Change search
Refine search result
78910 451 - 489 of 489
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 451.
    Swärd, Ann-Katrin
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, School Based Research and Professional Development. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Ett renoveringsarbete - varför blev det så?2014In: Ungdomar läser och skriver - specialpedagogiska perspektiv / [ed] Fischbein, Siv, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2014, 1, p. 121-134Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 452.
    Swärd, Ann-Katrin
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Improve students' self-esteem through Re-learning in Reading and Writing2012In: The European Journal of Social & Behavioural Science, ISSN 2301-2218, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 317-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When students’ fail in their reading and writing development it also affects their self-esteem and self-confidence. Too many students in Sweden fail in literacy development and therefore don’t reach the goal stated in the curriculum. Their future education will not be what students had wished, instead they are more or less forced to enter an individual program at high school or quit after nine year in compulsory school. Many of these students have low self-esteem and self-confidence and their self-efficacy are also low when entering high school. The aim of this part of a longitudinal Grounded Theory-study was to conceptualize and generate a theory about what four teachers and their students in high school actually do when working with reading and writing using a specific method. The results based on qualitative research interviews, observations, questionnaires, video recording, and analysis in the tradition of grounded theory, show how teacher and students strive to increase and ensure every student in their reading and writing skills through what is labelled didactic arranging. Teachers’ systematic work with reading and writing, their self-efficacy and beliefs in every student’s possibilities helps students to increase their self-esteem and self-confidence.

  • 453.
    Swärd, Ann-Katrin
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, School Based Research and Professional Development. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Re-learning in Reading and Writing – is it Possible?2012In: International Conference on Education & Educational Psychology (ICEEPSY 2012) / [ed] Zafer Bekirogullari, 2012, p. 104-113Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing failing in reading and writing among student in Swedish schools results in that many students can’t reach the goal stated in the curriculum in compulsory school. Therefore they are forced to enter an individual program at the upper secondary school. The specific aim of this part of a longitudinal Grounded Theory-study was to conceptualize and generate a theory about what two teachers and their students in one class in upper secondary school actually do when working with re-reading and re-writing using a specific method. The results based on qualitative research interviews, observations, questionnaires, video recording, and analysis in the tradition of grounded theory, show that these teachers strived systematically to ensure every student's reading and writing development through what is labeled didactic arranging. Teachers, students and the didactic procedures are shown to be in constant interaction. It was also found to be important that the teachers believed that every student could re- learn reading and writing and help them to believe in their re-learning so they could increase their low self-esteem and self-confidence.

  • 454.
    Swärd, Ann-Katrin
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Re-learning in Reading and Writing – is it possible?2012In: Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, ISSN 1877-0428, E-ISSN 1877-0428, Vol. 69, no 24, p. 104-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing failing in reading and writing among student in Swedish schools results in that many students can’t reach the goal stated in the curriculum in compulsory school. Therefore they are forced to enter an individual program at the upper secondary school. The specific aim of this part of a longitudinal Grounded Theory-study was to conceptualize and generate a theory about what two teachers and their students in one class in upper secondary school actually do when working with re-reading and re-writing using a specific method. The results based on qualitative research interviews, observations, questionnaires, video recording, and analysis in the tradition of grounded theory, show that these teachers strived systematically to ensure every student's reading and writing development through what is labeled didactic arranging. Teachers, students and the didactic procedures are shown to be in constant interaction. It was also found to be important that the teachers believed that every student could re- learn reading and writing and help them to believe in their re-learning so they could increase their low self-esteem and self-confidence.

  • 455.
    Swärd, Ann-Katrin
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Literacy Research.
    Säkerställa skriftspråklighet - vad kan det innebära?2010In: Dyslexi - aktuellt om läs- och skrivsvårigheter, ISSN 1401-2480, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 9-11Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 456.
    Swärd, Ann-Katrin
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Literacy Research.
    Vad erfarna och skickliga lärare gör när de arbetar med läs- och skrivundervisning2010In: Specialpedagogisk tidskrift - att undervisa, ISSN 2000-429X, no 1, p. 17-18Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 457.
    Tai, Lok Hei
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    The effects of witnessing domestic violence on the daily functioning of children aged, 3 to 8 years2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Domestic violence, intimate partner violence, is a major social problem is the world.  This systematic study will discuss the effects on children who witness domestic violence and how those effect can be coded in the ICF-CY coding system, Body functions and Activities and participation. The effects of witnessing domestic violence were categorized by the contexts of ICF-CY, Body function and Activities and participation. The result showed that there are negative impacts in mental function, immunological system functions, digestive system, communication and interpersonal interactions and relationships. All effects can be coded with ICF-CY Body functions and Activities and participation.

  • 458.
    Tang, Julia
    et al.
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Horlin, Chiara
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Tan, Tele
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Face recognition and visual search strategies in autism spectrum disorders: Amending and extending a recent review by Weigelt et al.2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 1-19, article id e0134439Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this review was to build upon a recent review by Weigelt et al. which examined visual search strategies and face identification between individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and typically developing peers. Seven databases, CINAHL Plus, EMBASE, ERIC, Medline, Proquest, PsychInfo and PubMed were used to locate published scientific studies matching our inclusion criteria. A total of 28 articles not included in Weigelt et al. met criteria for inclusion into this systematic review. Of these 28 studies, 16 were available and met criteria at the time of the previous review, but were mistakenly excluded; and twelve were recently published. Weigelt et al. found quantitative, but not qualitative, differences in face identification in individuals with ASD. In contrast, the current systematic review found both qualitative and quantitative differences in face identification between individuals with and without ASD. There is a large inconsistency in findings across the eye tracking and neurobiological studies reviewed. Recommendations for future research in face recognition in ASD were discussed.

  • 459.
    Tang, Julia S Y
    et al.
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Chen, Nigel T M
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Bölte, Sven
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Designing a Serious Game for Youth with ASD: Perspectives from End-Users and Professionals.2018In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent years have seen an emergence of social emotional computer games for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). These games are heterogeneous in design with few underpinned by theoretically informed approaches to computer-based interventions. Guided by the serious game framework outlined by Whyte et al. (Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders 45(12):1-12, 2014), this study aimed to identify the key motivating and learning features for serious games targeting emotion recognition skills from the perspectives of 11 youth with ASD and 11 experienced professionals. Results demonstrated that youth emphasised the motivating aspects of game design, while the professionals stressed embedding elements facilitating the generalisation of acquired skills. Both complementary and differing views provide suggestions for the application of serious game principles in a potential serious game.

  • 460.
    Thompson, Melanie
    et al.
    Curtin University.
    Elliott, Catherine
    Curtin University.
    Willis, Claire
    University of Western Australia.
    Ward, Roslyn
    University of Western Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Curtin University.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Curtin University.
    Gubbay, Anna
    University of Western Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya
    Curtin University.
    Can, Want and Try: Parents’ Viewpoints Regarding the Participation of Their Child with an Acquired Brain Injury2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 7, article id e0157951Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background 

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) is a leading cause of permanent disability, currently affecting 20,000 Australian children. Community participation is essential for childhood development and enjoyment, yet children with ABI can often experience barriers to participation. The factors which act as barriers and facilitators to community participation for children with an ABI are not well understood. 

    Aim

    To identify the viewpoints of parents of children with an ABI, regarding the barriers and facilitators most pertinent to community participation for their child. 

    Methods 

    Using Q-method, 41 parents of children with moderate/severe ABI sorted 37 statements regarding barriers and facilitators to community participation. Factor analysis identified three viewpoints. 

    Results 

    This study identified three distinct viewpoints, with the perceived ability to participate decreasing with a stepwise trend from parents who felt their child and family "can" participate in viewpoint one, to "want" in viewpoint two and "try" in viewpoint three. 

    Conclusions 

    Findings indicated good participation outcomes for most children and families, however some families who were motivated to participate experienced significant barriers. The most significant facilitators included child motivation, supportive relationships from immediate family and friends, and supportive community attitudes. The lack of supportive relationships and attitudes was perceived as a fundamental barrier to community participation. 

    Significance 

    This research begins to address the paucity of information regarding those factors that impact upon the participation of children with an ABI in Australia. Findings have implications for therapists, service providers and community organisations.

  • 461.
    Trejo, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    The participatory profiles of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy : with and without mental health issues2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 462.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    et al.
    Health Care Sciences Postgraduate School, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet Neuropediatric Unit, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital Q2:07, Solna, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology, Mälardalens University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena
    Health Care Sciences Postgraduate School, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet Neuropediatric Unit, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital Q2:07, Solna, Sweden.
    Cultural validity of the Children's assessment of participation and enjoyment/Preferences for activities of children (CAPE/PAC)2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 428-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate whether the activity items of the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment/Preferences for Activities of Children (CAPE/PAC) were relevant for Swedish children.

    Subjects: A total of 337 typically developed children aged 6–17 years old.

    Methods: The CAPE/PAC was translated into Swedish in accordance with accepted translation procedures. By means of 14 group interviews with children with and without disabilities aged 6–15 years old and parents, available leisure activities were listed. These were matched to the items in the CAPE/PAC. Sixteen new potential activities were added and tested on 337 typical developed children from different regions of Sweden. A cutoff level of activities performed by >10% was set to identify relevant activities. Differences between the original and a proposed Swedish version were analysed using paired-samples t-tests of standardized mean scores.

    Results: Three new activity items were included, for 10 items new activity examples were added, and three not relevant items were excluded. In the Swedish version the outcome of standardized mean diversity score was significantly higher compared with the outcome of the original version. Conclusions:When using instruments in new contexts, it is not enough simply to translate; validation of the item relevance to the new context is essential.

  • 463.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Neuropediatric unit, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bult, Maureen
    Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience and Center of Excellence for Rehabilitation Medicine, University Medical Center, Utrecht and Rehabilitation Center De Hoogstraat-Network for Childhood Disability Research in the Netherlands, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
    Nyquist, Anna
    Norwegian School of Sport Science, Department of Physical Education and Beitostølen Healthsport Centre, Beitostølen, Norway.
    Ketelaar, Marie
    Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience and Center of Excellence for Rehabilitation Medicine, University Medical Center, Utrecht and Rehabilitation Center De Hoogstraat-Network for Childhood Disability Research in the Netherlands, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
    Jahnsen, Ranvig
    Oslo University Hospital, Department of Neuroscience for children, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
    Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Neuropediatric unit, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalens University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    An international comparison of patterns of participation in leisure activities for children with and without disabilities in Sweden, Norway and the Netherlands2012In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 369-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate whether there are differences in participation in leisure activities between children with and without disabilities in Sweden, Norway and the Netherlands and how much personal and environmental factors explain leisure performance.

    Methods: In a cross-sectional analytic design, the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment, CAPE, was performed with 278 children with disabilities and 599 children without disabilities aged 6–17 years. A one-way between-groups ANOVA explored the differences in participation between the countries. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis assessed if age, gender, educational level, living area and country of residence explained the variance in participation.

    Results: Scandinavian children with disabilities participated in more activities with higher frequency compared to Dutch children. The strongest predictor was country of residence. For children without disabilities, differences existed in informal activities, the strongest predictor was gender.

    Conclusion: Differences in school- and support systems between the countries seem to influence patterns of participation, affecting children with disabilities most.

  • 464.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Neuropediatric Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Neuropediatric Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Differences in patterns of participation in leisure activities in Swedish children with and without disabilities2014In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 464-471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To compare participation in leisure activities between Swedish children with and without disabilities and to examine whether age, gender, presence of disabilities, and mother’ seducational level influence participation.

    Method: A Swedish version of the Children’s Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment was used to study the diversity, intensity, and enjoyment of participation in leisure activities of children aged 6 to 17 years. Fifty-five of the children had disabilities and 337 of the children did not have disabilities. A multiple regression analysis was conducted to explore the impact of age, gender, mother’s level of education, and disability on the diversity, intensity, and enjoyment of leisure activities. At-test for independent samples was used to compare the diversity and intensity of participation between children withand without disabilities.

    Results: The multiple regression analysis explained 4–36% of the variance of diversity, intensity, and enjoyment. Children with disabilities participated with higher diversity, but with less intensity, than children without disabilities. Younger children had higher levels of enjoyment.

    Conclusions: Children with disabilities participated in several different activities, but the presence of a disability was associated with lower intensity ofparticipation. The low explanatory value of the investigated variables indicates that the combined effect of several variables needs to be taken into consideration when designing participation interventions.

  • 465.
    Vale, Maria do Carmo
    et al.
    Pediatric Neurodevelopment Unit, Hospital Dona Estefânia, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Pereira-da-Silva, Luıs
    Woman, Children and Adolescent’s Medicine Teaching and Research Area, NOVA Medical School of Lisbon, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Pimentel, Maria João
    Pediatric Neurodevelopment Unit, Hospital Dona Estefânia, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Marques, Teresa Nunes
    Early Intervention Program Regional Lisbon Area, Ministry of Social Security and Solidarity, Portugal.
    Rodrigues, Helena
    Department of Special Education, Ministry of Education and Science, Portugal.
    Cunha, Gilda
    Department of Exact Science, Lisbon School of Health Technology, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Machado, Maria do Céu
    Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Sanches-Ferreira, Manuela
    Special Education Department, School of Education, Porto Polytechnic, Porto, Portugal.
    Simeonsson, Rune J.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Education, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
    Classifying Functioning of Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disability: The Utility of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth2017In: Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, ISSN 1741-1122, E-ISSN 1741-1130, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 285-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Observational cross-sectional study carried out in a pediatric neurodevelopment unit of a tertiary-care hospital. A sample of 355 children with median ((min.–max.) 1.0–17.3) years with intellectual disability (30.4% borderline, 43.1% mild, 19.7% moderate, 5.1% severe, and 1.7% profound disability) was seen over a period of 3 years. Based on clinical observation and psychological evaluation, a neurodevelopmental pediatrician selected ICF-CY body functions codes, and respective qualifiers, to effectively describe functioning of children. Based on evaluation reports, a psychologist and a special educator assigned the previously chosen ICF-CY body functions codes to 139 and 67 children, respectively. Inter-rater agreement was estimated using simple and weighted Cohen's kappa coefficients and Gwet's AC1 statistic and Gwet's weighted kappa coefficient statistic. A set of eight ICF-CY codes was identified as efficiently describing impairments of body functions of children with intellectual disability: global mental functions b117 and b122; specific mental functions b147, b163, b164, and b167; and voice and speech functions b320 and b330. Results indicate a correspondence between the level of severity of qualifiers assigned to ICF-CY codes and the level of intellectual disability. Inter-rater agreement was variable among raters, with the best agreements found for qualifying intellectual functions (b117) and psychomotor functions (b122). A profile of eight ICF-CY codes effectively describes functioning of children with intellectual disability, providing an alternative to medically based classification, based on diagnoses with functionally based classification of children's characteristics. The findings contribute to define a comprehensive set of codes to reliably record individual differences of functioning in this population.

  • 466.
    Van den Berg, Femke Marij
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, School Based Research and Professional Development. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Promoting culturally relevant pedagogy amongst pre-service teachers: A systematic literature review on how pre-service teachers in teacher education programs can develop culturally relevant pedagogy that enables them to establish a classroom environment that suits the needs of all learners.2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This century is characterized by an increasing pace of globalization and migration that results in an increased diversity of classroom populations in Western countries. However, the teacher workforce still consists mostly of white females that come from different cultural backgrounds than their students, and who seem to lack the skills to respond to diversity in the classroom effectively. This raises the question of how the cultural mismatch can be overcome. The aim of this research is to explore how pre-service teachers can develop culturally relevant pedagogy, so they can establish a classroom environment that suits the needs of all learners. A systematic literature review is conducted, and 10 articles were analysed. The results show pre-service teachers can develop culturally responsive pedagogy through courses that offer knowledge or a combination of knowledge and field-based experiences. Factors that contribute to increased culturally relevant pedagogy are: previous experience with diversity, connecting theory and practice, modelling, learning through a community of learners, and critical reflection. However, research indicates that becoming a culturally relevant teacher is a time consuming process. Hence, it is recommended that teacher education programs include more courses in the curriculum to enable pre-service teachers develop this skill over time through taking part in a community of learners. In addition, as much of the current research originates from the United States, it is suggested future research focuses on other Western countries.

  • 467.
    van Dijk, Lieselotte
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Interventions reducing anxiety in hospitalized children: A systematic literature review from 2010 to 20172017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A medical procedure is a threatening and stressful experience for many children. The consequent increased feelings of anxiety in hospitalized children can negatively affect their healing process, their psychological health, and their behavioural, cognitive, emotional and academic development. To limit these negative results, knowledge about interventions that could contribute to a decrease in anxiety in hospitalized children is needed. The aim of this review was to examine interventions aiming at reducing anxiety in hospitalized children that undergo a medical procedure. A systematic literature was conducted in three databases that has resulted in 10 articles that met the inclusion criteria. The 10 selected articles included a total of 11 interventions for this review. The results showed that the intervention technique Distraction was effective in reducing anxiety for most hospitalized children. The intervention technique Information provision showed both significance and non-significance and the intervention techniques Medication and Modelling showed a non-significant change in anxiety. Besides, an active distraction form and a longer duration of the intervention might contribute to the effectiveness in reducing the hospitalized child’s anxiety level. Future research needs to focus on the anxiety level of both children and their parents, in addition to the upcoming intervention use of multimedia applications. Furthermore, the characteristics of the hospitalized child and the collaboration with the child and parents should be taken into account before applying interventions aiming at reducing anxiety in hospitalized children.

  • 468.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Cordier, Reinie
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Boyes, Mark
    School of Psychology, Speech Pathology Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Parsons, Richard
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Joosten, Annette
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Ciccarelli, Marina
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Is using the strengths and difficulties questionnaire in a community sample the optimal way to assess mental health functioning?2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 0144039Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important characteristic of a screening tool is its discriminant ability or the measure's accuracy to distinguish between those with and without mental health problems. The current study examined the inter-rater agreement and screening concordance of the parent and teacher versions of SDQ at scale, subscale and item-levels, with the view of identifying the items that have the most informant discrepancies; and determining whether the concordance between parent and teacher reports on some items has the potential to influence decision making. Cross-sectional data from parent and teacher reports of the mental health functioning of a community sample of 299 students with and without disabilities from 75 different primary schools in Perth, Western Australia were analysed. The study found that: a) Intraclass correlations between parent and teacher ratings of children's mental health using the SDQ at person level was fair on individual child level; b) The SDQ only demonstrated clinical utility when there was agreement between teacher and parent reports using the possible or 90% dichotomisation system; and c) Three individual items had positive likelihood ratio scores indicating clinical utility. Of note was the finding that the negative likelihood ratio or likelihood of disregarding the absence of a condition when both parents and teachers rate the item as absent was not significant. Taken together, these findings suggest that the SDQ is not optimised for use in community samples and that further psychometric evaluation of the SDQ in this context is clearly warranted.

  • 469.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    et al.
    Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Cordier, Reinie
    Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Ciccarelli, Marina
    Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Parsons, Richard
    Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    McAuliffe, Tomomi
    James Cook University, Townsville, Qld, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Should schools expect poor physical and mental health, social adjustment, and participation outcomes in students with disability?2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 1-23, article id e0126630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature on whether students with disabilities have worse physical and mental health, social adjustment, and participation outcomes when compared to their peers without disabilities is largely inconclusive. While the majority of case control studies showed significantly worse outcomes for students with disabilities; the proportion of variance accounted for is rarely reported. The current study used a population cross-sectional approach to determine the classification ability of commonly used screening and outcome measures in determining the disability status. Furthermore, the study aimed to identify the variables, if any, that best predicted the presence of disability. Results of univariate discriminant function analyses suggest that across the board, the sensitivity of the outcome/screening tools to correctly identify students with a disability was 31.9% higher than the related Positive Predictive Value (PPV). The lower PPV and Positive Likelihood Ratio (LR+) scores suggest that the included measures had limited discriminant ability (17.6% to 40.3%) in accurately identifying students at-risk for further assessment. Results of multivariate analyses suggested that poor health and hyperactivity increased the odds of having a disability about two to three times, while poor close perceived friendship and academic competences predicted disability with roughly the same magnitude. Overall, the findings of the current study highlight the need for researchers and clinicians to familiarize themselves with the psychometric properties of measures, and be cautious in matching the function of the measures with their research and clinical needs.

  • 470.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    et al.
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Ciccarelli, Marina
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Passmore, Anne
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Parsons, Richard
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Black, Melissa
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Cuomo, Belinda
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Tan, Tele
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Belongingness in Early Secondary School: Key Factors that Primary and Secondary Schools Need to Consider2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 9, article id e0136053Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is unknown if, and how, students redefine their sense of school belongingness after negotiating the transition to secondary school. The current study used longitudinal data from 266 students with, and without, disabilities who negotiated the transition from 52 primary schools to 152 secondary schools. The study presents the 13 most significant personal student and contextual factors associated with belongingness in the first year of secondary school. Student perception of school belongingness was found to be stable across the transition. No variability in school belongingness due to gender, disability or household-socio-economic status (SES) was noted. Primary school belongingness accounted for 22% of the variability in secondary school belongingness. Several personal student factors (competence, coping skills) and school factors (low-level classroom task-goal orientation), which influenced belongingness in primary school, continued to influence belongingness in secondary school. In secondary school, effort-goal orientation of the student and perception of their school's tolerance to disability were each associated with perception of school belongingness. Family factors did not influence belongingness in secondary school. Findings of the current study highlight the need for primary schools to foster belongingness among their students at an early age, and transfer students' belongingness profiles as part of the handover documentation. Most of the factors that influenced school belongingness before and after the transition to secondary are amenable to change.

  • 471.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    et al.
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Ciccarelli, Marina
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Passmore, Anne
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Parsons, Richard
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Tan, Tele
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    The personal and contextual contributors to school belongingness among primary school students2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    School belongingness has gained currency among educators and school health professionals as an important determinant of adolescent health. The current cross-sectional study presents the 15 most significant personal and contextual factors that collectively explain 66.4% (two-thirds) of the variability in 12-year old students' perceptions of belongingness in primary school. The study is part of a larger longitudinal study investigating the factors associated with student adjustment in the transition from primary to secondary school. The study found that girls and students with disabilities had higher school belongingness scores than boys, and their typically developing counterparts respectively; and explained 2.5% of the variability in school belongingness. The majority (47.1% out of 66.4%) of the variability in school belongingness was explained by student personal factors, such as social acceptance, physical appearance competence, coping skills, and social affiliation motivation; followed by parental expectations (3% out of 66.4%), and school-based factors (13.9% out of 66.4%) such as, classroom involvement, task-goal structure, autonomy provision, cultural pluralism, and absence of bullying. Each of the identified contributors of primary school belongingness can be shaped through interventions, system changes, or policy reforms.

  • 472.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Centre for Research into Disability and Society, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Parsons, Richard
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, and School of Pharmacy, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Passmore, Anne Elizabeth
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Parkin, Timothy
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    School belongingness and mental health functioning across the primary-secondary transition in a mainstream sample: Multi-group cross-lagged analyses2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 6(e99576), p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between school belongingness and mental health functioning before and after the primary-secondary school transition has not been previously investigated in students with and without disabilities. This study used a prospective longitudinal design to test the bi-directional relationships between these constructs, by surveying 266 students with and without disabilities and their parents, 6-months before and after the transition to secondary school. Cross-lagged multi-group analyses found student perception of belongingness in the final year of primary school to contribute to change in their mental health functioning a year later. The beneficial longitudinal effects of school belongingness on subsequent mental health functioning were evident in all student subgroups; even after accounting for prior mental health scores and the cross-time stability in mental health functioning and school belongingness scores. Findings of the current study substantiate the role of school contextual influences on early adolescent mental health functioning. They highlight the importance for primary and secondary schools to assess students' school belongingness and mental health functioning and transfer these records as part of the transition process, so that appropriate scaffolds are in place to support those in need. Longer term longitudinal studies are needed to increase the understanding of the temporal sequencing between school belongingness and mental health functioning of all mainstream students.

  • 473.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Centre for Research into Disability and Society, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Parsons, Richard
    School of Pharmacy, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Passmore, Anne Elizabeth
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    The impact of personal background and school contextual factors on academic competence and mental health functioning across the primary-secondary school transition2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 1-13, article id e89874Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students negotiate the transition to secondary school in different ways. While some thrive on the opportunity, others are challenged. A prospective longitudinal design was used to determine the contribution of personal background and school contextual factors on academic competence (AC) and mental health functioning (MHF) of 266 students, 6-months before and after the transition to secondary school. Data from 197 typically developing students and 69 students with a disability were analysed using hierarchical linear regression modelling. Both in primary and secondary school, students with a disability and from socially disadvantaged backgrounds gained poorer scores for AC and MHF than their typically developing and more affluent counterparts. Students who attended independent and mid-range sized primary schools had the highest concurrent AC. Those from independent primary schools had the lowest MHF. The primary school organisational model significantly influenced post-transition AC scores; with students from Kindergarten--Year 7 schools reporting the lowest scores, while those from the Kindergarten--Year 12 structure without middle school having the highest scores. Attending a school which used the Kindergarten--Year 12 with middle school structure was associated with a reduction in AC scores across the transition. Personal background factors accounted for the majority of the variability in post-transition AC and MHF. The contribution of school contextual factors was relatively minor. There is a potential opportunity for schools to provide support to disadvantaged students before the transition to secondary school, as they continue to be at a disadvantage after the transition.

  • 474.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    et al.
    Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Wilson, Nathan
    University of Western Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Sim, Angela
    Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Scott, Melissa
    Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Cordier, Reinie
    Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjorn
    Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Factors associated with primary school teachers' attitudes towards the inclusion of students with disabilities2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 1-12, article id e0137002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Teachers' attitudes toward inclusion are often based on the practical implementation of inclusive education rather than a specific ideology and understanding of inclusiveness. This study aimed to identify the factors associated with primary school teachers' attitudes towards inclusion of students with all disabilities in regular schools.

    Method

    Seventy four primary school teachers participated in a cross-sectional survey conducted in Western Australia. Teachers' attitudes and efficacy toward integration of students with disabilities were measured using the Opinions Relative to Integration of Students with Disabilities scale and Bandura's Teacher Efficacy scale respectively.

    Results

    Four teacher attributes-age, gender, teaching self-efficacy and training collectively explained 42% of the variability in teachers' attitude toward including students with disabilities.

    Conclusion

    The current study further contributes to the accumulation of knowledge that can unpack the complex pattern of factors that should be considered to promote positive attitudes towards inclusive schools.

  • 475.
    Wang, Minzhi
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    How are the strategies teachers use to facilitate participation of children in need of special supports in three ‘inclusive schools’ in Finland: From teachers’ perspective2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Inclusion enable children with special needs pursue their education or activities with their peers who are not disabled. Participation of children can be promoted by inclusion. Teachers are key for developing inclusive schools and improve the participation of children with special needs. The aim of this study is to describe strategies teachers use to facilitate participation of children in need of special supports in three ‘inclusive schools’ in Finland. To study this issue, interviews were conducted with eight participants from these three schools. The ICF-CY model was used to analyze the interview data. Results show that teachers’ strategies of promoting children’s participation in these Finnish ‘inclusive’ schools are diverse, teachers use strategies that focus on children’s environmental factors as well as factors that relate to children themselves. Most of teachers believe strategies that make changes on children environmental factors can help children participate in classroom tasks and activities. Some factors to influence difference of the strategies in different schools were found, different school situations and seems to be a decisive role on teachers’ strategies of improving the participation of the children. This study gives a promising view of the actions that teachers take to promote participation of children in need of special support.

  • 476.
    Wang, Minzhi
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    The impact of teacher-student classroom interactions in primary school environment on children's engagement in classroom: A systematic literature review2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In primary school classrooms, teacher-student relations, student’s school engagement, achievement, and the frequency of teachers’ academic interactions are related to higher levels of student engagement. Since different strategies teachers use to initiate classroom interactions have different impacts on students’ engagement, the aim of this thesis is to explore how teacher-student classroom interactions in primary school influence their classroom engagement. A systematic literature review was conducted by using three databases. Eight studies that fit inclusion criteria were exerted and identified. The results show that teachers’ positive strategies (eg. emotional support, help, give instruction) in classroom interaction can significantly increase students’ behavior engagement, improve students’ social engagement and some of the strategies can also hinder students’ emotional engagement in classroom This thesis identifies actions teachers use to conduct classroom interaction and shows how these actions influence students’ behavioral, social, and emotional engagement in primary schools, which gives teachers an overview of the positive consequences of these interaction strategies in primary school classrooms. The suggestions for future research are, further studies can also include studies that perceived classroom interaction from teachers’ perspective and measured the influence of teachers’ negative interaction strategies (eg. criticism, punishment).

  • 477.
    Wigston, Christine
    et al.
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Parsons, Richard
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Participation in extracurricular activities for children with and without siblings with autism spectrum disorder2017In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 25-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To compare the number, frequency, enjoyment and performance in extracurricular activities of siblings of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) to their typically developing (TD) peers, and to identify differences between actual and desired participation.

    METHODS:

    A case-control study with 30 siblings of children with ASD and 30 siblings of TD children was conducted using the Paediatric Interest Profiles and a questionnaire.

    RESULTS:

    Siblings of children with ASD participated in fewer extracurricular activities than those with TD siblings. ASD symptoms were significantly associated with the sibling participating in fewer extracurricular activities. Children with TD siblings had higher enjoyment scores in relaxation activities than children with siblings with ASD.

    CONCLUSION:

    While results were mainly positive, some differences indicated that having a sibling with ASD may impact participation in extracurricular activities. Assessments of participation barriers, as well as support to minimise participation restrictions among siblings of children with ASD are required.

  • 478. Wilder, J
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Presymbolic children in Sweden: interaction, family accommodation and social networks2006In: Proceedings from the 12th Isaac research conference, Düsseldorf, August, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 479.
    Wilder, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Axelsson, Anna Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Carlsson, Maggan
    Föreningen JAG.
    Jag är med! Om personlig assistans och barns delaktighet i familjeaktiviteter2013Book (Other academic)
  • 480.
    Wilder, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Mälardalens Högskola.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Stability and change in sustainability of daily routines and social networks in families of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities2015In: JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, ISSN 1360-2322, E-ISSN 1468-3148, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 133-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) demand intense family accommodations from birth and onwards. This study used an exploratory and qualitative study design to investigate stability and change in sustainability of daily routines and social networks of Swedish families of children with PIMD.

    Materials and methods

    Eight families participated over two years in eco-cultural family interviews and social networks interviews collected at home visits. Data were analyzed descriptively and by manifest contents analysis.

    Results

    Results showed variations in sustainability of daily routines over time across families. The sustainability was linked to fathers' involvement, couples' connectedness and emotional support. Stability and change of social networks were characterized by low overlap between the child and family networks, the children's communicative dependency and low density of able communication partners.

    Conclusions

    The results indicate that patterns of stability and change were linked both to family resources and child characteristics.

  • 481.
    Wilder, Jenny
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education and Communication, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Cooperación entre professionales y familias de niños con pluridiscapacidad2012In: Pluridiscapacidad y contextos de intervención / [ed] Emili Soro-Camats, Carme Basil, Carme Rosell, Barcelona: Institut de Ciències de l'Educació (ICE) , 2012, p. 149-162Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 482.
    Ylvén, Regina
    et al.
    Department of Social Sciences, Mälardalen University, Västerås.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Literature review of positive functioning in families with children with a disability2006In: Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, ISSN 1741-1122, E-ISSN 1741-1130, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 253-270Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 483.
    Ylvén, Regina
    et al.
    School of Welfare and Health, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Collaborative problem solving in the context of early childhood intervention – the link between problems and goals2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 221-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish Child and Youth Habilitation Services (C-YHS) for children with disabilities and their families' build on regular planning meetings involving families and professionals, and appointments and interventions implemented between meetings. This study explores the content of issues discussed at planning meetings, and the relation between content and activities implemented in everyday interventions. Longitudinal data from five families and their C-YHS-teams were used. Data were analyzed using conventional content analysis. The results illustrate a process with a high degree of correspondence between families' concerns, experienced problems, the formal decisions and the activities they generated. Concerns were focused on the future, and related actions focused on supporting adults in the environment, mostly the parents, thus indirectly relating to the child. Problems were focused on the current situation, and to a larger extent concerned actions directly related to the child. Although a family-centred service, interventions focused on the proximal environment, may be underreported.

  • 484. Ylvén, Regina
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Identifying and Building on Family Strength: A Thematic Analysis2009In: Infants and young children, ISSN 0896-3746, E-ISSN 1550-5081, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 253-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In family-centered intervention, one important issue is to support families' different ways to manage stress. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether professionals encourage positive coping strategies in families of children with disabilities. Data (videotaped planning meetings and interviews) from 5 families enrolled in intervention programs were used. The data were analyzed deductively by applying theoretical concepts of 4 types of positive coping. Goal-directed problem-focused coping was the most frequently used type of coping, together with spiritual beliefs and practices. Professional encouragement of families' own strategy to solve problems occurring in everyday life must focus not only on explicit problem solving but also on the use of supplemental coping types.

  • 485.
    Ylvén, Regina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Welfare and Health.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Persson, Carina
    Karolinska Inst, Div Nursing, Dept Neurobiol, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Problem solving in relation to resources in everyday life in families of children with disabilities: a pilot study2012In: International Journal of Rehabilitation Research, ISSN 0342-5282, E-ISSN 1473-5660, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 102-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Problem solving is recognized as a skill, helping families of children with disabilities to manage problems in everyday life. Family problem-solving skills may therefore be seen as an important outcome of a child and youth habilitation service. The aim of this pilot feasibility study was to examine the design of a future web-based questionnaire study focusing on problem-solving patterns in relation to resources in families of children with disabilities. The descriptive statistical analyses built on data from 13 families and findings showed an overall satisfactory score distribution for three of the included instruments, whereas two instruments showed floor effects in one third of the items. Findings indicated design problems with data collection related to adapting questionnaires to a web-based survey format and to problems with the stop function that was added. Implementing the main study using web-based surveys needs critical considerations according to the choice of the web tool and the recruitment process.

  • 486. Zachrisson, Gerd
    et al.
    Rydeman, Bitte
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Gemensam problemlösning vid alternativ och kompletterande kommunikation (AAK)2002Report (Other academic)
  • 487. Zakirova-Engstrand, Rano
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health: Children and youth (ICF-CY): Testing its utility in classifying information from eco-cultural family interviews with ethnically diverse families with children with disabilities in Kyrgyztan2009In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 31, no 12, p. 1018-1030Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 488.
    Åman, Pia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Att läsa och berätta - gör förskolan rolig och lärorik2010Report (Other academic)
  • 489.
    Åström, Frida Marie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Khetani, Mary
    Department of Occupational Therapy, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA.
    Axelsson, Anna Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Young Children's Participation and Environment Measure: Swedish Cultural Adaptation2018In: Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, ISSN 0194-2638, E-ISSN 1541-3144, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 329-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To culturally adapt and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Young Children's Participation and Environment Measure (YC-PEM) for use by caregivers of Swedish children with and without disabilities, aged 2–5 years.

    Methods: Thirteen cognitive interviews and two focus groups with caregivers of children with and without disabilities were conducted to evaluate the cultural relevance of YC-PEM content for use in Sweden. Per participant feedback, a revised version of the Swedish YC-PEM was created and pilot tested with caregivers of children with disabilities (n = 11) and children with typical development (n = 22).

    Results: User feedback informed content revisions to 7% of items. Internal consistency estimates of the Swedish YC-PEM pilot version were acceptable and ranged from .70 to .92 for all but two of the YC-PEM scales. Mean percentage agreement between raters ranged from 47% to 93% across YC-PEM scales for inter-rater, and 44% to 86% for test-retest. One of twelve YC-PEM scales revealed significant group differences between young children with and without disabilities.

    Conclusions: This study contributes preliminary evidence for the use of some scales within a culturally adapted YC-PEM in Sweden. Further validation with larger samples will allow for parametric testing to evaluate its psychometric properties.

78910 451 - 489 of 489
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf