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  • 301.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Melander, Anders
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    The dynamics of path dependence on the organizational and the industry level: MoDo and the Swedish pulp and paper industry 1872-19902010Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 302.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Melander, Anders
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Blombäck, Anna
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Imprints and self-reinforcement: The case of corporate value statements2011Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 303.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, EMM (Entrepreneurskap, Marknadsföring, Management). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi.
    Melin, Leif
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, EMM (Entrepreneurskap, Marknadsföring, Management). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Continuity in Change: Path Dependence and Transformation in Two Swedish Multinationals2009Ingår i: The Hidden Dynamics of Path Dependence: Institutions and Organizations / [ed] Georg Screyögg & Jörg Sydow, Houndmills: Palgrave , 2009, 1, s. 94-109Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 304.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, EMM (Entrepreneurskap, Marknadsföring, Management).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, EMM (Entrepreneurskap, Marknadsföring, Management).
    Board Composition and Strategic Change: Some Findings from Family Firms and Venture Capital Backed Firms2001Ingår i: Corporate Governance in SMEs / [ed] Morten Huse, Hans Landström, Halmstad: Scandinavian Institute for Research in Entrepreneurship (SIRE) , 2001, s. 45-68Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 305.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, EMM (Entreprenörskap, Marknadsföring, Management). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, EMM (Entreprenörskap, Marknadsföring, Management). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Ownership Structure, Board Composition and Entrepreneurship: Evidence from Family Firms and Venture-Capital Backed Firms2004Ingår i: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research, ISSN 1355-2554, E-ISSN 1758-6534, Vol. 10, nr 1/2, s. 85-105Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to investigate how ownership structure, especially family and/or venture-capital involvement, as well as entrepreneurial activities, defined as strategic change and renewal, help explain the involvement of independent members on boards of directors. The CEOs of 2,455 small and medium-sized, private enterprises from practically all industries were contacted in a telephone survey, resulting in an exceptionally high response rate. The findings reveal that family firms are more reluctant to involve independent directors on their boards than non-family firms that presence of venture capitalists increases the frequency of independent board members and that ownership has an impact on board roles. The results do not support the hypothesised relationship that independent directors enhance entrepreneurial activities. One implication of our study is that the often-argued-for strategic contribution of outsiders to the boards in family firms may be overemphasised. Another implication is that family firms that choose to acquire additional capital should be aware that this could result in a change in the board composition and the loss of control of the business. However, new and external owners’ inclusion on the board seems to be negotiable since there are also venture capitalists that do not insist on board representation.

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  • 306.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, EMM (Entreprenörskap, Marknadsföring, Management). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, EMM (Entreprenörskap, Marknadsföring, Management). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Wiklund, Johan
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, EMM (Entreprenörskap, Marknadsföring, Management).
    Corporate governance and strategic change in SMEs: The effect of ownership, board composition and top management teams2007Ingår i: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 29, nr 3, s. 295-308Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper investigates how governance mechanisms affect the ability off small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to introduce strategic change. Previous research typically assumes that governance mechanisms operate independently of each other. Building on agency theory and insights from the literature on small firm governance, we hypothesize that governance variables related to ownership, the board of directors and the top management team all affect strategic change and that it is important to examine the interaction effects of these governance mechanisms. Using a longitudinal sample of over 800 SMEs, our general logic and hypotheses are supported by the analyses. We find that closely held firms exhibit less strategic change than do SMEs relying on more widespread ownership structures. However, to some extent, closely held firms can overcome these weaknesses and achieve strategic change by utilizing outside directors on the board and/or extending the size of the top management teams. Implications for theory and management practice are discussed.

  • 307.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Swedish School of Textiles, Borås.
    Wramsby, Gunnar
    Swedish School of Textiles, Borås.
    Avoiding to get stuck in a successful business model.: Business Model Adaptation at a high technology textile company2013Ingår i: RENT XXVII. Research in Entrepreneurship and Small Business: Entrepreneurship, Institutions and Competitiveness, European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management (EIASM) , 2013, s. 36-Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM

     

    The development of successful business models has become recognized as an important element of entrepreneurial processes (George & Bock, 2011). Business models are depicted as loci of innovation shaping the mechanisms that derive value from business opportunities (Amit & Zott, 2001; Chesbrough & Rosenbloom, 2002). Yet, a major challenge even for entrepreneurial firms with successful business models is to avoid getting stuck in their business model in situations where environmental changes call for business model alignment or where an established business model might be an obstacle to pursuing new opportunities. While firms need to adapt and change their business models, we know that organizations tend to get stuck in their early strategies and structures (Hannan & Freeman, 1977) and that firms may get locked into previously successful paths (Sydow; Schreyögg & Koch, 2009). Hence, Johnson et al. (1996) propose that new business models are most likely to emerge with new organizations. The present paper aims at exploring how innovative firms can avoid getting stuck in their business models. As a theoretical lens we are going to use the literature on path dependence that allows analyzing why firms get locked-in on specific patterns, but also how such lock-ins can be avoided. 

     

    CONTRIBUTION

     

    Being a buzzword during the time of the dot.com bubble (Magretta 2002), the ‘business model’ concept has become widely used among practitioners and in normatively oriented publications (Casadesus-Masanell & Ricart 2011; Johnson et al. 2008; Magretta 2002). So far, research on business models suffers from a lack of consensus as to what business models actually refer to (Morris et al. 2005), leading to a fragmented body of knowledge (George & Bock 2011) that is sometimes characterized by conceptual obscurity (Hedman & Kalling 2003).

     

    There have been attempts to bring more clarity and coherence to the use of the business model concept, most notably George & Bock’s (2011) recent article where they both review the existing business model literature and make an attempt to investigate how practitioners actually use the concept. Their literature review identifies six major themes, focusing on product and service design, the deployment of resources, narrative accounts of business models, innovation frameworks, transaction structures, and the enactment of opportunities. The findings relating to practitioners’ business model conceptions are no less diverse, yet they identify an emphasis on the pursuit of opportunities. George & Bock (2011), warn that if the business model concept comprises too many aspects, it may be difficult to distinguish business models from other management concepts such as strategy. Their solution is to propose a business model definition related to the enactment of opportunities. On the other hand, a primarily opportunity-based definition leads to the question, if such phenomena are not yet sufficiently addressed in classical conceptions of entrepreneurship (e.g. Stevenson 1995). Morris, Schindehutte & Allen (2005), thus choose to emphasize the logic of profit generation in their conception of business models. While the enactment of a business opportunity is important for any business model, it is only the inclusion of the profit generation logic that clearly distinguishes the business model from other concepts.    

     

    It is undisputed that in a changing environment. Business models have to be changed or even replaced in order to sustain the success of the firm in the long run (Brunninge & Achtenhagen 2011, Doz & Kosonen 2009; Johnson, Christensen & Kagerman 1996). Still, we have rather little knowledge relating to the question how such dynamic adaptation of business models is created in practice. Johnson et al. (1996) distinguish between reactive and opportunity driven business model changes. In general, they see severe obstacles to change in established organizations. Hence, they have relatively little to say about how business model change can be accomplished in established firms. Their description of inertia comes close to the phenomenon of organizational path dependence (Sydow, et al. 2009). The literature on path dependence goes back to the work of (Arthur 1989; David 1985) departing from the assumption that increasing returns, i.e. a positive feedback process that eventually results in a lock-in where changes of the selected solution become hard, if not impossible, to bring about (Sydow, Schreyögg & Koch 2009). It is thus essentially initial success that leads to inertia, making an effective business model a potential trap preventing future change. A key element of path dependent processes is a narrowing down of options that result from the increasing returns generated by a specific solution.

     

    Method

     

    As indicated initially, our emphasis in this paper lies on the change of business models. Despite some contributions on this issue (Brunninge & Achtenhagen 2011, Doz & Kosonen 2009; Johnson, Christensen & Kagerman 1996), surprisingly little has yet been done to understand what makes business models changeable and how business model change can be accomplished. In order help filling this gap we have conducted a longitudinal single case study of an entrepreneurial firm. Case studies are particularly suited for research on change processes, as they capture longitudinal developments in context (Pettigrew 1990, 1997). As they allow for empirically-based exploration, they are particularly suited for relatively novel research topics (Eisenhardt 1989) such as business models.

     

    Our case company Oxeon, was founded in 2003 by a team of three entrepreneurs and is based in Borås/Sweden. It has so far been focusing on developing, producing and marketing a specific type of carbon-fiber based composite textiles. Two members of the entrepreneurial team were students to one of the authors of this paper, who has been able to follow the development of Oxeon since the time before the company’s formal start-up. Over time, the entrepreneurs have documented the development of their firm and in particular its business model. We have had access to this written documentation. In addition we conducted semi-structured interviews with all three entrepreneurs. Based on the data, we constructed a case study covering the development of the firm over a period of 10 years.

     

    Results & Implications

     

    Our paper provides in-depth insight into the development process of an entrepreneurial firm’s business model. The Oxeon case reveals that any change in a business model enables and constrains the pursuit of future business opportunities. Choices entrepreneurs are making along the way result in the business model taking shape. While choices, such as Oxeon’s opting for carbon fibre created opportunities, but at the same time it also implied that potential opportunities associated with other materials were foregone. What is interesting about Oxeon’s choice however, is that the choice of carbon fibre left relatively many application opportunities open as opposed to the alternative options the company had. Likewise, choices to engage in raw material manufacturing, machine production as well as the combination of producing carbon fibre as well as licensing the process to customers avoided the typical narrowing down of options that tends to be typical of path dependent processes. In relatively short time, Oxeon pursued various business opportunities in manufacturing, machine development and raw material manufacturing. Likewise different revenue generating mechanisms, i.e. sales and licensing were applied simultaneously. The entrepreneurs themselves emphasize that that they consciously strive for leaving many options for the future development of their business model open. They just consciously seek to avoid the risk of lock-in to a path dependent development.

     

    While the path-dependence literature has recently been pointing at the fact that paths can actually be unlocked Ericson & Lundin (2013), the option of avoiding lock ins in the first place seems far more attractive to entrepreneurs that want to retain the strategic flexibility of being able to adapt and change their business model. Even though the Oxeon case does not mean that firms can retain an unlimited range of options for business model change, the conscious choice to pursue paths that allow for many future options creates a lot of possibilities for pursuing new business opportunities and for aligning the business model with environmental changes.

     

    Entrepreneurs who are aware of this, can adapt their business model in a way that always keeps a wide range of business opportunities open. So far the business model literature included few in-depth longitudinal studies exploring the dynamic adaptation of business model and the role of individual entrepreneurs in such processes. With our paper we show how the development of a business model evolves over time and how entrepreneurs can maintain a high flexibility in their business model by keeping options for a wide spectrum of future choices open.

  • 308.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Swedish School of Textiles, Borås.
    Wramsby, Gunnar
    Swedish School of Textiles, Borås.
    Avoiding to get stuck in a successful business model: Dynamic business model adaptation from a path dependence perspective2014Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 309.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Swedish School of Textiules, Borås.
    Wramsby, Gunnar
    Swedish School of Textiles, Borås.
    Continuous business model adaptation: The case of a high-growth Swedish textile company2012Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 310.
    Button, Kenneth J.
    et al.
    Schar School of Policy and Government, George Mason University, Arlington VA, USA.
    Eklund, Johan
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Nationalekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO). Department of Industrial Economics, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Are there inherent biases in applying cost–benefit analysis?2018Ingår i: Applied Economics Letters, ISSN 1350-4851, E-ISSN 1466-4291, Vol. 25, nr 7, s. 461-464Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article extends discussions of potential biases that can exist in applying cost–benefit analysis. While there is extensive evidence that capture can result in stakeholder manipulation of inputs, there are also claims that the analysis is inherently theoretically bias in favour of over acceptance. The article shows that, contrary to these latter claims, treating projects in isolation is unlikely to produce such bias; indeed, it is as likely as not to lead to suboptimally low acceptance rates. The reason for excessive acceptance of projects therefore is largely due to institutional capture of the analysis for either self-interest or natural human over-optimism.

  • 311.
    Bäckvall, Lisa
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    A Bourdieusian view of strategizing in the context of a family business2011Ingår i: Colloquium Program: Sub-theme 41: Strategizing as Wayfinding: A Process Perpective, 2011Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 312.
    Bäckvall, Lisa
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    A practice perspective of transgenerational entrepreneuring in the context of a family business2011Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 313.
    Bäckvall, Lisa
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Foreigner or Family?: Exploring succession through practice perspective within family business2012Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 314.
    Caccamo, Marta
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Leveraging innovation spaces to foster collaborative innovation2020Ingår i: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Companies increasingly seek to foster collaborative innovation through the design of innovation spaces such as incubators, accelerators, studios, and fab labs. Innovation spaces bring together multiple actors for collaborative practices to generate new products and processes. Despite their growing popularity, many innovation spaces fail to deliver on their promises and are subsequently shut down. How can innovation spaces foster effective collaborative innovation? This article illustrates the role of space and boundary objects to facilitate collaborative innovation. Based on illustrative examples from the context of business studios, the findings show that innovation spaces enable the four affordances of convergence, generativity, socialization, and collaborative learning. Managers who design and run innovation spaces need to leverage these affordances to propel collaborative innovation.

  • 315.
    Caccamo, Marta
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Pittino, Daniel
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Chirico, Francesco
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Tecnológico de Monterrey, EGADE Business School, San Pedro Garza García, Mexico.
    Family firm density and likelihood of failure: An ecological perspective2019Ingår i: The Palgrave handbook of heterogeneity among family firms / [ed] S. Memili & C. Dibrell, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, s. 821-846Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter aims at establishing a link between family business research and regional science. Drawing from the density dependence model from organizational ecology and embeddedness theory, we develop four testable propositions to inquire about the effect of the emergence of family firms’ agglomerations in the territory on firms’ survival.

    We theorize that increased family firm density reduces the likelihood of firm failure and this effect is (a) higher for family firms than for non-family firms, (b) lower in urban than in rural areas, and (c) higher in fine-grained variable environments than in stable environments. Contributions and future research implications are detailed in the concluding section.

  • 316.
    Campopiano, Giovanna
    et al.
    Witten/Herdecke University, Witten, Germany.
    De Massis, Alfredo
    Lancaster University Management School, Centre for Family Business, IEED, Lancaster, UK.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Firm Philanthropy in Small- and Medium-Sized Family Firms: The Effects of Family Involvement in Ownership and Management2014Ingår i: Family Business Review, ISSN 0894-4865, E-ISSN 1741-6248, Vol. 27, nr 3, s. 244-258Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on stewardship theory and arguments in relation to social and reputational capital, this study investigates how family involvement affects engagement in firm philanthropy in small- and medium-sized family firms. Specifically, we argue that family involvement in ownership positively influences firm philanthropy while its interaction with family involvement in management produces a negative effect. Based on a sample of 130 Italian family firms, our findings offer important implications for theory and practice and pave the way for future research in the field of philanthropy in the family firm context.

  • 317.
    Carlsson, Georg
    et al.
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Röös, Elin
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Stephan, Andreas
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Nationalekonomi.
    Tidåker, Pernilla
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Witthöft, Cornelia
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    ”Ät hälften så mycket kött och mer ärtor och bönor”2018Ingår i: Dagens Nyheter 2018-10-13, ISSN 1101-2447Artikel i tidskrift (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 318.
    Carnes, Christina
    et al.
    University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA.
    Hitt, Michael A.
    Texas A&M University and TCU, USA.
    Sirmon, David
    University of Washington, USA.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi.
    Wook Huh, Dong
    Frostburg State University, USA.
    The Contingent Effect of Synchronization on Leveraging Resources for Innovation2016Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Leveraging resources to exploit opportunities in external markets is at the heart of innovation. However, research suggests that leveraging resources is complicated and fraught with challenges. Building on work in resource orchestration by integrating behavioral logic relating to search behaviors and use of slack resources, we argue synchronization of internal activities enhances the innovation gains of a firm’s leveraging strategy (resource advantage, market opportunity, and entrepreneurial). We further suggest that this impact of synchronization on leveraging strategy and innovation is dependent on firms’ performance relative to social aspirations, elucidating boundary conditions of resource orchestration. Our findings offer theoretical and practical implications for understanding the influence of synchronization, leveraging strategies, and firm performance on innovation.

  • 319. Carnes, Christina M.
    et al.
    Hitt, Michael A.
    Huh, Dong Wook
    Chirico, Francesco
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Sirmon, David
    The Influence of Synchronization and Performance on Strategic Choice and Innovation2013Ingår i: Academy of Management Proceedings: Vol. 2013, No. 1, 2013Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Leveraging resources to exploit opportunities in external markets is at the heart of innovation. However, theory suggests that leveraging resources is a complicated affair, fraught with potential challenges. Building on work in resource orchestration, we argue that firms achieve superior innovation when their strategy used to leverage resources is synchronized with several resource orchestration processes – namely structuring and bundling. However, such synchronization is not easily achieved. Using prospect theory, we argue and find that prior performance and accompanying managerial biases influence which strategies are chosen to drive innovation and that these same influences are affected by the level of synchronization. Thus, working to leverage firm resources to achieve innovation requires the synchronization of several processes to produce the greatest outcomes.

  • 320.
    Carnes, Christina Matz
    et al.
    University of Nebraska-Lincoln.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Hitt, Michael A.
    Texas A&M University.
    Huh, Dong Wook
    Frostburg State University.
    Pisano, Vincenzo
    University of Catania.
    Resource Orchestration for Innovation: Structuring and Bundling Resources in Growth- and Maturity-Stage Firms2016Ingår i: Long range planning, ISSN 0024-6301, E-ISSN 1873-1872, Vol. 50, nr 4, s. 472-486Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation is an important outcome for firms across all life-cycle stages, though challenges to this goal vary by a firm's stage of development. In this study, we integrate resource orchestration with contingency theory to theorize how managers differentially orchestrate their firm's resource portfolio and capabilities to develop innovation based on the firm's life-cycle stage. Empirical tests using primary data collected from 189 managers of U.S. and Italian firms based on the policy capturing method provide support for our hypotheses. Overall, this research contributes to our understanding of how firms manage their resources to create innovation over the firm's life-cycle.

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  • 321. Caspersz, D.
    et al.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Brundin, Ethel
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    The Body Corporate: An Integrative Framework For Embodied Emotion In Family Business Life2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 322.
    Cestino, Joaquín
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Legitimacy-borrowing and bricolage by journalism entrepreneurs: From institutional ‘dopes’ to new industry pioneers?2016Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an unsatisfied need to understand the underlying mechanisms through which industrial sectors shape entrepreneurship phenomena. In this paper, we elaborate on the legitimacy-building mechanisms used by entrepreneurs in media industries. We suggest that in highly institutionalized contexts, start-up entrepreneurs may build trust in their ventures by borrowing sociopolitical legitimacy from neighboring fields. We also analyze the implications that these mechanisms may have on the cognitive and competitive configuration of the disrupted industry set-up. Our results propose that bricolage-entrepreneurs may succeed not only in developing a competitive advantage but also in creating a truly native, new legitimacy base in the media industry. We illustrate our theoretical analysis with the growing phenomenon of journalism entrepreneurship.

  • 323.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. University of Lugano.
    Knowledge models in family business: evidence from Ticino region (Switzerland)2008Ingår i: Culture-Specific Models of Family Businesses: A Compendium using GLOBE Paradigm / [ed] Gupta, V., Levenburg, N., Moore, L., Motwani, J., and Schwarz, T., ICFAI Press , 2008Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 324.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    The creation, sharing and transfer of knowledge in family business2008Ingår i: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 0827-6331, E-ISSN 2169-2610, Vol. 21, nr 4, s. 413-433Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This present research aims at investigating how "knowledge-related human capital" can be accumulated, i.e. created, shared and transferred, in family business over time. "Knowledge-related human capital" is viewed as pure knowledge and skill which family members have gained and developed through education and experience within and outside the organization. Two wine-producing family firms from Switzerland and a liqueur family firm from Italy are part of this research. A tentative knowledge model is presented at the end of the study. It analyses factors responsible for the accumulation process of knowledge in family business across generations.

  • 325.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi.
    Backman, Mikaela
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Nationalekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Baù, Massimo
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Karlsson, M.
    Pittino, Daniel
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    No Firm is an Island: Local Embeddedness and Rural-Urban Contexts for Business Growth in Family versus non-Family Firms.2017Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 326.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi.
    Baù, Massimo
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Financial Distress in Family and Non-Family-Controlled Firms2016Ingår i: Academy of Management Proceedings, January 2016 (Meeting Abstract Supplement) 12016 / [ed] John Humphreys, Academy of Management , 2016Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we heed the call from a growing number of scholars to extend our understanding of performance differences between family and non-family firms. Drawing on the mixed gamble logic of the behavioral agency model and the socioemotional wealth prospective, we provide a more fine-grained understanding of the unique role and diverse logic of dominant owners in relation to performance outcomes. Our findings suggest that family firms are the worst among the best (i.e. among firms that do not experience financial distress, they perform worse) and the best among the worst (i.e. among firms that experience financial distress, they perform better), which we attribute to the fact that family owners have more firm specific current wealth to lose (including not only financial wealth but also SEW), and as such respond differently to financial distress.

  • 327.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Baù, Massimo
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Is the Family an "Asset" or "Liability" for Firm Performance? The Moderating Role of Environmental Dynamism2014Ingår i: Journal of small business management (Print), ISSN 0047-2778, E-ISSN 1540-627X, Vol. 52, nr 2, s. 210-225Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    By integrating the stewardship and agency perspectives, our study extends the understanding of the dynamics that regulate the family as either an asset or liability for the firm. Our results show that the percentage of family members on the top management team (TMT) has an inverted U-shaped relationship with firm performance. However, when environmental dynamism is low this curvilinear relationship becomes steeper. When environmental dynamism is high, an increased percentage of family members on the TMT enhances firm performance.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 328.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Baù, Massimo
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi.
    Is the Family an Asset or Liability? The Role of Environmental Dynamism on Family Firm Performance2013Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 329.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Baù, Massimo
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Gomez-Mejia, Luis
    W. P. Carey School of Business, Arizona State University.
    Martin, Geoff
    Melbourne Business School, University of Melbourne.
    Risk-Taking and Financial Distress in Family-controlled Firms2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 330.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Baù, Massimo
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Schulze, William S.
    Department of Entrepreneurship and Strategy, David Eccles School of Business.
    Are Family Firms Loss Averse?2019Ingår i: Academy of Management Proceedings: Academy of Management, 2019Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A substantial stream of research has examined how strategic decision making in family-controlled firms is driven by a concern for safeguarding its socioemotional wealth (SEW), or the “affect related value embedded in the family firm” (Gomez-Mejia et al, 2007: 108). Proponents of this theory argue that because family owners and strongly identify with their firm (Cannella, Jones & Withers, 2015; Deephouse & Jaskiewicz, 2013), they routinely prioritize non-economic goals. In this study, we propose an alternative framing based on social identity. Using a panel study of private Swedish firms, we develop theory and find support for our claim that the concern for social identity gives family firms incentives to pursue penetration strategies and make related acquisitions in their core markets, and to offset the risks of that strategy by making diversifying unrelated) in peripheral markets. A reversal of this strategy when financial implications are averse supports the conclusion that family firms are not loss averse. Implications for BAM-based models of SEW are addressed.

  • 331.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Carnes, Christina M.
    Wook Huh, Dong
    Hitt, Michael A.
    Pisano, Vincenzo
    Structuring and bundling resources for innovation in different firm life cycle stages2014Ingår i: Academy of Management Proceedings: Vol. 2014, No. 1, 2014Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study based on a sample of US and Italian private firms confirms that resource orchestration is crucial in the creation of innovation. Structuring and bundling resources are important processes for all firms, especially for the development of innovation. Adopting a resource-based logic, we employed the technique of policy capturing to examine the relationship between resource orchestration and the creation of innovation by firms at different stages of their life-cycle. Our results show that early-stage (start-up and growth) firms attempt to acquire and accumulate resources and to enrich existing capabilities and pioneer new ones to develop novel innovations. This emphasis shifts to divesting resources and stabilizing existing capabilities during later (maturity and revitalization) stages to achieve more incremental innovations. This research contributes to our knowledge of innovation, resource orchestration and the firm life-cycle stages.

  • 332.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Colombo, Gianluca
    An experimental examination of the Fits family-business model: new insights from a simulation study through system dynamics2008Ingår i: Theoretical developments and future research in family business / [ed] Phillip H. Phan and John E. Butler, Charlotte, N.C.: Information Age Publishing, 2008, s. 77-116Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 333.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Jönköping University, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Criaco, Giuseppe
    Jönköping University, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Jönköping University, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO). Department of Strategic Management and Entrepreneurship, Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Jönköping University, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Naldi, Lucia
    Jönköping University, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Jönköping University, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Gomez-Mejia, Luis R.
    Department of Management, W.P. Carey School of Business, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA.
    Kotlar, Josip
    Centre for Family Business, Lancaster University Management School, Bailrigg, Lancaster, UK.
    To patent or not to patent: That is the question. Intellectual property protection in family firms2020Ingår i: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 44, nr 2, s. 339-367Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines family firms’ propensity to protect their intellectual property through patents. Building on the mixed gamble logic of the behavioral agency model, we theorize that family ownership has a U-shaped relationship with firm propensity to patent. Specifically, we argue that family firms’ desire to prevent losses of current socioemotional wealth inhibits their propensity to patent until a threshold level of family ownership, beyond which the family’s socioemotional wealth is secured and a greater focus on prospective financial gains attainable through patents is possible. We also suggest that environmental munificence moderates this nonlinear relationship such that a low-munificent environment accentuates the potentially detrimental (beneficial) effects of low-to-medium (medium-to-high) levels of family ownership on patents. We test our hypotheses on a sample of 4,198 small- and medium-sized family firms.

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  • 334.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    DeTienne, Dawn
    Colorado State University, USA.
    Clinton, Eric
    Dublin City University, Ireland.
    Sciascia, Salvatore
    IULM University-Milan, Italy.
    Resource structuring: linking resource acquisition, accumulation, and divestment in family firms2014Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    While much has been written about the idiosyncratic nature of family firms, the processes of managing the resource base in family firms has received limited attention. We examine resource structuring in family firms, inclusive of resource acquisition, accumulation and divestment. Specifically, we theorize that family firms that engage in resource acquisition and accumulation achieve higher levels of resource divestment. While the family generation in control positively moderate these relationships, the presence of a family CEO negatively moderate them. Additionally, we predict that family CEOs in later generations also engage less in resource divestment. Our theory is tested on a sample of 241 Irish family firms.

  • 335.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Gómez-Mejia, Luis R.
    W.P. Carey School of Business, Arizona State University, Department of Management, Tempe, AZ, USA.
    Hellerstedt, Karin
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Withers, Michael
    Mays Business School, Texas A&M University, Department of Management, College Station, TX, USA.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi.
    To merge, sell or liquidate? Socioemotional wealth, family control, and the choice of business exit2019Ingår i: Journal of Management, ISSN 0149-2063, E-ISSN 1557-1211Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We take the perspective that considering the affective motives of dominant owners is essential to understanding business exit. Drawing on a refinement of behavioral agency theory, we argue that family-controlled firms are less likely than non-family-controlled firms to exit and tend to endure increased financial distress to avoid losses to the family’s socioemotional wealth (SEW) embodied in the firm. Yet, when confronted with different exit options and performance heuristics suggest that exit is unavoidable family firms are more likely to exit via merger, which we argue saves some SEW, although it is less satisfactory financially. In contrast, non-family firms are more likely to exit via sale or dissolution, options that are more prone to offer higher financial returns than mergers. Family and non-family firms thus show different orders of exit options. We find support for these arguments in a longitudinal matched sample of privately held Swedish firms.

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    fulltext
  • 336.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Hellerstedt, Karin
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Mattias, Nordqvist
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Business Exit in Family vs. Non-Family Firms: When Emotional Logic Overrules Rational Judgment2012Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 337.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Hellerstedt, Karin
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    “Do Family Firms Exit Less?”2012Ingår i: Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research: Vol. 32, Texas, USA, 2012Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 338.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Naldi, Lucia
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Baù, Massimo
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi.
    Criaco, Giuseppe
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Socioemotional Wealth and Innovation in Family Firms: When the Environment Gets Tough, the Family Gets Going!2014Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 339.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    University of Lugano / Texas A&M University.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Dynamic capabilities and transgenerational value creation in family firms: The role of organizational culture2010Ingår i: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 28, nr 5, s. 487-504Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    While some research on entrepreneurship in family businesses has focused on transgenerational value creation, a gap exists in understanding how such value is generated across generations. The present research offers insights through the lens of dynamic capabilities, which are created by knowledge and in turn generate entrepreneurial performance and value creation. A model is built based on literature and case research. The crucial role of the organizational culture emerges through the empirical study. Family inertia is considered to be a factor preventing the creation of dynamic capabilities. We find that family inertia depends on characteristics of the family business culture, where paternalism and entrepreneurial orientation influence family inertia positively and negatively, respectively. Family firms from Switzerland and Italy active in the beverage industry represent the empirical context. Theoretical and practical implications are offered.

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    fulltext
  • 340.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Colombo, Gianluca
    University of Lugano, Lugano, Switzerland.
    Mollona, Edoardo
    University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
    Simulating Dynamic Capabilities and Value Creation in Family Firms: Is Paternalism an "Asset" or a "Liability"?2012Ingår i: Family Business Review, ISSN 0894-4865, E-ISSN 1741-6248, Vol. 25, nr 3, s. 318-338Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors conduct a simulation study using system dynamics methods to interpret how and when paternalism affects dynamic capabilities (DCs) and by association value creation in family firms. Their simulation experiments suggest that the effect of paternalism on DCs and value creation varies over time. Initially, increasing levels of family social capital and low levels of paternalism are associated with high rates of DCs and value creation accumulation (asset). Later, higher levels of paternalism produce their pressure to decrease DCs, value creation, and family social capital accumulation rates (liability)

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    fulltext
  • 341.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi.
    Pathak, Seemantini
    University of Missouri, St. Louis, USA.
    Baù, Massimo
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Hoskisson, Robert
    Rice University, USA.
    Family versus Non-Family Firm Mergers: Likes Attract Likes, Outperform Opposites2017Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Using social identity theory, we examine how the identity of the target firm in a family firm-led merger impacts the merged entity’s subsequent performance. We compare family firms’ target preferences and postmerger performance to those of non-family firms, and find that not only are family firms more likely to prefer other family firms as merger partners, but also achieve better post-merger outcomes with them. We test our hypotheses using a large sample of Swedish private firms, which largely controls for national cultural differences. After controlling for endogeneity and self-selection bias, our results support all our hypotheses.

  • 342.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Salvato, Carlo
    Bocconi University.
    Knowledge internalization and product development in family firms: When relational and affective factors matter2016Ingår i: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 40, nr 1, s. 201-229Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the forces that support and inhibit product development (PD) in family firms is central to explaining their long-term success and survival. Our study reveals that social capital and relational conflict among family members do not affect PD directly, as existing theory suggests, but only through the internalization of knowledge among family members. In contrast, family members’ affective commitment to the family firm is so powerful that it has both a mediated and a direct effect on PD. These results differ across generations of the controlling family, therefore offering an extension of existing theories of knowledge and PD in family firms.

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    Post-print
  • 343.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). EGADE Business School, Tecnológico de Monterrey.
    Salvato, Carlo
    Bocconi University.
    Byrne, Barbara
    University of Ottawa.
    Akhter, Naveed
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Arriaga Múzquiz, Juan
    EGADE Business School, Tecnológico de Monterrey .
    Commitment escalation to a failing family business2018Ingår i: Journal of small business management (Print), ISSN 0047-2778, E-ISSN 1540-627X, Vol. 56, nr 3, s. 494-512Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The overarching intent of this manuscript is to heighten awareness to the concept of commitment escalation as it bears on a failing family business. Specifically, drawing on the concept of emotional ownership, together with self-justification arguments, we a) identify factors considered to be most forceful in contributing to the presence of commitment escalation and thus, resistance to change in a failing family business (i.e., emotional ownership, feeling of responsibility, investment of capital, temporal distance from the founder’s business, individualism/collectivism), and b) model these related factors in a form that can serve heuristically to stimulate future empirical research capable of testing for the construct validity of commitment escalation in a family business context. We present potential items that may be useful for future scholars in measuring our constructs of interest as they relate to a failing family business.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    Preprint
  • 344.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Texas A and M University, Mays Business School, College Station, United States.
    Sirmon, David G.
    Texas A and M University, Mays Business School, College Station, United States.
    Sciascia, Salvatore
    IULM University, Italy.
    Mazzola, Pietro
    IULM University, Italy.
    Entrepreneurial Orientation, Generational Involvement and Participative Strategy: A Configurational Approach to Performance in Family Firms2011Ingår i: Academy of Management 2011 Annual Meeting: West meets East. Enlightening. Balancing. Transcending, New York: Academy of Management , 2011Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    To better understand the entrepreneurship in family firms, we consider the joint interaction effect of entrepreneurial orientation (EO), generational involvement and participative strategy. Drawing on the logic of resource orchestration, we argue that participative strategy acts as a coordinating mechanism that not only mitigates the relational conflict that increased generational involvement generates when mobilized EO, but also enhances family firms' ability to utilize the heterogeneous, yet complementary knowledge and experiences generational involvement offers. Configuring participative strategy and EO with generational involvement provides the direction and coordination needed to unlock the potential value of these unique resources. Our theory suggests that realizing the benefits from entrepreneurship in family firms is a complicated matter, affected by the configuration of EO, generational involvement and participative strategy.

  • 345.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Sirmon, David G.
    Mays Business School, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, U.S.A..
    Sciascia, Salvatore
    Marketing and Economics Department, IULM University, Milan, Italy.
    Mazzola, Pietro
    Marketing and Economics Department, IULM University, Milan, Italy.
    Resource orchestration in family firms: Investigating how entrepreneurial orientation, generational involvement, and participative strategy affect performance2011Ingår i: Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal, ISSN 1932-4391, E-ISSN 1932-443X, Vol. 5, nr 4, s. 307-326Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on the process of resource orchestration, we argue a co-alignment of multiple factors is needed for family firms to increase performance through entrepreneurship. Specifically, we posit that entrepreneurial orientation provides the mobilizing vision to use the heterogeneous yet complementary knowledge and experiences offered by increased generational involvement toward entrepreneurship. However, without a coordinating mechanism, generational involvement leads to conflict and negative outcomes. When, instead, it is also coordinated via a participative strategy, performance gains are achieved. In sum, results suggest that realizing the benefits from entrepreneurship in family firms is a complicated matter affected by the synchronization of entrepreneurial orientation, generational involvement, and participative strategy. Copyright © 2011 Strategic Management Society.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 346.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Jönköping University, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO). Macquarie Business School, Macquarie University, Department of Management, Sydney, Australia.
    Welsh, Dianne H. B.
    Bryan School of Business & Economics, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, United States.
    Ireland, R. Duane
    Mays Business School, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, United States.
    Sieger, Philipp
    Department of Management and Entrepreneurship, University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Family versus non-family firm franchisors: Behavioral and performance differences2020Ingår i: Journal of Management Studies, ISSN 0022-2380, E-ISSN 1467-6486Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing from resource-based theory, we argue that family firm franchisors behave and perform differently compared to non-family firm franchisors. Our theorizing suggests that compared to a non-family firm franchisor, a family firm franchisor cultivates stronger relationships with franchisees and provides them with more training. Yet, we predict that a family firm franchisor achieves lower performance than a non-family firm franchisor. We argue, however, that this performance relationship reverses itself when family firm franchisors are older and larger. We test our hypotheses with a longitudinal dataset including a matched-pair sample of private U.S. family and non-family firm franchisors.

  • 347. Colombo, Gianluca
    et al.
    Koiranen, Matti
    Chirico, Francesco
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. University of Lugano.
    Le imprese familiari: Sistemi di generazione di valore attraverso le generazioni2008Ingår i: AIDEA, Mulino Editore , 2008Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 348.
    Criaco, Giuseppe
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Founding conditions and the survival of new firms: An imprinting perspective on founders, organizational members and external environments2016Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    New firms are important sources of new employment, economic growth and innovation. Yet, a large portion of them do not manage to survive their first years of existence. This is often linked to their initial lack of capabilities, resources, routines and legitimacy. Certain favorable conditions at founding may allow new firms to partially overcome these initial shortcomings, and help them survive. For instance, organizational members’ prior experience may provide knowledge and skills to the new firm. However, it may also act as a constraint. It can lead new firms to follow a prescribed way of doing things which may ultimately threaten their survival. Similarly, certain unfavorable conditions of the external environment at founding may paradoxically offer a fertile ground for new firms to nurture their survival. Thus, whether some founding conditions are good or bad for new firms is still an unanswered question.

    Building on imprinting theory, this dissertation investigates how different founding conditions affect the survival of new firms. At the organizational level, I study founders’ prior working experience in an incumbent family firm, organizational members’ prior shared international experience and prior industry experience, and focus respectively on three types of new firms: entrepreneurial spawns, international new ventures and high/mid-high tech new firms. I use a matched employer-employee dataset to test the effect of different types of prior experience on new firm survival. At the environment level, I propose how population density of similar organizational forms and the mortality of generalist organizations at founding may affect the survival of new family firms.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    Kappa
  • 349.
    Criaco, Giuseppe
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Organisational ecology and the family business2015Ingår i: Theoretical perspectives on family businesses / [ed] Mattias Nordqvist, Leif Melin, Matthias Waldkirch and Gershon Kumeto, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, s. 18-34Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Organisational ecology has long studied the survival of organisations. However, few studies have focused on how such perspective can be applied to investigate similar topics in distinct organisational forms, such as family businesses. This book chapter thus attempts to apply an organisational ecology perspective to the study of family businesses. More specifically, it explores how such perspective can inform research on the survival of family businesses. Special attention is given to environmental determinants conceptualised at the industry level

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    Accepted Manuscript
  • 350.
    Criaco, Giuseppe
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Prior shared international experience and the survival of international new venturesManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper shows how organizational members’ prior shared experience in international firms affects the survival of the international new ventures (INVs) to which they belong. I propose that as the length of prior shared international experience (PSIE) increases, these ventures are more likely to draw greater survival-enhancing benefits from the pre-existing routines and capabilities that their members previously developed while working together in the same international firm. However, for high PSIE length, INVs may find it difficult and costly to revise existing routines and capabilities and to develop new ones to achieve survival. Using a unique sample of Swedish INVs, I find that PSIE has an inverted U-shaped relationship with survival. Further, I theorize and show that contextual familiarity between the contexts in which PSIE was acquired and those in which it is applied through the INV is an important contingency of the PSIE-survival relationship. This study has valuable implications for research on international entrepreneurship and shared experience.

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