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  • 301.
    Koutsogeorgou, Eleni
    et al.
    Neurological Institute Carlo Besta IRCCS Foundation, Milan, Italy.
    Maxwell, Gregor
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Aluas, Maria
    Centre for Bioethics, Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania.
    Moretti, Marta
    Zurich University of Teacher Education, Switzerland.
    Quintas, Rui
    Neurological Institute Carlo Besta IRCCS Foundation, Milan, Italy.
    Evaluating social capital indicators and national inclusive education policies in six European countries2012In: International Journal of Inclusive Education, ISSN 1360-3116, E-ISSN 1464-5173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates how measures of social capital correspond with inclusive education policies by linking both to the ICF-CY. The method employs cross-country comparative analyses of six European countries – Germany, Greece, Romania, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom – based on social capital indicators from the European Social Survey (Round 4-2008), along with comparison on the level of inclusive education policies within these countries by analyzing policies from a participation perspective. The results indicate that the ICF-CY is a useful tool for measuring both social capital and inclusive education policies, and although no connections could be drawn between social capital and inclusive education policy, the ICF-CY provided a consistent and common language for describing health and its related topics.

  • 302.
    Krenn, Elisabeth
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    School-based interventions supporting refugees and asylum seeking children in mainstream schools: A systematic literature review2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 303. Kuisma, Marja
    et al.
    Sandberg, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Preschool teachers' and student preschool teachers' thoughts about professionalism in Sweden 2008In: European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, ISSN 1350-293X, E-ISSN 1752-1807, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 186-195Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 304.
    Kyarkanaye, Thilendree
    et al.
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Dada, Shakila
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Samuels, Alecia E.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Collaboration in early childhood intervention services in Gauteng: caregiver perspectives2017In: Infants and young children, ISSN 0896-3746, E-ISSN 1550-5081, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 238-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A central tenant of early childhood intervention (ECI) is collaboration between professionals and the caregivers of children receiving these services. There are limited studies on caregiver perceptions of collaboration in ECI teams particularly in resource-limited countries. Sixty-four caregivers participated in this study by completing a questionnaire on their perceptions of collaboration in ECI services in South Africa. The questionnaire survey was administered in a group setting by a trained research assistant who was proficient in the Setswana language. The results revealed that caregivers have a good understanding of collaboration in ECI services. However, collaboration, in relation to family-centered practices, appeared to be undervalued by caregivers. These results are discussed and the limitations of the study as well as future recommendations are outlined.

  • 305.
    Kyriakidou, Despina
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Play integrated in physiotherapyy for children with chronic health conditions: A systematic literature review2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Play is the child’s natural world. According to psychoanalytical studies, play has an important role in children’s development, and the absence of play during a child’s life could lead to severe pathological implications. Based on this theory and being aware that physiotherapy treatment programs could be long lasting, tiresome and lacking motivation for children, this literature review presents a perspective regarding the integration of play within physiotherapy programs and examines the physical and emotional outcomes during this integration. Aim: To investigate the outcomes of integrating play in physiotherapy for children with chronic health conditions. Method: The research strategy for this review was a thorough search of peer-reviewed articles in the databases CINAHL and AMED which include articles from the fields of allied and complementary medicine, as well as the database Scope Med. Participants were children with chronic health conditions, ranging from 2-18 years old. In the term ‘play’ virtual reality and video game activities were included due to the lack of research. In addition, articles from a previous literature review conducted by the author were also included in the present paper. Results: The focus of researchers on children with CP and the lack of evidence for children with other health conditions, the persistence of physiotherapists to assess mainly physical outcomes and not emotional needs of children, and the measurement tools used for this purpose are presented. Conclusions: For children with chronic health conditions who attend physiotherapy sessions, play could serve as a mediate and an appropriate developmental approach in order to achieve physical and emotional changes. There is a need for physiotherapists to balance physical and emotional needs, and have a more ‘human’ relationship, rather than a ‘bodily’ - strict professional relationship with children. Although the information presented in this review is not considered as sufficient to draw conclusions, it could serve as a first step for researchers to study this integration in greater depth, and to focus on children with conditions other than CP.

  • 306.
    Kyriazopoulou, Mary
    et al.
    European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education.
    Bartolo, PaulEuropean Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education.Björck-Åkesson, EvaJönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.Giné, ClimentUniversitat Ramon Llull, Barcelona, Spain.Bellour, Flora
    Inclusive Early Childhood Education Environment: New Insights and Tools - Contributions from a European Study2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 307.
    Landin, Sebastian
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Valvassori, Alexander
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Inflytande och delaktighet i fritidshemmet: En kvalitativ studie om elevers uppfattningar av inflytande och delaktighet i fritidshemmet2018Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    I dagens skolor ska demokratiska medborgare formas, men vad uppfattar eleverna själva att de får vara med och bestämma samt hur delaktiga är de i beslutsfattande processer? Vad innebär inflytande och delaktighet för eleverna?

    Syftet med studien är att undersöka hur elever uppfattar att de har inflytande och delaktighet i fritidshemmet. Utifrån ovanstående syfte har vi formulerat följande frågeställningar:

    • Vad är elevers uppfattningar av inflytande och delaktighet?
    • Hur uppfattar eleverna sitt eget inflytande i fritidshemmets verksamhet?
    • Hur uppfattar eleverna sin egen delaktighet i fritidshemmets verksamhet?

    Studien utgår ifrån en kvalitativ forskningsmetod med en fenomenografisk ansats. Sex stycken elever deltog i intervjuerna. Studien utgår från barns perspektiv där elevers uppfattningar skulle synliggöras, tolkas och analyseras. Shiers (2001) modell som synliggör elevers inflytande och delaktighet användes som ett raster genom hela studien, med avsikt att synliggöra dess nivåer från inflytande till delaktighet i verksamheten. Analysen gav en övergripande bild av elevers uppfattningar utifrån de olika nivåerna. Resultatet visade att eleverna använde sig av en förslagslåda i fritidshemmet för att få sin röst hörd och såg förslagslådan som den största vägen till inflytande. Eleverna ville bli mer delaktiga i beslutsfattande processer som att få vara med och bestämma vad som ska köpas in till fritidshemmet samt när eleverna ska få vara inomhus och utomhus.

  • 308. Larsson, J-O
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Lichenstein, P
    Malmberg, K
    Edbom, T
    Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder and sense of coherence in teenagers: a prospective study2007In: ESCAP, August, Italy, Florence, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 309.
    Lazzarino, Lucio
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    LANGUAGE RELATED OUTCOMES OF BILINGUAL EDUCATION IN PRESCHOOL AND PRIMARY SCHOOL: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW FROM 2000 TO 20162017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Good language skills are essential to academic success. Immigrant and refugee children who enter school without previous knowledge of the societal language are more prone to failure and need of special support. The aim of this study is to describe bilingual educational program used in preschool and primary school and to examine their outcomes related to language development, both for the home language (L1) as well as the school language (L2). 17 studies were identified through a systematic literature review. Results showed a predominance of the transitional bilingual education (TBE) and two-way immersion (TWI) models in bilingual education. Language related outcomes confirmed the finding from previous literature that bilingual education doesn't inhibit L2 acquisition. Also, confirming previous literature, advantages of bilingual programs over monolingual ones are proven hard to confirm. However, several methodological issues addressed by the previous meta-analysis seem to generally persist in the most recent literature. The results of this study reiterate the need for more high- quality study in the field. Moreover, future research should also include experimentation with different languages. Finally, this argues the interest to further study and implement bilingual education programs to better accommodate the need of children with a migration background. 

  • 310. Lenardi, Mathilde
    et al.
    Chatterji, Somnath
    Ayuso-Mateos, Jose Luis
    Hollenweger, Judith
    Ustun, Bedirhan
    Kostanjek, Nenad Friedrich Ivan
    Newton, Alistair
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Francescutti, Carlo
    Alonso, Jordi
    Matucci, Marina
    Samoilescu, Adriana
    Good, Anne
    Cieza, Alarcos
    Svestkova, Olga
    Bullinger, Monica
    Marincek, Crt
    Burger, Helena
    Raggi, Alberto
    Bickenbach, Jerome Edmond
    From functioning and disability measurement to policy development: The experience of the EU-MHADIE Project (Measuring Health and Disability inEurope: supporting policy development)2010In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, ISSN ISSN 0963-8288, Vol. 32, no S1, p. 139-147Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 311.
    Leonardi, Matilde
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Neurology, Public Health and Disability Unit, Neurological Institute C. Besta IRRCS Foundation, Milan, Italy.
    Chatterji, Somnath
    Department of Health Statistics and Informatics, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Ayuso-Mateos, José Luís
    Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Hollenweger, Judith
    National Disability Authority, Dublin, Ireland.
    Üstün, Bedirhan
    Department of Health Statistics and Informatics, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Kostanjsek, Nenad Friedrich Ivan
    Department of Health Statistics and Informatics, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Newton, Alistair
    European Federation of Neurological Association, Brussels, Belgium.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication.
    Francescutti, Carlo
    Italian WHO Collaborating Centre for the Family of International Classifications, Friuli Venezia Giulia Region, Udine, Italy.
    Alonso, Jordi
    Health Services Research Unit, IMIM-Hospital del Mar, Barcelona, Spain.
    Matucci, Marina
    Regione Lombardia, Direzione Generale Famiglia e Solidarietà Sociale.
    Samoilescu, Adriana
    National Authority for the Persons with Handicap, Bucharest, Romania.
    Good, Anne
    National Disability Authority, Dublin, Ireland.
    Cieza, Alarcos
    Institute for Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany.
    Svestkova, Olga
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Bullinger, Monika
    Department for Medical Psychology, University Clinic of Hamburg-Eppendorf , Hamburg, Germany.
    Marincek, Crt
    Institute for Rehabilitation, Republic of Slovenia, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Burger, Helena
    Institute for Rehabilitation, Republic of Slovenia, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Raggi, Alberto
    Neurology, Public Health and Disability Unit, Neurological Institute C. Besta IRRCS Foundation, Milan, Italy.
    Bickenbach, Jerome Edmond
    Swiss Paraplegic Research (SPF), ICF Research Branch of the World Health Organization' Family of International Classifications Collaborating Center in Germany.
    Integrating research into policy planning: MHADIE policy recommendations2010In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 32, no S1, p. 139-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    MHADIE project (Measuring Health and Disability in Europe: Supporting policy development) aimed at developing realistic, evidence-based and effective national policies for persons with disabilities. A preliminary step towards this goal was the demonstration on the feasibility of employing the ICF in clinical, educational and statistical fields, which corresponds to the recognised need to enhance the European Union's capacity of analysis of disability, as highlighted in its Disability Action Plan 2006–2007. The ultimate outcome of the project is the production of 13 policy recommendations, dealing with statistics clinical and educational areas, and four general policy recommendations focusing on: (a) the need of coordinating and integrating disability conceptualisation at all policy levels and across sectors; (b) the need of conducing longitudinal cohort studies which include children aged 0–6; (c) the need of reviewing transportation policies in light of the requirements of persons with disabilities; (d) the need of reviewing all disability policies to emphasise and support the role of the family, which is a consistent and substantial environmental facilitator in the lives of persons with disabilities.

  • 312.
    Leung, Denise
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Ordqvist, Anna
    Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences (IMH), Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University & Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, UHL, County Council, Linköping, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Parsons, Rickard
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Facial emotion recognition and visual search strategies of children with high functioning autism and Asperger syndrome2013In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 7, no 7, p. 833-844Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adults with high functioning autism (HFA) and Asperger syndrome (AS) are often less able to identify facially expressed emotions than their matched controls. However, results regarding emotion recognition abilities in children with HFA/AS remain equivocal. Emotion recognition ability and visual search strategies of 26 children with HFA/AS and matched controls were compared. An eye tracker measured the number of fixations and fixation durations as participants were shown 12 pairs of slides, displaying photos of faces expressing anger, happiness or surprise. The first slide of each pair showed a face broken up into puzzle pieces. The eyes in half of the puzzle piece slides were bisected, while those in the remaining half were whole. Participants then identified which of three alternative faces was expressing the same emotion shown in the preceding puzzle piece slide. No differences between the participant groups were found for either emotion recognition ability or number of fixations. Both groups fixated more often on the eyes and performed better when the eyes were whole, suggesting that both children with HFA/AS and controls consider the eyes to be the most important source of information during emotion recognition. Fixation durations were longer in the group with HFA/AS, which indicates that while children with HFA/AS may be able to accurately recognise emotions, they find the task more demanding.

  • 313.
    Liao, Hua-Fang
    et al.
    National Taiwan University, Taiwan.
    Hwang, Ai-Wen
    Chang Gung University, Taiwan.
    Kang, Lin-Ju
    Chang Gung University, Taiwan.
    Liao, Ya-Tzu
    Chang Gung University, Taiwan.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Simeonsson, Rune J.
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA.
    Development of the FUNDES-Child and its implications for the education of Taiwanese children2018In: An emerging approach for education and care: Implementing a worldwide classification of functioning and disability / [ed] S. Castro & O. Palikara, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 85-110Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children and youth with special needs from age two to 18 years in Taiwan receive evaluation and services from both the Ministry of Health and Welfare and the Ministry of Education based on the People with Disabilities Rights Protection Act (Ministry of Health and Welfare, 2007) and the Special Education Act (Ministry of Education, 2014). On the basis of the earlier two acts, those children could apply for Disability Identification to receive related services, which are provided by the local social welfare department, and could also apply for special education services provided by the local educational department if they are going to attend preschool or higher-level school (both public and private). Special education placements range widely, from inclusion in regular classes in school to segregated setting in special education schools.

  • 314.
    Lidström, Helene
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University.
    Use of ICT in school: a comparison between students with and without physical disabilities2012In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 21-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to determine the information and communication technologies use in school activities of two groups of students with physical disabilities, comprised of those who did and those who did not use a computer-based assistive technology device (ATD) and to make a comparison with students from the general population. In addition, positive factors associated with in-school computer use are identified for students with physical disabilities. The method adopted was a cross-sectional survey about computer-based activities in school among students with physical disabilities (n = 287); including those who used (n = 127) and those who did not use (n  = 160) a computer-based ATD in school (mean age 13 years 6 months). Group comparisons were made with students from the general population (n  = 940). The results showed that the most frequent computer users were students with physical disabilities, who used a computer-based ATD daily. However, when considered as a group, students with physical disabilities used the computer for less varied educational activities than the reference group. Four factors had a positive association to ‘participation in computer activities in school’ for students with physical disabilities: attending a mainstream school, the students’ age (notably, being 16–18 years old), using a computer often in school, and the teachers using a computer frequently in teaching. The present study concludes that, regardless of whether they use a computer-based ATD or not, students with a physical disability have restricted participation in some computer-based educational activities in comparison to students from the general population. An individual plan could be beneficial for each student to: focus on the aim of the computer use; examine the students’ needs in terms of computer-based ATDs and their inclusion in education; and ensure that the students’ digital skills are fully utilised.

  • 315.
    Lillvist, Anne
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Preschool children in need of special support: prevalence of traditional disability categories and functional difficulties2010In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 99, no 1, p. 131-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To investigate the prevalence of children who are in need of special support in the total population of children attending preschools (CA 1–6) in two Swedish counties, and the functional problems exhibited by the children in relation to demographical and environmental factors in the preschool context.

    Method: Survey distributed to (N = 1138) preschools in two Swedish counties.

    Results:The majority of children perceived by preschool teachers and in need of special support were undiagnosed children with functional difficulties related to speech, language and interaction with peers.

    Conclusion: Undiagnosed and diagnosed children share the same type of difficulties. Thus, in estimating the prevalence of children in need of special support in a preschool context, traditional disability categories capture only a small proportion of the children experiencing difficulties. Therefore, a functional approach in studies of children in need of special support is recommended.

  • 316.
    Lillvist, Anne
    et al.
    School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Anette
    School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    The construct of social competence: how preschool teachers define social competence in young children2009In: International Journal of Early Childhood, ISSN 0020-7187, E-ISSN 1878-4658, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 51-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preschool teachers share their environment with young children on a daily basis and interventions promoting social competence are generally carried out in the preschool setting. The aim was to find out if and how preschool teachers' definitions of social competence are related to factors in the preschool environment like: a) the number of children having problems related to social competence; b) the support provided to the children; and c) the preschool environment and current research definitions. Method: 481 preschools from 22 municipalities in Sweden participated. Data was analyzed using a mixed methods design in which a qualitative content analysis was followed by group comparisons using quantitative methods. Results: Preschool teachers defined social competence mainly as intrapersonal skills, or as interpersonal relations. The definitions of social competence were not related to the numbers of children having problems related to social skills or social competence in units, the amount of the support provided to the children or the preschool environment. Conclusion: Preschool teachers' definitions of social competence are partly multidimensional, which implies that the interventions aimed at promoting children's social skills and social competence also should be multidimensional. Preschool teachers' definitions of social competence have little relevance to environmental factors, which indicate that social competence, as a construct is more dependent upon perceptions of the individual than on contextual factors.

  • 317.
    Lindqvist, Gunilla
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Other School Based Research.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Other School Based Research.
    Making schools inclusive? Educational leaders' views on how to work with children in need of special support2013In: International Journal of Inclusive Education, ISSN 1360-3116, E-ISSN 1464-5173, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 95-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Educational leaders have a comprehensive responsibility for how preschools and schools work with children in need of special educational support. The aim of this research is to study how educational leaders (a) explain why children have problems in schools, (b) consider how preschools/schools should help children in need of special support and (c) the role they believe that Special Educational Needs Coordinators (SENCOs) should have in such work. Educational leaders (N = 45) working in preschools and regular compulsory schools in a Swedish municipality responded (100%) to a questionnaire. According to the results of this study, this group seems to view difficulties in schools as being caused primarily by individual shortcomings. Educational leaders often advocate solutions that are closely linked to the work of special educators. The educational leaders believe SENCOs should work with supervising staff and focus on documentation and evaluations. Preschool leaders attribute children's need of special support to teachers more often than their colleagues in compulsory schools.

  • 318.
    Lojk, Manca
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Promoting peer interactions of preschool children with behavior problems: A Systematic Literature Review2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Behavior problems are quite common in preschool.  Without effective intervention, children with behavior problems are at risk for rejection by teachers, peers and academic failure. But many children in preschool are not diagnosed and are not getting the support they need. At the age of two, children can show both prosocial and aggressive behavior with peers. Researchers stress the importance of positive peer relationships in childhood, because early childhood is the time children learn how to interact with each other. Through peer interactions children develop social, cognitive and language skills. The aim of this systematic literature review is to identify, and critically analyze, special support in preschool which promote peer interaction of children with behavior problems (age of 2-5 years). Five studies, with different interventions have been found through the search procedure. The results show that all the implemented interventions had positive effect on peer interactions and did reduce behavior problems in the classrooms. The results show that the studies focused on different behavior problems, but aggression was found in all the articles.  The studies were focused on different participants in order to influence behavior problems and peer interactions. Four major groups of special support orientations were found: Teacher oriented support, Team-based oriented support, Peer oriented support and Support oriented toward target children. This review presents a good overview on available special support in preschool settings, however more research still needs to be done.

  • 319.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Mälardalen University.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Participation profiles in domestic life and peer relations as experienced by adolescents with and without impairments and long-term health conditions2019In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 27-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To investigate how individual and environmental factors relate to self-reported participation profiles in adolescents with and without impairments or long-term health conditions.

    METHODS: A person-oriented approach (hierarchical cluster analysis) was used to identify cluster groups of individuals sharing participation patterns in the outcome variables frequency perceived importance in domestic life and peer relations. Cluster groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA).

    RESULTS: A nine-cluster solution was chosen. All clusters included adolescents with impairment and long-term health conditions. Perceived importance of peer relations was more important than frequent attendance in domestic-life activities. Frequency of participation in dialogues and family interaction patterns seemed to affect the participation profiles more than factors related to body functions.

    CONCLUSION: Type of impairment or long-term health condition is a weaker determinant of membership in clusters depicting frequency and perceived importance in domestic life or peer relations than dialogue and family environment.

  • 320.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Department of Psychology, Faculty of Education, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Department of Special Education, Oslo University, Oslo, Norway.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Factors Associated With Participation and Change Over Time in Domestic Life, Peer Relations, and School for Adolescents With and Without Self-Reported Neurodevelopmental Disorders. A Follow-Up Prospective Study2018In: Frontiers in Education, ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 3, p. 1-13, article id 28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though participation in everyday events is a vital part in the fulfilment of human rights, adolescents with neurodevelopmental disorders often face participation restrictions in every-day activities. Few studies have investigated the predictors for participation in different contexts, over time and in relation to the same outcome variables. The objective of the current study was therefore to investigate predictors of change in participation operationalized as frequency of attendance and perceived importance in domestic life activities, peer related activities, and school activities as experienced by adolescents with and without self-reported neurodevelopmental disorders. Method: Associations with participation, both in terms of frequency and perceived importance, in domestic life, peer relations, and the school setting were investigated using six independent variables measuring experience of time and self, sex, age, stress, support from siblings, and atmosphere in family at two-time (with approximately 2 years in between). The sample consisted of adolescents with and without self-reported neurodevelopmental disorders (n= 916). Adolescents with self-reported neurodevelopmental disorders were n=154 and adolescents without self-reported neurodevelopmental disorders was n= 762. Data was collected via self-reported questionnaires administered in schools. Results: Three key findings are presented. 1) more factors were associated with participation outcomes at time1 for adolescents without NDD than for adolescents with NDD, but this difference in the number of factors decreases with time; 2) few associations were related to time for both adolescents with and without NDD; and 3) patterns of predicting variables were different for adolescents with and without NDD. Conclusion: The findings indicate that the factors related to participation in and outside school differs between groups, when the impairment or disability is not considered as a predictor for participation. This study supports the need for using a multidimensional developmental and contextual perspective in addressing enhanced participation for adolescents with neurodevelopmental disorders.

  • 321.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Donohue, Dana
    Centre for Augumentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Bornman, Juan
    Centre for Augumentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    A Systematic review of Generic and Special Needs of Children with Disabilities Living in Poverty Settings in Low- and Middle-Income Countries2013In: Journal of Policy Practice, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 296-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children with disabilities living in poverty settings in low and middle-income countries are particularly in need of special support designed to meet the needs occurring in an environment where poverty is prevalent and resources are scarce. This paper presents a systematic review of the needs of children with disabilities living in poverty settings in low and middle-income countries using Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs as a theoretical framework.  The findings demonstrate that needs at the first level of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs are more frequently researched in low and middle-income countries.  Higher order needs should be further explored and children’s own voices should be taken into consideration when performing research, designing policies and services aiming at increased service user empowerment.

  • 322.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Kapetanovic, S.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Short-term longitudinal participation trajectories related to domestic life and peer relations for adolescents with and without self-reported neurodevelopmental impairmentsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 323.
    Madsen, Jennifer
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Rosengren, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Barns möjligheter i ateljén: -En fallstudie om förskolebarns möjligheter till kreativt skapande i ateljémiljön2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med studien är att skapa kunskap om barns möjligheter till estetiska uttrycksformer i ateljémiljöer. För att kunna besvara detta har vi använt oss av en kvalitativ forskningsmetod. Vi har därför genomfört en fallstudie på en förskola som är Reggio Emilia-inspirerad, där vi har intervjuat två förskollärare samt två förskolebarn i femårsåldern. Vi har även observerat förskolans verksamma ateljémiljö. Vårt insamlade material presenterar vi sedan med hjälp av en tematisk analysmetod.

     

    Våra forskningsfrågor som väglett oss genom studiens gång är:

    -         På vilket sätt utgör atlején i förskolan en plats där barn får möjlighet att behärska alla typer av tekniker som målning, teckning och arbete med lera?

    -         På vilket sätt utgör ateljén i förskolan en plats där förskollärare samt barnen i verksamheten blir inspirerade till att utforska tankar och idéer som uppstår i verksamheten?

     

    I denna fallstudie har vi utgått från Nordin Hultman (2004) som är legitimerad barnpsykolog och filosofie doktor samt Vecchi (2010) som är en välrenommerad ateljerista inom Reggio Emiliafilosofin. Det finns även vissa inslag av det sociokulturella perspektivet.

     

    Ett av resultaten i studien var att ateljéns placering på förskolan påverkade användandet av den. Av informanterna kom det fram att verksamheten påverkades av att ateljén inte ligger visuellt synlig och därför inte används i den grad man hade önskat. Det andra resultatet var att miljön i ateljén bör vara uppbyggd på ett tillåtande sätt. I den vetenskapliga forskningen framförs det att det är viktigt att materialet är placerat så att barnen själva kan ta av det samt att materialet synliggörs. Av informanterna framkom det att barnens möjligheter till estetiska uttrycksformer påverkas av materialets placering samt hur förskollärarnas inställning är till en tillåtande atmosfär.

  • 324.
    Mahdi, Soheil
    et al.
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders at Karolinska Institutet (KIND), Division of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Albertowski, Katja
    Experimental Developmental Psychopathology, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine of the TU Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
    Almodayfer, Omar
    Mental Health Department, KAMC-R, MNGHA, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Arsenopoulou, Vaia
    Theotokos Foundation, Athens, Greece.
    Carucci, Sara
    Child & Adolescent Neuropsychiatric Unit, Department of Biomedical Science, University of Cagliari.
    Dias, José Carlos
    Childhood and Adolescence Psychiatry Department, Oporto Hospital Centre, Porto, Portugal.
    Khalil, Mohammad
    Human Development Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Knüppel, Ane
    Aalborg University Hospital Psychiatry, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Langmann, Anika
    Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, University Hospital of Marburg, Germany.
    Lauritsen, Marlene Briciet
    Aalborg University Hospital, Clinical Institute, Aalborg, Denmark.
    da Cunha, Graccielle Rodrigues
    TEAMM Clinic, Department of Psychiatry, Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo, Brazil.
    Uchiyama, Tokio
    Japan Centre for Applied Autism Research, Department of Clinical Psychology, Taisho University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Wolff, Nicole
    Experimental Developmental Psychopathology, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine of the TU Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
    Selb, Melissa
    ICF Research Branch, A Cooperation Partner Within the WHO Collaborating Centre for the Family of International Classifications in Germany (at DIMDI), Nottwil, Switzerland.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    de Vries, Petrus J.
    Division of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
    Bölte, Sven
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders at Karolinska Institutet (KIND), Division of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    An International Clinical Study of Ability and Disability in Autism Spectrum Disorder Using the WHO-ICF Framework2018In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 2148-2163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the fourth international preparatory study designed to develop International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF, and Children and Youth version, ICF-CY) Core Sets for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Examine functioning of individuals diagnosed with ASD as documented by the ICF-CY in a variety of clinical settings. A cross-sectional study was conducted, involving 11 units from 10 countries. Clinical investigators assessed functioning of 122 individuals with ASD using the ICF-CY checklist. In total, 139 ICF-CY categories were identified: 64 activities and participation, 40 body functions and 35 environmental factors. The study results reinforce the heterogeneity of ASD, as evidenced by the many functional and contextual domains impacting on ASD from a clinical perspective.

  • 325.
    Mahdi, Soheil
    et al.
    Division of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), CAP Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ronzano, Nadia
    Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatric Unit, Department of Biomedical Science, University of Cagliari, Italy.
    Knüppel, Ane
    Research Unit for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Dias, José Carlos
    Childhood and Adolescence Psychiatry Department, Oporto Hospital Centre, Porto, Portugal.
    Albdah, Ayman
    Child Psychiatry Division, King Abdullah Specialist Children Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Chien-Ho, Lin
    Department of Psychiatry, Chimei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Almodayfer, Omar
    Mental Health Department, KAMC-R, MNGHA, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Bluschke, Annet
    Cognitive Neurophysiology, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Technical University, Dresden, Germany.
    Karande, Sunil
    Learning Disability Clinic, Department of Paediatrics, Seth GS Medical College and KEM Hospital, Parel, India.
    Huang, Huei-Lin
    Institute of Behavioral Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, National Chen Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Christiansen, Hanna
    Department of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg, Germany.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work.
    de Vries, Petrus J.
    Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Coghill, David
    Departments of Paediatrics and Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
    Tannock, Rosemary
    Research Institute of the Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
    Rohde, Luis
    ADHD Outpatient Program, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    Bölte, Sven
    Division of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), CAP Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    An international clinical study of ability and disability in ADHD using the WHO-ICF framework2018In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 27, no 10, p. 1305-1319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the fourth and final study designed to develop International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF, and children and youth version, ICF-CY) core sets for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). To investigate aspects of functioning and environment of individuals with ADHD as documented by the ICF-CY in clinical practice settings. An international cross-sectional multi-centre study was applied, involving nine units from eight countries: Denmark, Germany, India, Italy, Portugal, Saudi Arabia, Sweden and Taiwan. Clinicians and clinical researchers rated the functioning level of 112 children, adolescents and adults with ADHD using the extended ICF-CY checklist version 2.1a. The ratings were based on a variety of information sources, such as medical records, medical history, clinical observations, clinical questionnaires, psychometric tests and structured interviews with participants and family members. In total, 113 ICF-CY categories were identified, of which 50 were related to the activities and participation, 33 to environmental factors and 30 to body functions. The clinical study also yielded strengths related to ADHD, which included temperament and personality functions and recreation and leisure. The study findings endorse the complex nature of ADHD, as evidenced by the many functional and contextual domains impacted in ADHD. ICF-CY based tools can serve as foundation for capturing various functional profiles and environmental facilitators and barriers. The international nature of the ICF-CY makes it possible to develop user-friendly tools that can be applied globally and in multiple settings, ranging from clinical services and policy-making to education and research. 

  • 326.
    Mahdi, Soheil
    et al.
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Division of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Viljoen, Marisa
    Division of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Yee, Tamara
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
    Selb, Melissa
    ICF Research Branch, a cooperation partner within the WHO Collaborating Centre for the Family of International Classifications in Germany (at DIMDI), Nottwil, Switzerland.
    Singhal, Nidhi
    Action for Autism, The National Centre for Autism, New Delhi, India.
    Almodayfer, Omar
    Mental Health Department, KAMC-R, MNGHA, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    de Vries, Petrus J.
    Division of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie
    Bolte, Sven
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Division of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    An international qualitative study of functioning in autism spectrum disorder using the World Health Organization international classification of functioning, disability and health framework2018In: Autism Research, ISSN 1939-3792, E-ISSN 1939-3806, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 463-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the third in a series of four empirical studies designed to develop International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Sets for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The present study aimed to describe functioning in ASD (as operationalized by the ICF) derived from the perspectives of diagnosed individuals, family members, and professionals. A qualitative study using focus groups and semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 stakeholder groups (N = 90) from Canada, India, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, and Sweden. Meaningful concepts from the focus groups and individual interviews were linked to ICF categories using a deductive qualitative approach with standardized linking procedures. The deductive qualitative content analysis yielded meaningful functioning concepts that were linked to 110 ICF categories across all four ICF components. Broad variation of environmental factors and activities and participation categories were identified in this study, while body functions consisted mainly of mental functions. Body structures were sparsely mentioned by the participants. Positive aspects of ASD included honesty, attention to detail, and memory. The experiences provided by international stakeholders support the need to understand individuals with ASD in a broader perspective, extending beyond diagnostic criteria into many areas of functioning and environmental domains. This study is part of a larger systematic effort that will provide the basis to define ICF Core Sets for ASD, from which assessment tools can be generated for use in clinical practice, research, and health care policy making.

  • 327.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Alternative cognitive strategies (?) while solving spatial-mathematical tasks: Pupils with motor disabilities participating in a qualitative experiment1999In: European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction, 1999, p. 335-Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 328.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Choice of upper secondary school for pupils with severe motor disabilities: Results from a research review2007In: The 6th World Congress on Conductive Education, August 19-22, 2007 in Göteborg, Sweden, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 329.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Educational progress2006Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 330.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Expectations on pupils with motor disabilities in school often too low: Why?2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 331.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    For what it's worth: How pupils in need of special support are valued, within different local school ideologies, in an evolving school market2014In: For what it's worth: How pupils in need of special support are valued, within different local school ideologies, in an evolving school market, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish education system encompasses goals towards inclusion, where all schools according to the school law also shall work towards equity. Such ambitions may can be seen as contradictory to business goals and principles of competition in an evolving school market. The aim of the study is to describe solutions used in five schools, classified as having different local school ideologies, in their work with Pupils in Need of Special Support (PNSS) and to describe motives for these solutions.

    Eight schools were initially chosen, in a stratified purposeful sampling procedure, from 546 independent comprehensive schools answering a national survey comprising all independent comprehensive schools in Sweden (response rate 79,5%). These schools have previously been classified within a theoretical framework related to inclusion. They represent very clearly different value patterns in relation to inclusion.

    Three schools are labelled holistic-inclusive and two schools are labelled market-oriented-exclusive. Holistic-inclusive local school ideologies are fully in line with inclusion whereas market-oriented-exclusive local school ideologies show a value pattern which is entirely the opposite. These five schools were finally chosen for this study.

    Interview data from semi-structured interviews with principals, special educators, class-teachers, pupils in need of special support and class-teachers provide major source of data. The data was analysed in regard to school situations for Pupils in Need of Special Support (PNSS).

    Preliminary results show substantial differences between schools with different local school ideologies in allocation of resources and competence to pupils in need of special needs. The resources allocated to pupils in need of special support are restricted in market-oriented-exclusive schools. This may be seen as an indication that neither the pupils’ needs nor goals of equity are of high priority in these schools. Results show the opposite situation in holistic-inclusive schools.

    Private equity companies have been questioned as owners of schools due to profit demands. Interview data show that the situation in some schools with private owners may be an complication as well in regard to goals of inclusion and equity.

  • 332.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Gymnasieval för ungdomar med svåra rörelsehinder: En forskningsöversikt. Delrapport2006Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 333.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Gymnasieval för ungdomar med svåra rörelsehinder: Slutrapport från regeringsuppdrag2007Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 334.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Hemskola i stället för resursskola för "Elever I Specifika Skolsvårigheter"2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med studien är att undersöka hur skolledare och lärare vid tre grundskolor i Jönköpings kommun arbetar med elever i mycket stort behov av särskilt stöd. Eleverna kallas i studien för Elever I Specifika Skolsvårigheter (EISS). En resursskoleplacering har varit en ofta använd lösning i de fall som elevernas egna skolor (hemskolor) inte har lyckats utforma en tillfredsställande skolsituation för eleverna. Jönköpings kommun har beslutat om nedläggning av centrala särskilda undervisningsgrupper (resursskolan) i kommunen.

    Tre grundskolor har studerats då de haft likvärdiga elevupptagningsområden och liknat varandra i ett flertal andra avseenden. Däremot har det varit stora skillnader i antalet resursskoleplaceringar under en studerad tioårsperiod. Skola 1 har till skillnad mot skolorna 2 och 3 endast i undantagsfall haft en elev placerad inom resursskolan. Det är små skillnader mellan skolorna i antal elever som har gått på de tre skolorna under tioårsperioden.

    Intervjuer och enkäter har använts vid de tre skolorna för att studera lärares och skolledares beskrivningar av specialpedagogiskt arbete och med särskilt fokus på arbetet med EISS. En mixed research design (Creswell, 2009) har använts.

    Intervjuer och enkätuppgifter visar på stora skillnader mellan skolorna i ett stort antal aspekter som kan ses som relaterade till skolsituationen för Elever I Specifika Skolsvårigheter. De viktigaste skillnaderna är relaterade till skolledningen och specialpedagogfunktionens möjligheter att arbeta inkluderande. Det finns flera beskrivningar på skola 1 som visar på en hög grad av samsyn bland de anställda vad gäller värdegrund, vilket sannolikt har haft en stor betydelse för hur skolan skiljer sig från övriga två skolor.

  • 335.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Kunskapsutveckling hos elever med rörelsehinder: Delstudie I: Resultat och erfarenheter från den nationella utvärderingen av grundskolan 19951998Report (Other academic)
  • 336.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Kunskapsutveckling hos elever med rörelsehinder: Delstudie II: Resultat på prov för elever med rörelsehinder vid arbete med anpassat provmaterial2000Report (Other academic)
  • 337.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Kunskapsutveckling hos elever med rörelsehinder: Delstudie III: Kognitiva strategier vid arbete med matematikuppgifter med spatialt innehåll2001Report (Other academic)
  • 338.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Lärande med rörelsehinder: Studier av förutsättningar och möjligheter för kunskapsutveckling i skolan2001Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 339.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    PSSD in schools?: A comparison between three elementary schools dealing with behavioural issues2014In: NERA 42nd Congress, Education for Sustainable Development, Lillehammer, March 5 - 7, 2014., 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study, using a mixed methods research design, was to describe differences between elementary schools in their work with pupils described to be Pupils in Specific School Difficulties (PSSD). This group of pupils, consists of pupils who in many cases have had their education in a special school called a resource school. These special schools are administered at the central level, in the municipality where the study was done. An important finding in the beginning of this study, was that the distribution of placements from elementary schools to these special schools, were unequally distributed within the municipality. Placements in special schools during a period of ten years have been studied. Three elementary schools were selected having the same or almost the same socio-economic conditions in their vicinities. The number of placements as well as the relative frequency of placements (placements/school size) in special schools, differs to a large degree between these three schools. Two of the schools have every year, in average, had one of their pupils placed in a special school. The third school, however, have almost never had such a placement during the ten year period. This school distinguished itself by staff being in complete agreement on the positive value of inclusion. This particular school has succeeded in keeping almost all their pupils without any indication that, while attending to their special needs, this in any way deprived other pupils of their rightful learning. This study differs clearly from other research that reports differences between schools as a consequence of an intervention or a particular strategic application as derived from theoretical models. The results of this study are rather due to varying cultural patterns in the three participating schools even though they share the same values as expressed in the National Curriculum. This study contributes to an understanding of working with complex behavioural issues within school cultures; issues of a kind not easily examined by evidence-based research. It also clearly describes hindrances for inclusion.

  • 340.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Results for pupils with motor disabilities related to explanation models when using accommodated assessment instruments1999Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 341.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Resursskolan - en lösning för elever i skolsvårigheter?2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Resursskolans verksamhet i Eksjö kommun har utvärderats. Fyra frågeställningar i kommunens beställning, har varit utgångspunkt för undersökningen: 1. Hur fungerar resursskolan?, 2. Vad var tanken från början med resursskolan och hur blev det?, 3. Vad är resultatet med utgångspunkt från tilldelade resurser? och slutligen 4. Finns det alternativ utifrån aktuell forskning?

    Åtta grupper har ingått i utvärderingen som är en intressentutvärdering. Grupperna är så kallade naturligt avgränsade grupper. Grupperna är valda för att ge kunskap om olika intressenters perspektiv. De åtta ingående grupperna är 1. Elever som vid tillfället går på resursskolan, 2. Elever som tidigare har gått i resursskolan, 3. Föräldrar till elever på resursskolan tillsammans med föräldrar till elever som tidigare gått på resurskolan, 4. Resursskolans personal, 5. Rektorer på elevernas hemskolor, 6. Ledningspersonal inom Elevhälsan tillika ledningsgrupp för resursskolan, 7. Sektorsledningen för kommunens skolsektor och 8. Barn- och ungdomsutskottet (politiskt utskott).

    Resultat från gruppintervju- och fokusgruppsintervjuer visar att resursskoleverksamheten har fungerat utifrån de målsättningar resursskolan startades utifrån. Den startades utifrån sociala och ekonomiska mål i första hand snarare än skolmål.

    Ett huvudmål som var tydligt beskrivet när resursskolan startade var att resursskolans verksamhet skulle göra att eleverna skulle kunna återvända till hemskolan. Det saknades underlag som beskriver om och i så fall i vilken utsträckning som elever kommer tillbaka till sina hemskolor. Den tidigare verksamhetsplan som fanns för resursskolan, med en tydlig målsättning att eleverna skulle återgå till hemskolans ordinarie klass, är ersatt av styrkort. I detta styrkort finns inget uttalat mål specifikt för resursskolan utan beskriver mål av allmän karaktär på individnivå. Till avsaknaden av tydlig målbeskrivning för resursskolan saknas även en systematiskt uppföljning med kvalitetsredovisningar. Svaren i fokusgrupperna visar att det förekommer många olika beskrivningar av vad som är målet med resursskolan.

    Ett återkommande problem enligt flera beskrivningar är att insatser och åtgärder sätts in för sent för elever som får sin placering på resursskolan. Det blir reaktiva åtgärder i stället för proaktiva. För att komma tillrätta med denna problematik föreslås att kommunens skolverksamhet i större utsträckning utformas utifrån ett förebyggande specialpedagogiskt perspektiv.

  • 342.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Rh-anpassad gymnasieutbildning: Slutrapport från regeringsuppdrag2004Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 343.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Rh-anpassad utbildning vid riksgymnasier: Uppgifter från skolbesök samt beskrivning av personkrets. Delrapport2002Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 344.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Local School Ideologies and Inclusion: The Case of Swedish Independent Schools2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on the development of a framework for the classification of local school ideologies in relation to inclusion that provides a tool for classifying the general educational direction as well as work with pupils in need of special support of individual schools. The framework defines different aspects of local school ideology in terms of values related to the societal level, school level, and individual level of the education system. The paper also reports on a study exploring variations among Swedish independent schools, concerning local school ideology using the framework as a theoretical tool. In this qualitative analysis, eight schools were selected from results of a questionnaire to all Swedish independent schools (return rate 79.5%) for further analysis based on interviews with different categories of school personnel, parents, and pupils. Five different patterns of local school ideologies were found more or less in line with values of inclusion, e.g. the holistic – inclusive and the market oriented – exclusive. Results are discussed in relation to the multiple and sometimes competing objectives that every school has to deal with and make priorities between. Implications for pupils in need of special support in a school system rapidly undergoing marketization are finally discussed.

  • 345.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Malmö högskola.
    Children diagnosed with AD/HD in the Swedish comprehensive school system2014In: ECER 2014 "The Past, the Present and Future of Educational Research in Europe", Porto, 1 - 5 September 2014., 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children are increasingly diagnosed with neuropsychiatric disorders which is an expression of the contemporary increase in the medicalization of deviance. In several countries there have been fierce debates about the pros and cons of diagnosing children. Yet little is known about the teaching of these pupils. The purposes of the presented studies were to provide an overall picture of the education of children with AD/HD in the Swedish comprehensive school and to more closely analyze educational arrangements designed in order to meet the needs of these children.  

     

    Two studies were made. Firstly, a questionnaire was sent to all Swedish municipalities regarding their education of children diagnosed with AD/DH. Several measures were taken in order to secure valid and reliable data and to achieve a high response rate (76 %). Secondly, case studies were made in 5 municipalities with groups especially designed for children with AD/HD and 5 municipalities without. Data from both studies will be presented. However, the focus will be on educational arrangements and teaching strategies in the groups specifically designed for children with AD/HD in comparison with school situations for pupils with AD/HD in municipalities without such groups.

  • 346.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Malmö högskola.
    Forskarrapport: Särskilt stöd och kunskapsmål - en kartläggning av effektforskning2014In: Fristående skolor för elever i behov av särskilt stöd: En kartläggning, Stockholm: Skolverket , 2014, , p. 30p. 89-118Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 347.
    Mattinson, Shani
    et al.
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Black, Melissa H
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Participation profiles and the barriers and facilitators that impact on participation of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders living in regional and remote Western Australia2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychology, E-ISSN 2245-8875, Vol. 6, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a heterogeneous condition, influencing participation in activity and occupation. Approximately, 1% of Australian children have an ASD diagnosis, with many of these families living in remote and regional areas. Given the environments role in facilitating or hindering participation, there is a need to understand how geographical location impacts the participation profiles of children with ASD. Objective: This study aims to describe the participation profiles, and environmental barriers and facilitators to participation for children with ASD living in regional or remote Western Australia.

    Methods:

    A total of 32 families completed a questionnaire pack including a socio-demographic questionnaire and the Participation and Environment Measure – Children and Youth.

    Results:

    Children with ASD had reduced participation in community activities. Within the home, children most commonly participated in computer and video games, and in school settings, children participated rarely in non-classroom and extracurricular activities. Parents reported a desire for their children to decrease time spent engaging in video games and increase time spent in the community, socializing, engaging in extracurricular activities, and completing chores. Parents reported a number of barriers to participation across community, home, and school settings.

    Conclusion:

    Children with ASD living in regional areas had restricted participation profiles and a number of barriers to participation as reported by their parents. There is a need for additional support and services in non- metropolitan areas for families of children with ASD to increase participation. This study also highlights the need to expand the definition of participation in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health to include aspects of involvement.

  • 348.
    Maxwell, Gregor
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Bringing more to participation: Participation in school activities of persons with disability within the framework of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth (ICF-CY)2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As societies the world over move towards defining inclusive and effective education systems this presents the educator with the new challenge of providing an equal and democratic education environment for all students. With children the nature of functioning and environmental settings varies greatly in comparison with adults and assessing children’s involvement in activities is of particular importance to ensure effective and inclusive society building through education. Building on the existing and previous participation research this thesis specifically aims to provide a means to theorize participation from two perspectives (frequency of attending and intensity of involvement) and put in to operation using five dimensions of the environment: availability, accessibility, affordability, accommodability, and acceptability. Contextually this has been done by investigating children in need of additional support (including children with disabilities) at school. Results indicate that while research and theory take a holistic and balanced approach by using participation based on two perspectives, this has yet to filter down to practice. A new approach to measuring inclusive education using social capital, the five environmental dimensions, and the ICF-CY is proposed and tested. However, while the ICF-CY provides a consistent descriptive framework, no clear connections between social capital and inclusive education policy could be drawn and the five environmental dimensions – especially the involvement-related ones – need further development. The final paper presents evidence from the individual perspective for a third ICF-CY activities and participation qualifier to represent the subjective experience of involvement. Participation can thus be regarded as a multi-dimensional phenomenon with two main conceptual roots: sociology and developmental psychology.

  • 349.
    Maxwell, Gregor
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Alves, Ines
    School of Education, University of Manchester, UK.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Participation and environmental aspects in education and the ICF and the ICF-CY: findings from a systematic literature review2012In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 63-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This paper presents findings from a systematic review of the literature related to participation and the ICF/ICF-CY in educational research.

    Objectives: To analyse how and investigate the application of participation in educational research. Specifically, how participation is related to the environmental dimensions availability, accessibility, affordability, accommodability and acceptability.

    Methods: A systematic literature review using database keyword searches and refinement protocols using inclusion and exclusion criteria at abstract, full-text and extraction.

    Results: Four hundred and twenty-one initial works were found. Twenty-three met the inclusion criteria. Availability and accommodations are the most investigated dimensions. Operationalization of participation is not always consistent with definitions used.

    Conclusion: Research is developing a holistic approach to investigating participation as, although all papers reference at least one environmental dimension, only four of the 11 empirical works reviewed present a fully balanced approach when theorizing and operationalizing participation; hopefully this balanced approach will continue and influence educational policy and school practice.

  • 350.
    Maxwell, Gregor
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Alves, Ines
    Consiglio Nazionale sulla Disabilità (CND), Italy.
    Moretti, Marta
    Pädagogische Hochschule Zürich, Switzerland.
    A Systematic Literature Review of the ICF/ICF-CY in Education: A Useful Tool for Inclusion or a Flight of Fantasy?2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) is meant to be a universal language for professionals working with functioning and health in children and adults. So far most applications of ICF have been in the field of health sciences. Is it also applicable to education? This paper aims to present the outcome of a systematic literature review in the fields of education, more specifically education of children with disabilities or special educational needs and the ICF. Devised as a complementary classification of health and functioning by the World Health Organisation (WHO) in 2001 with a child and youth version (ICF-CY) published in 2007, it introduces a biopsycosocial approach to functioning. This stresses the importance of the environment and participation experience and incorporates components described at the body, individual and societal levels. One of the aims of inclusive education is to enhance the access and participation of children with disabilities (UNESCO, 1994; United Nations, 1989, 2006). From a disability perspective the biopsychosocial model emphasizes that the needs of persons with disabilities being not just medical but more broadly, social, educational and functional in nature (Simeonsson et al., 2003).  Disability is understood as a complex interaction between a health condition and contextual factors and not as an attribute of a person.

    The ICF appears to be mostly used in the medical field with reviews highlighting its use and applications (Bruyère, Van Looy, & Peterson, 2005). However, if there is considerable work done in terms of the use of the ICF/ICF-CY in the medical and rehabilitation fields, this does not appear to be the case when we consider its presence, concepts and model in the field of education: it is unknown how well received or known the ICF is in the educational field. Thus, this literature review intends to situate the current debates in education, such as additional support, eligibility, and goal planning, which relate to the ICF and its concepts and also to report the extent to which it is being used. The main interest of this literature review is to explore how the ICF and its child and youth version (ICF-CY), are currently situated in the field of education with respect to various processes at different levels with an international perspective. This research focus can be broken into three key questions:- Is the ICF/ ICF-CY is used in educational context today? If yes, how is it used?- What critical points arise when using the ICF/ ICF-CY in educational settings, namely what are the possible effects of the use of the ICF/ ICF-CY in the approaches to additional support provision with a view to ensuring inclusion?- Are the ICF/ ICF-CY components present in the reviewed articles, namely how is the environment described, which personal factors are mentioned, and how is the concept of participation used?

     

    Method

    This study uses a systematic review of the literature using database keyword searches. Studies exploring the relationship between education, the ICF and its related concepts: participation, environment, and personal factors were sought. The keywords used to search in the databases were applied after qualitative test searches were carried out to establish the suitability of the terms. The selection of studies was then refined further using inclusion and exclusion protocols. The protocols investigated the paper contents at different levels: abstract, full-text, and full-text quality level. In addition an extraction protocol is also used on the included documents to draw on the points which arise from the research questions and provide the basis for the main discussion.

    Expected Outcomes

    The final search was limited to works which had an ICF and an educational focus and using this strategy 423 studies were found. The primary-step protocol stipulated that abstracts containing at least one ICF-related factor, and at least one education-related factor were included. All of the authors examined the first 100 abstracts and a check for inter-rater reliability was made. Approximately 150 further abstracts were examined by each of the authors ensuring that the majority of the abstracts were reviewed by more than one author. Overall inter-rater reliability was calculated. After the primary stage 70 abstracts met the inclusion criteria for the second stage of review at full-text level. Preliminary results suggest that there is little application of the ICF/ICF-CY at different levels of education systems. When it is used it appears to be linked to SEN, Special Education, Special Needs, disability in general or specific disabilities. Whether the framework itself will be of direct use for different education purposes remains to be resolved. It is the view of the authors, having undertaking this review, that the concepts ICF/ICF-CY introduces – especially those of disability and participation – will have a long-lasting and positive effect on inclusive education.

    References

    Bruyère, S. M., Van Looy, S. A., & Peterson, D. B. (2005). The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health: Contemporary Literature Overview. Rehabilitation Psychology 50(2), 113-121. Simeonsson, R. J., Leonardi, M., Lollar, D., Bjorck-Akesson, E., Hollenweger, J., & Martinuzzi, A. (2003). Applying the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to measure childhood disability. Disability and Rehabilitation, 25(11-12), 602-610. UNESCO (1994). Salamanca Statement and Framework for Action on Special Needs Education. United Nations. (1989). Convention on the Rights of the Child. United Nations. (2006). Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. WHO. (2001). International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Geneva: WHO. WHO. (2007). International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Version for Children and Youth, ICF-CY. Geneva: WHO.

     

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