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  • 3751.
    Bjuggren, Per-Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Palmberg, Johanna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Swedish Listed Family Firms and the Entrepreneurial Spirit2007In: 3rd EIASM Workshop on Family Firm Management Research, 2007Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 3752.
    Bjuggren, Per-Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Palmberg, Johanna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    The Impact of Vote Differentiation on Investment Performance in Listed Family Firms2010In: Family Business Review, ISSN 0894-4865, E-ISSN 1741-6248, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 327-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the effects of separation of ownership and control because of vote differentiation on listed family firms’ investment performance. The authors study the question of whether family-controlled firms have better investment performance than nonfamily firms and whether this investment performance is negatively affected by a separation of ownership and control because of vote differentiation. Marginal q is used as a performance measure. The empirical analysis shows that family control has a positive impact on investment performance when ownership and control are aligned, whereas separation of ownership and control in terms of vote-differentiated shares reduce investment performance.

  • 3753.
    Bjuggren, Per-Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Palmberg, Johanna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Haag, Kajsa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    The Dichotomy and Incongruity of Financing a Family Owned Business and Securing Ownership Positions2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3754.
    Bjuggren, Per-Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    A contractual perspective on succession in family firms: a stakeholder view2014In: European Journal of Law and Economics, ISSN 0929-1261, E-ISSN 1572-9990, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 211-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses succession in family firms from a contractual perspective. A firm is regarded as a nexus of contractual relations with owners, employees, suppliers of goods and services and customers. These contractual parties are in differing degrees tied to the firm through asset specificities. Succession can affect the value of such assets. In this sense they become stakeholders with vested interests in the succession process. The theoretical discussion of affected stakeholdersis backed up by a survey study of 143 Swedish family-owned businesses that have been subject to succession. The results show that the opinions of close shareholders such as family members and incumbent mangers as well as those of other stakeholders such as suppliers and customers are important.

  • 3755.
    Bjuggren, Per-Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Commercial Law.
    A Transaction Cost Rationale for Transition of the Firm within the Family2002In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 123-133Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3756.
    Bjuggren, Per-Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Commercial Law.
    Organisering av generationsskifte i små och medelstora familjeföretag2003In: Skattenytt, ISSN 0346-1254, no 7-8, p. 527-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3757.
    Bjuggren, Per-Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Commercial Law. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Organization of transfers of small and medium-sized enterprises within the family: Tax law considerations2005In: Family Business Review, ISSN 0894-4865, E-ISSN 1741-6248, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 305-319Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3758.
    Bjuggren, Per-Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Law.
    Ownership Restrictions, Risk and Team Considerations in Family-owned Businesses2011In: European Business Law Review, ISSN 0959-6941, E-ISSN 1875-841X, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 93-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the start of a new business both team and risk aspects have to be considered in the choice of business form. The partnership form offers advantages in terms of team considerations while the corporate form provides limited liability which provides a way to handle the risk problems associated with owning a firm. The advantage of having a well synchronized team is important for many new firms and especially for cases where family relations are considered important. Seen from that angle the partnership form should be opted for. But risk is high up in the mind of founders. Events might unfold in an unexpected way and in the process the economy and well being of the family is at stake. The corporate form with limited liability is in this sense a very attractive choice that is commonly chosen. But with the corporate form comes transferability of ownership of shares without consent of other owners. The shareholder team might therefore change in an unexpected and unwelcome way. Therefore it is important to consider different types of transfer restrictions when a new corporate form of business is started. This aspect has not been much considered in practice and in the entrepreneurship literature. An accountant or a lawyer often has to remind an entrepreneur of the importance of stability in ownership positions.

  • 3759.
    Bjuggren, Per-Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Sund, Lars-Göran
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Commercial Law.
    Strategic Decision Making in Intergenerational Successions of Small- and Medium-Size Family-Owned Businesses2001In: Family Business Review, ISSN 0894-4865, E-ISSN 1741-6248, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 11-23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3760.
    Bjuggren, Per-Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Wiberg, Daniel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Industry Specific Effects in Investment Performance and Valuation of Firms2008In: Empirica, ISSN 0340-8744, E-ISSN 1573-6911, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 279-291Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3761.
    Bjuggren, Per-Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Wiberg, Daniel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Ownership, Succession and Entrepreneurship in an Aging Society: Is There a Transition Problem?2009In: Innovation, Agglomeration and Regional Competition / [ed] Charlie Karlsson, Börje Johansson & Roger R. Stough, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar , 2009, p. 57-76Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3762.
    Bjur, Elin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Christo-Dionne, Dimitri
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Fortification of New Venture Branding through Brand Image and Brand Identity: An exploratory study to shed new light on branding for new venture entrepreneurs2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Entrepreneurs embarking upon a new business venture have a vast amount of responsibilities to

    consider during the new venture phase, therefore strategically taking action to gain a competitive

    advantage in the marketplace is a necessity. While there exist many routes towards acquiring an

    edge over the competition, branding proves to be a highly effective and influential strategy. As

    entrepreneurs are left to their own business development devise, there is no one approach towards

    creating a brand. Brand image and brand identity are two components of the brand strategy that

    impact and leverage the success of the branding design. Nonetheless, it is up to the entrepreneur’s

    own accord to implement these components, thus the general consensus is unknown as to whether

    they take into consideration aspects of branding, specifically those of brand image and brand

    identity during their new venture development.

    Purpose

    The purpose of this study is to shed new light on branding for new venture companies, specifically

    investigating the brand image and brand identity perspectives.

    Method

    The primary data for the research was gathered through a series of semi-structured open ended

    interviews among five entrepreneurs who all cultivated a new venture for no longer than two years

    of age. Furthermore, secondary data was compiled from suitable peer-reviewed articles and

    published books sustaining appropriate theories and models.

    Conclusion

    The discovered research indicates that branding in general is a known valued strategy among new ventures but not necessarily a highly ‘worked with’ concept. As a whole, the new ventures work with branding activities to a various extent but for the most part did not show a comprehension of what entails brand image and brand identity. However, the findings show that new venture entrepreneurs withhold their own interpretations of the terms, but those meanings did not translate into the actual essence of what brand image and brand identity signify. Furthermore the research suggests that new ventures unknowingly consider some aspects of brand identity and brand image in their development phase. They were found to deliberatively acknowledge some facets of brand identity and brand image but also were recognized as disregarding others. Even though there existed some unknowingness, inconsistencies, and lack of comprehension among the ventures in regards to brand image and brand identity, it is important to note that the entrepreneurs upheld an eagerness to learn, thus suggesting that their future branding strategies may become successful. 

  • 3763.
    Bjurenstedt, Anton
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Imperfections in Recycled Aluminium-Silicon Cast Alloys2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In striving to produce high quality cast components from recycled aluminium alloys,imperfections have to be considered, because recycled aluminium usually containsmore of it. However, there are great energy savings to be made by using recycledaluminium; as little as 5% of the energy needed for primary aluminium productionmay be required. High quality castings are dependent on, besides alloy chemistry, bothmelt quality and the casting process; the focus of this work is related to the meltquality.This thesis aims to increase knowledge about imperfections, foremost about Fe-richparticles, oxides/bifilms, and porosity. Experiments were performed at industrialfoundry facilities and in a laboratory environment. Melt quality was evaluated byproducing samples with the reduced pressure test (RPT), from which both densityindex (DI) and bifilm index (BI) could be measured, results that were related to tensiletest properties. Data from tensile test samples were analysed, and fracture surfacesand cross sections were studied in both light microscope and in scanning electronmicroscope (SEM). For the purpose of investigating nucleation of primary Fe-richparticles (sludge) differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used.In the analysis of results, a correlation between the morphology of particles and tensileproperties were found. And elongated Fe-rich β-particles were seen to fracturethrough cleavage towards the centre. However, DI and BI have not been possible torelate to tensile properties.The nucleation temperature of primary Fe-rich particles were found to increase withincreased Fe, Mn, and Cr contents, i.e. the sludge factor (SF), regardless of cooling rate.For a set SF, an increase of cooling rate will decrease the nucleation temperature.

  • 3764.
    Bjurenstedt, Anton
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    On the influence of imperfections on microstructure and properties of recycled Al-Si casting alloys2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There are great energy savings to be made by recycling aluminium; as little as 5% of the energy needed for primary aluminium production may be required. Striving to produce high quality aluminium castings requires knowledge of microstructural imperfections, which is extra important when casting recycled aluminium that generally contains higher levels of imperfections compared to primary aluminium. Imperfections include amongst others Si, Fe, and Mn as well as oxides. Si is needed for castability, but it may also initiate fracture. There are different types of Fe-rich intermetallics influencing properties of castings, generally in a negative direction. Oxides constitute cracks and they are elusive because they are difficult to quantify.

    This thesis aims to increase knowledge about imperfections in recycled aluminium castings originating from alloying elements and the melt. Experiments were performed in advanced laboratory equipment, including X-radiographic imaging during solidification and in-situ tensile testing in a scanning electron microscope. Experiments were also performed at industrial foundry facilities.

    The experiments showed that the nucleation temperature of primary α-Fe intermetallics increased with higher Fe, Mn, and Cr contents. Primary α-Fe are strongly suggested to nucleate on oxides and to grow in four basic morphologies. Lower nucleation frequency of α-Fe promoted faster growth and hopper crystals while higher nucleation frequency promoted slower growth rates and massive crystals. Results also showed that a decrease in the size of the eutectic Si and plate-like β-Fe intermetallics improved tensile properties, foremost the elongation to fracture. In β-Fe containing alloys the transversely oriented intermetallics initiated macrocracks that are potential fracture initiation sites. In alloys with primary α-Fe foremost clusters of intermetallics promoted macrocracks. In fatigue testing, a transition from β-Fe to α-Fe shifted the initiation sites from oxides and pores to the α-Fe, resulting in a decrease of fatigue strength. Oxides in Al-Si alloys continue to be elusive; no correlations between efforts to quantify the oxides and tensile properties could be observed.

  • 3765.
    Bjurenstedt, Anton
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Casari, Daniele
    Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Seifeddine, Salem
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Mathiesen, Ragnvald H.
    Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Dahle, Arne K.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    In-situ study of morphology and growth of primary α-Al(FeMnCr)Si intermetallics in an Al-Si alloy2017In: Acta Materialia, ISSN 1359-6454, E-ISSN 1873-2453, Vol. 130, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Morphology and growth of primary α-Al(FeMnCr)Si intermetallics have been studied in-situ during solidification of a commercial secondary aluminum alloy employing X-radiographic imaging combined with deep-etching. The α-Al(FeMnCr)Si intermetallics were found to nucleate primarily on surface oxides, and the continued growth yielded both rhombic dodecahedrons and elongated rod-like morphologies. Both morphologies were observed as hopper and massive types, where the hopper intermetallics had the higher growth rates. The growth rate, which determines the type, appears to be linked to nucleation frequency; higher nucleation frequency promoted massive types and lower nucleation frequency promoted hopper intermetallics. 

  • 3766.
    Bjurenstedt, Anton
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Ghassemali, Ehsan
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Seifeddine, Salem
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Dahle, Arne
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    The effect of Fe-rich intermetallics on crack initiation in cast aluminium: an in-situ tensile study2019In: Materials Science & Engineering: A, ISSN 0921-5093, E-ISSN 1873-4936, Vol. 756, p. 502-507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To evaluate the role of Fe-rich intermetallics on crack initiation, two fully modified Al-Si alloys, one containing plate-like β-Fe and the second containing primary α-Fe intermetallics, were investigated by in-situ tensile testing in the scanning electron microscope. In the first alloy, large plate-like β-Fe intermetallics oriented parallel to the test direction were the first to crack at an elongation of about 1.8%. More transversely oriented intermetallics caused crack initiation in the matrix which linked up with the final fracture. In the second alloy, the cracking of α-Fe intermetallics initiated at an elongation of about 0.9%. It is concluded that large α-Fe intermetallics crack first and that clusters of α-Fe are the most potent crack initiation sites.

  • 3767.
    Bjurenstedt, Anton
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Seifeddine, Salem
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Jarfors, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    On the complexity of the relationship between microstructure and tensile properties in cast aluminum2015In: International Journal of Modern Physics B, ISSN 0217-9792, Vol. 29, no 10-11, article id 1540011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties in cast aluminium alloys is very complex. This relationship is also strongly affected by the casting process and melt handling. In the current study the mechanical properties were investigated and correlated with microstructural features such as porosity, Fe-rich particles, SDAS, Si-length. Process quality measures such as bifilm index, density index, and sludge factor were also investigated. The aim of the work was to understand the critical interactions between material microstructure and process quality in the development of high performance materials.

  • 3768.
    Bjurenstedt, Anton
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Seifeddine, Salem
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Jarfors, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    The effects of Fe-particles on the tensile properties of Al-Si-Cu alloys2016In: Metals, ISSN 2075-4701, Vol. 6, no 12, article id 314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of Fe-rich particles has been a topic for discussion in the aluminum casting industry because of the negative impact they exert on the mechanical properties. However, there are still contradictions on the effects of various morphologies of Fe-particles. In this study, microstructural characterization of tensile tested samples has been performed to reveal how unmodified and modified Fe-rich particles impact on the tensile behavior. Analysis of additions of Fe modifiers such as Mn and Cr, showed higher amounts of primary Fe-rich particles (sludge) with increased porosity and, as result, degraded tensile properties. From the fracture analysis of tensile tested HIPed samples it could be concluded that the mechanical properties were mainly governed by the Fe-rich particles, which were fracturing through cleavage, not by the porosity.

  • 3769.
    Bjurenstedt, Anton
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Seifeddine, Salem
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Liljenfors, Tomas
    Assessment of Quality when Delivering Molten Aluminium Alloys Instead of Ingots2013In: Materials Science Forum, ISSN 0255-5476, E-ISSN 1662-9752, Vol. 765, p. 266-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recycled aluminium alloys manufactured at Stena Aluminium, in Älmhult, Sweden, are delivered in special designed transport containers, called thermoses. Thermoses are best described as an insulating layer protected by a steel cover with a heat loss of about 5 degrees/h. Three thermoses are transported by a truck, giving the possibility for a total capacity of about 24 tonnes delivered aluminium just-in-time to the foundry. By delivering a full load of liquid aluminium, about 2 tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions are saved, compared with delivering ingots. The aim of the paper is to assess the quality benefits, in terms of inclusions sedimentation and mechanical properties, assured by delivering aluminiummelts instead of ingots. The results indicate that materials produced by just-in-time melt delivery have slightly improved quality compared to ingots. The trends are explained in terms of quality, density and bifilm indexes, based on microstructural observations as well as tensile test data analysis.

  • 3770.
    Bjurevik, John
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research.
    Musik i grundskolan och förskoleklass som ett pedagogiskt verktyg2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 3771.
    Bjurman, Jessica
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Sundh, Malin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Personcentrerad omvårdnad inom demensvård ur ett personalperspektiv: - en litteraturöversikt2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Title: Person centered care in dementia care from a personnel perspective – a literature review. Background: Dementia is described as pathological changes in the brain that affects abilities of memory and thinking, and gives an impact on the person’s ability to cope with normal activities of daily life. The person with dementia can through person centered care maintain a life as good as possible and a good wellbeing. Aim: To describe the nursing staff’s experiences of caring according to person centered care in dementia care.  Method: The study is a literature review with a qualitative approach which was inductively analyzed. Results: During the analysis process two categories were identified; the person in focus and obstacles in the implementation. Two of the main findings were to individualize the care and that education within the specific area is necessary. A number of obstacles that could occur were identified by the staff, such as lack of communication, time and questioning relatives. Conclusion: Both research and education about person centered care in dementia care is required to be able to implement person centered care in an adequate manner.

  • 3772.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    A virtual study in higher education2018In: INTED 2018 Proceedings / [ed] L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez, I. Candel Torres, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A study visit is when an individual or a group visits a site to learn about the context and to exchange knowledge with the people at the site. Study visits are often connected to efforts to create intercultural understanding within a course. Traditionally, study visits are connected to geographical sites: students travel to other countries or visit organisations relevant to their education and training. With the development of online environments, virtual study visits are emerging as an alternative to traditional study visits. This paper explores a virtual study visit. The purpose of the virtual study visit was for students to prepare for a laboratory exercise by getting familiar with the context where the exercise would take place. The virtual environment where the study visit took place was a model of the Foundry School they would visit later in the course. There were nine students in the course, and the results of their evaluation of the virtual study visit are presented in the paper. The discussion centres on the students’ perception of the virtual study visit in the course as well as a general consideration of how a virtual study visit can provide additional value in a higher education course. Some unique features of an educational virtual environment, which cannot be achieved in traditional classroom education, are discussed in the paper. The conclusion is that a virtual study visit can provide flexibility in time and space and the possibility to zoom between micro and macro levels in the model of the building. To achieve educational goals, both teachers and students need to engage in the preparation as well as in the virtual study visit itself.

  • 3773.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Active ageing through work and learning2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The demographic changes, with an ageing population in many countries, are usually seen as a financial problem and the solution is to discuss a higher retirement age. In Sweden, the government is working with changes on several levels to make it possible to continue working later in life. This discussion is however paradoxical. People who are sick or worn-out are afraid of being forced to prolong their work life. People, who want to continue working, cannot stay because of employers’ negative attitude towards older employees. To work longer can be a way for individuals to stay active which promotes good health and well-being, but the discussion needs to include alternative solutions and a broader perspective, not just prolonging working life. Work is often equal to fulltime employment and the role of learning throughout (work)life is seldom addressed. In addition, one often forgets to ask the older adults themselves about their experience and opinion in this matter. We talk about them and not with them.

    The purpose of this paper is to study the role of work and learning in older adults lives. A survey was distributed in four pensioner's associations in one of Sweden’s county’s. 232 individuals replied and out of these, 83 (35,8%) have worked in some form after retirement. Only four of these had worked fulltime. About half had worked for payment and the rest had worked for non-profit organizations. The primary context for learning activities was to be involved in a study circle.

    Based on the results of this study, there was an expressed need for individual flexibility and adjustment so that pensioners could stay active and productive on their own terms. In today’s working life, flexibility is usually a demand on the workforce but rarely expected from employers. There is also a lack of the systematic integration of education in a lifelong perspective.

  • 3774.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    An innovative organization or organi­zing innovatively after a merger?2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the middle of the post-merger integration process voices expressing a need for innova­tion was heard. What was the reason for this change of focus in the organization and why did they use the concept innovation? This paper is based on a study of a merger between a Finnish and a Swedish company. Both companies had historically been family com­panies but one of them was listed on the Stockholm Stock Exchange in 1993 which had changed the business logic in the organization. When talking to the managers after the merger they referred to cultures to explain problematic issues. In this paper, the frame concept is used to analyze organizational cultures, and to compare them with the notion of an innovative organization. It turned out that the two pre-merger organizational cultures had stronger innovative features, compared to the culture in the new, merged company. This is followed by a suggestion that innovation should be seen as a method for integration, rather than a goal for the new organization.

  • 3775.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Berättelser från Norsjöbygden2014Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3776.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Book Review: Mary Barrett and Ken Moores, Women in Family Business Leadership Roles. Daughters on the Stage2012In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 101-103Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3777.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Collaborative authorship to engage in organizational knowledge sharing2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3778.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Cultural divergence in merging family businesses2011In: The Journal of Family Business Strategy, ISSN 1877-8585, E-ISSN 1877-8593, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 69-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mergers and acquisitions (M&A) is one of the strategic options available for business growth, and there is an increased research interest in the topic and its relevance to family firms. In this article, post-merger integration is discussed by looking at ownership, family and management as three separate value systems at work in the process. The interplay between these aspects influences what people perceive as organizational culture in terms of norms and values in a specific setting. The paper builds on a field study of two family businesses in a Nordic setting, including over 200 interviews and 40 h of video. The paper contributes to the emerging knowledge about M&A in family business. Furthermore, it contributes to the field of M&A by highlighting that ownership could be included as an aspect in cultural studies to better understand post-merger integration.

  • 3779.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    E-mentorship for lifelong learning2019In: INTED 2019 Proceedings, 2019, p. 9750-9759Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has long been known that mentorship programs can provide both vocational and psycho-social support and development opportunities for program participants. Mentorship has proven itself to be a superior way to learn ‘on the job’, as this education and training are based on problem-oriented learning relevant for the specific work setting. It has been reported that traditional educational approaches with a fixed curriculum are not efficient when it comes to meeting an organizations’ needs and that it might be difficult, or even impossible, to apply what one has learned when one returns to one’s workplace. Problem-oriented learning that takes place at the workplace, as an alternative to traditional courses, has many advantages; for example, such learning can be linked to everyday tasks. The digitalization of mentorship can benefit from knowledge that has been developed within traditional mentorship programs, and in particular the structure of a program. At the same time, technological development can allow for the introduction of new and innovative ways of working with lifelong learning in organizations. This paper addresses the potential benefits from e-mentorship for workplace learning. E-mentorship and mentorship systems have been studied before but not to a large extent. Based on the continuous development of digital tools and the digitalization of work practices, there is a need to understand if and when these tools can contribute to strengthening mentorship aimed at workplace learning. A model for strategic mentorship that was developed to assist mentorship in the foundry industry is presented: Strategic Mentorship for Inclusion, Learning, and Equality (SMILE). The model is discussed in relation to three advantages with e-mentorship: (i) flexibility in time and space, (ii) variety of learning formats and, (iii) access to global expertise. The general conclusion is that since the model covers several aspects of inclusion in working life, with respect to the individual’s whole life-situation, e-mentorship may not be the most functional approach. Since psycho-social support is central in the model, in-person mentorship is preferred since this kind of mentorship tends to be more interactive. When it comes to online learning and e-mentorship, there are several tools that support interactivity, but they still have limitations compared to the physical meeting. The model also comprises several different areas which makes the mentorship more complex than just discussing a single task or problem. E-mentorship can however be a very good complement when there is need for flexibility in time and space, variety of learning formats and, access to global expertise. Finally, the organizational support from managers, in terms of structure and resources, determines what can be done. The provision of education to build competencies in mentorship as well as ICT skills are other aspects to include if there is a need to work strategically with mentorship and e-mentorship.

  • 3780.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    EMIL’s EY 2012 Programme of Events: Report from Encell – National centre for lifelong learning in Sweden2012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3781.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Forskning och vuxenutbildning i samverkan2012In: KOM : kommunikation mellan vuxenutbildare, ISSN 0347-4445, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 4-6Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3782.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Growth through education: the narratives of older adults2019In: Frontiers in Sociology, ISSN 2297-7775, Vol. 4, article id 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of Narrative Gerontology is placed on stories about the aging process. In the present paper, the learning of older adults in a Senior University context is captured by means of stories written by the participants themselves. The examination of older adults' stories, as they look back on life or any narrative that connected to a specific area of life, can contribute to our understanding of growth later in life. The aim of the study is to examine how growth manifests itself later in life. Participants at Senior University were asked to share their experiences of education later in life. Participation was voluntary and the identity of each participant was kept anonymous for the purpose of the research project. Fifty-three stories written by Senior University participants (n = 38 women and 15 men) were analyzed according to: (i) an inductive analysis of the stories that resulted in a description of the main topics addressed in the stories, and (ii) a deductive analysis that invoked a theoretical framework concerning the existential aspects of older adults' learning, including “corporeality,” “relationality,” “spatiality,” “temporality,” and “materiality.” The two analyses were compared, and it was noted that “relationality” and “spatiality” corresponded to the educational experiences in the stories. “Relationality” was observed to be concerned with the social dimensions of life; but in the context of Senior University, “relationality” was strongly intertwined with the learning process. “Spatiality” addressed how older adults relate to physical- and mental space. Participation at Senior University entailed an expansion of both physical- and mental space for the participants. A number of tensions were identified in the stories. One the one hand, the stories can be interpreted as illustrations of moving forward and embracing continued growth and development. On the other hand, the stories can be interpreted as illustrations of resistance toward aging and decline. Since life is complex and contradictory, multiple, and even contradictory plots, co-exist in life stories.

  • 3783.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Heterogeneous frames and homogenizing activity: Dualistic tensions in a merger discourse2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper conceptualizes a post-merger integration process as a quest for semantic fit in the process of changing meaning in international business; a study of how meaning is constructed in the creation of a new social setting after a merger. The analysis showed how the integra­tion discourse consisted of dualistic tensions in several dimensions, and how management worked towards homogenization to deal with these tensions, which in itself created a tension in the dimension heterogeneity – homogeneity. The paper is based on a longitudinal field study of post-merger integration meetings in a mangement group.

  • 3784.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Hon har tid för lärande2012In: Leva hela livet / [ed] Cecilia Bjursell och Svante Hultman, Hestra: Isaberg Förlag , 2012, p. 69-73Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3785.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Humboldt är död, länge leve Humboldt: Bokrecension av Bildningens praktiker2017In: Organisation & Samhälle, ISSN 2001-9114, E-ISSN 2002-0287Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3786.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Ingen konst att jobba med konst2012In: Leva hela livet / [ed] Cecilia Bjursell och Svante Hultman, Hestra: Isaberg Förlag , 2012, p. 75-78Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3787.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Karriärtopp vid 96 går som en dans2012In: Leva hela livet / [ed] Cecilia Bjursell och Svante Hultman, Hestra: Isaberg Förlag , 2012, p. 63-66Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3788.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Kartläggning av lärande mellan generationer och utvärdering av utbildningsaktiviteter i projektet Affärsnytta och sociala medier2013Other (Other academic)
  • 3789.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Keynote speech: Images of women in family business2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3790.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Knowledge management technology supporting individual learning preferences2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This conceptual paper focuses on variations in the preferred learning spaces of knowledge workers and resulting implications for the construction of an effective knowledge management technology system. The discussion in the paper is based on the cross-reference of ideas from literature on Knowledge Management (KM) and Experiential Learning Theory (ELT). When developing a Knowledge Management Technology (KMT) system, the technological possibilities are often the point of departure. Based on the discussion in this paper, I propose that the knowledge workers’ learning styles should be the proper point of departure. The paper presents a conceptual model based on the concept of learning spaces. An important finding is that data base technology is over-emphasized. Instead, more attention should be given to the role of ICT and social media in managing knowledge. This paper answers to calls for a focus on the knowledge worker in KM.

  • 3791.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Kvalitetsarbete i folkbildning2016In: Folkbildningens framtidsfrågor / [ed] Folkuniversitetet, Stockholm: Folkuniversitetet , 2016, p. 41-50Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3792.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Managers understanding themselves as artifacts: A possibility for identity development during organizational change?2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The merger process is often described as a turbulent situation where cultures collide. For the people involved, this can be a time of crisis, but in this crisis there is also an opportunity for growth. This paper describes how a management group worked in a project to develop a new corporate identity during the integration process after the decision to merge. The first step in this process was to describe the characteristics of the previous cultures using words and images. After this, a shared corporate identity was developed, together with a vision, mission and core values.

     

    The idea of this paper is to discuss a further use of the descriptions of culture made in the identity project. By using the conception of managers in the two organizations, the stereo­types, I will take a look at possible strategies for socially identity-based impression manage­­ment when working in a merged company. To further enhance the interactive aspect of management, I will use the term artefact, instead of stereotype. In the empirical illustration I will show how the management group worked with identity construction after the merger, and what the charac­ter­istics for corporate identity were before and after the merger. Furthermore, I will use the managers’ description of the other and see how this is related to corporate identity (social identity), and how this can be used when thinking about oneself as an artefact. Could managers improve the understanding of their professional identity, when working with a corporate identity? If so, what aspects of corporate identity are used when relating to professions within the company? And can the change of corporate identity be a way to improve management during a post-merger integration process?

  • 3793.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Metaphors in Communication of Scholarly Work2015In: Handbook of Qualitative Research Techniques and Analysis in Entrepreneurship / [ed] Helle Neergaard & Claire Leitch, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, p. 170-184Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metaphors can be helpful in storying your research findings. Considering the amount of work that goes into collecting and analysing material in a study, it makes sense to spend some time reflecting on how to communicate effectively. Taking a pedagogical approach to communication by using metaphors can be an effective way to illustrate and contextualize what you have to say. People learn by metaphor because it allows them to apply familiar knowledge structures to new settings (Walsh 1995; Cardon et al. 2005). Metaphors facilitate understanding while they trigger new questions to be explored. What do metaphors such as villain and hero do for our understanding of a phenomenon? How do they shape our understanding of entrepreneurship in this case? What venues for research might appear in the wake of these metaphors, and what falls outside the spotlight of a metaphor? Questions like these send chills down the spine of many researchers. They appear to go against everything we were taught about significance, generalization and precision in method classes. Yet, in the same classes, there were few discussions about academic authorship and communication of research. This chapter is an attempt to provide input for those discussions by looking at metaphors in communication of scholarly work.

  • 3794.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Metaphors in research and a note on academic authorship2011In: Reassembling Organizations, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3795.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    New challenges late in life – advanced studies for pensioners2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3796.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Older adults and the stories they tell2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3797.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Older adults’ motivation for continued participation in work and learning2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many countries face aging populations, and this is accompanied by discussions of how people can stayemployed later in life. This raises the question of how organizations can attract, retain, and develop olderworkers for productive working lives. This paper presents a study in Sweden of pensioners’ motives forparticipating in work and learning activities. Of 232 individuals, 83 (35.8 %) had worked after retirement,but only four had worked full time. The main motives for continuing to work and learn were (1) stayingactive, (2) social contact, and (3) the content of the activity. The motive of staying active, which reflects adesire to stay healthy, might be enhanced with age and is rarely included in discussions about workmotivation. Using self-determination theory to interpret the results, a suggestion is that organizationsshould use separate strategies for organizing work and learning for younger and older workers.

  • 3798.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Organizing for Intergenerational Learning and Knowledge Sharing2015In: Journal of Intergenerational Relationships, ISSN 1535-0770, E-ISSN 1535-0932, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 285-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increased age diversity in society challenges organizations to rethink the purpose and structuring of learning. This article proposes that an intergenerational learning (IL) approach can be useful for addressing the emergent needs, since IL implies a reciprocal process of learning and knowledge development. Taking an IL approach involves a shift from “succession of knowledge” to “co-creation of knowledge” in knowledge-sharing efforts. This shift becomes crucial as the digital generation enters the workforce. This paper presents insights from a case where students and entrepreneurs were engaged in an IL project to learn about business advantages and social media.

  • 3799.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Professional development for older colleagues2018In: Human resource management: A Nordic perspective / [ed] H. Ahl, I. Bergmo Prvulovic & K. Kilhammar, London, UK: Routledge, 2018, p. 140-152Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Demographic changes have raised the issue of a prolonged working life. Research has shown that older employees are reliable, service- and customer-orientated, knowledgeable, productive, demonstrate good work ethics, and are able to learn new skills. Employers thus show wisdom and foresight when they provide competence development programmes for their older employees. Another relevant dimension is the need for the transfer of knowledge from older to younger employees. The chapter discusses learning at the workplace and suggests that HR supports 'study circles', in which participants search for, and develop knowledge themselves, and they subsequently share this knowledge between themselves.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-04-10 00:00
  • 3800.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Prolonged working life - increased inequality?2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many countries face aging populations, and this is accompanied by discussions of how people can stay employed later in life. To stay in working life can be a way to support a healthy and active lifestyle. Late life learning is an important part of a prolonged working life and in an earlier study, it was suggested that the main motives for continuing to work and learn were (1) staying active, (2) social contact, and (3) the content of the activity. The motive of staying active, which reflects a desire to stay healthy, might be enhanced with age and is rarely included in discussions about work motivation. In this paper, continued participation in working life will, however, be problematized. People have different opportunities to continue working and learning and the result might be that a prolonged working life will dramatically increase inequality within the older age groups.

73747576777879 3751 - 3800 of 29145
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