orthodontic treatment simultaneous to or after periodontal cause-related treatment in periodontitis susceptible patients. Part I: Clinical outcome. A randomized clinical trial2018In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 213-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To compare two treatment strategies regarding the effect of orthodontic treatment on periodontal status in patients with plaque-induced periodontitis.

    Subjects and Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial. Fifty periodontal patients were randomly assigned to the test or control groups according to periodontal treatment timing. All patients received supra- and subgingival debridement following baseline examination. Control group patients received cause-related periodontal treatment before the start of orthodontic treatment and which was performed simultaneous to orthodontic treatment for the test group patients.

    Results: No difference between the test and control groups was found regarding change of clinical attachment level (CAL) after periodontal–orthodontic treatment. Fewer sites with initial pocket depth (PD) of 4–6 mm healed after periodontal–orthodontic treatment in the test group (20.5%, IQR = 11.9%) in comparison with controls (30.4%, IQR = 27.1%) (p =.03). Anterior teeth [OR 2.5] and teeth in male patients [OR 1.6] had a greater chance for PD improvement ≥2 mm. Total periodontal–orthodontic treatment duration was significantly longer for the control group (p <.01).

    Conclusions: Both groups showed a gain of CAL and a reduction in sites with PD ≥ 4 mm. Orthodontic treatment, simultaneously to the periodontal treatment, could be used in the routine treatment of patients with plaque-induced periodontitis.

  • 464.
    Zasčiurinskienė, Eglė
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Orthodontics, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Lund, Henrik
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Odontology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindsten, Rune
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Department of Orthodontics, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Jansson, Henrik
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Periodontology, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bjerklin, Krister
    Department of Orthodontics, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Outcome of periodontal-orthodontic treatment in periodontitis susceptible patients. Part II: A CBCT study of external apical root resorptionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 465.
    Zasčiurinskienė, Eglė
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Orthodontics, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Lund, Henrik
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Odontology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindsten, Rune
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Department of Orthodontics, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Jansson, Henrik
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Periodontology, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bjerklin, Krister
    Department of Orthodontics, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Outcome of periodontal-orthodontic treatment in periodontitis susceptible patients. Part III: A CBCT study of alveolar bone changesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 466.
    Zasčiurinskienė, Eglė
    et al.
    Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Rastokaitė, Liveta
    Faculty of Odontology, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Lindsten, Rune
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Department of Orthodontics, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Basevičienė, Nomeda
    Department of Dental and Oral Pathology, Faculty of Odontology, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Šidlauskas, Antanas
    Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Malocclusions, pathologic tooth migration, and the need for orthodontic treatment in subjects with stage III-IV periodontitis: A cross-sectional study2023In: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 418-429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Literature is scarce on malocclusion prevalence and orthodontic treatment need (OTN) in subjects with stage III-IV periodontitis. Study aims were to assess prevalence of primary and secondary malocclusions in subjects with stage III-IV periodontitis and OTN based on pathologic tooth migration (PTM) and occlusal trauma of anterior teeth (AT).

    Subjects and methods

    One hundred and twenty-one subjects with stage III-IV periodontitis were examined. A comprehensive periodontal-orthodontic examination was performed. Exclusion criteria: age <30 years, removable prosthetics, uncontrolled diabetes, pregnancy/lactation, and oncologic disease.

    Results

    Class II malocclusion was found in 49.6% (Class II div 1-20.7%, Class II div 2-9.9%, subdivision Class II-19.0%), Class I-31.4%, Class III-10.7%, no malocclusion-8.3% of subjects. PTM was observed in 74.4% of maxillary and 60.3% of mandibular AT. Spacing and extrusion were the main types of PTM of AT. Odds ratio for PTM of maxillary AT was 9.3 in cases with >30% of sites with clinical attachment loss >= 5 mm (P = 0.001). Spacing of maxillary AT was influenced by periodontitis, Class III malocclusion, and lost teeth. Tongue habit had impact on spacing of mandibular AT. Dental Health Component of Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need yielded that OTN was found in >50% and OTN due PTM, occlusal trauma and impaired function in 66.1% of subjects.

    Conclusions

    The most prevalent malocclusion was Class II. Spacing and extrusion were prevalent types of PTM of AT. OTN was found in more than half of the subjects. The study highlights the need for preventive measures for PTM in subjects with stage III-IV periodontitis.

  • 467. Øgaard, Bjørn
    et al.
    Larsson, Erik
    Lindsten, Rune
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    The effect of sucking habits, cohort, sex, intercanine arch widths, and breast or bottle feeding on posterior crossbite in Norwegian and Swedish 3-year-old children1994In: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, ISSN 0889-5406, E-ISSN 1097-6752, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 161-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The upper and lower intercanine arch widths and the prevalence of posterior crossbite were registered for 445 3-year-old children with and without a continuing or previous dummy-sucking or finger-sucking habit in different areas in Sweden and Norway. Sami children from northern Norway also took part in the study, as well as 15 medieval skulls with intact deciduous dentitions. Compared with the nonsuckers, an increased prevalence of posterior crossbite was observed for the finger suckers, especially the Swedish girls. Stepwise logistic regression showed that posterior crossbite could be predicted with upper intercanine arch width alone. The finger sucking variable would not improve prediction; neither did other entities such as cohort (residential area), sex, lower intercanine arch width, nor the difference between upper and lower intercanine arch width. High prevalences of posterior crossbite were registered for dummy suckers (pacifiers) especially the Swedish girls (26%). Stepwise logistic regression showed that posterior crossbite in dummy suckers could be predicted with upper and lower intercanine arch width. Stepwise linear regression showed that both arches tended to be narrower in Swedes and girls, and that dummy sucking decreased the upper and increased the lower intercanine arch width. Analyses of covariance revealed that at least 2 years of dummy sucking is necessary to produce a significant effect in the upper jaw and 3 years in the lower jaw.

  • 468. Žiemytė, Miglé
    et al.
    Lopez-Roldan, Andrés
    Carda-Diéguez, Miguel
    Reglero-Santaolaya, Marta
    Rodriguez, Ana
    Ferrer, María D.
    Mira, Alex
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics.
    Personalized antibiotic selection in periodontal treatment improves clinical and microbiological outputs2023In: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, E-ISSN 2235-2988, Vol. 13, article id 1307380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Periodontitis is a biofilm-mediated disease that is usually treated by non-surgical biofilm elimination with or without antibiotics. Antibiotic treatment in periodontal patients is typically selected empirically or using qPCR or DNA hybridization methods. These approaches are directed towards establishing the levels of different periodontal pathogens in periodontal pockets to infer the antibiotic treatment. However, current methods are costly and do not consider the antibiotic susceptibility of the whole subgingival biofilm.

    Methods: In the current manuscript, we have developed a method to culture subgingival samples ex vivo in a fast, label-free impedance-based system where biofilm growth is monitored in real-time under exposure to different antibiotics, producing results in 4 hours. To test its efficacy, we performed a double-blind, randomized clinical trial where patients were treated with an antibiotic either selected by the hybridization method (n=32) or by the one with the best effect in the ex vivo growth system (n=32).

    Results: Antibiotic selection was different in over 80% of the cases. Clinical parameters such as periodontal pocket depth, attachment level, and bleeding upon probing improved in both groups. However, dental plaque was significantly reduced only in the group where antibiotics were selected according to the ex vivo growth. In addition, 16S rRNA sequencing showed a larger reduction in periodontal pathogens and a larger increase in health-associated bacteria in the ex vivo growth group.

    Discussion: The results of clinical and microbiological parameters, together with the reduced cost and low analysis time, support the use of the impedance system for improved individualized antibiotic selection.

78910 451 - 468 of 468
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