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  • 301.
    Ernsth, Marie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Gustafsson, Gunnel
    Kartläggning av avlösning och växelvård1998Report (Other academic)
  • 302.
    Ernsth, Marie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Larsson, Birgitta
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    "Att bo kvar hemma": en kartläggning av kvälls- och nattpatrullernas arbete i Jönköpings kommun2000Report (Other academic)
  • 303.
    Ernsth, Marie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Larsson, Birgitta
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Evening and Night Patrols reduce Environmental Demands2002In: Aspects on aging, old age care and local contexts / [ed] Bo Malmberg and Cecilia Henning, Jönköping: Hälsohögskolan , 2002, p. 111-119Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 304.
    Ernsth, Marie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Färdigbehandlad - och sedan?: Vårdplanering i Jönköpings län.1999Report (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 305.
    Ernsth, Marie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Gustafsson, Gunnel
    Äldre mellan två stolar?: äldreomsorg och äldrevård i gränslandet mellan landstingets och kommunernas ansvarsområden i Jönköpings län1997Report (Other academic)
  • 306.
    Ernsth, Marie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Svensson, Gabriella
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Respite Care: a Way of Improve the Interpersonal Resources2002In: Aspects on aging, old age care and local contexts / [ed] Bo Malmberg and Cecilia Henning, Jönköping: Hälsohögskolan , 2002, p. 101-110Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 307. Evrin, Per-Erik
    et al.
    Nilsson, Sven
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Öberg, Tommy
    Malmberg, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Serum C-reactive protein in elderly men and women: Association with mortality, morbidity, and various biochemical values.2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 23-31Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 308.
    Falkmer, Marita
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Barnett, Tania
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Horlin, Chiara
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Olov
    Lund University.
    Siljehav, Jessica
    Lund University.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Lee, Hoe C.
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Chee, Derserri Y.
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Wretstrand, Anders
    Lund University.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Viewpoints of adults with and without Autism Spectrum Disorders on public transport2015In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 80, p. 163-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Public transport is low cost, allows for independence, and facilitates engagement and participation for non-drivers. However, the viewpoints of individuals with cognitive disabilities are rarely considered. In Australia, the prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) is approximately 1% and increasing. Many individuals with ASD do not possess a driver's licence, indicating that access to public transport is crucial for their independence. However, at present, there is no research on the opinions of adults with ASD on public transport. Aim: To identify the viewpoints of adults with ASD regarding the barriers and facilitators of public transport usage and their transportation preferences, and to contrast these against the viewpoints of neurotypical adults. Methods: Q. method was used to identify the viewpoints of both participant groups on public transport. Participants consisted of 55 adults with a diagnosis of ASD and a contrast group of 57 neurotypical adults. Both groups completed a Q sort task which took place in either Perth or Melbourne, Australia. Results: The most prominent viewpoint indicated that both groups preferred to use public transport over driving and believed that it supported their independence. This viewpoint also indicated that both groups preferred to use electronic ticketing when using public transport. Interestingly, the second most prominent viewpoint indicated that both groups preferred to drive themselves by private car rather than use public transport. Discussion: It appears that the viewpoints of adults with and without ASD regarding public transportation were largely similar. However, questions arose about whether the preference for public transport in the ASD group may be more a result of difficulties obtaining a driving licence than a deliberate choice. The only barrier specified by adults with ASD related to crowding on public transport. Safety and convenience in relation to location and timing of services were barriers reported by neurotypical adults.

  • 309.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Dahlman, J
    Dukic, T
    Bjällmark, Anna
    Larsson, M
    Fixation identification in centroid versus start-point modes using eye-tracking data2008In: Perceptual and Motor Skills, ISSN 0031-5125, E-ISSN 1558-688X, Vol. 106, no 3, p. 710-724Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 310. Fauth, B
    et al.
    Zarit, S
    Johansson, Boo
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Predicting the transition into disability in the oldest old2006In: 59th Annual Scientific Meeting, The Gerontological Society of America, Dallas, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 311. Femia, E E
    et al.
    Davey, A
    Shea, D G
    Zarit, Z H
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Sundström, Gerdt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Smyer, M A
    Formal and informal help for people at risk of institutionalization in the US and Sweden1997In: 50th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Gerontogical Society of America, Cincinatti, 1997Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 312. Ferguson, F G
    et al.
    Wikby, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Maxson, P
    Olsson, J
    Johansson, B
    Immune parameters in a longitudinal study of a very old population of Swedish people: a comparison between survivors and nonsurvivors.1995In: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, ISSN 1079-5006, E-ISSN 1758-535X, Vol. 50, no 6, p. B378-B382Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 313. Finkel, D
    et al.
    Pedersen, N L
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Johansson, Boo
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    McClearn, G E
    Quantitative genetic analysis of biobehavioral markers of aging in SATSA and OCTO twins1996In: Behavior Genetics Association Meeting, Pittsburg, 1996Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 314.
    Finkel, Deborah
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany.
    Ernsth Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sex differences in genetic and environmental influences on longitudinal change in functional ability in late adulthood2015In: The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, ISSN 1079-5014, E-ISSN 1758-5368, Vol. 70, no 5, p. 709-717Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. To determine the extent to which genetic and environmental factors contribute to individual and gender differences in aging of functional ability.

    Method. Twenty assessments of functional ability are collected as part of the longitudinal Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging from 859 twins aged 50–88 at the first wave. Participants completed up to 6 assessments covering a 19-year period. Factor analysis was used to create 3 factors: flexibility, fine motor skills, and balance.

    Results. Latent growth curve analysis demonstrated increasing disability and variability after age 70. For flexibility, results indicated significant sex differences in mean change trajectories but no sex differences in components of variance. No sex differences were found for fine motor movement. For balance, there were no sex differences in mean change trajectories; however, there was significant genetic variance for changes in balance in women after age 70 but not for men.

    Discussion. Although idiosyncratic environmental influences account for a large part of increasing variance, correlated and shared rearing environmental effects were also evident. Thus, both microenvironmental (individual) and macroenvironmental (family and cultural) effects, as well as genetic factors, affect maintenance of functional ability in late adulthood.

  • 315.
    Finkel, Deborah
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, USA.
    Ernsth Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Temporal dynamics of motor functioning and cognitive aging2016In: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, ISSN 1079-5006, E-ISSN 1758-535X, Vol. 71, no 1, p. 109-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Because of the possible implications for intervention and thus successful aging, researchers have striven to determine whether the age changes in physical and cognitive functioning are coincident or does functioning in one domain change before, and possibly contribute to, functioning in the other.

    Methods. Bivariate dual change score models were applied to four cognitive factors and three motor functioning factors available from 813 adults who participated in the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging. Participants were aged 50–88 at the first of six waves of testing covering a 19-year follow-up period; 68% participated in at least three waves.

    Results. Model comparisons indicated dynamic coupling relationships between Balance and Fine Motor factors and the Speed cognitive factor. Decline in motor function precedes decline in performance on processing speed tasks, even though the motor function tasks were not timed. Results indicated possible bidirectional coupling between Fine Motor and Speed.

    Conclusions. Combined with other dual change score model analyses of cognition and physical function, a picture is beginning to emerge of the cascade of events that may lead to cognitive aging.

  • 316. Finkel, Deborah
    et al.
    Pedersen, Nancy L
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Johansson, Boo
    McClearn, Gerald E
    Quantitative genetic analysis of biobehavioral markers of aging in swedish studies of adult twins2000In: Journal of Aging and Health, ISSN 0898-2643, E-ISSN 1552-6887, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 47-68Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 317. Finkel, Deborah
    et al.
    Pedersen, Nancy L
    Reynolds, Chandra A
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    DeFaire, U
    Svartengren, M
    Genetic and environmental influences on decline in biobehavioral markers of aging2003In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 0001-8244, E-ISSN 1573-3297, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 107-123Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 318. Finkel, Deborah
    et al.
    Pedersen, Nancy
    McClearn, Gerald E
    Plomin, R
    Nesselroade, J
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Cross-sequential analysis of genetic influences on cognitive ability in the Swedish adoption/twin study of aging1996In: Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition, ISSN 1382-5585, E-ISSN 1744-4128, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 84-99Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 319. Finkel, Deborah
    et al.
    Reynolds, Chandra A
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Pedersen, Nancy L
    Surprising lack of sex differences in normal cognitive aging in twins2006In: The International Journal of Aging & Human Development, ISSN 0091-4150, E-ISSN 1541-3535, Vol. 62, no 4, p. 335-357Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 320. Fjellström, Christina
    et al.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    Sidenvall, Birgitta
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Meals, habits and culture among retired women living at home1997In: Abstract presented at The Sixth Food Choice Conference in Uppsala 25-26 June, 1997Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 321. Fjellström, Christina
    et al.
    Sidenvall, Birgitta
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    Food intake and the elderly: Social aspects2001In: Food, People and Society: A European perspective of Consumers’ Food Choices., Berlin: Springer-Verlag , 2001, p. 197-209Chapter in book (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 322. Fjällström, Christina
    et al.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    Sidenvall, Birgitta
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    How surveys versus qualitative case studies can display different meanings and use of food among older women2000In: Presentation at the conference Qualitative Research in Health & Social Care 2000. Bournemouth 25-27 October, 2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 323.
    Foebel, A. D.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Zavala, C.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Ernsth Bravell, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Reynolds, C. A.
    University of California, USA.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Latent growth curve analysis: Multimorbidity and sex affect functional trajectories in later life2015In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 55, p. 218-219Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 324. Forsey, R J
    et al.
    Thompson, J M
    Ernerudh, J
    Hurst, T L
    Strindhall, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Johansson, B
    Nilsson, B-O
    Wikby, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Plasma cytokine profiles in elderly humans.2003In: Mechanisms of Ageing and Development, ISSN 0047-6374, E-ISSN 1872-6216, Vol. 124, no 4, p. 487-493Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 325. Framholt, Pia
    et al.
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Self-rated memory and cognitive functioning1997In: Functional status, health and aging: The NORA study, Paris: Serdi Publishing Co , 1997, p. 55-65Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 326.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Normalt åldrande2008In: Den äldre parkinsonpatienten: Utredning, diagnostik och åtgärder för individuellt omhändertagande, Stockholm: Svensk Geriatrisk Förening , 2008, p. 7-9Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 327.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Batty, David
    Tabak, Adam
    Brunner, Eric
    Kumari, Meena
    Shipley, Martin
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Weight gain is associated with greater increase in CRP among overweight and obese than among normal weight people2011In: Obesity Reviews: (Suppl. 1), 2011, p. 44-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 328.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Batty, David
    University College London.
    Tabák, Adam
    University College London.
    Brunner, Eric
    University College London.
    Kumari, Meena
    University College London.
    Shipley, Martin
    University College London.
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    University College London.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    University College London.
    Association between change in body composition and change in inflammatory markers: An 11-year follow-up in the Whitehall II study2010In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 95, no 12, p. 5370-5374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Obesity is associated with low-grade inflammation, but the long-term effects of weight change on inflammation are unknown.

    Objective: The aim was to examine the association of change in weight, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference with change in C-reactive protein (CRP) and IL-6 and to assess whether this association is modified by baseline obesity status.

    Design and Setting: The design was a prospective cohort study among civil servants (the Whitehall II Study, UK). We used data from two clinical screenings carried out in 1991–1993 and 2002–2004 (mean follow-up, 11.3 yr).

    Participants: We studied 2496 men and 1026 women [mean age, 49.4 (SD = 6.0) yr at baseline] with measurements on inflammatory markers and anthropometry at both baseline and follow-up.

    Main Outcome Measures: We measured change in serum CRP and IL-6 during follow-up.

    Results: The mean increases in CRP and IL-6 were 0.08 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.07–0.09] mg/liter and 0.04 (95% CI, 0.03–0.05) pg/ml per 1-kg increase in body weight during follow-up. Study members with a BMI less than 25 kg/m2 at baseline had an average increase in CRP of 0.06 (95% CI, 0.05–0.08) mg/liter per 1-kg increase in body weight, whereas the increase in those who were overweight (25 BMI < 30 kg/m2) and obese (BMI 30 kg/m2) was greater: 0.08 (95% CI, 0.06–0.09) mg/liter and 0.11 (95% CI, 0.07–0.14) mg/liter, respectively (P value for interaction = 0.002). Similar patterns were observed for changes in BMI and waist circumference.

    Conclusions: Those who were overweight or obese at baseline had a greater absolute increase in CRP per unit increase in weight, BMI, and waist circumference than people who were normal weight.

  • 329.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Heikkilä, Katriina
    Nyberg, Solja
    Zins, Marie
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Westerholm, Peter
    Väänänen, Ari
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Theorell, Töres
    Suominen, Sakari
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Siegrist, Johannes
    Sabia, Severine
    Rugulies, Reiner
    Pentti, Jaana
    Oksanen, Tuula
    Nordin, Maria
    Nielsen, Martin
    Marmot, Michael
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda
    Madsen, Ida
    Lunau, Thorsten
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Kumari, Meena
    Kouvonen, Anne
    Koskinen, Aki
    Koskenvuo, Markku
    Knutsson, Anders
    Kittel, France
    Jöckel, Karl-Heinz
    Joensuu, Matti
    Houtman, Irene
    Hooftman, Wendela
    Goldberg, Marcel
    Geuskens, Goedele
    Ferrie, Jane
    Erbel, Raimund
    Dragano, Nico
    De Bacquer, Dirk
    Clays, Els
    Casini, Annalisa
    Burr, Hermann
    Borritz, Marianne
    Bonenfant, Sebastien
    Bjorner, Jakob
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Hamer, Mark
    Batty, David
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Job Strain as a Risk Factor for Leisure-Time Physical Inactivity: An Individual-Participant Meta-analysis of up to 170 000 Men and Women2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 330.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Heikkilä, Katriina
    Nyberg, Solja
    Zins, Marie
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Westerholm, Peter
    Väänänen, Ari
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Theorell, Töres
    Suominen, Sakari
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Siegrist, Johannes
    Sabia, Severine
    Rugulies, Reiner
    Pentti, Jaana
    Oksanen, Tuula
    Nordin, Maria
    Nielsen, Martin
    Marmot, Michael
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda
    Madsen, Ida
    Lunau, Thorsten
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Kumari, Meena
    Kouvonen, Anne
    Koskinen, Aki
    Koskenvuo, Markku
    Knutsson, Anders
    Kittel, France
    Jöckel, Karl-Heinz
    Joensuu, Matti
    Houtman, Irene
    Hooftman, Wendela
    Goldberg, Marcel
    Geuskens, Goedele
    Ferrie, Jane
    Erbel, Raimund
    Dragano, Nico
    De Bacquer, Dirk
    Clays, Els
    Casini, Annalisa
    Burr, Hermann
    Borritz, Marianne
    Bonenfant, Sebastien
    Bjorner, Jakob
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Hamer, Mark
    Batty, David
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Job Strain as a Risk Factor for Leisure-Time Physical Inactivity: An Individual-Participant Meta-analysis of up to 170,000 Men and Women2012In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 176, no 12, p. 1078-1089Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unfavorable work characteristics, such as low job control and too high or too low job demands, have been suggested to increase the likelihood of physical inactivity during leisure time, but this has not been verified in large-scale studies. The authors combined individual-level data from 14 European cohort studies (baseline years from 1985–1988 to 2006–2008) to examine the association between unfavorable work characteristics and leisure-time physical inactivity in a total of 170,162 employees (50% women; mean age, 43.5 years). Of these employees, 56,735 were reexamined after 2–9 years. In cross-sectional analyses, the odds for physical inactivity were 26% higher (odds ratio = 1.26, 95% confidence interval: 1.15, 1.38) for employees with high-strain jobs (low control/high demands) and 21% higher (odds ratio = 1.21, 95% confidence interval: 1.11, 1.31) for those with passive jobs (low control/low demands) compared with employees in low-strain jobs (high control/low demands). In prospective analyses restricted to physically active participants, the odds of becoming physically inactive during follow-up were 21% and 20% higher for those with high-strain (odds ratio = 1.21, 95% confidence interval: 1.11, 1.32) and passive (odds ratio = 1.20, 95% confidence interval: 1.11, 1.30) jobs at baseline. These data suggest that unfavorable work characteristics may have a spillover effect on leisure-time physical activity.

  • 331.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Nyberg, Solja
    Heikkilä, Katriina
    Theorell, Töres
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Agreement between alternative versions of Karasek's job demand-control scale: The IPD-Work Consortium2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 332.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Nyberg, Solja T
    Heikkilä, Katriina
    Alfredsson, Lars
    De Bacquer, Dirk
    Batty, G David
    Bonenfant, Sébastien
    Casini, Annalisa
    Clays, Els
    Goldberg, Marcel
    Kittel, France
    Koskenvuo, Markku
    Knutsson, Anders
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda L
    Nordin, Maria
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Suominen, Sakari
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Westerholm, Peter
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Zins, Marie
    Theorell, Töres
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Comparison of alternative versions of the job demand-control scales in 17 European cohort studies: the IPD-Work consortium2012In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 12, no 62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Job strain (i.e., high job demands combined with low job control) is a frequently used indicator of harmful work stress, but studies have often used partial versions of the complete multi-item job demands and control scales. Understanding whether the different instruments assess the same underlying concepts has crucial implications for the interpretation of findings across studies, harmonisation of multi-cohort data for pooled analyses, and design of future studies. As part of the 'IPD-Work' (Individual-participant-data meta-analysis in working populations) consortium, we compared different versions of the demands and control scales available in 17 European cohort studies.

    Methods Six of the 17 studies had information on the complete scales and 11 on partial scales. Here, we analyse individual level data from 70 751 participants of the studies which had complete scales (5 demand items, 6 job control items).

    Results We found high Pearson correlation coefficients between complete scales of job demands and control relative to scales with at least three items (r > 0.90) and for partial scales with two items only (r = 0.76-0.88). In comparison with scores from the complete scales, the agreement between job strain definitions was very good when only one item was missing in either the demands or the control scale (kappa > 0.80); good for job strain assessed with three demand items and all six control items (kappa > 0.68) and moderate to good when items were missing from both scales (kappa = 0.54-0.76). The sensitivity was >0.80 when only one item was missing from either scale, decreasing when several items were missing in one or both job strain subscales.

    Conclusions Partial job demand and job control scales with at least half of the items of the complete scales, and job strain indices based on one complete and one partial scale, seemed to assess the same underlying concepts as the complete survey instruments.

  • 333. Fransén, Karin
    et al.
    Dimberg, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Osterström, Anna
    Olsson, Anneli
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Sirsjö, Allan
    Nitric oxide synthase 2 mRNA expression in relation to p53 and adenomatous polyposis coli mutations in primary colorectal adenocarcinomas.2002In: Surgery, ISSN 0039-6060, E-ISSN 1532-7361, Vol. 131, no 4, p. 384-392Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 334. Fransén, Karin
    et al.
    Klintenäs, Maria
    Osterström, Anna
    Dimberg, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Monstein, Hans-Jürg
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Mutation analysis of the BRAF, ARAF and RAF-1 genes in human colorectal adenocarcinomas.2004In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 527-533Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 335.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Funktionellt åldrande.2011In: Äldre och åldrande.: Grundbok i gerontologi. / [ed] Marie Ernsth Bravell, Stockholm: Gothia Förlag AB , 2011, p. 142-167Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 336.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Funktionellt åldrande.2013In: Äldre och åldrande: Grundbok i gerontologi / [ed] Marie Ernsth-Bravell, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2013, 2, p. 119-140Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 337.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Occupational participation through community mobility among older men and women2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of the present thesis was to explore and characterise occupational participation and community mobility from an occupational perspective of health and well-being, and to elucidate potential barriers and facilitators for occupational participation and community mobility in older men and women.

    In Study I, questionnaires were sent to a sample of older citizens (75+) in three Swedish mid-sized municipalities. This survey focused on actual and preferred travel opportunities and was returned by 957 persons (response rate 46%). Although older people appreciated the existing travel opportunities, there was evidence of restricted community mobility for some sub-groups of older people, due to various perceived barriers. More efforts must be put into accessibility improvements including usability from the perspective of older people.

    In Study II nine focus group interviews with a total of 42 participants (20 men) were conducted, focusing on older peoples’ motives for, and experiences of, community mobility and occupational participation outside the home. The main category “Continuing mobility and occupational participation outside the home in old age is an act of negotiation” summarised the findings. This main category was abstracted from the generic categories “Occupational means and goals”, “Occupational and mobility adaptation” and “Occupational barriers and facilitators”, and their subcategories. Community mobility was identified as an important occupation that in itself also facilitated occupational participation outside the home. Individual community mobility seemed to be influenced by, for example, age and gender, as well as habits acquired over time. Furthermore, community mobility was negatively affected not only by physical barriers, but also by social and attitudinal barriers in the public environment.

    Study III identified and described older people’s viewpoints on community mobility and occupational participation in older age through a Q-methodology study conducted with 36 participants, including men and women, both drivers and non-drivers. Three viewpoints were found and assigned content-descriptive denominations; viz.: “Prefer being mobile by car”, “Prefer being mobile by public transport” and “Prefer flexible mobility”. Unfortunately, the existing demand-responsive Special Transportation Systems was not considered an attractive enough alternative by any of the participants. Thus, intermediate community mobility options are needed for those who no longer can drive or use public transport. In

    Study IV factors associated with community mobility, and decreased community mobility over time, for older men and women were described. Data were based on the Gender study “Aging in men and women: a longitudinal study of gender differences in health behaviour and health among elderly” and collected through surveys in 1994 and 2007. The base-line sample consisted of 605 twin-pairs, i.e., 1,210 individuals, aged 69-88, and the follow-up of 357 individuals (165 men and 192 women), aged 83-97. This surveycovered health and health-related issues including community mobility and occupational participation. Continuing community mobility was cross-sectionally (at follow-up) and prospectively (from baseline to follow-up) associated with better self-reported subjective health rather than self-reported health conditions for both men and women. For men, community mobility was also cross-sectionally associated with few or non-existant depressive symptoms, while reduced community mobility was prospectively associated with higher age for women. Consequently, interventions aiming to enable community mobility must move beyond interventions directed towards health conditions and instead target subjective health and well-being.

  • 338.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Wretstrand, Anders
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Continuing Mobility and Occupational Participation Outside the Home in Old Age is an Act of Negotiation2011In: Activities, Adaptation & Aging, ISSN 0192-4788, E-ISSN 1544-4368, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 275-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Facilitated by mobility, occupational participaton is vital in old age. However, the relative importance of other influencing factors remains unclear. The present study describes older people's motives for, and experiences of, mobility and occuoational participation outside the home. Nine focus group interviews were conducted and analyzed using content analysis. Occupational participation and mobility was individually experienced even if some subjective perspectives were common. Continuing mobility and occupational participation outside the home in old age is an act of negotiation, encompassing occupational means and goals, occupational and mobility adaptation, and occupational barrieres and facilitators.

  • 339.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Dahl, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Community mobility in older men and women - a cross-sectional and 13 years prospective perspective2014In: Age well: Challenges for individual and society, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Community mobility, defined as "moving [ones] self in the community and using public or private transportation", has a unique ability to promote older peoples' wellbeing by enabling independence and access to activity arenas for interaction with others. Early predictors of decreased community mobility among older men and women are useful in developing health promoting strategies. However, long-term prediction is rare, especially when it comes to including both public and private transportation. In the present study factors associated with community mobility and decreased community mobility over time among older men and women were identified. Gender-balanced data from a project entitled "Aging in men and women: a longitudinal study of gender differences in health behavior and health among elderly" (GENDER) based on pairs of unlike-sex twins were utilized. In total, 119 men and 147 women responded to a questionnaire in 1994 and 2007. Respondents were between 82 and 96 years old at follow-up. After 13 years, 40% of men and 43% of women had decreased community mobility, but 47 % of men and 45 % of women still experienced some independent community mobility. Cross-sectional independent community mobility among men was associated with higher ratings of subjective health, reporting no depression and more involvement in sport activities. Among women, cross-sectional independent community mobility was associated with better subjective health and doing more instrumental activities of daily living outside the home. Lower subjective health predicted decreased community mobility for both men and women, whereas self-reported health conditions did not. Consequently, general policies and individual interventions aiming to improve community mobility should consider older persons' subjective health.

  • 340.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Dahl, Anna K.
    Wretstrand, Anders
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Changes in community mobility in older men and women. A 13-year prospective study2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 2, p. e87827-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Community mobility, defined as "moving [ones] self in the community and using public or private transportation", has a unique ability to promote older peoples' wellbeing by enabling independence and access to activity arenas for interaction with others. Early predictors of decreased community mobility among older men and women are useful in developing health promoting strategies. However, long-term prediction is rare, especially when it comes to including both public and private transportation. The present study describes factors associated with community mobility and decreased community mobility over time among older men and women. In total, 119 men and 147 women responded to a questionnaire in 1994 and 2007. Respondents were between 82 and 96 years old at follow-up. After 13 years, 40% of men and 43% of women had decreased community mobility, but 47% of men and 45% of women still experienced some independent community mobility. Cross-sectional independent community mobility among men was associated with higher ratings of subjective health, reporting no depression and more involvement in sport activities. Among women, cross-sectional independent community mobility was associated with better subjective health and doing more instrumental activities of daily living outside the home. Lower subjective health predicted decreased community mobility for both men and women, whereas self-reported health conditions did not. Consequently, general policies and individual interventions aiming to improve community mobility should consider older persons' subjective health.

  • 341.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Dahl, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Wretstrand, Anders
    Lunds universitet.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Community mobility in older men and women - a cross-sectional and 13 years prospective perspective2014In: Sharing traditions Creating futures, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 342.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Elgmark Andersson, Elisabeth
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Unsworth, Carolyn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. La Trobe University, Melbourne.
    Reliability of the Swedish Translation of the Australian Therapy Outcome Measures for Occupational Therapy (AusTOMs-OT-S)2014In: Sharing traditions, creating futures, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 343.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Elgmark Andersson, Elisabeth
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Unsworth, Carolyn
    School of Occupational Therapy, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria , Australia.
    The inter-rater and test-retest reliability of the Self-care and Transfer scales, and intra-rater reliability of all scales of the Swedish Translation of the Australian Therapy Outcome Measures for Occupational Therapy (AusTOMs-OT-S)2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 182-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The Australian Therapy Outcome Measures for Occupational Therapy (AusTOMs-OT) are used internationally to measure the outcomes of occupational therapy services across diagnoses, ages, and health care settings. This study reports on the inter-rater and test-retest reliability of the Self-care and Transfer scales as well as the intra-rater reliability of all scales of the Swedish (AusTOMs-OT-S) translation.

    Methods: Fifteen occupational therapists rated 11 case study clients on two occasions, separated by two weeks. Test-retest reliability and inter-rater reliability were calculated for the Self-care scale and Transfer scales. Moreover, intra-rater reliability was calculated for each of the 15 therapists across all 12 scales.

    Results: The inter-rater reliability intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were all found to be high to very high, ranging from ICC 0.762 to 0.904; the intra-rater reliability coefficients were also very good with 11 of the 15 therapists achieving ICCs of 0.745 or over, and finally the test-retest ICCs were also found to be high, ranging from 0.705 to 0.920.

    Conclusions: Although further research is required to confirm reliability, preliminary reliability of the AusTOMs-OT Swedish translation has been demonstrated and therapists can have confidence when using the scales.

  • 344.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Wretstrand, Anders
    Svensson, Helena
    Older people and local public transit; mobility effects of accessibility improvements in Sweden2010In: WFOT 15th International Congress of the World Federation of Occupational Therapists: Sharing the World of Occupation from Latin America, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 345.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Jönsson, Lena
    Londos, Yvonne
    Timén, Ewa
    AusTOMs för arbetsterapi.: Svensk version (1.0) av Australian Therapy Outcome Measures for Occupational Therapy2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 346.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Ernsth Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Life-space mobility and participation in daily activities and social life among older men and women2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Life-space mobility, i.e., the frequency and independence of transferring to different life-spaces (extending from a person’s bedroom to places beyond hometown), is evident to decrease in later life with potential risk of restricted participation in daily activities and social life. Modes of transport support participation through life-space mobility differently, and older men and women tend to choose different modes. The aim was to identify differences in participation in daily activities and social life related to life-space mobility and gender.

    Methods

    Data included the Life-Space Assessment (LSA), transportation, activities of daily living, and community activities. Participants living in their own housing in Sweden (n=312; 147 men, 165 women), aged 75+ (mean age 80), were randomly selected from a population register.

    Result

    LSA total score differed significantly (p<0.001) between men (mean=72) and women (mean=58), and between different modes of transport (p<0.001) with bike users (mean=79) and car drivers (mean=77) reaching the highest LSA total scores. Gender differences were evident related to mode of transport (p<0.001), with men predominantly (74%) driving their own car, while women were driving (32%), going by car as a passenger (32%) or used public transportation (21%). Participation in community activities did not differ significantly between genders, but between LSA total scores (p<0.001). For example, LSA total score was lower for persons taking part in no (mean=55) compared to five (mean=84) community activities at least once a month.

    Conclusion

    Life-space mobility is vital to consider when aiming to support continuing participation in daily activities and social life.

     

  • 347.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Linköpings universitet och Futurum, Länssjukhuset Ryhov.
    Ernsth Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Validitet och reliabilitet för Life-Space Assessment (LSA) - ett instrument för bedömning av äldre personers mobilitet2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Förmågan och möjligheter att förflytta (mobilitet) begränsas ofta i senare delen av livet, med negativa konsekvenser fördelaktighet i dagliga och sociala aktiviteter. Såväl i praktisk verksamhet som för forskning behövs instrument som kanbedöma mobilitet. The Life Space Assessment (LSA), utvecklat i USA, är bedömer en individs mobilitet genom attfokusera på förmågan att ta sig till olika “life-spaces”, från rummet där personen sover till platser bortom hemorten undersenaste månaden. LSA beaktar dessutom hur ofta detta sker, och om det sker med hjälpmedel eller hjälp av annanperson.

    Syfte: Syftet var att undersöka samtidig validitet och testa reliabilitet av LSAs svenska version.

    Metod: LSA översattes till svenska och inkluderades tillsammans med andra hälsorelaterade mått i en populationsbaserad studiemed slumpmässigt utvalda personer mellan 75 och 90 år (medelålder 81 år) i enskilt boende. LSA summerades till fyrapoängsummor, dvs total, oberoende, assisterad och maximal life-space poäng. 298 individer ingick i reliabilitetstudienoch besvarade LSA vid två tillfällen med 14 dagars mellanrum. 312 individer ingick i validitetsstudien där LSA jämfördesmed andra mobilitetsrelaterade mått.

    Resultat/preliminärt resultat: Det fanns inga signifikanta skillnader mellan skattningarna över tid för LSA fyra poängsummor. Medelvärdet för total life-space poäng var t ex 65 (22) och 65 (23) (max 120). Korrelationsvärden (ICC) mellan 0.84-0.94 visar på god till utmärktreliabilitet för total, oberoende och assisterad LSA. Vad gäller validitet påvisas signifikanta (p<0.01) och måttligt till godakorrelationer (0.50- 0.75) mellan LSAs fyra poängsummor och förmåga till förflyttning (överflyttning, balans, uppresningoch gångförmåga), transport (vardagliga resor och nöjesresor), och aktivitet i samhället (inköp och fritid)

    Slutsats: Den svenska versionen av LSA har god validitet samt god till utmärkt reliabilitet och kan med förtroende användas för attbedöma mobilitet hos äldre i enskilt boende.

  • 348.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Rosell, Sandra
    Mobilt geriatriskt team - till nytta för multisjuka äldre?!2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund:Mobila geriatriska team (MGT), bestående av läkare och sjuksköterska, har visat sig vara en framgångsrik resurs förmultisjuka äldre med upprepade inläggningar, mycket läkemedel och nedsatt ADL-förmåga. På Höglandet i Jönköpingslän arbetar sedan hösten 2013 ett MGT, som utöver läkare och sjuksköterska också erbjuder insatser från sjukgymnastoch arbetsterapeut under 15 veckor eller längre. MGT inkluderar ett geriatriskt arbetssätt som beaktar helalivssituationen, genom att lindra symtom och behandla sjukdomar, motverka funktionsnedsättningar och främjadelaktighet i aktivitet, för att göra det dagliga livet så bra och tryggt som möjligt för patienten och dennes närstående.Syfte:Projektets syfte är att utvärdera effekter och upplevd nytta av MGT.Metod:Hittills har 18 patienter i åldrarna mellan 65 och 84 fått insatser av teamet och data för utvärdering samlas kontinuerligt.Telefonintervjuer genomförs efter utskrivning med patient och/eller närstående kring upplevd nytta ochförbättringsmöjligheter. En enkät till berörd personal utanför MGT avser att belysa MGT ur ett deras perspektiv. Skattningmed Katz och COPM genomförd före MGT och direkt efter avslutad MGT, utgör ytterligare data, liksom demografiskauppgifter och måluppfyllelse. Uppgifter om besök till sjukvård och inläggning året före anslutning till MGT, under MGT-perioden samt tre respektive sex månader efter MGT registreras.Resultat/preliminärt resultat:Preliminära resultat visar på nöjdhet med MGT från patient/närstående, men också personal. ADL-förmåga påverkasinte. Däremot har 19 av 25 rehabiliteringsmål utvärderats som uppfyllda. Gruppen hade året innan anslutning till MGT 71inläggningar/akutbesök och under 6 månaders MGT-anslutning är motsvarande siffra 24. Om denna förändring kvarståröver tid har ännu inte analyserats, men kommer att kunna presenteras vid Arbetsterapiforum tillsammans med data sombeskrivits under metod.Slutsats:MGT förväntas bidra till att främja målgruppens hälsa, trygghet, aktivitetsnivå och motverka återinläggningar

  • 349.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Rosén, K G
    Landräddningen- structuring human support and volunteers the app way2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale for seminar and how it relates to the conference theme:

    New and good technological solutions are needed to enable older persons to age in place, i.e., to remain living in their own housing, with safety and security as long as possible (Swedish Institute of Assistive Technology, 2011). Importantly, ageing in place is the general policy in Sweden these days (National Board of Health and Welfare, 2011) and the municipalities are responsible for supporting older persons in their own housing. On the other hand a great deal of support to older persons is informal and provided by family caregivers, i.e., partners or relatives providing basic care (Johansson, Long & Parker, 2012). Moreover, technologies supporting ageing in place are likely to influence health in a positive way from both the older persons’ and their family caregiver’s perspective.

    “Landräddningen” provides a GPS-based extended safety and support system (ESS) available through a mobile phone application or a special unit that the user wears around the wrist. Both these (app and special unit) works outside the home, while the traditional PERS (personal emergency response system) provided by the municipalities works merely inside the users’ home. Importantly, it is a vital, societal goal that everyone, regardless of age, functional ability and circumstance in life feel secure also when participating in activities outside the home and being mobile in the community. Consequently, “Landräddningen” is an innovative, technological solution that supports ageing in place, by also filling a gap in social services. The user of “Landräddningen” could let family caregivers follow their position when they feel unsafe. It is also possible to establish a safe perimeter (geo fencing) for people with impaired orientation or memory. “Landräddningen” also provide a monitoring station that in case of an unplanned incident could search for available, listed volunteers that could support users on spot or in case of emergency alert ambulance or police. Given the GPS function and net of volunteers “Landräddningen” has a geographical and sectorial cross border functionality.

    The long term goal of “Landräddningen” is that nobody shall disappear, and that all of us shall have a good chance to receive quick support. In previous research including persons with dementia (pwd) using the same ESS that “Landräddningen” builds one, carers noted that pwd were more independent when engaged in activities dependent on community mobility. Staff considered that nearly half of pwd could remain living at home due to the ESS, compared with a third amongst carers.

    Objectives/Outcomes:

    The session will introduce and describe the services provided by “Landräddningen”. It will also give insight to previous research on the ESS used by “Landräddningen” focusing on users and care givers. Finally, current research on “Landräddningen” including preliminary results will be presented both from users’, care givers, ethical and organizational perspectives. The intent is also to give insight about the effects and benefits of a service like “Landräddningen”, but also challenges when introducing and implementing a service with cross border functionality and how these challenges could be successfully handled.

    Outline plan for the session plus timings (not included in word count):

    1. Brief introduction to “Landräddningen”
    2. Previous research on “Landräddningen”
    3. Current research on “Landräddningen”
    4. Implications for service like “Landräddningen” including experiences from introducing and implementing and how implementation challenges could be successfully handled.

     

    List of key references/resources (not included in word count):

    Johansson, L., Long, H. & Parker M.G. (2012) Informal caregiving for Elders in Sweden: An Analysis of Current Policy Developments Journal of Aging and Social Policy 23, 335-353.

    Magnusson, L., Samdman, L., Rosén, K.G., & Hanson, E. (2014) Extended saftey and support systems for people with dementia living at home Jounral of Assistive Technologies (; 188-206

    National Board of Health and Welfare. (2011). Bostad i särskilt boende är den enskildes hem [Living in Nursing homes are the Individual’s home]. Stockholm: National Board of Health and Welfare.

    Swedish Institute of Assistive Technology. (2011). Teknik för äldre [Technology for older people].   Retrieved 0830, 2013, from http://teknikforaldre.se/

  • 350.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Wretstrand, Anders
    Äldre mäns och kvinnors perspektiv på mobilitet och delaktighet2010In: Q-metodologi En velegnet måte å utforske subjektivitet / [ed] Arlene Arstad Thorsen och Eleanor Allgood, Trondheim: Tapir Akademisk forlag , 2010, 1, p. 123-140Chapter in book (Other academic)
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