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  • 301.
    Caccamo, Marta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Pittino, Daniel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Tecnológico de Monterrey, EGADE Business School, San Pedro Garza García, Mexico.
    Family firm density and likelihood of failure: An ecological perspective2019In: The Palgrave handbook of heterogeneity among family firms / [ed] S. Memili & C. Dibrell, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, p. 821-846Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter aims at establishing a link between family business research and regional science. Drawing from the density dependence model from organizational ecology and embeddedness theory, we develop four testable propositions to inquire about the effect of the emergence of family firms’ agglomerations in the territory on firms’ survival.

    We theorize that increased family firm density reduces the likelihood of firm failure and this effect is (a) higher for family firms than for non-family firms, (b) lower in urban than in rural areas, and (c) higher in fine-grained variable environments than in stable environments. Contributions and future research implications are detailed in the concluding section.

  • 302.
    Campopiano, Giovanna
    et al.
    Witten/Herdecke University, Witten, Germany.
    De Massis, Alfredo
    Lancaster University Management School, Centre for Family Business, IEED, Lancaster, UK.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Firm Philanthropy in Small- and Medium-Sized Family Firms: The Effects of Family Involvement in Ownership and Management2014In: Family Business Review, ISSN 0894-4865, E-ISSN 1741-6248, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 244-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on stewardship theory and arguments in relation to social and reputational capital, this study investigates how family involvement affects engagement in firm philanthropy in small- and medium-sized family firms. Specifically, we argue that family involvement in ownership positively influences firm philanthropy while its interaction with family involvement in management produces a negative effect. Based on a sample of 130 Italian family firms, our findings offer important implications for theory and practice and pave the way for future research in the field of philanthropy in the family firm context.

  • 303.
    Carlsson, Georg
    et al.
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Röös, Elin
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Stephan, Andreas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Tidåker, Pernilla
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Witthöft, Cornelia
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    ”Ät hälften så mycket kött och mer ärtor och bönor”2018In: Dagens Nyheter 2018-10-13, ISSN 1101-2447Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 304.
    Carnes, Christina
    et al.
    University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA.
    Hitt, Michael A.
    Texas A&M University and TCU, USA.
    Sirmon, David
    University of Washington, USA.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Wook Huh, Dong
    Frostburg State University, USA.
    The Contingent Effect of Synchronization on Leveraging Resources for Innovation2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leveraging resources to exploit opportunities in external markets is at the heart of innovation. However, research suggests that leveraging resources is complicated and fraught with challenges. Building on work in resource orchestration by integrating behavioral logic relating to search behaviors and use of slack resources, we argue synchronization of internal activities enhances the innovation gains of a firm’s leveraging strategy (resource advantage, market opportunity, and entrepreneurial). We further suggest that this impact of synchronization on leveraging strategy and innovation is dependent on firms’ performance relative to social aspirations, elucidating boundary conditions of resource orchestration. Our findings offer theoretical and practical implications for understanding the influence of synchronization, leveraging strategies, and firm performance on innovation.

  • 305. Carnes, Christina M.
    et al.
    Hitt, Michael A.
    Huh, Dong Wook
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Sirmon, David
    The Influence of Synchronization and Performance on Strategic Choice and Innovation2013In: Academy of Management Proceedings: Vol. 2013, No. 1, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leveraging resources to exploit opportunities in external markets is at the heart of innovation. However, theory suggests that leveraging resources is a complicated affair, fraught with potential challenges. Building on work in resource orchestration, we argue that firms achieve superior innovation when their strategy used to leverage resources is synchronized with several resource orchestration processes – namely structuring and bundling. However, such synchronization is not easily achieved. Using prospect theory, we argue and find that prior performance and accompanying managerial biases influence which strategies are chosen to drive innovation and that these same influences are affected by the level of synchronization. Thus, working to leverage firm resources to achieve innovation requires the synchronization of several processes to produce the greatest outcomes.

  • 306.
    Carnes, Christina Matz
    et al.
    University of Nebraska-Lincoln.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Hitt, Michael A.
    Texas A&M University.
    Huh, Dong Wook
    Frostburg State University.
    Pisano, Vincenzo
    University of Catania.
    Resource Orchestration for Innovation: Structuring and Bundling Resources in Growth- and Maturity-Stage Firms2016In: Long range planning, ISSN 0024-6301, E-ISSN 1873-1872, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 472-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation is an important outcome for firms across all life-cycle stages, though challenges to this goal vary by a firm's stage of development. In this study, we integrate resource orchestration with contingency theory to theorize how managers differentially orchestrate their firm's resource portfolio and capabilities to develop innovation based on the firm's life-cycle stage. Empirical tests using primary data collected from 189 managers of U.S. and Italian firms based on the policy capturing method provide support for our hypotheses. Overall, this research contributes to our understanding of how firms manage their resources to create innovation over the firm's life-cycle.

  • 307. Caspersz, D.
    et al.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Brundin, Ethel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    The Body Corporate: An Integrative Framework For Embodied Emotion In Family Business Life2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 308.
    Cestino, Joaquín
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Legitimacy-borrowing and bricolage by journalism entrepreneurs: From institutional ‘dopes’ to new industry pioneers?2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an unsatisfied need to understand the underlying mechanisms through which industrial sectors shape entrepreneurship phenomena. In this paper, we elaborate on the legitimacy-building mechanisms used by entrepreneurs in media industries. We suggest that in highly institutionalized contexts, start-up entrepreneurs may build trust in their ventures by borrowing sociopolitical legitimacy from neighboring fields. We also analyze the implications that these mechanisms may have on the cognitive and competitive configuration of the disrupted industry set-up. Our results propose that bricolage-entrepreneurs may succeed not only in developing a competitive advantage but also in creating a truly native, new legitimacy base in the media industry. We illustrate our theoretical analysis with the growing phenomenon of journalism entrepreneurship.

  • 309.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. University of Lugano.
    Knowledge models in family business: evidence from Ticino region (Switzerland)2008In: Culture-Specific Models of Family Businesses: A Compendium using GLOBE Paradigm / [ed] Gupta, V., Levenburg, N., Moore, L., Motwani, J., and Schwarz, T., ICFAI Press , 2008Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 310.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    The creation, sharing and transfer of knowledge in family business2008In: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 0827-6331, E-ISSN 2169-2610, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 413-433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This present research aims at investigating how "knowledge-related human capital" can be accumulated, i.e. created, shared and transferred, in family business over time. "Knowledge-related human capital" is viewed as pure knowledge and skill which family members have gained and developed through education and experience within and outside the organization. Two wine-producing family firms from Switzerland and a liqueur family firm from Italy are part of this research. A tentative knowledge model is presented at the end of the study. It analyses factors responsible for the accumulation process of knowledge in family business across generations.

  • 311.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Backman, Mikaela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Karlsson, M.
    Pittino, Daniel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    No Firm is an Island: Local Embeddedness and Rural-Urban Contexts for Business Growth in Family versus non-Family Firms.2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 312.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Financial Distress in Family and Non-Family-Controlled Firms2016In: Academy of Management Proceedings, January 2016 (Meeting Abstract Supplement) 12016 / [ed] John Humphreys, Academy of Management , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we heed the call from a growing number of scholars to extend our understanding of performance differences between family and non-family firms. Drawing on the mixed gamble logic of the behavioral agency model and the socioemotional wealth prospective, we provide a more fine-grained understanding of the unique role and diverse logic of dominant owners in relation to performance outcomes. Our findings suggest that family firms are the worst among the best (i.e. among firms that do not experience financial distress, they perform worse) and the best among the worst (i.e. among firms that experience financial distress, they perform better), which we attribute to the fact that family owners have more firm specific current wealth to lose (including not only financial wealth but also SEW), and as such respond differently to financial distress.

  • 313.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Is the Family an "Asset" or "Liability" for Firm Performance? The Moderating Role of Environmental Dynamism2014In: Journal of small business management (Print), ISSN 0047-2778, E-ISSN 1540-627X, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 210-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By integrating the stewardship and agency perspectives, our study extends the understanding of the dynamics that regulate the family as either an asset or liability for the firm. Our results show that the percentage of family members on the top management team (TMT) has an inverted U-shaped relationship with firm performance. However, when environmental dynamism is low this curvilinear relationship becomes steeper. When environmental dynamism is high, an increased percentage of family members on the TMT enhances firm performance.

  • 314.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Is the Family an Asset or Liability? The Role of Environmental Dynamism on Family Firm Performance2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 315.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Carnes, Christina M.
    Wook Huh, Dong
    Hitt, Michael A.
    Pisano, Vincenzo
    Structuring and bundling resources for innovation in different firm life cycle stages2014In: Academy of Management Proceedings: Vol. 2014, No. 1, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study based on a sample of US and Italian private firms confirms that resource orchestration is crucial in the creation of innovation. Structuring and bundling resources are important processes for all firms, especially for the development of innovation. Adopting a resource-based logic, we employed the technique of policy capturing to examine the relationship between resource orchestration and the creation of innovation by firms at different stages of their life-cycle. Our results show that early-stage (start-up and growth) firms attempt to acquire and accumulate resources and to enrich existing capabilities and pioneer new ones to develop novel innovations. This emphasis shifts to divesting resources and stabilizing existing capabilities during later (maturity and revitalization) stages to achieve more incremental innovations. This research contributes to our knowledge of innovation, resource orchestration and the firm life-cycle stages.

  • 316.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Colombo, Gianluca
    An experimental examination of the Fits family-business model: new insights from a simulation study through system dynamics2008In: Theoretical developments and future research in family business / [ed] Phillip H. Phan and John E. Butler, Charlotte, N.C.: Information Age Publishing, 2008, p. 77-116Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 317.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Criaco, Giuseppe
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Department of Strategic Management and Entrepreneurship, Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Naldi, Lucia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Gomez-Mejia, Luis R.
    Department of Management, W.P. Carey School of Business, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA.
    Kotlar, Josip
    Centre for Family Business, Lancaster University Management School, Bailrigg, Lancaster, UK.
    To patent or not to patent: That is the question. Intellectual property protection in family firms2018In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines family firms’ propensity to protect their intellectual property through patents. Building on the mixed gamble logic of the behavioral agency model, we theorize that family ownership has a U-shaped relationship with firm propensity to patent. Specifically, we argue that family firms’ desire to prevent losses of current socioemotional wealth inhibits their propensity to patent until a threshold level of family ownership, beyond which the family’s socioemotional wealth is secured and a greater focus on prospective financial gains attainable through patents is possible. We also suggest that environmental munificence moderates this nonlinear relationship such that a low-munificent environment accentuates the potentially detrimental (beneficial) effects of low-to-medium (medium-to-high) levels of family ownership on patents. We test our hypotheses on a sample of 4,198 small- and medium-sized family firms.

  • 318.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    DeTienne, Dawn
    Colorado State University, USA.
    Clinton, Eric
    Dublin City University, Ireland.
    Sciascia, Salvatore
    IULM University-Milan, Italy.
    Resource structuring: linking resource acquisition, accumulation, and divestment in family firms2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While much has been written about the idiosyncratic nature of family firms, the processes of managing the resource base in family firms has received limited attention. We examine resource structuring in family firms, inclusive of resource acquisition, accumulation and divestment. Specifically, we theorize that family firms that engage in resource acquisition and accumulation achieve higher levels of resource divestment. While the family generation in control positively moderate these relationships, the presence of a family CEO negatively moderate them. Additionally, we predict that family CEOs in later generations also engage less in resource divestment. Our theory is tested on a sample of 241 Irish family firms.

  • 319.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Gómez-Mejia, Luis R.
    W.P. Carey School of Business, Arizona State University, Department of Management, Tempe, AZ, USA.
    Hellerstedt, Karin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Withers, Michael
    Mays Business School, Texas A&M University, Department of Management, College Station, TX, USA.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    To merge, sell or liquidate? Socioemotional wealth, family control, and the choice of business exit2019In: Journal of Management, ISSN 0149-2063, E-ISSN 1557-1211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We take the perspective that considering the affective motives of dominant owners is essential to understanding business exit. Drawing on a refinement of behavioral agency theory, we argue that family-controlled firms are less likely than non-family-controlled firms to exit and tend to endure increased financial distress to avoid losses to the family’s socioemotional wealth (SEW) embodied in the firm. Yet, when confronted with different exit options and performance heuristics suggest that exit is unavoidable family firms are more likely to exit via merger, which we argue saves some SEW, although it is less satisfactory financially. In contrast, non-family firms are more likely to exit via sale or dissolution, options that are more prone to offer higher financial returns than mergers. Family and non-family firms thus show different orders of exit options. We find support for these arguments in a longitudinal matched sample of privately held Swedish firms.

  • 320.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Hellerstedt, Karin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Mattias, Nordqvist
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Business Exit in Family vs. Non-Family Firms: When Emotional Logic Overrules Rational Judgment2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 321.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Hellerstedt, Karin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    “Do Family Firms Exit Less?”2012In: Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research: Vol. 32, Texas, USA, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 322.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Naldi, Lucia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Criaco, Giuseppe
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Socioemotional Wealth and Innovation in Family Firms: When the Environment Gets Tough, the Family Gets Going!2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 323.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    University of Lugano / Texas A&M University.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Dynamic capabilities and transgenerational value creation in family firms: The role of organizational culture2010In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 487-504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While some research on entrepreneurship in family businesses has focused on transgenerational value creation, a gap exists in understanding how such value is generated across generations. The present research offers insights through the lens of dynamic capabilities, which are created by knowledge and in turn generate entrepreneurial performance and value creation. A model is built based on literature and case research. The crucial role of the organizational culture emerges through the empirical study. Family inertia is considered to be a factor preventing the creation of dynamic capabilities. We find that family inertia depends on characteristics of the family business culture, where paternalism and entrepreneurial orientation influence family inertia positively and negatively, respectively. Family firms from Switzerland and Italy active in the beverage industry represent the empirical context. Theoretical and practical implications are offered.

  • 324.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Colombo, Gianluca
    University of Lugano, Lugano, Switzerland.
    Mollona, Edoardo
    University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
    Simulating Dynamic Capabilities and Value Creation in Family Firms: Is Paternalism an "Asset" or a "Liability"?2012In: Family Business Review, ISSN 0894-4865, E-ISSN 1741-6248, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 318-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors conduct a simulation study using system dynamics methods to interpret how and when paternalism affects dynamic capabilities (DCs) and by association value creation in family firms. Their simulation experiments suggest that the effect of paternalism on DCs and value creation varies over time. Initially, increasing levels of family social capital and low levels of paternalism are associated with high rates of DCs and value creation accumulation (asset). Later, higher levels of paternalism produce their pressure to decrease DCs, value creation, and family social capital accumulation rates (liability)

  • 325.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Pathak, Seemantini
    University of Missouri, St. Louis, USA.
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Hoskisson, Robert
    Rice University, USA.
    Family versus Non-Family Firm Mergers: Likes Attract Likes, Outperform Opposites2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using social identity theory, we examine how the identity of the target firm in a family firm-led merger impacts the merged entity’s subsequent performance. We compare family firms’ target preferences and postmerger performance to those of non-family firms, and find that not only are family firms more likely to prefer other family firms as merger partners, but also achieve better post-merger outcomes with them. We test our hypotheses using a large sample of Swedish private firms, which largely controls for national cultural differences. After controlling for endogeneity and self-selection bias, our results support all our hypotheses.

  • 326.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Salvato, Carlo
    Bocconi University.
    Knowledge internalization and product development in family firms: When relational and affective factors matter2016In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 201-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the forces that support and inhibit product development (PD) in family firms is central to explaining their long-term success and survival. Our study reveals that social capital and relational conflict among family members do not affect PD directly, as existing theory suggests, but only through the internalization of knowledge among family members. In contrast, family members’ affective commitment to the family firm is so powerful that it has both a mediated and a direct effect on PD. These results differ across generations of the controlling family, therefore offering an extension of existing theories of knowledge and PD in family firms.

  • 327.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). EGADE Business School, Tecnológico de Monterrey.
    Salvato, Carlo
    Bocconi University.
    Byrne, Barbara
    University of Ottawa.
    Akhter, Naveed
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Arriaga Múzquiz, Juan
    EGADE Business School, Tecnológico de Monterrey .
    Commitment escalation to a failing family business2018In: Journal of small business management (Print), ISSN 0047-2778, E-ISSN 1540-627X, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 494-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overarching intent of this manuscript is to heighten awareness to the concept of commitment escalation as it bears on a failing family business. Specifically, drawing on the concept of emotional ownership, together with self-justification arguments, we a) identify factors considered to be most forceful in contributing to the presence of commitment escalation and thus, resistance to change in a failing family business (i.e., emotional ownership, feeling of responsibility, investment of capital, temporal distance from the founder’s business, individualism/collectivism), and b) model these related factors in a form that can serve heuristically to stimulate future empirical research capable of testing for the construct validity of commitment escalation in a family business context. We present potential items that may be useful for future scholars in measuring our constructs of interest as they relate to a failing family business.

  • 328.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Texas A and M University, Mays Business School, College Station, United States.
    Sirmon, David G.
    Texas A and M University, Mays Business School, College Station, United States.
    Sciascia, Salvatore
    IULM University, Italy.
    Mazzola, Pietro
    IULM University, Italy.
    Entrepreneurial Orientation, Generational Involvement and Participative Strategy: A Configurational Approach to Performance in Family Firms2011In: Academy of Management 2011 Annual Meeting: West meets East. Enlightening. Balancing. Transcending, New York: Academy of Management , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To better understand the entrepreneurship in family firms, we consider the joint interaction effect of entrepreneurial orientation (EO), generational involvement and participative strategy. Drawing on the logic of resource orchestration, we argue that participative strategy acts as a coordinating mechanism that not only mitigates the relational conflict that increased generational involvement generates when mobilized EO, but also enhances family firms' ability to utilize the heterogeneous, yet complementary knowledge and experiences generational involvement offers. Configuring participative strategy and EO with generational involvement provides the direction and coordination needed to unlock the potential value of these unique resources. Our theory suggests that realizing the benefits from entrepreneurship in family firms is a complicated matter, affected by the configuration of EO, generational involvement and participative strategy.

  • 329.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Sirmon, David G.
    Mays Business School, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, U.S.A..
    Sciascia, Salvatore
    Marketing and Economics Department, IULM University, Milan, Italy.
    Mazzola, Pietro
    Marketing and Economics Department, IULM University, Milan, Italy.
    Resource orchestration in family firms: Investigating how entrepreneurial orientation, generational involvement, and participative strategy affect performance2011In: Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal, ISSN 1932-4391, E-ISSN 1932-443X, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 307-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on the process of resource orchestration, we argue a co-alignment of multiple factors is needed for family firms to increase performance through entrepreneurship. Specifically, we posit that entrepreneurial orientation provides the mobilizing vision to use the heterogeneous yet complementary knowledge and experiences offered by increased generational involvement toward entrepreneurship. However, without a coordinating mechanism, generational involvement leads to conflict and negative outcomes. When, instead, it is also coordinated via a participative strategy, performance gains are achieved. In sum, results suggest that realizing the benefits from entrepreneurship in family firms is a complicated matter affected by the synchronization of entrepreneurial orientation, generational involvement, and participative strategy. Copyright © 2011 Strategic Management Society.

  • 330. Colombo, Gianluca
    et al.
    Koiranen, Matti
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. University of Lugano.
    Le imprese familiari: Sistemi di generazione di valore attraverso le generazioni2008In: AIDEA, Mulino Editore , 2008Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 331.
    Criaco, Giuseppe
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Founding conditions and the survival of new firms: An imprinting perspective on founders, organizational members and external environments2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    New firms are important sources of new employment, economic growth and innovation. Yet, a large portion of them do not manage to survive their first years of existence. This is often linked to their initial lack of capabilities, resources, routines and legitimacy. Certain favorable conditions at founding may allow new firms to partially overcome these initial shortcomings, and help them survive. For instance, organizational members’ prior experience may provide knowledge and skills to the new firm. However, it may also act as a constraint. It can lead new firms to follow a prescribed way of doing things which may ultimately threaten their survival. Similarly, certain unfavorable conditions of the external environment at founding may paradoxically offer a fertile ground for new firms to nurture their survival. Thus, whether some founding conditions are good or bad for new firms is still an unanswered question.

    Building on imprinting theory, this dissertation investigates how different founding conditions affect the survival of new firms. At the organizational level, I study founders’ prior working experience in an incumbent family firm, organizational members’ prior shared international experience and prior industry experience, and focus respectively on three types of new firms: entrepreneurial spawns, international new ventures and high/mid-high tech new firms. I use a matched employer-employee dataset to test the effect of different types of prior experience on new firm survival. At the environment level, I propose how population density of similar organizational forms and the mortality of generalist organizations at founding may affect the survival of new family firms.

  • 332.
    Criaco, Giuseppe
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Organisational ecology and the family business2015In: Theoretical perspectives on family businesses / [ed] Mattias Nordqvist, Leif Melin, Matthias Waldkirch and Gershon Kumeto, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, p. 18-34Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organisational ecology has long studied the survival of organisations. However, few studies have focused on how such perspective can be applied to investigate similar topics in distinct organisational forms, such as family businesses. This book chapter thus attempts to apply an organisational ecology perspective to the study of family businesses. More specifically, it explores how such perspective can inform research on the survival of family businesses. Special attention is given to environmental determinants conceptualised at the industry level

  • 333.
    Criaco, Giuseppe
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Prior shared international experience and the survival of international new venturesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper shows how organizational members’ prior shared experience in international firms affects the survival of the international new ventures (INVs) to which they belong. I propose that as the length of prior shared international experience (PSIE) increases, these ventures are more likely to draw greater survival-enhancing benefits from the pre-existing routines and capabilities that their members previously developed while working together in the same international firm. However, for high PSIE length, INVs may find it difficult and costly to revise existing routines and capabilities and to develop new ones to achieve survival. Using a unique sample of Swedish INVs, I find that PSIE has an inverted U-shaped relationship with survival. Further, I theorize and show that contextual familiarity between the contexts in which PSIE was acquired and those in which it is applied through the INV is an important contingency of the PSIE-survival relationship. This study has valuable implications for research on international entrepreneurship and shared experience.

  • 334.
    Criaco, Giuseppe
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    The survival of new family firmsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Motivated by both the scarcity of studies on the survival of new family firms and the call to better understand how external environments may affect family firms, I apply organizational ecology to outline the potential effects of environmental conditions on the survival of new family firms. This study extends organizational ecology in the context of new family firms, proposes three testable propositions and opens new avenues for research on the ecology of (new) family firms.

  • 335.
    Criaco, Giuseppe
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Larrañeta, Barbara
    Pablo de Olavide University.
    Naldi, Lucia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Zahra, Shaker A.
    University of Minnesota.
    Industry knowledge, prior industry experience and new venture survivalManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research suggests that new ventures can overcome threats to their survival by gaining access to technological knowledge from other firms in their industry even without directly transacting with them or joining their networks. This access can be obtained through vicarious learning that allows new ventures to benefit from spillovers of industry knowledge made public through patents. However, absorbing industry knowledge can be difficult for new ventures. On the one hand, new ventures have different absorptive capacities as a result of their organizational members’ prior experience within the current industry and across different industries. On the other hand, industries differ in the characteristics of their public technological knowledge (i.e., intensity and breadth). We propose that the intensity and breadth of an industry’s public technological knowledge interact with organizational members’ prior industry experience to determine the ability of new ventures to learn vicariously, affecting the likelihood of venture survival. Our results show that having prior experience in the same industry is beneficial for new venture survival when the technological knowledge within an industry is high in intensity and breadth, while prior experience across different industries is beneficial when this knowledge is low in intensity and breadth. This study contributes to the literature on prior industry experience, organizational learning, absorptive capacity and new venture survival.

  • 336.
    Criaco, Giuseppe
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Back To The Roots: Inherited Ownership Effects and Spawns’ Performance2014In: Strategies in a World of Networks, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes inherited ownership effects, defined as socialization benefits that employees acquire while working in privately-held firms that may be transferred to a spawn. We test for inherited ownership effects in the population of Swedish entrepreneurial spawns competing in medium-high and high technology manufacturing industries. Preliminary results show that spawns of family-owned businesses survive at a higher rate than spawns of non-family-owned businesses. Moreover, spawns that share family ties with the parent company survive at a higher rate than spawns started by non-family members. This findings suggest the existence of inherited ownership effects that influence the performance of new firms.

  • 337.
    Criaco, Giuseppe
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Inherited ownership effects and spawns' survival2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 338.
    Criaco, Giuseppe
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    The survival of family-firm spawns2017In: 2017 Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2017, Academy of Management , 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyze whether entrepreneurial spawns from family firms are more likely to survive than spawns from non-family firms. Using a matched employer employee panel data set, we find that entrepreneurial spawns from family firms survive longer than spawns from non-family firms. To mitigate endogeneity concerns, we used a two-stage model for self-selection into spawning and implemented coarsened exact matching to compare more closely aligned treatment (family parent) and control (non-family parent) samples. We further show that entrepreneurial spawns from family firms survive longer when located closer to the parent firm and when the founder had longer tenure at the parent firm.

  • 339.
    Criaco, Guiseppe
    et al.
    RSM Erasmus University, Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands.
    Sieger, Philipp
    Department of Management and Entrepreneurship, University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Wennberg, Karl
    Department of Management and Organization, Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Minola, Tommaso
    Università degli studi di Bergamo, Italy.
    Parents' performance in entrepreneurship as a "double-edged sword" for the intergenerational transmission of entrepreneurship2017In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 841-864Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate how perceived parents’ performance in entrepreneurship (PPE) affects the entrepreneurial career intentions of offspring. We argue that while perceived PPE enhances offspring’s perceived entrepreneurial desirability and feasibility because of exposure mechanisms, it weakens the translation of both desirability and feasibility into entrepreneurial career intentions due to upward social comparison mechanisms. Thus, perceived PPE acts as a double-edged sword for the intergenerational transmission of entrepreneurship. Our predictions are tested and confirmed on a sample of 21,895 individuals from 33 countries. This study advances the literature on intergenerational transmission of entrepreneurship by providing a foundation for understanding the social psychological conditions necessary for such transmission to occur.

  • 340. Cruz, Cristina
    et al.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    A Lifecycle Approach to Entrepreneurial Orientation in Family Businesses2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 341.
    Cruz, Cristina
    et al.
    Instituto de Empresa Business School, Madrid, Spain.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Entrepreneurial orientation in family firms: A generational perspective2012In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 33-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We adopt a generational perspective to investigate entrepreneurial orientation (EO) in family firms. We test a model that determines how the influence on EO of external factors and internal factors differs in first-, second- and third-and-beyond-generation family firms. We argue that while the founder is vital in the first generation, EO is more subject to interpretations of the competitive environment in the second generation and that in the third generation and beyond, access to non-family resources drives EO to a greater extent. Our findings show that perceptions of the competitive environment and EO correlate differently in family firms, depending on the generation in charge, and it is generally stronger in second-generation family firms. Further, we find that non-family managers on the top management team makes a positive difference for EO only in the third-generation and beyond family firms. The significance of non-family investors’ on EO is particularly strong in third-generation-and-beyond firms.

  • 342. Cruz, Cristina
    et al.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Environmental factors and entrepreneurial orientation in family firms: a generational perspective2007In: 3rd EIASM Workshop on Family Firm Management, 2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 343.
    Cyron, Thomas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Goal formation and everyday governance in family firms2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 344.
    Cyron, Thomas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Growth-of-practice: Towards a notion of organizational betterment2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I seek to develop a humanist onto-epistemological understanding of firm growth by combining a practice-based social ontology with notions of process theory. Instead of first measuring the outcome in terms of an increase in size and then explaining it backwards via distinct entities, my idea is to turn the mannequin back to its feet. When centering the activity that embeds the individual agent in society at the core of our theorizing, growth entails a different meaning. It becomes a theory of deliberate actions that seek to change an organization’s net of practice-arrangement bundles (cf. Schatzki, 2005) in which practitioners constantly need to make sense of the past while prospecting the future (Hussenot & Missonier, 2016). When acting deliberately, moral reasoning impacts decision-making and action. The acknowledgement of moral reasoning throughout the process of firm growth then allows for its normative evaluation, e.g. whether the individual has acted out of pure interest or altruism, or whether the decision was taken by a single person or democratically involved multiple stakeholders. Instead of searching for practices that lead to increases in sales, profit, or workforce (i.e. growth-as-practice) the main purpose of firm growth becomes the improvement of practices (i.e. growth-of-practice) not only in terms of efficiency but also morality. It moves us closer towards a notion of organizational betterment and thus approaches the meaning of growth commonly depicted in Aristotelian philosophy: the development of character and personality on the road of becoming a good citizen.

  • 345.
    Cyron, Thomas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Theoretical Perspectives on Growth Motivation: A Systematic Literature Review2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives What motivates entrepreneurs to grow their business? Why are some entrepreneurs more willing than others to grow their firms? Does growth motivation influence the actual growth of firms? These questions serve as guiding lights for a systematic literature review on the topic of business growth motivation. The aim is to develop a holistic conceptual map of growth motivation based upon a meta-theoretical analysis. This procedure will condensate existing knowledge and guide future research.

    Prior work Existing reviews on firm growth address the topic of motivation scarcely. Davidsson, Achtenhagen and Naldi (2006) seek for common grounds in existing literature and develop an overarching framework for future research. Wiklund, Patzelt and Shepherd (2009) develop and test an integrative model of firm growth. McKelvie and Wiklund (2010) focus explicitly on the growth mode. Dobbs and Hamilton (2007) criticize an episodic and linear approach towards business growth, while Achtenhagen, Naldi and Melin (2010) highlight a discrepancy between academic and practitioners’ perceptions of growth. Of these, only two review devote sub-chapters to growth motivation (cf. McKelvie & Wiklund 2010; Wiklund et al. 2009). Others, integrate the aspect of motivation indirectly. Yet, motivation plays an important role in seminal contributions of entrepreneurship (cf. Schumpeter 1934; Kirzner 1973) and firm growth (cf. Penrose 1959). In light of this, an up-to-date review on existing research on growth motivation is needed.

    Approach This systematic literature review includes publications listed in Thomson Reuters’ Web of Science, limited to the Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI). The search syntax included various synonyms for ‘motivation’ and ‘business’ in combination with ‘growth’. I searched for the synonyms of ‘motivation’ and ‘business’ in titles, abstract and keywords. ‘Growth’ was required to appear in the title in order to increase the publications’ relevance. A similar approach was proved useful by previous reviews on growth (cf. Achtenhagen et al. 2010). 48 publications are considered eventually. These publications are reviewed systematically with regard to their theoretical approaches. The identified theories are structured in accordance to their position in Locke’s (1991) motivation sequence and their level of analysis in line with Bandura’s (1986) social cognitive theory.

    Results I generate a phenomenon-centered conceptual map of firm growth motivation based upon applied theoretical concepts. It reveals that the phenomenon of growth motivation is hypothesized as a cognitive sequence which is influenced by personal, organizational, and environmental components. Until now, the cognitive base was researched extensively and remains mostly in line with developments in organizational and social psychology. A multitude of different persona, organizational, and environmental components have been explored. However, the research on growth motivation remains far from complete. Three aspects require further attention: accuracy of concepts, the influence of interpersonal relationships on growth motivation (e.g., family business), and variations in motivation across time.

    Value/Implications The phenomenon-centered map on growth motivation condensates existing knowledge and guide future research on good grounds. The primary contribution is thus research-related. At the same time, it illustrates the complexity of growth motivation and supports critical voices against univocal policy-foci on high-growth firms. The widespread reluctance of small business owner-managers to grow their firms is explained by phenomenon’s immense complexity.

  • 346.
    Cyron, Thomas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Business growth in practice: Navigating dualities in the process of development2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studying business growth from inception into establishment is challenging. We took up this challenge and studied a firm’s developmental process over the span of almost 17 years by analysing more than 860 weekly reports. Drawing on recent developments in the entrepreneurship-as-practice literature, our attention was on the activities and practices that supported the firm’s sustained growth. We find that the firm’s overall activity system periodically shifts in temporal focus between future, presence and past by navigating through four different dualities: (1) detail vs efficiency, (2) rigidity vs flexibility, (3) pressure vs relief and (4) prospection vs retrospection. As we emphasize temporal aspects, our findings extend current business growth theory by adding the dimension of past-oriented renewing to future- and presence-oriented entrepreneuring. We encourage practitioners to implement renewing practices during which they actively renovate and modernize obsolescent parts of their business.

  • 347.
    Cyron, Thomas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Zoellick, Jan Cornelius
    Charite Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Business development in post-growth economies: Challenging assumptions in the existing business growth literature2018In: Management Revue, ISSN 0935-9915, E-ISSN 1861-9908, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 206-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Existing literature has not specifically examined individual business growth in post-growth economies. This paper challenges dominant assumptions in the business growth literature by considering post-growth economies as an organisational context characterised by natural resource scarcity and an absence of macro-level economic expansion. We investigate conceptually how such a context impacts business growth theory by seeking to answer three major questions: (1) What is business growth? (2) Why do businesses grow? (3) And how do businesses grow? Accordingly, post-growth contexts pose three major challenges to business growth theorising: (1) business growth as an increase in measurable outcomes, (2) resource competition and dispositive path dependencies, and (3) detrimental growth modes and strategies. Based upon six revised assumptions, we re-define business development in line with forces at work in post-growth economies. We further suggest a multidimensional research agenda that can catalyse future discussions of post-growth organisations. These discussions have the potential to overcome the inertia in business growth theory and its discrepancies with practice.

  • 348.
    Dawson, Alexandra
    et al.
    Concordia University, Quebec - John Molson School of Business.
    Irving, P. Gregory
    Independent.
    Sharma, Pramodita
    Wilfrid Laurier University.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Markus, Joel
    Wilfrid Laurier University.
    Behavioural outcomes of next-generation family members’ commitment to their firm2014In: European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, ISSN 1359-432X, E-ISSN 1464-0643, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 570-581Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Are there variations in behaviours and leadership styles of next-generation family members or descendants who join their family business due to different forms of commitment? Evidence from a dual respondent study of 109 Canadian and Swiss family firms suggests that descendants with affective commitment to their family firms are more likely to engage in discretionary activities going beyond the job description, thereby contributing to organizational performance. Next-generation members with normative commitment are more likely to engage in transformational leadership behaviours. Both affectively and normatively motivated next-generation members use contingent reward forms of leadership. A surprising finding of this study is the binding force of normative commitment on positive leadership behaviours of next-generation members. This study empirically tests the generalizability of the three-component model of commitment to family businesses, a context in which different forms of commitment may play a unique role.

  • 349.
    Dawson, Alexandra
    et al.
    John Molson School of Business, Concordia University, Montreal, Canada.
    Sharma, Pramodita
    School of Business Administration, University of Vermont, Burlington, USA.
    Irving, P. Gregory
    School of Business and Economics, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Canada.
    Markus, Joel
    Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies, York University, Toronto, Canada.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Predictors of later-generation family members' commitment to family enterprises2015In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 545-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the antecedents of different bases of organizational commitment and intention to stay of later-generation family members who are currently working in their family firm. Evidence from 199 Canadian and Swiss firms indicates that when these individuals' identity and career interests are aligned with their family enterprise, they experience affective commitment. Family expectations are associated with normative commitment. Individuals who are concerned about losing inherited financial wealth or who perceive a lack of alternative career paths stay with the family enterprise because of continuance commitment. Finally, individuals driven by desire or obligation exhibit low turnover intentions.

  • 350. De Massis, A.
    et al.
    Kotlar, J.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Le imprese familiari percepiscono il capitale sociale come vantaggio o come svantaggio competitivo? Un’analisi esplorativa delle percezioni degli Amministratori Delegati2013In: Economia e Politica Industriale, ISSN 1319–1340, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
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