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  • 351.
    Norderyd, Ola
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden; Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Wahlin, Åsa
    The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Impact of Risk-Based Prevention on Public Oral Health: Examples from Sweden with Long-Term Follow-Up2020In: Risk assessment in oral health: A concise guide for clinical application / [ed] I. L. C. Chapple & P. N. Papapanou, Cham: Springer, 2020, p. 23-29Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 352.
    Norderyd, Ola
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden; Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Wahlin, Åsa
    The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    The secrets of Jönköping: Why do most 80-year-olds have more than 20 remaining teeth, and why are there very few edentulous?2018In: Translational oral health research / [ed] J. H. Meurman, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 143-149Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Repeated epidemiological studies have been performed in the city of Jonkoping, Sweden, every 10 years since 1973. The studies were initiated in order to describe the changes in oral health in the population. Basic preventive dental care and supplementary programs were extensively performed in the population, especially among children and adolescents. In this population, the percentage of individuals with sound teeth (no caries or restorations) continuously increased each decade. The main finding regarding periodontitis is the significant increase in individuals having no or minimal periodontitis experience. In 2013, 20-60-year-olds had nearly complete dentitions (28 teeth), and the individuals in age groups 70 and 80 years had a mean number of teeth of 23 and 21, respectively. Edentulous individuals having complete dentures in the age groups 40-70 years decreased from approximately every sixth individual in 1973 to none in 2013. The continuous improvement in oral health and the reduced need for restorative treatment will have an impact on dental health-care and dental delivery systems in the near future. 

  • 353.
    Odersjö, M. L.
    et al.
    Clinic of Pediatric Dentistry, Public Dental Service, Borås, Region Västra Götaland, Sweden.
    Robertson, A.
    Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Institute of Odontology at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Koch, G.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Incidence of dental traumatic injuries in children 0-4 years of age: a prospective study based on parental reporting2018In: European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 1818-6300, E-ISSN 1996-9805, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 107-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To collect prospective information reported by parents regarding dental traumas occurring in children 6 months to 4 years of age, furthermore, to collect data on complications from the dental records.

    METHODS: The staff from the child health services distributed a questionnaire at the regular health check-up reviews for a number of age groups, i.e., 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, and 42 months of age. The parents were to observe and register factors around dental trauma for the following 6-month period. The questionnaires (138) were returned, irrespective of any trauma having occurred or not. If a child was seeing a dentist (emergency visit), the diagnosis of trauma and later complications were collected from the dental records.

    RESULTS: There were 35 of 138 children experienced trauma (6-47 months of age). The half-year incidence of trauma in children 6 months to 4.0 years of age was between 12 and 48%. A total of 41 traumatic dental injuries (TDIs) were reported. Of these 24 occurred indoors. The most common reason for trauma was falling accidents. In 24 out of the 41 reported TDIs the children were not seen by a dentist in connection with the trauma. The reason was that the parents thought the trauma did not matter.

    CONCLUSIONS: The high incidence of TDIs reported in toddlers in this study indicates that there is an under-reporting of TDIs in previously reported studies. The research design used in the present study has an advantage and should be tested in further studies.

  • 354.
    Odhagen, Erik
    et al.
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Södra Älvsborgs Hospital, Borås, Sweden; Department of Research, Education and Innovation, Södra Älvsborgs Hospital, Borås, Sweden; Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Alm, Fredrik
    School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Sara
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Helsingborg Hospital, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Hemlin, Claes
    Swedish Quality Register for Tonsil Surgery, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nerfeldt, Pia
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stalfors, Joacim
    Department of Research, Education and Innovation, Södra Älvsborgs Hospital, Borås, Sweden; Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sunnergren, Ola
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Long-term complications after tonsil surgery: an analysis of 54,462 patients from the Swedish Quality Register for Tonsil Surgery2023In: Frontiers in Surgery, E-ISSN 2296-875X, Vol. 10, article id 1304471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate long-term complications after tonsil surgery using an exploratory retrospective cohort study design based on data from the Swedish Quality Register for Tonsil Surgery (SQTS).

    METHODS: All patients registered in the SQTS between 1 January 2009 and 31 May 2021 were eligible for the study. In this study, a long-term complication is defined as any complication persisting for a minimum of 6 months after surgery. The definition of a complication was based on individual patient reports, provided in a free text format, of any remaining issues 6 months after tonsil surgery. Complications were categorized as follows: disturbed taste or sense of smell, dysphagia, miscellaneous and general symptoms and signs, miscellaneous throat problems, pain or discomfort in the mouth or throat, problems with jaws or teeth, problems with the ears or hearing, problems with the nose or sinuses, problems with throat secretions or throat clearing, problems with voice or speech, and sensory symptoms. A multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent predictors of long-term complications.

    RESULTS: In total, 54,462 patients were included in the study. A total of 3,780 patients (6.9%) reported one or more long-term complications. The most frequent long-term complications, with a plausible connection to the surgery, were found in the following categories: pain or discomfort in the mouth or throat (1.9%), problems with throat secretions or throat clearing (0.8%), dysphagia (0.6%), and problems with voice or speech (0.6%). Tonsillotomy was associated with a lower risk of long-term complications than tonsillectomy.

    CONCLUSION: This study suggests that subjective long-term complications after tonsil surgery, in general, are relatively common (6.9%). However, complications with a plausible connection to the surgery were less common (4.0%), and specific complications seemed to be relatively rare, with no single specific problem reaching a prevalence of ≥0.6%.

  • 355.
    Odisho, Helen
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Khan, Hina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Oral health knowledge among nursing students2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Oral health is a part of general health and it is therefore important that nurses are able to detect abnormalities in the mouth to refer to dental care. Aim: The aim of this study was to examine oral health knowledge regarding oral diseases and oral hygiene among nursing students at two universities - InHolland University and University of Victoria [UVic]. Method: This study has a quantitative cross-sectional design based on a questionnaire. Chi-square tests were made to discover differences between the two universities. Results: The study consists of a total of 105 questionnaires. The participants had good knowledge of oral hygiene. Concerning knowledge about dental caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis, limited knowledge and several statistical significant differences between the universities were found. The extent of the oral health education was between 1-10 hours in the respective universities. Several nurses considered that they did not feel ready or were unsure if they have enough knowledge about oral health for their future work. Conclusion: The study has shown that the nursing students at both InHolland University and UVic have basic knowledge regarding oral hygiene but moderate knowledge in oral diseases regarding development and prevention of dental caries, gingivitis and periodontitis.

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  • 356.
    Odqvist, Stephanie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Vu, Helen
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Tandvårdsrädsla hos sexuellt utnyttjade personer: - En litteraturstudie2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Dental fear may originate from both incidents within or outside of the dentistry.  The majority of the population experience some form of dental fear in varying degrees. It has been shown that dental fear has a negative impact of the oral health. Due to sexual abuse, people may suffer from several harmful consequences, which can be observed during a clinical examination. Aim: The aim of this review was to explore eventual relationship between dental fear and sexual abuse. Method: The method used was a literature review. An article search with keyword combinations was carried out in different databases. The selected articles went through several steps of selections and one quality assessment. Result:  The studies showed a divided result, but most studies could demonstrate a statistically significant relationship between dental fear and sexual abuse. Several factors in dentistry may evoke flashbacks and contribute to a negative perception of dentistry. Victims of oral sexual abuse presented higher levels of dental fear. Conclusion: There is a confirmed relationship between dental fear and sexual abuse. Certain elements within the dentistry can have a negative impact on the dental care experience.  

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  • 357. Ohrn, K
    et al.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Abrahamsson, K H
    Dental beliefs, patients' specific attitudes towards dentists and dental hygienists: a comparative study.2008In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 205-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interpersonal relationships are important for communication, oral health education and patients' satisfaction with dental care. To assess patients' attitudes towards dental caregivers, a Swedish version of the revised Dental Belief Survey (DBS-R) and a comparable and partly new instrument the Dental Hygienist Belief Survey (DHBS) have been evaluated. The aim of the present study was to investigate if patients' attitudes towards dental hygienists (DH) and dentists (D) differ with regard to the separate items in DBS-R and DHBS. The study was a comparative cross-sectional study with 364 patients (students, general patients and patients with periodontal disease). All patients completed the DBS-R and DHBS surveys. The overall pattern in the results showed that participants in general had a less negative attitude towards DH when compared with that towards D. This was most pronounced among students and least pronounced among patients with periodontal disease. No statistically significant difference could be found in items with regard to feelings of shame and guilt in dental care situations, indicating that these items were rated on a more negative level also for DH. The conclusion is that participants had a less negative attitude towards DH with the exception of situations which may give rise to feelings of shame and guilt, an important finding for future dental hygiene care.

  • 358.
    Olaniran, Margaret
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Tomtélius, Sofia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Attityder och erfarenhet avseende munhygien hos en grupp vuxna med utländsk bakgrund i Sverige2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim: The aim of this qualitative study was to study the attitudes and experiences about oral care in a group of adults with a foreign background in Sweden. Method: Interviews were conducted with ten informants on a SFI training in Sweden. An interview guide with open questions was used. The interviews were conducted in Swedish and English. Results: There were a number of contributing factors to the informants’ knowledge, attitudes and experiences regarding oral hygiene. These factors were termed as subcategories and were listed below five main categories. The main categories were health awareness, motivation, social influence, prices and oral hygiene practices. The informants felt that it was difficult to break old habits. They were accustomed to using both toothbrush and Miswak, but not inter dental cleaning aids. Conclusions Dental professionals should be sensitive to the knowledge and the capabilities of migrants but also be able to convey the Swedish dental culture in a good way.

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  • 359. Ostberg, AL
    et al.
    Andersson, P
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the oral impacts on daily performances (OIDP) in Swedish2008In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 187-195Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 360.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Kumar, Santhosh
    Population Social Health Research Program, Griffith Health Institute, School of Dentistry and Oral Health, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Australia.
    Scheerman, Janneke F. M.
    Academic Centre of Dentistry Amsterdam, Department of Preventive Dentistry, ACTA University, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Jansson, Henrik
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Oral health-related quality of life in Iranian patients with spinal cord injury: A case-control study2016In: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 1345-1352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The study aimed to compare the oral health variables, general, and oral health-related quality of life (QoL), depression, and anxiety between spinal cord injury (SCI) patients and healthy controls and also to determine the key factors related to the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) in the SCI patients.

    Methods: A total of 203 SCI patients and 203 healthy controls were enrolled. Patients and healthy adults were invited to attend a dental clinic to complete the study measures and undergo oral clinical examinations. OHRQoL was assessed by the 14-item Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14), and the general health-related quality of life (GHRQoL) was evaluated by SF-36. In SCI patients, depression and anxiety were recorded using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), while Functional Assessment Measure (FAM) was used to assess dependence and disability. All the subjects were examined for caries which was quantified using the decayed, missing, and filled Teeth (DMFT) index, gingival bleeding index (GI), plaque index, and periodontal status by community periodontal index (CPI).

    Results: The analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) revealed significant differences between the two groups in terms of oral health expressed in DMFT, oral hygiene, and periodontal status, controlled for age, gender, family income, and occupational status (p < 0.001). Using the hierarchical linear regression analyses, in the final model, which accounted for 18% of the total variance (F(126.7), p < 0.01), significant predictors of OHRQoL were irregular tooth brushing (β = 1.23; 95% CI = 1.06; 1.41), smoking (β = 0.82; 95% CI = 0.66; 0.97), dry mouth (β = 0.37; 95% CI = -0.65 to 0.10) functional and motor functioning (β = 0.32; 95% CI = -0.45 to 0.17), DMFT (β = 0.06; 95% CI = 0.02; 0.09), CPI (β = 0.22; 95% CI = 0.04; 0.04), physical component measure of GHRQoL (β = -0.275; 95% CI = -0.42 to 0.13), lesion level at the lumbar-sacral (β = -0.18; 95% CI = -0.29 to -0.06) and thoracic level (β = -0.09; 95% CI = -0.11 to -0.06).

    Conclusion: SCI patients had poor oral hygiene practices, greater levels of plaque, gingival bleeding, and caries experience than the healthy controls. In addition, more number of SCI patients had periodontal pockets and dry mouth than the comparative group. SCI patients experienced more depression and anxiety, poor GHRQoL, and OHRQoL than the healthy control group. The factors that influenced OHRQoL in SCI patients were age, toothbrushing frequency, smoking, oral clinical status, depression, physical component of GHRQoL, and level of lesion.

  • 361.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong.
    Kumar, Santhosh
    Griffith Health Institute, School of Dentistry and Oral Health, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Jansson, Henrik
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Predictors of oral health-related quality of life in Iranian adolescents: A prospective study.2018In: Journal of Investigative and Clinical Dentistry, ISSN 2041-1618, E-ISSN 2041-1626, Vol. 9, no 1, article id e12264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: In the present study, we evaluated the direct and mediating (indirect) effects of clinical oral conditions, dental anxiety, sense of coherence (SOC), and socioeconomic variables on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) and general health-related quality of life (GHRQoL) in Iranian adolescents.

    METHODS: A longitudinal design was used with a sample of 1052 (694 males, mean age=15.05 years) schoolchildren from Qazvin, Iran. Each participant completed a background information sheet and the following scales at baseline: Modified Dental Anxiety Scale, SOC, PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scale, and PedsQL Oral Health Scale. The PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core and Oral Health scales were recompleted at the 18-mo follow up.

    RESULTS: Father's education, monthly family income, dental anxiety, Community Periodontal Index (CPI), decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT), and SOC significantly and directly predicted OHRQoL at 18 mo. Father's education had indirect effects on OHRQoL through CPI and DMFT, family income had indirect effects through DMFT, and dental anxiety had indirect effects through CPI. OHRQoL at 18 mo (β=0.499) and SOC (β=0.084) had significant and direct and mediating effects through OHRQoL on GHRQoL, while father's education, monthly family income, dental anxiety, CPI, and DMFT only showed mediating effects.

    CONCLUSIONS: Clinical oral indicators had direct effects on OHRQoL, but mediated the effects of dental anxiety and socioeconomic status on both OHRQoL and GHRQoL.

  • 362.
    Persson, Viktoria
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Enroth, Anna-Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Kunskap och tillämpning av Functional food i det kariespreventiva arbetet inom tandvården: En enkätstudie2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: An adequate nutrition is essential for the promotion and maintenance of the general and oral health. Dental caries is a multifactorial disease in which diet is a important factor. Functional foods are defined as "foods that provide health benefits beyond basic nutrition" and "foods that has one or more additives, modified to contribute to a healthy diet". Aim: The aim of the study was to identify the level of knowledge and application regarding information to patients about Functional food in caries prevention work in Public dental services, County Council of Kronoberg. Method: The survey included 106 participants consisted of dentists, dental hygienists and dental nurses from 17 different Public dental services. The survey consisted of 24 questions. The results were presented descriptive, with tables and charts, as well as statistically analyzes using chi-square tests. Results: The majority of participants were categorized into the groups: low level of knowledge and medium or low application level of Functional food in the caries prevention work. Most of the participants had a great interest in obtaining additional knowledge. Conclusion: Dental professionals would like to get more knowledge about Functional food for an increased application in patient care, provided that scientific evidence is obtained.

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  • 363.
    Petersson, L G
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Lodding, A
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Koch, G
    Fluorine profiles in human enamel after in vitro treatment with dentifrices of different compositions and acidities.1989In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 177-183Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 364.
    Pezoa, Marcello Emilio
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Interdentala hjälpmedels effekt på dental plack och inflammation kring orala implantat: En systematisk litteraturstudie2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Implants can fill tooth gaps but can be affected by mucosit and peri-implantitis cussed by plaque. Interdental aids effect on plaque and inflammation is based on clinical expertise and not scientific evidence. Objective: The objective was to review published studies, to identify interdental aids effect on plaque and inflammation around oral implants. Method: A systematic review was conducted in Pubmed, Medline and Scopus after articles that studied interdental brushes, dental floss, toothpick or water floss for presence of plaque bleeding on probing (BOP), mucosit or peri-implantitis on adults. Totally 2172 articles where found, four where included. The study followed PRISAM checklist. SBU templates where used for quality assessment and determine evidence according to GRADE. Result: Dental floss reduces BOP by 33,3% but can be risk for mucosit/peri-implantitis if fibers get stuck but if removed pocket depth reduces 2,2 mm. Water floss reduces BOP by 81,8% and is 2,45 times more efficient then dental floss and removes 40,56% of plaque. This is based on few studies with deficient study design and the evidence is insufficient. Conclusion: More clinical studies are needed to elevate evidence. 

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  • 365.
    Pitchika, Vinay
    et al.
    Department of Restorative Dentistry, Periodontology, Endodontology and Preventive and Pediatric Dentistry, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
    Jordan, Rainer
    Institute of German Dentists (IDZ), Cologne, Germany.
    Norderyd, Ola
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Department of Periodontology, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Rolander, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Futurum, Academy for Health and Care, Region Jönköping County and Department of Social Work, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Welk, Alexander
    Department of Restorative Dentistry, Periodontology, Endodontology and Preventive and Pediatric Dentistry, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
    Völzke, Henry
    Institute for Community Medicine, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
    Holtfreter, Birte
    Department of Restorative Dentistry, Periodontology, Endodontology and Preventive and Pediatric Dentistry, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
    Kocher, Thomas
    Department of Restorative Dentistry, Periodontology, Endodontology and Preventive and Pediatric Dentistry, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
    Factors influencing tooth loss in European populations2022In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 49, no 7, p. 642-653Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This study aimed to identify the factors influencing the changes in the number of teeth present, and the number of healthy or filled surfaces between two time-points.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Repeated cross-sectional data from population-based studies, i.e., the German Oral Health Studies (DMS-III vs DMS-V), the Studies of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-START-0 vs. SHIP-TREND-0), and the Jönköping study (2003 vs. 2013), were analysed. Oaxaca decomposition models were constructed for the outcomes (number of teeth, number of healthy surfaces and number of filled surfaces).

    RESULTS: The number of teeth increased between examinations [DMS: +2.26 (adults), +4.92 (seniors), SHIP: +1.67, Jönköping: +0.96]. Improvements in education and dental awareness brought a positive change in all outcomes. An increase in powered toothbrushing and interdental cleaning showed a great impact in DMS (adults: +0.25 tooth, +0.78 healthy surface, +0.38 filled surface; seniors: +1.19 teeth, 5.79 healthy surfaces, +0.48 filled surface). Interdental cleaning decreased by 4% between SHIP-START-0 and SHIP-TREND-0, which negatively affected the outcomes.

    CONCLUSION: From this study, it can be concluded that education may be the most important factor having a direct and indirect effect on the outcomes. However, for better oral health, powered toothbrushing and interdental cleaning should not be neglected.

  • 366.
    Pola, Forat
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Följsamhet av vårdhygienrutiner och kunskap om blodburna smittor hos tandvårdsstudenter vid Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University, Sydafrika: En kvantitativ tvärsnittsstudie2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Blood-borne infections are common problem in healthcare. Informations about the prevalence in dental care are limitet. Healthcare professionals in South Africa are particularly vulnerable to blood-borne infections. The best way to minimize blood-borne infections is to increase compliance to infection control. Objective: To describe and compare compliance to infection control routines and knowledge of blood-borne infections among  different groups of dental students at a university in Ga-Rankuwa, South Africa. Materials and method: A quantitative cross-section web-based survey. The participants were dental students who were registered in 2019, dental hygienist, dental therapist students, 3ed year and dental students 4th year. Non Parametric – Chi - Square and Fisher's test was used to analyze data. Result: Majority of the students had  compliance regarding the use of gloves and mask during patient treatment, changing gloves and disinfection of  unit between patients. Compliance was less at other parts where approximately half (49%) had the correct answer concerning: gloves, using of  gloves, clinical uniform and using of mobile and accessories. Correct answers to the knowledge of blood-borne infections för all dental students was 67%. Conclusions: The participants had better results on knowledge of blood-borne infections than on compliance to infection kontrol. No significant difference was found among the student dental groups

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  • 367. Poulsen, Sven
    et al.
    Koch, Göran
    Wendt, Lill-Kari
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Fissurförsegling år 20062006In: Odontologi 2006, Köpenhamn : Munksgaards , 2006, p. 131-141Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 368.
    Rada, Daniel-Ion
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Påverkan av oral hälsa hos patienter behandlade för huvud- och halscancer2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 369.
    Rantzow, Veronica
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Munbedömningar och planerade åtgärder mot munproblem utförda på omsorgsberoende äldre: - En registerstudie2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Increased life expectancy and improved dental health means that more teeth are retained into old age, often with advanced prosthetic constructions, which entails greater demands and need for oral care. Despite this, there is a limited knowledge of oral health care among elderly in need of care and there is a great need to be able to give this group the right actions and measures when it comes to oral health care.

    Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of and planned actions against oral problems among elderly in need of care in the Swedish region of Skåne, using the mouth assessment instrument ROAG-J.

    Method: The study was conducted with a quantitative approach, the design was non-experimental and data about identified oral problems and planned measures were collected retrospectively from the national registry Senior alert between 2014-07-01- 2015-06-30.

    Results: In total 2567 individuals aged 65 or older were assessed during the study period, using the ROAG-J assessment tool from Senior alert. The variation in identified oral health problems was between 12,0 % to 43.2 %. The most frequent category was that of "Teeth", indicating a lack of oral hygiene and broken teeth. At least one action was planned to be performed on all of the individuals in the study.

    Conclusion: The result indicate that oral care needs to be a higher priority among elderly in need of care. Oral problems were common within the group and the planned measures did not seem to be sufficient enough. 

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  • 370.
    Rantzow, Veronica
    et al.
    Higher Vocational Education, Helsingborg.
    Andersson, Pia
    Kristianstad University.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Occurrence of oral health problems and planned measures in dependent older people in nursing care2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 23-24, p. 4381-4389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVE:

    To describe oral health problems and planned measures in older people receiving nursing care.

    BACKGROUND:

    Poor oral health conditions have a negative impact on the quality of life of older people. Therefore, oral care is an important task in daily nursing activities.

    METHODS:

    Data were obtained from the web-based Swedish national quality register Senior Alert. Data regarding oral health status and planned measures in individuals ≥65 years from one county in Sweden between July 2014-June 2015 were included. The Revised Oral Assessment Guide-the Jönköping (ROAG-J) was used routinely by nursing staff in nursing care facilities to measure oral health status.

    RESULTS:

    Oral assessments were made on 2,567 individuals (65.7% women). The most common oral health problem was related to "Teeth" (43.0%), which indicates deficient oral hygiene and/or broken teeth. At least one measure was planned in all the participants. The most common planned measures were "Moistening of the mouth" (16.6%), followed by "Brushing - assistance or complete help" (13.5%).

    CONCLUSION:

    Oral health problems were common, and planned measures did not seem to be sufficient to address the identified problems. The results indicate that greater priority should be given to the oral health care of older people in nursing care.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:

    The study highlights the importance of not only identifying oral health problems but also having knowledge and strategies for oral health care. Collaboration is needed to support nurses in caring for the oral health care of older people in nursing homes.

  • 371.
    Rolander, Bo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Futurum, Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping County Council, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Johnston, V.
    School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Wåhlin, C.
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Organizational types in relation to exposure at work and sickness - a repeated cross-sectional study within public dentistry2020In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 78, no 2, p. 132-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Organizations and state agencies that provide dental care continuously face various and novel demands related to the need for dental care. However, rearrangements of work tasks by reducing the number of tasks performed by dental personnel might make the work more monotonous, repetitive, and static within an organization. The aim of this study is to compare how two dental work organizations, with different staffing and clinic size, are perceived by dental personnel focusing on physical and psychosocial conditions, leadership, work ability and presenteeism in 2012 and 2014.

    Material and Methods: This repeated cross-sectional study included personnel from the Public Dental Service in Sweden. There were 282 dentists, dental hygienists, and dental nurses who answered a questionnaire 2012 and 299 in 2014.

    Results and conclusion: In 2012, nine per cent of medium clinics reported poor leadership compared with 27% in 2014. For large clinics, 17% perceived poor leadership in 2012 compared with 31% in 2014. A higher proportion of the employees reported presenteeism due to high physical load (43%) and high psychosocial load (21%) in 2014 compared with 31% and 13% in 2012. These results indicate the need for work place interventions promoting health among dental employees.

  • 372.
    Rolander, Bo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Futurum, Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping County Council, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Johnston, Venerina
    Intervention and Implementation Research Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Changes in division of labour and tasks within public dentistry: relationship to employees work demands, health and work ability2016In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 74, no 6, p. 471-479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: By 2023, fewer dentists are expected in Sweden, at the same time as the demand for dental care is expected to increase. Older people, in particular, are expected to require more dental health than previous generations. To meet this demand, the public sector dentistry in Sweden is moving towards changes in division of labour among dental professionals, including dentists, dental hygienists and dental nurses. However, the impact of this reallocation on the physical and psychosocial wellbeing of employees is unknown. The aim of this study was to compare workplaces with an equal or larger proportion of dental hygienists than dentists (HDH) with workplaces with a larger proportion of dentists than dental hygienists (HD) on the physical and psychosocial work load, musculoskeletal and psychosomatic disorders and sickness presence.

    Material: A total of 298 persons employed in the Public Dental Service in a Swedish County Council participated in this study.

    Conclusion: The medium large clinics HDH reported 85% of employee’s with considerably more high psychosocial demands compared to employees in medium HD (53%) and large HD (57%). Employees in medium large clinics HDH also reported sleep problems due to work (25%) compared with employees in medium large clinics HD (6%), large clinics HD (11%) and small clinics HDH (3%). Clinic size does not seem to influence the outcome of the HD and HD clinics to any great extent. Of all employees, about 94–100% reported high precision demands and 78–91% poor work postures.

  • 373. Rolandsson, M
    et al.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Factors associated with snuffing habits among ice-hockey-playing boys2001In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 145-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present investigation was to study differences in background factors between ice-hockey-playing boys who used snuff, who had tried using snuff, and who had never used snuff. The background factors studied were the socio-economic conditions of the boys' parents; the tobacco habits of the boys' parents, siblings, and friends; the boys' choice of theoretical or practical upper secondary school programme; knowledge of the harmful effects of tobacco as well as participation in a sport other than ice hockey. Data were collected usinG a questionnaire. Of 249 boys in the age group 12-19 years who participated in the study, 13% used snuff, 34% had tried using snuff, and 53% had never used snuff. The factors knowledge of the harmful effects of tobacco and choice of theoretical or practical upper secondary school programme had no significant association with the boys' snuffing habits. This was also true for the parents' tobacco habits unless their habits were analysed separate from each other, where "mother smoked" showed an association with boys who used snuff. The study also showed a significant difference between boys who used snuff and boys who had never used snuff and between boys who had tried using snuff and boys who had never used snuff; boys who used snuff tended to have siblings who used snuff. Of boys who used snuff, 77% reported that their friends' use of snuff had influenced them to start using snuff. A significant difference could also be shown between boys who used snuff, had tried using snuff and never-users depending on whether the boys participated in a sport other than ice hockey. Snuff usage was not as widespread among boys who participated in other sport activities. This was verified by the multivariate logistic regression analysis where "taking part in other sports than ice hockey" was the explanatory variable that showed the strongest association with the dependent variable. An active participation in ice hockey and the environment, in which this sport is practised, would consequently be a strong influencing factor to start using snuff.

  • 374. Rolandsson, M
    et al.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Knowledge and habits of tobacco among ice-hockey-playing boys: An intervention study.2000In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 24, no 1-2, p. 59-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate tobacco habits among ice-hockey-playing boys in three clubs in the County of Värmland, Sweden and to analyse whether health information about the harmful effects of tobacco could change the players' tobacco habits. In addition, the issue of whether there is any correlation between knowledge of tobacco and its harmful effects with tobacco habits was studied. Ice-hockey-players from three ice-hockey clubs were represented and one of the clubs acted as a control group. A total of 252 male ice-hockey-players, 12-19 years old participated. A specially designed questionnaire containing 33 questions on background, socioeconomics, behaviour, and knowledge was used. The boys answered the questionnaire on three occasions. The first and second examinations took place on the same occasion with the intervention occurring between the examinations. The third examination was carried out after 3-5 weeks. The study showed that the use of snuff played a more important role among the ice-hockey-players than did smoking and that they had tried using snuff at the age of 12. The baseline investigation showed that there were no significant differences between the clubs in tobacco habits and knowledge of the harmful effects of tobacco. After the health information, the boys' knowledge of tobacco and its harmful effects increased significantly (p<0.001), but regardless, no change in their use of tobacco was found after 3-5 weeks. Knowledge also increased significantly among the boys in the control group (p<0.001), but no change in the use of tobacco was found here either. No significant difference could be demonstrated between the group of boys who used snuff and the non-users with regard to their knowledge of the harmful effects of tobacco.

  • 375. Rolandsson, Margot
    et al.
    Hellqvist, Lena
    Lindqvist, Lena
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Effects of snuff on the oral health status of adolescent males: a comparative study.2005In: Oral health & preventive dentistry, ISSN 1602-1622, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 77-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of snuff on the oral health status of adolescent males. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The participants consisted of 80 adolescent males between 16-25 years, 40 snuff users and 40 non-users. The snuff users and non-users were matched with reference to their age. Data were collected using a questionnaire containing questions on general and oral health, daily oral hygiene and tobacco habits. The clinical examination was carried out in a dental office by two experienced dental hygienists. Snuff lesions were clinically classified on a four-point scale and documented on colour slides. The examination also assessed the number of teeth, restored tooth surfaces, plaque index and gingival index, probing pocket depth and gingival recessions. RESULTS: Out of 40 snuff users, 35 showed snuff incluced lesions. The clinical diagnosis of snuff users' mucosa showed snuff lesions of different severity clinically classified as degree 1, 2 and 3. When explaining snuff lesions of degree 2 and 3, hours of daily snuff use and package form (portion-bag snuff versus loose snuff) was statistically significant. There were no statistical differences between snuff users and non-users regarding restored tooth surfaces, presence of plaque, gingival inflammation and probing pocket depth. Seventeen percent of the cases showed loss of periodontal attachment as gingival recessions. CONCLUSION: In spite of mucosal lesions caused by snuff there were no statistical differences in prevalence in plaque and gingivitis between snuff users and non-users. However, some cases showed loss of periodontal attachment as gingival recessions.

  • 376. Rolandsson, Margot
    et al.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Changes in tobacco habits: A prospective longitudinal study of tobacco habits among boys who play ice hockey.2003In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 175-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the investigation was to follow up tobacco habits and actual sporting activities among the boys who participated in an earlier study by the authors, and to examine whether knowledge of the harmful effects of tobacco and tobacco behaviour patterns and/or the choice of tobacco had changed amongst the participants. The study was conducted 3 years after the original study. Data were collected using a questionnaire. Of the 183 boys in the age group 15-22 years who participated in the study, 26.8% were tobacco users: 19.7% only snuff users, 6.0% both snuff users and smokers and 1.1% smokers. Compared with the original study, a further 16.4% of the boys had started to use tobacco. The use of tobacco increased in all age groups except amongst 19-year-olds where tobacco use was unchanged. The age group 17-22 years included boys who were both snuff users and smokers. An increase in tobacco use between the ages of 17 and 19 years could be shown compared with the original study, for equivalent age groups. Among the 132 boys who still played ice hockey, 25.8% were tobacco users: 18.2% only snuff users, 6.1% both snuff users and smokers and 1.5% smokers. A statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) could be shown between boys who used snuff and non-users depending on whether the boys participated in another sport besides ice hockey. Snuff usage was thus not as widespread among boys who participated in other sporting activities. The increase in tobacco use amongst the boys in the study showed that the various preventive initiatives which society so far has offered have been inadequate. Hence, the preventive measures need to be evaluated and developed to prevent tobacco habits from becoming established. The results of this and previous studies show that the environment in which ice hockey is practiced can, in itself, constitute a risk for tobacco usage becoming established among ice-hockey-playing adolescents.

  • 377. Rosa, V.L.M
    et al.
    Yasuda, M Y
    Guimares, A
    Magnusson, C
    Magnusson, T
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Correlation between macroscopic findings and CT images in human temporomandibular joints.2010In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 38, p. 14-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 378.
    Roshandel, Zahra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Legitimerad tandvårdspersonals uppfattning och erfarenhet kring kariesriskbedömning- En intervjustudie2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 379. Rödström, P O
    et al.
    Jontell, M
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Berggren, U
    Lindstedt, G
    Erosive oral lichen planus and salivary cortisol.2001In: Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine, ISSN 0904-2512, E-ISSN 1600-0714, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 257-263Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 380.
    Rönnlöf, Jessica
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Vettebring, Alva
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Halitosis och livskvalitet: - en allmän litteraturstudie2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

     

    Background: In order for halitosis to be taken more seriously and for the affected individuals to receive the right kind of support, it is important to identify and pay attention to halitosis's possible effects on the quality of life. Aim:The aim of the study was to identify and compile knowledge about halitosis possible impact on perceived quality of life particulary regarding oral health related quality of life, social anxiety and social relationships. Method: The study was a general literature study where systematic and manual searches, in three different databases, were used to find articles. The selection of articles where made in three steps. Results: The study results is based on 17 scientific original articles. The articles mutually show a negative correlation between halitosis and oral health-related quality of life, halitosis and social anxiety or halitosis and social relationships. Conclusion:By affecting an individual's self- esteem, halitosis can lead to psychological distress in terms of social anxiety, impaired social relationships and impaired oral health related quality of life, which can affect the general quality of life. It is therefore at the utmost importance that dental professionals take oral health into account from a broader perspective where halitosis can be noted.

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    Halitosis och livskvalitet
  • 381.
    Safi, Morid Ahmad
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Nasrallah, Rowaid
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Knowledge and attitude of oral health among caregivers in nursing homes for elderly in Ga-Rankuwa, South Africa.: A Cross-sectional study2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Elderly today have an increased life expectancy and retaining their teeth longer than before, it is important that healthcare-professionals have knowledge about oral health and how to prevent oral diseases. Objective: To study knowledge and attitude of oral health among caregivers at nursing homes in Ga-Rankuwa, Pretoria, South Africa. Method: The study was a quantitative cross-sectional study. Data was collected by a questionnaire representing four dimensions; Internal Locus of Control, External Locus of Control, Self-Efficacy and Oral Health Care Beliefs (OHCB), consisting questions about oral health and oral hygiene. The population consisted of 130 caregivers. Result: A total of 50 out of 61 caregivers participated in the study, out of which 43 were females and 7 were males. The age-interval was between 20-75 years. Generally, no statistical significant differences in knowledge and attitudes between the two nursing homes and between the caregivers´ professional statuses was noticed. T-test showed a statistical significant difference (P=0.011) between the caregivers for OHCB-dimension, and (P=0.044) between nursing home “A” and “B” for OHCB dimension. Conclusion: The general level of knowledge and attitude among the caregivers was satisfactory but low. Monitored health intervention studies should be given to promote oral health care knowledge and beliefs. 

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  • 382. Samuelsson, Niclas
    Astma ökar risken för hål i tänderna2021In: Allergia, no 4, p. 32-32Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Ingress: 

    Studier visar att det finns ett samband mellan astma och problem med tänderna. Orsakerna till detta är flera och mer forskning i ämnet behövs.

    Personer med astma har ökad risk att utveckla karies i såväl mjölktänderna som i de permanenta tänderna. Det går dock inte att säga att det är astman i sig som orsakar karies, utan det kan ha att göra med flera olika faktorer, säger Malin Stensson, tandhygienist och universitetslektor vid Hälsohögskolan i Jönköping.

  • 383.
    Sara, Vali
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Sandra, Sallander
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Oral hälsa hos barn med akut lymfatisk leukemi (ALL): -En litteraturöversikt2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 384.
    Sayardoust, Shariel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Department of Periodontology, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Omar, Omar
    Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Norderyd, Ola
    Department of Periodontology, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Thomsen, Peter
    Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Implant-associated gene expression in the jaw bone of smokers and nonsmokers: A human study using quantitative qPCR2018In: Clinical Oral Implants Research, ISSN 0905-7161, E-ISSN 1600-0501, Vol. 29, no 9, p. 937-953Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to compare the molecular events in implant-adherent cells and in peri-implant bone during the osseointegration of machined and oxidized titanium implants in smokers and nonsmokers.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-four smokers and 24 nonsmokers each received machined and anodically oxidized mini-implants. The mini-implants and the surrounding bone were retrieved after 1, 7, and 28 days, for gene expression analysis of selected factors using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR).

    RESULTS: Differences between machined and oxidized implants were more evident in the implant-adherent cells than the peri-implant bone. The machined implants revealed higher expression of proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin-8 (IL-8) (in nonsmokers), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (in nonsmokers and smokers), compared with the oxidized implants. Conversely, the expression of bone formation genes, alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin, was generally higher at the oxidized implants. In smokers, the temporal pattern revealed the delayed and initial inhibition of osteoblastic and osteoclastic gene expression, respectively, mainly at the machined implants. In contrast, oxidized implants revealed higher expression of bone remodeling, cathepsin K (CatK) and calcitonin receptor, and coupling, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin, genes after 7 day in smokers.

    CONCLUSIONS: The implant-adherent cells are more sensitive to surface properties and smoking conditions than the cells in the peri-implant bone. Smoking imposes inhibitory effects on the initial molecular events of osseointegration in the human bone-implant interface. The surface properties of oxidized implants appear to have a beneficial effect on osseointegration by mitigating the smoking-induced negative effects.

  • 385.
    Scheerman, Janneke F M
    et al.
    Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), Department of Preventive Dentistry, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    van Meijel, Berno
    Inholland University of Applied Sciences, Department of Health, Sports and Welfare/Cluster Nursing, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    van Empelen, Pepijn
    Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), Department of Child Health, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Kramer, Gem J C
    Academic Centre of Dentistry Amsterdam, Department of Orthodontics, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Verrips, Gijsbert H W
    Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), Department of Child Health, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Department of Social Determinants of Health, Research Centre (SHD), Qazvin, Iran.
    Van den Braak, Matheus C T
    Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), Department of Preventive Dentistry, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    van Loveren, Cor
    Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), Department of Preventive Dentistry, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Study protocol of a randomized controlled trial to test the effect of a smartphone application on oral-health behavior and oral hygiene in adolescents with fixed orthodontic appliances2018In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Adolescents with fixed orthodontic appliances are at high risk of developing dental caries. To date, new smartphone technologies have seldom been used to support them in the preventive behavior that can help prevent dental caries. After an intervention-mapping process, we developed a smartphone application (the WhiteTeeth app) for preventing dental caries through improved oral-health behavior and oral hygiene. The app, which is intended to be used at home, will help adolescents with fixed orthodontic appliances perform their oral self-care behavior. The app is based on the Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) theory, and incorporates several behavior-change techniques that target the psychosocial factors of oral-health behavior. This article describes the protocol of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the effects of the WhiteTeeth app on oral-health behavior and oral-hygiene outcomes (presence of dental plaque and gingival bleeding) compared with those of care as usual, in patients aged 12-16 with fixed orthodontic appliances.

    METHODS/DESIGN: The RCT has two conditions: an experimental group that will receive the WhiteTeeth app in addition to care as usual, and a control group that will only receive care as usual. Care as usual will include routine oral-health education and instruction at orthodontic check-ups. In the western part of the Netherlands 146 participants will be recruited from four orthodontic clinics. Data will be collected during three orthodontic check-ups: baseline (T0), 6 weeks of follow-up (T1) and 12 weeks of follow-up (T2). The primary study outcomes are the presence of dental plaque (measured with a modified Silness and Loë Plaque Index); and gingival bleeding (measured with the Bleeding on Marginal Probing Index). Secondary outcomes include changes in self-reported oral-health behaviors and its psychosocial factors identified by the HAPA theory, such as outcome expectancies, intention, action self-efficacy, coping planning and action control.

    DISCUSSION: Since the intervention was designed to target psychosocial factors in the motivational and volitional components of the behavior-change process, we hypothesize that the app will cause greater improvements in oral-health behavior and oral hygiene more than traditional oral-health-promotion programs (i.e., care as usual).

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial has been registered with the Dutch Trial Register ( NTR6206 : 20 February 2017).

  • 386.
    Scheerman, Janneke Francisca Maria
    et al.
    Department Oral Hygiene, Inholland University of Applied Sciences, Cluster Health, Sport and Welfare, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Hamilton, Kyra
    School of Applied Psychology, Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia.
    Sharif, Mohammad Owaise
    Eastman Dental Institute, University College London, London, England.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    A theory-based intervention delivered by an online social media platform to promote oral health among Iranian adolescents: a cluster randomized controlled trial2020In: Psychology and Health, ISSN 0887-0446, E-ISSN 1476-8321, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 449-466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Based on the Health Action Process Approach, we tested the efficacy of a theory-based program using an online social media platform (Telegram) to promote good oral hygiene behaviour among Iranian adolescents.

    Design: A three-arm randomized-controlled trial design was used, consisting of an adolescent only intervention group (A group; n = 253), an adolescent and mother intervention group (A + M group; n = 260), and a control group (n = 278).

    Main outcome measures: Psychosocial variables, toothbrushing behaviour, Visual Plaque Index, and Community Periodontal Index.

    Results: Increases in adolescent toothbrushing at the one- and six-month follow-ups in both intervention groups compared to the control group were observed. Adolescents in the A + M group showed significant greater improvements in their toothbrushing behaviour, Visual Plaque Index, and Community Periodontal Index scores than adolescents in the A group. Improvements to toothbrushing social cognitions were also observed.

    Conclusions: Current results support the use of the theory-based program delivered by Telegram in improving good oral hygiene behaviour and oral health outcomes among Iranian adolescents. Involving mothers in an intervention can confer additional benefits for adolescent oral health.

  • 387.
    Schütz-Fransson, Ulrike
    et al.
    Orthodontic Clinic, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Bjerklin, Krister
    The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lindsten, Rune
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Long-term follow-up of orthodontically treated deep bite patients2006In: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 503-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term stability of corrected deep bite and mandibular anterior crowding in a sample of 62 subjects (30 patients and 32 controls). The patients began treatment at a mean age of 12.2 years (SD 1.56). The treatment consisted of non-extraction and fixed appliances in 23 subjects and functional appliances in seven. The treatment group was compared with the control group with normal molar occlusion, normal overjet and overbite, no crowding, and without an orthodontic treatment need. The registrations were made on four occasions: before treatment (T1), after treatment (T2), and at two long-term follow-ups (T3 and T4). Four registrations were also made in the control group. All measurements were undertaken on plaster models and lateral cephalograms. Treatment was found to have normalized the overbite and overjet and to have eliminated the space deficiency in the mandibular anterior region. At T4, there was a minor relapse in overbite in the treatment group (mean 0.8 mm). In the control group, the overbite underwent reverse development (bite opening by 0.7 mm) during the same period. The available mandibular incisor space, however, was -0.9 mm in the treatment group and -1.8 mm in the control group. The long-term stability of the treatment results was thus good.

  • 388.
    Shmarina, Elena
    et al.
    Department of Oral Diagnostics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden; Kalmar County Council, Public Dental Service, Oskarshamn, Sweden.
    Stensson, Malin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Odontology and Oral Health Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Jacobsson, Brittmarie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Oral health literacy among migrant mothers in Sweden: A qualitative study2023In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    This interview study explored the oral health literacy of migrant mothers in Sweden, with special reference to where and why they access information about oral health and how they determine the credibility of such information.

    Material and method

    In-depth interviews were conducted with seven migrant mothers of children up to 10 years old. The mothers had entered Sweden from 2015 onwards and had been resettled in Kalmar County, Sweden. Their native language was Somalian, Dari or Arabic. The interview questions concerned the participants’ experiences of seeking oral health information, as well as oral health in general and dental health services. The interviews were analysed by qualitative content analysis.

    Findings

    The main findings indicate that migrant mothers used information sourcing as a pathway to solve oral health literacy tasks. Three main categories were identified, each with subcategories, describing the migrant mothers’ experiences of accessing and evaluating oral health information: ‘accessible source of information’, ‘needs-related purpose of seeking information’ and ‘trustworthiness assessment’. The migrant mothers reported that in case of a dental emergency or general queries, they sought oral health information from professionals and social sources. Moreover, they perceived oral health information to be most reliable when it was provided by dental professionals, was a recurring theme, or constituted majority opinion.

    Conclusion

    To improve oral health literacy in migrant mothers of young children, it is important not only to provide consistent and recurrent oral health information through accessible information channels, but also to adapt dental care to be more culturally appropriate.

  • 389.
    Simic, Angelica
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Sameforoghi, Mojgan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Fissurförsegling som preventionsmetod mot karies hos barn2020Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Karies är en multifaktoriell sjukdom där flera faktorer spelar in för att det ska bildas karies. Kariesförekomst är ett hälsoproblem hos barn och ungdomar speciellt hos barn i förskoleåldern.En av behandlingarna för att förebygga karies i tidig ålder är fissurförseglingar på första permanenta molarerna, detta ska helst utföras så snart det är möjligt när tänderna är helt erupterade. Denna metod utförs främst på barn med risk för karies, tidigare karieserfarenhet och lagningar och om tanden har mycket djupa fissurer. Karies i molarernas fissursystem är en vanlig behandling inom barn- och ungdomstandvården.

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  • 390.
    Sjöberg, Linn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Edberg, Jonna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Dental caries prevalence among 3- and 5-year old children in Da Nang, Vietnam2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Da Nang city is located in the central of Vietnam and is a developing country in Asia. Previous studies have shown high dental caries prevalence among young children in Vietnam. Dental caries is a chronic disease that can cause pain and discomfort for individuals suffering from the disease. In 2008 intervention program was made at Hoa Huong Dong Pre-school, in Da Nang. The intervention was made to promote better dental health in children at the school, after study results showed that almost all children had at least one dental caries lesion. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of dental caries among pre-school children in Da Nang, Vietnam. Method: The study was a cross-sectional cohort study with clinical dental examination, among 143 children aged 3 and 5 at Hoa Huong Dong Pre-school in Da Nang. Result: Results showed that 96.5 % of all participating children suffered from at least one initial and, or manifest dental carious lesion. Conclusion: The results of the study indicate that dental caries prevalence among 3- and 5-year old children is high. Further prevention programs and more studies to promote better dental health for young children in Da Nang are needed.

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  • 391.
    Sköld, Ulla M.
    et al.
    Department of Cariology, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Birkhed, Dowen
    Former: Department of Cariology, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Xu, Jian-Zhi
    Pediatric Dentistry, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
    Lien, Kai-Hua
    Pediatric Dentistry, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
    Stensson, Malin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Odontology and Oral Health Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Liu, Jeng-Fen
    Pediatric Dentistry, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan; School of Dentistry, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Risk factors for and prevention of caries and dental erosion in children and adolescents with asthma2022In: Journal of Dental Sciences, ISSN 1991-7902, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 1387-1400Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are many studies and reviews of the relationship between the asthma disease in young individuals on the one hand and caries and dental erosion on the other. The causes of caries and dental erosion might be related to the asthmatic drugs, low pH and the sweeteners that the inhaled drug contains and perhaps even the lifestyle of children and adolescents with asthma. The main focus of this review is therefore to describe various preventive strategies, based on long experience of preventive dental care in Sweden. Two fact boxes are presented, one on fluoride toothpaste as a population-based intervention for different ages and one on diet counselling in children and adolescents with asthma. The most important thing is to introduce fluoride toothpaste early in the child's life and that the parents brush the child's teeth twice a day, in the morning after breakfast and at night before bedtime, up to the age of 10. Moreover, a high-risk approach with an additional fluoride supply at home is presented, together with the application of fluoride varnish at the clinic. Regarding diet counselling, it is important to make sure that the child has regular meals during the day, maximum five to six times a day, to allow the teeth to rest between meals and restrict sweets and soft drinks to once a week. It is important to identify children and adolescents with asthma as early as possible and to refer them to a dental team for preventive treatment.

  • 392.
    Slåtterlid Skeie, Marit
    et al.
    Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry.
    Wendt, Lill-Kari
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Poulsen, Sven
    Department of Pediatric Dentristy .
    Dental caries in children and adolescents2009In: Pediatric Dentistry: A Clinical Approach / [ed] Göran Koch, Sven Poulsen, Oxford, England: Blackwell , 2009, 2, p. 61-70Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 393.
    Snögren, Maria
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Eriksson, Irene
    School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Stensson, Malin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Odontology and Oral Health Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Ek, Kristina
    School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Browall, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Psychometric evaluation of a short-form version of the Swedish "Attitudes to and Knowledge of Oral Health" questionnaire2022In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 22, article id 513Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Healthcare professionals' attitudes to and knowledge of oral health are fundamental to providing good oral health care to older adults. One instrument that assesses healthcare professionals' attitudes to and knowledge of oral health in a Swedish context is the "Attitudes to and Knowledge of Oral health" (AKO) questionnaire. Two of the three item-groups of the AKO have previously been validated in a Swedish context. However, it is crucial that all three item-groups are validated, and beneficial to design a shorter, easy-to-use questionnaire for healthcare professionals while maintaining adequate integrity of its reliability and validity. Therefore, the present study aims to develop a short-form version of AKO and to secure its psychometric properties.

    METHODS: Psychometric evaluation with Classical Test Theory and Item Response Theory to validate and shorten AKO with 611 healthcare professionals from a population of 1159 working in a municipality in an urban area in western Sweden.

    RESULTS: Of the original 16 items in the AKO, 13 were shown to warrant retention in the abbreviated/shortened form. These showed acceptable validity and reliability for assessing healthcare professionals' attitudes to and knowledge of oral health.

    CONCLUSION: This validated short-form version of AKO shows acceptable validity and reliability after being reduced to 13 items, structured in a 3-part scale. The items are consistent with the total scale, indicating that the internal consistency is acceptable. Future studies should be performed to evaluate AKO in other groups of healthcare professionals, across cultures, languages, and so on, to investigate its use and strengthen its validity and reliability.

  • 394. Sondell, Katarin
    et al.
    Söderfeldt, Björn
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Dental care utilization in a Swedish county in 1993 and 20032010In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 217-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 395.
    Stange, Karolina Mikkelä
    et al.
    Department of Orthodontics, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jonkoping, Sweden .
    Lindsten, Rune
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Department of Orthodontics, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Bjerklin, Krister
    Department of Orthodontics, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Autotransplantation of premolars to the maxillary incisor region: A long-term follow-up of 12-22 years2016In: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 508-515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the long-term outcome of treatment of missing maxillary incisor teeth by transplantation of premolars, with special reference to aesthetics and patient satisfaction.

    Subjects and Methods: Twenty subjects who had undergone transplantation of premolars to the maxillary incisor area were recalled for follow-up varying between 12 and 22 years post-surgery. Twelve subjects presented for examination, including radiography and three subjects participated only by answering questions. Three reference groups-general practitioners, orthodontists, and lay people-evaluated the aesthetic results from photographs. Patient satisfaction was evaluated by interviews and OHIP-14.

    Results: The mean age at transplantation was 12.3 years: 1 subject had been 20 years old and 11 were in the range of 9-14 years. Twelve to 22 years after autotransplantation, 5 subjects could not be reached: of the 15 who could be contacted, the survival rate was 15 out of 15. In the 12 subjects who presented for clinical examination, 11 out of the 12 transplants were assessed as successful. Nine transplants were restored with crowns and five had been recontoured with composite build-ups. In one patient, no restorative treatment had been undertaken. The subjects were satisfied with the aesthetic result.

    Conclusion: Autotransplantation of premolars is an appropriate method for treatment of missing maxillary anterior teeth. Subjects with a transplanted tooth to the maxillary anterior region perceive their oral health as good long term.

  • 396.
    Starö, Rebecca
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Svensson, Cornelia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Rutiner kring munhygien vid behandling med fast apparatur: En enkätstudie bland tandvårdspersonal på ortodontikliniker2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Orthodontic treatment is usually performed on adolescents and increase risks for the oral health. Studies have shown that patients with fixed appliances more likely develop gingival enlargement and caries. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the dental pro-fessional’s routines including oral hygiene in patients with fixed appliances on orthodontic clin-ics. Method: The study was a quantitative cross-sectional study with questionnaire regarding 11 questions. The questionnaire was sent to four orthodontic clinics in four counties in southern Sweden and contained questions regarding oral hygiene routines and dental hygienists. Alto-gether 59 individuals were asked to participate. Results: The questionnaire was answered by 38 individuals. The result showed that the majority gave oral hygiene instructions at insertion of fixed appliances and when oral hygiene was poor. All participants practice oral hygiene in-structions on patients and almost everyone had conversations and follow-up visits. The majority of clinics didn´t have dental hygienists employed. Of all participants 29% (n=11) thought it would be good to have dental hygienists employed and 45% (n=17) saw need of contact. Conclusion: No major differences between professions and clinics were shown regarding oral hy-giene routines and performance. Almost half of the participants saw need of contact with dental hygienists.

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  • 397.
    Stenebrand, Agneta
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Dental anxiety among 15-year-olds: Psychosocial factors and oral health2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The overall aim of this thesis was to examine the associations between dental anxiety, experiences of dental care, psychosocial factors and oral health among 15-year-olds, and to analyse changes in the prevalence of dental anxiety over time.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: The thesis was based on two cross-sectional epidemiological studies in Jönköping, Sweden. Papers I, II, and III were based on a random sample of 15-year-old individuals. The total sample consisted of 221 individuals. Six questionnaires were used, one included items of background data, while the others were psychometric instruments measuring dental anxiety, temperament, general anxiety and depression, general fearfulness and attitudes to dental care. Paper IV was based on the Jönköping studies, a series of epidemiological studies from 1973, 1983, 1993, and 2003 in which random samples of 15-year-old individuals were included. The total sample consisted of 405 individuals. Questionnaires including background data and dental anxiety were used and clinical data were collected.

    RESULTS: Of the 15-year-old individuals 6.5% were classified as dentally anxious with girls proportionally more fearful than boys (Papers I-III). Dental anxiety correlated significantly with three of the temperament dimensions; emotionality, activity and impulsivity. Reported pain or unpleasant experiences during dental care treatment were clear predictors concerning dental anxiety (Paper I). Both symptoms of general anxiety and depression were significantly correlated with dental anxiety after controlling for other potential risk factors (Paper II). Dental anxiety was associated with both general fearfulness and with attitudes to dental care, where the strongest predictor of dental anxiety was general fearfulness (Paper III). A trend analysis over the 30-year period showed a gradient of statistically significantly decreasing dental anxiety prevalence, from 38.1% in 1973 to 12.8% in 2003. Over the period the 15-year-old individuals with dental anxiety had significantly higher number of filled tooth-surfaces than those with no dental anxiety, and also more caries in 1973. There were no such differences concerning plaque and gingivitis (Paper IV).

    CONCLUSIONS: Dental anxiety in 15-year-olds correlated with experiences of dental care, psychosocial factors as well as to oral health. Specifically, pain experiences related to dental care, attitudes to dental care and general fearfulness seem to have the strongest impact on dental anxiety. Dental anxiety showed a clear declining change over time. More girls than boys reported dental anxiety. The thesis shows that dental care providers need paying attention on providing a supportive dental care situation, in which the patients should not experience pain. One part may be adequate local anaesthesia during operative dentistry or similar dental treatments. Another part may be a good oral health to prevent negative experiences of dental care. There is a need for the understanding of psychological factors associated with dental care procedures.

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  • 398.
    Stenebrand, Agneta
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Tandvårdsrädsla och temperament hos 15-åringar2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 399.
    Stenebrand, Agneta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Odontologiska Institutionen, Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Dental anxiety and temperament in 15-year olds2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Dental anxiety has a major impact on oral health and general quality of life. Previously, some studies have shown an association between dental anxiety and temperament among children and adults. However, there is a lack of cohort studies which have investigated a possible relationship in adolescents. The aim of the present study was to analyse the prevalence of dental anxiety and its association with temperament (EASI - emotionality, activity, sociability, impulsivity), sociodemographic factors and previous painful and unpleasant experiences of dental care among 15-year old individuals.

    Methods: The sample included 263 randomly selected 15-year old individuals living in the municipality of Jönköping, Sweden. The school, parental and adolescent consent was acquired. Because no sensitive nor clinical procedures were performed on the 15-year olds, no ethic approval was necessary. Three self-reported questionnaires were used, one included items of sociodemography, while the others dealt with dental anxiety assessed by the Dental Fear Survey (DFS) and temperament assessed by an adapted version of “The EAS Temperament Survey for Children” now composed of 25 items, which has been modified for adults, the EASI temperament survey. SPSS 16.0 was used for statistical analysis with T-test, Mann-Whitney U-test, Chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, Pearson correlation and Hierarchical multiple regression.

    Results: The results showed that 6.5 % of the adolescents were classified as dentally anxious and with girls proportionally more fearful than boys. The three temperaments activity, impulsivity and emotionality were significantly correlated with dental anxiety. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis showed that pain at the last dental appointment or previous pain experiences during dental care treatment were the strongest predictors regarding dental anxiety in 15-year olds. The temperament dimensions activity and impulsivity had also statistically significant correlations to dental anxiety in this regression analysis.

    Conclusions: Although some of the temperament dimensions are correlated with dental anxiety, this study showed that previous pain experiences during dental care treatment is a strong predictor for high dental anxiety in 15-year olds.

  • 400.
    Stenebrand, Agneta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Odontologiska institutionen, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    TANDVÅRDSRÄDSLA OCH TEMPERAMENT HOS 15-ÅRINGAR2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syfte: Syftet med föreliggande studie var att bland 15-åringar undersöka prevalens av tandvårdsrädsla och dess samband med temperament (EASI), bakgrundsfaktorer samt tidigare smärtsamma erfarenheter i tandvårdssituationen.

     

    Metod: Urvalet bestod av 263 slumpmässigt utvalda 15-åringar boende i Jönköpings kommun. Tre självrapporterande frågeformulär användes varav ett gällande bakgrundsfaktorer. Grad av tandvårdsrädsla mättes med Dental Fear Survey (DFS) medan temperament mättes med hjälp av en bearbetad version av ”The EAS Temperament Survey for Children”, nu bestående av 25 delfrågor, vilken blivit modifierad för vuxna, EASI temperament survey.

     

    Statistiska analyser: Data analyserades med SPSS 16,0 gällande frekvenser, medelvärden,  standardavvikelser, medianer, samband samt skillnader.

     

    Resultat: Resultatet visade att 6,5 % av ungdomarna klassificerades som tandvårdsrädda med en övervägande andel flickor. De tre temperamenten aktivitet, impulsivitet och emotionalitet var signifikant korrelerade till tandvårdsrädsla. En hierarkisk multipel regression visade emellertid att smärta vid senaste tandläkarbesöket samt om det under uppväxten förekommit smärtsamma eller obehagliga tandbehandlingar var de tydligaste prediktorerna avseende tandvårdsrädsla hos 15-åriga ungdomar. Även dimensionerna aktivitet och impulsivitet i temperament korrelerade signifikant till tandvårdsrädsla i denna regressionsanalys.

     

    Slutsats: Fastän några av dimensionerna i temperament korrelerar med tandvårdsrädsla, visade denna studie, att tidigare smärtsamma erfarenheter i tandvårdssituationen är en stark prediktor gällande hög nivå av tandvårdsrädsla bland 15-åringar.

     

     

    Studien har inte genomförts med stöd eller forskningsanslag.

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