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  • 251.
    Kartal, Petra
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Mavi, Miray
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Tandläkarstudenters kunskap gällande tandhygienistens kompetens: - En enkätstudie2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Dental hygienist profession plays a significant role in Swedish dentistry and works primarily with prevention/health promotion. Dentists and dental hygienist's professions complete each other, which makes co-operation necessary to obtain a safe care for the patient. The aim was to study dental students (semester 10) knowledge regarding dental hygienists competence. Method: A cross-sectional study with questionnaire as measuring instrument was performed. The sample consisted of dentistry students from Malmo- and Gothenburg’s University, with two respective three years of dental hygienist education. Variables were analyzed by descriptive statistics. Comparisons between institutions, through Chi2-test were performed in SPSS. The result was based on 51 (Malmo) respective 26 (Gothenburg) participants. Statistically significant differences occurred regarding questions of diagnosing pericoronitis, behavioral changes, removing sutures, working with temporomandibular disorders, bite-impressions and responsibility of radiographic equipment. Malmo had 39 participants and Gothenburg 18 that reported they had not received enough knowledge. The relationship between the students knowledge and dental hygienists’ length of education cannot be established. Conclusion: There is a knowledge about dental hygienist’s competence, but with some variation. Differences in knowledge exists between the institutions. The majority of participants felt that the education did not give them sufficient knowledge about the dental hygienist's competence.

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  • 252.
    Khanbhai, Rashida
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Hanna, Nareeman
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Sambandet mellan övervikt/fetma och orala sjukdomar hos barn och ungdomar: En litteraturöversikt2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The link between overweight/obesity and oral diseases in children and adolescents

     

    Background: Overweight/obesity is a health problem that is increasing rapidly in Sweden and around the world. Overweight/obesity, dental caries and periodontitis are all chronic and multifactorial diseases. These diseases are common in both children and adolescents. The oral diseases are linked to unhealthy dietary habits that affect both oral- and general health, which in turn may affect the weight of children and adolescents. Aim: To study whether there is a possible link between overweight/obesity and oral diseases in children and adolescents. Me-thod: This work was a literature review. DOSS and PubMed were used for search of scientific articles. Total generated hits were 393 of which 50 articles were selected for fulltext review. Using a modified review the articles were then examined for probative value and analyzed to determine if the the articles are weak, moderate or strong. Finally, 19 articles were included in the study. Results: Socioeconomi, BMI in children and parents, level of education, ethnicity, hygiene, nutrition and health status was of great importance in the development of overweight/obesity and dental caries. Overweight/obesity had a direct impact on periodontal disease but because of the studies in this area being few the authors of this study believe that further research in this area is required. Conclusion: The majority of these 19 studies have shown a statistically significant association between overweight/obesity and oral diseases and the relationship was shown to be dependent on several factors.

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  • 253. Koch, G
    et al.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Petersson, L G
    Fluoride uptake on dry versus water-saliva wetted human enamel surfaces in vitro after topical application of a varnish (Duraphat) containing fluoride.1988In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 221-225Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 254.
    Krivohlavek, Natalija
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Duric, Tina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Diabetes typ 1. Dess påverkan på barn och ungdomars orala hälsa.2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of the literature overview was to study evidence for type 1 diabetes impact on children and adolescents oral health.

    Method: The study was a general literature study. The inclusion criteria were that they should have been published between 2008 until 2018, peer-reviewed and have an age range of children up to 18 years. After a quality review, 21 articles were used in this study. The articles that was used, have all studied diabetes type 1 and its impact on children and adolescents oral health.

    Result: The result showed that the disease type 1 diabetes has an effect on the oral health of children and adolescents. Gingivitis, caries, periodontitis, oral candidos, plaque and calculus are oral disorders that has been shown having a higher prevalence in children with diabetes in comparison to healthy children. The results in the studies varied to a certain extent due to different outcome measures and methods.

    Conclusion: Previous studies have shown a relationship between children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes and their impaired oral health, where plaque and gingivitis were most prevalent. More research is generally required on how diabetes type 1 affects the oral health of children and adolescents in general.

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  • 255. Kulich, K R
    et al.
    Berggren, U
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Gustafsson, J E
    Factor structure of the Dental Beliefs Survey in a dental phobic population.2001In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 109, no 4, p. 235-240Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 256.
    Kvarnvik, Christine
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Department of Periodontology, Postgraduate Dental Education, The Institute of Odontology, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ahonen, Hanna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Odontology and Oral Health Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Jansson, Henrik
    Folktandvården Skåne, Lund, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Bergen, Norway.
    Stensson, Malin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Odontology and Oral Health Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Sayardoust, Shariel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Odontology and Oral Health Science. Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Center for Oral Rehabilitation, Linköping, Sweden.
    Clinical and radiographic periodontal status in hypertensive patients with or without obstructive sleep apnea 10 years after diagnosis and CPAP initiation2024In: Clinical and Experimental Dental Research, E-ISSN 2057-4347, Vol. 10, no 2, article id e859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Through inflammation and hyposalivation, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is suggested to affect periodontal status over time. Our aim was to compare the clinical and radiographic periodontal status of hypertensive patients with or without long-term presence of OSA, treated or untreated with continuous positive airway pressure treatment (CPAP).

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 2007-2009, a screening for OSA was conducted among 394 hypertensive primary care patients. Polygraphy was used to create three groups: no OSA, non-CPAP, or adherent CPAP based on the apnea hypopnea index (AHI). After 10 years, a cross-sectional sleep and periodontal examination including a clinical and radiographic examination, a questionnaire, and a matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8) chair-side test was conducted. Based on levels of alveolar bone, bleeding on probing (BoP), and probing pocket depth (PPD), patients were categorized into four periodontal stages: periodontal health/gingivitis and three periodontal disease stages. Periodontal status and periodontal stages were compared between the OSA (n = 49), non-CPAP (n = 38), or adherent CPAP (n = 34) groups.

    RESULTS: The 121 patients (53% women) had a median age of 71 years. No differences were seen between the OSA groups regarding median number of teeth (p = .061), teeth/implants, (p = .107), plaque index (p = .245), BoP (p = .848), PPD ≥ 4 mm (p = .561), PPD ≥ 6 mm (p = .630), presence of MMP-8 (p = .693) except for bone loss (p = .011). Among patients with stage periodontal health/gingivitis a significant difference was seen, as 70% of those were categorized as no OSA, 20% as non-CPAP, and 10% as adherent CPAP (p = .029). Differences were not seen in periodontal disease stages.

    CONCLUSIONS: Hypertensive patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) did not have an adverse clinical periodontal status compared to patients without OSA. However, when combining radiographic and clinical status into periodontal stages, patients without OSA more frequently exhibited periodontal health or gingivitis compared to patients without OSA, regardless of CPAP treatment.

  • 257. Kvint, Sven
    et al.
    Lindsten, Rune
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Nilsson, Peter
    Bjerklin, Krister
    Autotransplantation of teeth in 215 patients: A Follow-up Study2010In: Angle orthodontist, ISSN 0003-3219, E-ISSN 1945-7103, Vol. 80, no 3, p. 446-451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the success rate of autotransplantation of teeth in consecutive patients and to analyze factors affecting the outcome. Materials and

    METHODS: The subjects consisted of 215 consecutive patients (101 women and 114 men; aged 9.1-56.4 years, median age 15.2 years [P(10) = 11.4, P(90) = 19.7]) who had undergone transplantation of a total of 269 teeth, all by the same surgeon. In patients with multiple transplants, only the first transplant was included, to ensure that all transplanted teeth were independent units. The transplants were recorded as unsuccessful if the tooth had been extracted or was surviving but with root resorption or ankylosis. The interval between transplantation and final follow-up was a median 4.8 years (P(10) = 2.0, P(90) = 5.5) for successful transplants and a median of 2.4 years (P(10) = 0.4, P(90) = 7.7) for unsuccessful transplants.

    RESULTS: One-hundred seventy-five (81%) of the transplantations were recorded as successful and 40 (19%) as unsuccessful. Twenty-five teeth had been extracted and 15 had survived but did not fulfill the criteria for success.

    CONCLUSIONS: The success rate of 215 consecutively transplanted teeth was 81%. The highest success rate was for transplantation of premolars to the maxillary incisor region (100%). Complications at surgery such as difficult extraction, deviant root anatomy, or damaged root periodontium affected the outcome. During growth, a successful transplant preserves alveolar bone.

  • 258. Kvint, Sven
    et al.
    Magnusson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Anmälningsärenden i anslutning till implantatstödd protetik2001In: Tandläkartidningen, ISSN 0039-6982, Vol. 93, no 6, p. 34-39Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 259.
    Källner, Emma
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Blomquist, Evelina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    The prevalence of dental caries and fluorosis among 5-7 year old children in Ga-Rankuwa, South Africa: A descriptive study2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 260.
    Landt, K.
    et al.
    Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Hagstam-Harrison, L.
    Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Kvist, T.
    Department of Endodontology, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Frisk, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Department of Endodontology, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Dawson, V. S.
    Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Bjørndal, L.
    Department of Cariology and Endodontics, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    EndoReCo, (Group author)
    Fransson, H.
    Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Demographic factors in Swedish adults undergoing root filling and subsequent extraction of a maxillary first molar: a comparative study2018In: International Endodontic Journal, ISSN 0143-2885, E-ISSN 1365-2591, Vol. 51, no 9, p. 975-980Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To study the demographics of Swedish adults who had received a root filling, followed by extraction during the following 5–6 years in comparison with subjects who had undergone a corresponding root filling with an uneventful outcome.

    Methodology: The root filled maxillary first molar was chosen as the comparison model. The Swedish Social Insurance Agency provided data on all teeth reported as root filled in Sweden during 2009. A comparison group, equally large as the study group, was constructed by randomly selecting subjects with root filled maxillary first molars, which had not subsequently been extracted, that is, an uneventful outcome. Demographic data on the subjects were obtained from Statistics Sweden: country of birth, disposable income, educational level, age, civil status and gender. Chi-square, t-tests and logistic regression were used for statistical analyses.

    Results: In the year 2009, 36 139 maxillary first molar teeth were reported to have been root filled, 4362 (12.1%) of which were then recorded as extracted during the following 5–6 year period. Only minor intergroup differences were noted: 86.5% of the study group were Swedish-born, compared with 84.4% of the comparison group (P = 0.007). Women comprised 53.2% of the study group and 50.5% (P = 0.01) of the comparison group. There was an association between extractions and gender as well as age; men had a lower odds ratio (OR) for extraction OR, 0.87; confidence interval (CI), 0.80–0.95. For every additional year, the chance for extraction was higher OR, 1.01; CI, 1.01–1.01. No other significant differences were detected.

    Conclusions: There was only little or no demographic differences between the study group, comprising Swedish adults who had undergone root filling of one of their maxillary first molars in 2009 and subsequent extraction during the following 5–6 years, and the comparison group, with uneventful outcomes after a corresponding root filling. 

  • 261.
    Larsson, Erik
    et al.
    Orthodontic Clinic, Falköping, Sweden, and Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Øgaard, Bjørn
    Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Lindsten, Rune
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Holmgren, Nils
    Swedish Animal Health Service, Skara, Sweden.
    Brattberg, Marianne
    Swedish National Food Administration, Skara, Sweden.
    Brattberg, Lars
    Swedish Board of Agriculture, Skara, Sweden.
    Craniofacial and dentofacial development in pigs fed soft and hard diets2005In: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, ISSN 0889-5406, E-ISSN 1097-6752, Vol. 128, no 6, p. 731-739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Several authors have found a correlation between reduced chewing activity and malocclusion. In animal experiments, it has been possible to correlate a diet of low chewing resistance to narrower arches, which predispose the subject to crowding and irregular teeth.

    METHODS: In this study, 17 pigs were weaned at 5 weeks of age and divided into 2 groups according to diet and housing. The soft-diet, indoor group was housed in conventional pens, and the animals were fed aliquots of barley and oats with soya and a mineral-vitamin premix added. The food was mixed with water at a dry matter content of about 25%. The hard-diet, outdoor group was kept outdoors; the pigs were fed solid food and also ate organic matter in the soil. All pigs were killed at 22 months of age. The skulls were dissected, and transverse and sagittal craniofacial and dentofacial dimensions were measured.

    RESULTS: Chewing hard food caused considerable occlusal and approximal attrition in the experimental animals. The dental arches were shorter due to this attrition and to mesial migration of the molars and premolars. The approximal attrition also reduced the tendency for crowding and rotation of the teeth. Posterior crossbite was more common among the hard-chewing animals.

    CONCLUSIONS: The increase in arch width in the hard-diet animals reported in the literature was not duplicated in this study. On the contrary, the soft-diet pigs had significantly wider arches than the hard-diet animals. This was most pronounced in the premolar region and could be the result of an atypical tongue habit, caused by the nonphysiologic feeding of the pigs. The soft-diet pigs also had a greater tendency to postnormal occlusion, especially in the canine region.

  • 262. Laurell, Lars
    et al.
    Romao, Cristina
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Longitudinal study on the distribution of proximal sites showing significant bone loss2003In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 346-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND, AIMS: In 1973, a random sample of 574 dentate individuals aged 15, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 years in the city of Jönköping, Sweden, were examined clinically and radiographically to assess oral health and overall treatment needs. Periodontal examination included registration of plaque, gingivitis, probing depths at four aspects of each tooth, and interproximal bone height measurements on full-mouth intraoral radiographs. In 1990, 17 years later, the same individuals were invited to participate in a new investigation. Of these, 433 (75%) agreed to participate in the investigation and were re-examined (Hugoson & Laurell 2000). The proximal alveolar bone height at all interproximal sites was measured and expressed as per cent of tooth length. Only teeth that were present in both 1973 and 1990 were included in the assessment of changes in bone score. From the age of 30 years, about 80% of the population had one or more sites with a bone loss of 2-3 mm or more. Seventeen per cent of the individuals had more than six such sites, indicating destructive periodontal disease. Bone loss occurred at sites both with and without previous bone loss. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that sites with a bone loss of 10% or more of the tooth length (2-3 mm) during the 17 years were randomly distributed in the dentition. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Of the 13,197 sites examined in individuals 20-60 years at baseline, 1201 sites (9.0%) in 998 teeth with a bone loss corresponding to 10% or more of the tooth length were found and included in the analysis. A probability test for binomial distribution was used to test the null hypothesis that all teeth had the same risk of losing bone regardless of its position in the dentition. The valid risk for each tooth was 3.571% and the null hypothesis was rejected at the 95% confidence interval. RESULTS: Although all tooth types were affected by tooth loss, some teeth, namely 17, 16, 42, 41, and 31, showed a higher incidence of sites losing bone, whereas 46, 45, 44, and 36 had a lower incidence. Loser sites in smokers appeared more at random. CONCLUSION: Sites that will develop periodontal break-down over time may appear at random, although with higher risk at maxillary molars and lower incisors. For the early detection of destructive periodontitis, periodontal examination that includes all teeth should be made routine in every dental check-up.

  • 263. Linde, Cristina
    et al.
    Magnusson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Predicting response to treatment of TMJ disc displacement without reduction - a case series2015In: Zeitschrift für kraniomandibuläre Funktion, ISSN 1868-4149, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 355-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate possible factors that predict response to treatment in subjects with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc displacement without reduction (DDwoR). A treatment algorithm with disc manipulation, a protrusive splint or, if unsuccessful, a stabilization splint used fulltime for 2 to 10 weeks was introduced to a consecutive series of 50 patients with TMJ DDwoR. The splint treatment non-responders were offered surgery. At the end of the splint period/after surgery, the patients rated their response to treatment on preset alternatives, according to which they were classified as responders or non-responders. In total, 44 patients were responders, ie, were completely free from symptoms or had minor discomfort on rare occasions. The remaining 6 patients still suffered moderate to severe pain. The non-responders were all women. The only statistically significant difference in baseline case-history information between the two groups was a longer duration of symptoms in the non-responder group; mean 6 years vs 2 years for the responders. All other case-history information parameters were non-significant. Conclusively, duration of symptoms was a factor of significance in predicting response to treatment.

  • 264. Lindfors, E
    et al.
    Helkimo, M
    Magnusson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Patients' adherence to hard acrylic interocclusal appliance treatment in general dental practice in Sweden2011In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 133-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of the present study were to investigate patient adherence to treatment with hard acrylic interocclusal appliance in general dentistry in Sweden and to see if some general factors could predict patient adherence or non-adherence. During the period January - May 2009 a postal questionnaire was sent to all adult patients (≥20 years of age) that had received a hard acrylic interocclusal appliance from the public dental health service in the County of Uppsala during 2007 (n=388). The same questionnaire was also sent to all adult patients that had received a hard acrylic interocclusal appliance at a specialist clinic during the same year (n=69). The response rate in general dental practice was 71 % and at the specialist clinic the response rate was 91 %. In general dental practice, 97 % of the hard acrylic interocclusal appliances were stabilisation appliances. At the specialist clinic other types of interocclusal appliances was used to a greater extent. A vast majority of patients in both general dental practice and at the specialist clinic experienced that the interocclusal appliance had a positive treatment effect. In general dental practice, 73% of the patients still used their interocclusal appliances 1 1/2-2 years after they had received them. The corresponding figure at the specialist clinic was 54%. The main reasons for not using the interocclusal appliance, besides disappearance/reduction of TMD symptoms, were different kinds of comfort problems. From the results of this study it is concluded that the patient adherence to hard acrylic stabilisation appliances made in general dental practice in Sweden is good. It can also be concluded that a perceived good treatment effect, as well as treatment of more long-term conditions, predicted a better patient adherence to hard acrylic stabilisation appliances. More studies concerning factors affecting patient adherence in TMD therapy are warranted.

  • 265. Lindfors, Erik
    et al.
    Arima, Taro
    Baad-Hansen, Lene
    Bakke, Merete
    De Laat, Antoon
    Giannakopoulos, Nikolaos Nikitas
    Glaros, Alan
    Guimaraes, Antonio Sergio
    Johansson, Anders
    Le Bell, Yrsa
    Lobbezoo, Frank
    Michelotti, Ambra
    Mueller, Frauke
    Ohrbach, Richard
    Wanman, Anders
    Magnusson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Ernberg, Malin
    Jaw exercises in the treatment of temporomandibular disorders - An international modified Delphi study2019In: Journal of Open Archaeology Data, E-ISSN 2049-1565 , Vol. 33, no 4, p. 389-398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To investigate whether an international consensus exists among TMD experts regarding indications, performance, follow-up, and effectiveness of jaw exercises.

    Methods: A questionnaire with 31 statements regarding jaw exercises was constructed. Fourteen international experts with some geographic dispersion were asked to participate in this Delphi study, and all accepted. The experts were asked to respond to the statements according to a 5-item verbal Likert scale that ranged from 'strongly agree' to 'strongly disagree." The experts could also leave free-text comments, which was encouraged. After the first round, the experts received a compilation of the other experts' earlier responses. Some statements were then rephrased and divided to clarify the essence of the statement. Subsequently, the experts were then asked to answer the questionnaire (32 statements) again for the second round. Consensus was set to 80% agreement or disagreement.

    Results: There is consensus among TMD experts that jaw exercises are effective and can be recommended to patients with myalgia in the jaw muscles, restricted mouth opening capacity due to hyperactivity in the jaw closing muscles, and disc displacement without reduction. The patients should always be instructed in an individualized jaw exercise program and also receive both verbal advice and written information about the treatment modality.

    Conclusion: This Delphi study showed that there is an international consensus among TMD experts that jaw exercises are an effective treatment and can be recommended to patients with TMD pain and disturbed jaw function.

  • 266.
    Lindfors, Erik
    et al.
    Department of Stomatognathic Physiology, Public Dental Health Service, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hedman, Eva
    Public dental health service, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Ernberg, Malin
    Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet and Scandinavian, Center for Orofacial Neurosciences, (SCON), Huddinge, Sweden.
    Gabre, Pia
    Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Patient experiences of therapeutic jaw exercises in the treatment of masticatory myofascial pain: A qualitative study2017In: Journal of Oral and Facial Pain and Headache, ISSN 2333-0384, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 46-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To investigate patients' experiences of therapeutic jaw exercises for treating masticatory myofascial pain.

    Methods: A total of 10 patients were selected for the interview study. All patients had received treatment with jaw exercises at a specialist clinic. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in a nonclinical environment according to an interview guide with 10 domains. The interviews were transcribed and translated into English. Systematic text condensation (STC) was used to arrange and analyze the text material.

    Results: In the systematic process of analyzing the qualitative data, four main themes were identified: "Patient Adherence," "Symptoms," "Treatment Effect," and "Participation." Most informants were initially skeptical of the jaw exercises due to their simplicity. Later on, the simplicity of the exercises and the fact that they did not need more advanced treatment were valued most by a majority of patients. Some informants suspected serious disease behind their symptoms. Treatment effects on pain and physical impairment were reported. To do the jaw exercises in conjunction with an already established routine seemed important to enhance adherence. Trust in the caregiver and being able to remedy their pain by themselves were also important to the informants.

    Conclusion: Jaw exercises are a useful treatment valued by patients due to their simplicity and effectiveness. However, before the treatment, patients should be informed about the cause of the symptoms, and any skepticism should be addressed. Results from this qualitative study cannot be generalized, but the study design and the selected population allow the results to be transferable to similar contexts. 

  • 267.
    Lindfors, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Surg Sci Odontol & Maxillofacial Surg, Publ Dent Hlth Serv, Dept Stomatognath Physiol, Uppsala, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Dent Med, Scandinavian Ctr Orofacial Neurosci, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Magnusson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Ernberg, Malin
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Dent Med, Scandinavian Ctr Orofacial Neurosci, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Effect of Therapeutic Jaw Exercises in the Treatment of Masticatory Myofascial Pain: A Randomized Controlled Study2020In: The Journal of Oral & Facial Pain and Headache, ISSN 2333-0384 , E-ISSN 2333-0376 , Vol. 34, no 4, p. 364-373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To study the effect and cost-effectiveness of jaw exercise treatment in patients with masticatory myofascial pain.

    Methods: A total of 97 patients with myofascial pain according to the RDC/TMD were randomized into three groups: (/) jaw exercises; (2) stabilization appliance; or (3) no treatment. After 3 months, the patients were evaluated according to the following instruments: pain intensity according to a visual analog scale (VAS); global improvement according to the Patient Global Impression of Change scale (PGIC); depression and anxiety according to the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS); jaw function according to the Jaw Functional Limitation Scale (JFLS-20); consumption of analgesics; and frequency of tension-type headache.

    Results: Pain intensity during jaw movement decreased significantly more in the jaw exercise group compared to the no treatment group (P < .001). There was no statistically significant difference between the jaw exercise and stabilization appliance groups in this aspect. The patients in the treatment groups reported greater improvement on the PGIC compared to the no treatment group (P < .001). There was a significant decrease in headache frequency (P = .028), consumption of analgesics (P = .007), and JFLS scores (P = .008) in the jaw exercise group compared to the no treatment group. In the jaw exercise group, patients had fewer appointments and a lower mean treatment time compared to the group that received stabilization appliance treatment.

    Conclusion: Jaw exercises are effective in reducing pain intensity, headache, and consumption of analgesics in patients with masticatory myofascial pain. Jaw exercises are also cost-effective when compared to treatment with a stabilization appliance.

  • 268.
    Lindfors, Erik
    et al.
    Department of Stomatognathic Physiology, Public Dental Health Service, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Ernberg, Malin
    Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Scandinavian Center for Orofacial Neurosciences, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Patients' experiences of therapeutic jaw exercises in the treatment of masticatory myofascial pain-A postal questionnaire study2019In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 46, no 9, p. 800-806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The most common non-dental pain in the orofacial region is pain associated with temporomandibular disorders (TMD), and jaw exercises are a common treatment in these cases. Since masticatory myofascial pain has components of an affective and cognitive nature, knowledge about the patients' experiences of the condition and treatment is important.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to study the patients' experiences of jaw exercises in the treatment of masticatory myofascial pain.

    METHODS: A questionnaire, containing 24 statements that should be answered according to a five-item verbal Likert scale, was sent to 150 consecutive patients with masticatory myofascial pain according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD after they had been treated with jaw exercises for 3-12 months.

    RESULTS: The response rate was 73% (n = 109), and 79% of the responders were women. 71% of the patients reported that it was easier to remember the jaw exercises if they put them in conjunction with an already established routine. Before examination, 49% of the patients suspected serious disease behind their symptoms, but these concerns were greatly relieved by the information provided. As a result, 78% reported that information about the underlying cause of their symptoms made them more involved in the treatment. Finally, 72% of the respondents reported that the jaw exercises were effective in reducing their symptoms.

    CONCLUSIONS: Information about the cause of the symptoms and the treatment is important to reassure and make the patient involved in the treatment. Most patients report that jaw exercises are an effective treatment and they appreciated to have tools to tackle the problems themselves if the symptoms should return.

  • 269. Lindfors, Erik
    et al.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    Helkimo, Martti
    Magnusson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Treatment of temporomandibular disorders with a combination of hard acrylic stabilisation appliance and a soft appliance in the opposing jaw: A retro- and prospective study2008In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 9-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the treatment effect of a combined treatment with a stabilisation appliance and a soft appliance in the opposing jaw in patients refractory to previous TMD treatment. During a 5-year-period, 2001-2005, a total of 98 patients received the combined treatment at the Department of Stomatognathic Physiology, the Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden. Before the patients received the combined treatment, they had already been given several different TMD treatments during a long period of time, either before referral or at the specialist clinic, with only minor or no effect on their TMD symptoms. The patients were followed prospectively (n=10), or analysed retrospectively (n=88). The data registered were gender, age, main indication for TMD treatment, number of visits to the clinic before and after the introduction of the combined treatment, as well as according to a clinical (Di) and anamnestic (Ai) dysfunction index. The most common causes for treatment in the retrospective material were problems of muscular origin and problems of both muscular and TMJ origin. In the prospective material, most of the patients had mainly muscular symptoms. Both the clinical and anamnestic dysfunction index decreased statistically significantly in the retrospective material after the introduction of the combined treatment. There was a numerical improvement of both indices also in the prospective material. In conclusion, the present investigation showed that a combined treatment with a hard acrylic stabilisation appliance and a soft appliance in the opposing jaw seems to give a remarkable improvement of TMD signs and symptoms in apparently therapy resistant TMD patients. General conclusions should, however, be made with caution due to the fact that the study did not include any control group. There is an obvious need for randomized controlled studies concerning the efficacy and effectiveness of the combined treatment presented in this study.

  • 270.
    Lindfors, Erik
    et al.
    Department of Stomatognathic Physiology, Public Dental Health Service, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Tegelberg, Åke
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Ernberg, Malin
    Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Scandinavian Center for Orofacial Neuroscience (SCON), Huddinge, Sweden.
    Treatment of temporomandibular disorders – knowledge, attitudes and clinical experience among general practising dentists in Sweden2016In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 74, no 6, p. 460-465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the self-perceived level of knowledge, attitudes and clinical experience in treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) among general practising dentists (GPDs).

    Material and methods: A web-based questionnaire was sent to all GPDs in the public dental health service in the County of Uppsala in 2010 (n = 128) and 2014 (n = 113). The GPDs were asked to answer questions in the following categories: Demographic information, Quality assurance, Clinical experience and treatment, Need for specialist resources in the field of TMD and Attitudes. Between the two questionnaires, the GPDs were offered TMD education and an examination template including three TMD questions was introduced in the computer case files. The results were also compared with a previous questionnaire from 2001.

    Results: The response rate was 71% (2010) and 73% (2014). The majority of the GPDs were women (70% in 2010 and 72% in 2014). The reported frequency of taking a case history of facial pain and headache increased between 2010 and 2014. In 2014, the GPDs were more secure and reported higher frequency of good clinical routines in treatment with jaw exercises and pharmacological intervention compared to 2001. Interocclusal appliance was the treatment with which most dentists felt confident and reported good clinical routines.

    Conclusions: The GPDs felt more insecure concerning TMD diagnostics, therapy decisions and treatment in children/adolescents compared to adults. There is a high need for orofacial pain/TMD specialists and a majority of the GPDs wants the specialists to offer continuing education in TMD.

  • 271.
    Lindmark, Lindmark
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Jacobsson, Brittmarie
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Larsson, Anna-Britta
    Tandhygienistprogrammet, Högskolan Dalarna.
    Müller, Görel
    Tandhygienistprogrammet, Högskolan Dalarna.
    Andersson, Pia
    Tandhgienistprogrammet, Högskolan Kristianstad.
    Mårtensson, Carina
    Tandhgienistprogrammet, Högskolan Kristianstad.
    Olsson, Margaretha
    Tandhygienistprogrammet, Karlstad universitet.
    Rolandsson, Margot
    Tandhygienistprogrammet, Karlstad universitet.
    Sundberg, Nina
    Tandhygienistprogrammet, Karlstad universitet.
    Klinisk slutexamination i tandhygienistprogrammet vid fyra lärosäten2009Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The registered dental hygienist has a key role in promotion and prevention within Swedish dental care. Working as a dental hygienist requires an ability to work independently and make well-grounded decisions in order to give good and sure care. The aim of the project was to develop, test and evaluate a model for clinical final examinations based on the requirements for working as a registered dental hygienist. The project resulted in a model consisting of a theoretical and a clinical examination. The theoretical part consists of a fictitious patient case while the clinical part comprises a realistic patient situation in which the student takes charge of a patient and gives treatment. The strength of the new model lies in the fact that all students at different universities and colleges have to take clinical examinations according to the same assessment criteria, which ensures good and comparable quality.

  • 272.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Känsla av sammanhang, den orala hälsan, tandvårdsbeteende och attityder till tandvård2007In: Tandhygienisttidningen, ISSN 1102-6146, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 5-Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 273.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Munhälsa hos äldre2020In: Äldre och åldrande: grundbok i gerontologi / [ed] Marie Ernsth Bravell & Lena Östlund, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2020, 3, p. 111-124Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 274.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Munhälsa hos äldre kvinnor.2014In: Sociala skillnader i äldre kvinnors hälsa.: En kunskapssammanställning av KvinnorKan., Stockholm, 2014, p. 32-43Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 275.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Munhälsan kan förbättras med promotiva strategier2019In: Hälsopromotion i teori och praktik: olika arenor och målgrupper / [ed] Åsa Bringsén & Petra Nilsson Lindström, Liber, 2019, p. 178-194Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 276.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Mycket stress bland tandläkare2016In: Tandläkartidningen, ISSN 0039-6982, no 4, p. 46-48Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 277.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Oral Health and Sense of Coherence: Health Behaviours Knowledge, Attitudes and Clinical Status2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
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  • 278.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Resursrikedom och balans i livet ger god munhälsa hos 19-åringar2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet var att undersöka hälsoorienterade resurser bland 19-åringar och hur dessa interagerar med orala hälsorelaterade attityder och beteenden.Deltagare, 19-åringar som bor i Jönköping, var strategiskt utvalda i samband med den årliga undersökningen på Folktandvården. En strukturerad enkät besvarades innehållande bakgrundsfaktorer och Antonovskys livsfrågeformulär som mäter "känsla av sammanhang" (KASAM), följt av en tematiserad djupintervju. Den kvalitativa analysmetoden var Grounded Theory. Nio informanter (fyra kvinnor) har hittills tagits med i studien.Den preliminära analysen visar en kärnkategori, "Resursrikedom och balans i livet", som tycks vara avgörande för hälsosamma val som påverkar orala hälsorelaterade attityder och beteenden. Denna kärnkategori bygger på fem inbördes relaterade teman som beskriver olika dimensioner av hälsorelaterade resurser. Trygghet och stöd från familj och vänner, interna resurser såsom självtillit men också olika strategier för att hantera vardagen lyftes fram som centrala resurser. Värderingar och förväntningar, egen erfarenhet och behov, men också tankar om framtida orala hälsotillstånd, var viktiga för motivation till hälsosamma val. Dessutom ansågs tillgången till samhällets resurser såsom stormarknader, möjlighet till självhushåll, en hälsosam kost,  men också hälsobudskap från media, skola och tandvård samt den psykosociala miljön som påverkande faktorer för hälsosamma val.Slutsats: Samspelet mellan olika externa och interna resurser beskrevs som avgörande för hälsosamma val och oral hälsa. Fokus på individens resurser kan vara en framgångsfaktor i förebyggande och munhälsofrämjande åtgärder.

  • 279.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Sense of coherence (SOC) and oral health status among Swedish adults: a cross sectional population study2009In: Forskningskonferens i munhälsa 2009, Falun, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The Sense of coherence (SOC) questionnaire estimate an individual’s degree of an inside strength leading to a health promoting behaviour. The aim was to investigate sense of coherence in relation to oral health status.

    Method A stratified random sample of 910 individuals from Jönköping, Sweden, aged 20,30,40,50,60,70 and 80 years old, was used. The investigation contained the Swedish short version of  the SOC questionnaire with 13-items and a self-reported questionnaire about demographic information, oral health related behaviour and attitudes to oral health. In addition a clinical and radiographical examination was performed.

    Results A total of 525 individuals participated in the study, 261 men and 264 women. Socioeconomic factors such as age, marital status, income and education had a statistical significant association to SOC.  Bivariate analyse showed that higher mean SOC scores had a statistically significant relationships with more decayed filled surfaces (DFS) and filled surfaces (FS), less caries severity, less teeth with calculus and a better periodontal health. Logistic regression analysis showed that Individuals with high SOC score were predictive of high DFS and FS but low gingivitis scores. After controlling for age, high SOC scores showed a protective effect for gingivitis and plaque.

    Conclusions Socioeconomic factors had an association with SOC. Statistical associations were found between SOC scores and oral health status with regard to several  important oral clinical variables and high SOC scores may indicate a protective determinant for gingivitis and plaque.

  • 280.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    What is an Oral Health Risk Assessment Tool, and can it be useful within nursing care? ROAG-J in the Swedish Quality Register Senior Alert2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 281.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Abrahamsson, Kajsa H.
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Oral health-related resources - a salutogenic perspective on Swedish 19-year-olds2015In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 56-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to explore health-oriented resources among 19-year-olds and, specifically, how these resources interact with oral health-related attitudes and behaviour. To represent individuals with various psychosocial environments and socioeconomic areas, the participants were selected from different geographical locations of the Public Dental Service clinics in the county of Jönköping, Sweden. A structured questionnaire was distributed, including the instrument ‘sense of coherence’, for description of the study group, followed by a semi-structured thematized interview. The qualitative method used for sampling and analyses was grounded theory. Data sampling and analysis were performed in parallel procedures and ended up in a sample of ten informants (five women). In the analysis of interview data, a core category was identified, ‘Resources of Wealth and Balance in Life – a Foundation for Healthy Choices’, describing the central meaning of the informants’ perceptions of resources with an essential beneficial impact on oral health. The core category was built on five themes, which in turn had various subthemes, describing different dimensions of resources interacting with beneficial oral health-related attitudes and behaviour: ‘Security-building Resources and Support’, ‘Driving force and Motivation’,Maturity and Insight’,Health Awareness’ and ‘Environmental influences.’ The results elucidate personal and environmental health-oriented resources with influence on oral health-related attitudes and behaviours of young individuals. Such beneficial recourses should be recognized by dental personnel to promote oral health.

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  • 282.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Ekman, Aimée
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Berg, L.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hedén, L.
    Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life, and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Källstrand, J.
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Larsson, M.
    School of Health and Education, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Nunstedt, H.
    Department of Health Sciences, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Oxelmark, L.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pennbrant, S.
    Department of Health Sciences, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Sundler, A.
    Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life, and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Larsson, I.
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Health-promoting factors in higher education for a sustainable working life – protocol for a multicenter longitudinal study2020In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-8, article id 233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The World Health Organization has highlighted the importance of health promotion for health service providers in order to ensure sustainable working life for individuals involved in providing health services. Such sustainability begins when students are preparing to manage their own future health and welfare in working life. It has been suggested that universities, employees and trainee health professionals should adopt or follow a salutogenic approach that not only complements the providing of information on known health risks but also favors health promotion strategies. This paper describes the study design and data collection methods in a planned study aiming to explore health-promoting factors for a sustainable working life among students in higher education within healthcare and social work.

  • 283.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Bülow, Pia H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Social Work, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Rönning, Helén
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Gunnarsson, Nina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Henricson, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Kjellström, Sofia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Sandgren, Anna
    Center for Collaborative Palliative care, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    The use of the concept of transition in different disciplines within health and social welfare: An integrative literature review2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 664-675Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    To continuing the quest of the concept of transition in nursing research and to explore how the concept of transition is used in occupational therapy, oral health and social work as well as in interdisciplinary studies in health and welfare, between 2003–2013.

    Design

    An integrative literature review.

    Methods

    PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, DOSS, SocIndex, Social Science Citation Index and AMED databases from 2003–2013 were used. Identification of 350 articles including the concept of transition in relation to disciplines included. Assessment of articles are in accordance to Meleis' typologies of transition by experts in each discipline. Chosen key factors were entered into Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS).

    Results

    Meleis' four typologies were found in all studied disciplines, except development in oral health. The health‐illness type was the most commonly explored, whereas in social work and in occupation therapy, situational transitions dominated.

  • 284.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Do, Thi Thu Hien
    Hanoi Medical University, Vietnam.
    Do, Quang Trung
    Hanoi Medical University, Vietnam.
    Bengtsson, Ann
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Effectiveness of oral hygiene after supervised tooth-brushing education in six-year-old children at a primary school in Vietnam2012In: Journal of Behavioral Health, E-ISSN 2146-8346, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 279-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The prevalence of dental caries is very high among Vietnamese children why methods and techniques for good oral hygiene behaviours therefore is very important in caries prevention.

    Aim: To assess oral hygiene before and after supervised tooth-brushing education in six-yearold children.

    Design: A pilot study with a pre-post-test design was used. Forty children, six years of age, at a primary school in Hanoi, participated in the study. The modified Bass tooth-brushing method were taught. Oral hygiene, i.e. dental plaque, was assessed on each tooth surface before the tooth-brushing education and after one week.

    Results: There was a distinct and significant improvement in tooth-brushing skills among sixyear- old children of both genders after the tooth-brushing education. The rate of dental plaque was reduced by 40% after the education. An improvement in cleaning could be seen on all four tooth surfaces (buccal, lingual, mesial and distal).

    Conclusion: School-based education in tooth-brushing technique are very effective for improving oral hygiene among six year olds.

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  • 285.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Ernsth-Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Johansson, Linda
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Finkel, Deborah
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Oral health is essential for quality of life in older adults: A Swedish National Quality Register Study2021In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 191-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine the relationship between QoL and oral health from two Swedish national quality registries (NQRs).

    Background: Oral health plays an important part in general health, which might also affect QoL. No studies have examined the relationships between QoL and oral health in late adulthood based on aggregated data from Swedish NQRs.

    Material and methods: Four NQRs incorporated the EQ-5D, which assesses 5 aspects of QoL: mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain/discomfort and anxiety/depression. Items from the Revised Oral Assessment Guide, obtained from the NQR Senior Alert, were used to identify older adults at risk for oral health issues.

    Results: A total of 510 individuals had data on all relevant variables. Analyses indicated significantly higher QoL for individuals without risk of oral health problems (M = −0.15 (SD = 1.01)), compared to those with risk (M = −0.75 (SD = 1.52)). Logistic regression analysis showed that lower QoL (OR = 0.69 (0.49, 0.97)), mental status (OR = 0.37 (0.19, 0.71)), lower self-rated health (OR = 0.59 (0.42, 0.85)) and higher age (OR = 1.07 (1.01, 1.13)) were significantly related to risk of oral health problems. Higher BMI (OR = 1.13 (0.99, 1.30)), living alone (OR = 2.37 (0.93, 6.06)) and more years of education (OR = 1.15 (1.01, 1.31)) were associated with higher risk of oral health problems.

    Conclusions: Oral health is a significant component of quality of life in late adulthood. NQRs are of value for healthy ageing research in populations that may be underrepresented in research studies.

  • 286.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    H Abrahamsson, Kajsa
    Odontologiska fakulteten, Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Resources of Wealth and Balance in life – Essential for Oral health among Swedish 19-year olds2013In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene: Abstracts for the International Symposium on Dental Hygiene, Cape Town, South Africa, August 14–17, 2013 / [ed] Öhrn, Kerstin, 2013, Vol. 11, p. 163-164Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim was to explore health oriented resources among 19-year olds and in specific how these health oriented recourses interacts with oral health related attitudes and behaviors.Methods: Participants, 19-year olds living in Jönköping, were strategically selected in connection with the annual examination at the Public Dental Service. A structured questionnaire included background factors and Antonovsky´s 13-items Life-orientation questionnaire measuring ‘Sense of coherence’ (SOC), followed by a thematized in-depth interview. The qualitative method chosen was Grounded Theory (GT). In accordance with GT, datasampling and analyses is performed in a parallel procedure that continues until new data do not bring anything vital into the analysis model. Nine informants (four women) have so far been included in the study.

    Preliminary results: The preliminary analysis model suggests a core category labeled ‘Resources of Wealth and Balance in Life’ which seemed to be essential for healthy choices influencing oral health related attitudes and behaviors. This core category is built on five interrelated themes describing different dimensions of health related recourses. Security and support from family and friends, internal resources such as self-efficacy but also different strategies to coop with everyday life were highlighted as central resources.  Values and expectation within life context, your own experience and needs but also thoughts about future oral health conditions, were important for motivation towards healthy choices. Moreover, availability to community resources such as supermarkets, opportunity for self-cooking and a healthy diet, but also health messages from media, school and dental care as well as the psychosocial environment were described as influencing factors for healthy choices.  Conclusions: The interplay between different external and internal resources were described as essential for healthy choices and oral health. Focusing on such beneficial resources could be a success factor in prevention and oral health promotion strategies. 

  • 287.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Is Sense of coherence (SOC) a determinant to oral health status in adults?: a cross sectional population study2009In: Oral hälsa och livskvalitet - bidrar tandvården?: 22-23 april 2009 Malmö, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The Sense of coherence (SOC) questionnaire estimate an individual’s degree of an inside strength leading to a health promoting behaviour. The aim was to investigate sense of coherence in relation to oral health status. Method A stratified random sample of 910 individuals from Jönköping, Sweden, aged 20,30,40,50,60,70 and 80 years old, was used. The investigation contained the Swedish short version of  the SOC questionnaire with 13-items and a self-reported questionnaire about demographic information, oral health related behaviour and attitudes to oral health. In addition a clinical and radiographical examination was performed. Results A total of 525 individuals participated in the study, 261 men and 264 women. Socioeconomic factors such as age, marital status, income and education had a statistical significant association to SOC.  Bivariate analyse showed that higher mean SOC scores had a statistically significant relationships with more decayed filled surfaces (DFS) and filled surfaces (FS), less caries severity, less teeth with calculus and a better periodontal health. Logistic regression analysis showed that Individuals with high SOC score were predictive of high DFS (OR=3.3, CI 1.14-9.36) and FS  (OR=2.1, CI 0.98-4.31) but low gingivitis scores (OR=0.54, CI 0.30-0.95). After controlling for age, high SOC scores showed a protective effect for gingivitis (OR=0.52,  CI 0.29-0.94) and plaque (OR=0.61, CI 0.36-1.04). Conclusions Socioeconomic factors had an association with SOC. Statistical associations were found between SOC scores and oral health status with regard to several  important oral clinical variables and high SOC scores may indicate a protective determinant for gingivitis and plaque.

  • 288.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Avdelning för Beteende och Samhällsodontologi, Institutionen för Odontologi, Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Kan känsla av sammanhang ha betydelse för beteende, kunskap och attityder relaterat till oral hälsa?2010In: Tandhygienisttidningen, ISSN 1102-6146, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 55-Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Abstrakt – Syfte: Att studera sambandet mellan känsla av sammanhang (KASAM), oralt hälsorelaterat beteende, kunskap om och attityd till oral hälsa i en vuxen svensk befolkning. Metod: En tvärsnittsstudie där ett stratifierat urval av 910 individer, i åldrarna 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 och 80 år erbjöds att delta i studien. I undersökningen användes den svenska kortversionen (13 frågor) av Antonovsky’s livsfrågeformulär som mäter känslan av sammanhang samt ett frågeformulär gällande oralt hälsorelaterat beteende, kunskap om samt attityder till oral hälsa. Dessutom ingick frågor gällande sociodemografiska faktorer. Totalt var det 589 individer som samtyckte att delta i studien. Resultat: Totalt var det 525 individer, 261 men och 264 kvinnor, som besvarade alla 13 frågorna i SOC frågeformuläret, vilket utgjorde det slutliga materialet vid analyserna. Bivariata analyser visade på samband mellan högre KASAM medel poäng och beteende såsom färre söta drycker och färre antal mellanmål/ dag, jämfört med individer med lägre KASAM medel poäng. Individer med högre KASAM hade också en mer positive attityd såsom påståenden om att vara nöjd med tandvården, betydelsen av att ha egna tänder när man blir äldre, nöjd med egna tänder, anser sig ha bra tänder samt ingen känsla av obehag att uppsöka tandvården. Individer med högre KASAM poäng hade även ett signifikant samband med kunskap om karies. Dessa samband, förutom variabeln söta drycker, kvarstod efter kontrollering för alla sociodemografiska faktorerna (kön, ålder, civilstånd, inkomst, utbildning och yrkesnivå). Stark KASAM och god kunskap om karies var statistiskt signifikant, efter kontrollering för ålder och kön. Sammanfattning: KASAM hade ett statistiskt signifikant samband med oralt hälsoorelaterat beteende, attityder till oral hälsa samt kunskap om karies. I arbetet med oralt hälsofrämjande arbete, skulle KASAM kunna vara ett verktyg för att främja en större förståelse för individers beteende, attityder till och kunskap om oral hälsa och  möjliggöra för tandvårdspersonal att använda denna kunskap i kommunikation med individer och grupper.

  • 289.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Känslan av sammanhang (KASAM) och oralt status bland vuxna: en epidemiologisk tvärsnittsstudie2009In: Tandhygienisttidningen, ISSN 1102-6146, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 61-61Article, review/survey (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Känslan av sammanhang (KASAM) är ett frågeformulär som skattar förmågan till ett hälsofrämjande beteende. Syftet var att analysera sambandet mellan KASAM, sociodemografiska faktorer samt oralt status. Material och Metod: Populationen bestod av ett stratifierat slumpmässigt urval bestående av 910 individer från Jönköping, i åldrarna 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 och 80 år. Instrument som användes var den korta versionen av KASAM (13 frågor) samt ett frågeformulär innehållande sociodemografiska frågor. En klinisk och röntgenologisk undersökning genomfördes i anslutning till utlämnandet av enkäterna. Resultat: Totalt deltog 525 individer, 261 men och 264 kvinnor. Sociodemografiska faktorer som ålder, civilstånd, inkomst och utbildning hade en statistisk signifikant association med KASAM. Bivariat analys visade att individer med högre KASAM medelvärde hade statistiskt signifikant fler karierade och fyllda ytor (DFS) och fyllda ytor (FS), färre karierade ytor, färre tänder med tandsten och bättre parodontal hälsa. Efter kontrollering för bakgrundsfaktorer såsom kön, civilstånd, inkomst, utbildning och yrkesnivå, visade det sig att individer med hög KASAM poäng hade en större risk för högre DFS och FS men mindre risk för gingivit. Efter justering för ålder, visades hög KASAM poäng ha en förklarande betydelse för gingivit och plack. Konklusion: Sociodemografiska faktorer hade ett samband med KASAM. Dessutom visade analyserna samband mellan KASAM och fler viktiga orala variabler. Ytterligare studier rekommenderas avseende sambanden mellan KASAM och oral hälsa, där bl a oralt hälsobeteende och attityder till tandvård studeras.

  • 290.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Sense of coherence and its relationship with oral health-related behaviour and knowledge of and attitudes towards oral health2011In: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, E-ISSN 1600-0528, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 542-553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:  To investigate the relationship between sense of coherence (SOC), oral health–related behaviour, knowledge of and attitudes towards oral health in an adult Swedish population.

    Methods:  A cross-sectional design with a stratified random sample of 910 individuals aged 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 years were invited to the study, from Jönköping, Sweden. The investigation used the Swedish short version of the SOC questionnaire comprising 13 items and self-reported questions about oral health habits and knowledge of and attitudes towards oral health. In addition, a self-report questionnaire to elicit demographic information was included.

    Results:  A total of 525 individuals, 261 men and 264 women, answered all the 13-item SOC questions, which constituted the final number of the participants. After adjustment for all the sociodemographic factors included in the analysis, individuals with a stronger SOC had twice as high a chance of having healthier behaviour, including a lower frequency of snacks and drinks between meals, as well as a more positive attitude, such as the importance of having one’s own teeth as one gets older, satisfaction with their own teeth, perceiving their teeth as good and no feeling of dental fear, compared with individuals with a poorer SOC. Moreover, SOC and a good knowledge of caries were significantly associated after adjustment for age and gender.

    Conclusions:  SOC was significantly associated with several oral health–related behaviours, attitudes towards oral health and knowledge of dental caries. When working with oral health promotion, SOC could be a way for promoting a better understanding of the behaviour and attitudes of individuals and for enabling dental personals to use that knowledge for the guidance of the individual.

  • 291.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    2Department of Behavioral and Community Dentistry, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Sense of coherence and oral health status in an adult Swedish population2010In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 69, p. 12-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To investigate sense of coherence in relation to oral health status in an adult Swedish population in order to better understand the determinants of positive oral health-promoting behavior and differences in oral health.

    Material and methods. A stratified random sample of 910 individuals from Jönköping, Sweden aged 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 years was obtained. The investigation used the Swedish short version of the Sense of Coherence (SOC) questionnaire comprising 13 items and a self-report questionnaire to elicit demographic information. In addition, a clinical and radiographic oral examination was performed.

    Results. A total of 525 individuals, 261 men and 264 women, consented to participate in the study. Bivariate analysis revealed that higher mean SOC scores were statistically significantly associated with more decayed and filled surfaces (DFS) and filled surfaces (FS), fewer decayed surfaces (DS), fewer teeth with calculus and periodontal health. Multivariate analysis showed that higher SOC scores represented a predictor of fewer occurrences of a periodontal probing pocket depth of ‡4 mm and a lower risk of plaque in different regression models.

    Conclusions. Higher SOC scores may be a protective determinant of plaque and periodontal disease, indicating an association between SOC and oral health.

  • 292.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Sense of coherence (SOC), a determinant to oral health status among adults?: a cross sectional population study2008In: International Research Seminar on Salutogenesis and at the 1st Research Meeting of the IUHPE Thematic Working Group on Salutogenesis, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To investigate sense of coherence in relation to oral health status. Method A stratified random sample of 910 individuals from Jönköping, Sweden, aged 20,30,40,50,60,70 and 80 years old, was used. The investigation contained the Swedish 13-items version of  the SOC questionnaire and a self-reported questionnaire about demographic information. In addition an oral clinical and radiographical examination was performed. Results A total of 525 individuals participated in the study, 261 men and 264 women. Socioeconomic factors such as age, marital status, income and education had a statistical significant association to SOC. Bivariate analyse showed that higher mean SOC scores had a statistically significant relationships with more decayed filled surfaces (DFS) and filled surfaces (FS), less caries severity, less teeth with calculus and a better periodontal health. Logistic regression analysis showed that Individuals with high SOC score were predictive of high DFS and FS  but low gingivitis scores. After controlling for age, high SOC scores showed a protective effect for gingivitis and dental plaque. Conclusions Socioeconomic factors had an association with SOC. Statistical associations were found between SOC scores and oral health status with regard to several important oral clinical variables and high SOC scores may indicate a protective determinant for gingivitis and plaque.

  • 293.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Avdelning för beteende och samhällsodontologi, Institutet för odontologi, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Sense of Coherence (SOC) and Oral Health among Swedish Adults – A Population Study2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Research are suggested studying the complex causal processes to understand and explain people’s behaviour and actions in their living context, which both can be promoting or unfavourable for oral health. A way to measure health related behaviour is with sense of coherence (SOC), which estimate a person’s degree of an inside strength and attitude to the world around, and by that maintaining health. A person with high level of SOC have been seen to have an adaptive health behaviour. The aim was to investigate a person’s ability to maintaining health, in terms of Sense of coherence in relation to oral health. Method: A stratified random sample of 910 individuals from Jönkping, Sweden, aged 20,30,40,50,60,70 and 80 years old, was used. The investigation contained the Swedish short version of The orientation to life questionnaire (SOC) with 13-items and a self-reported questionnaire about demographic information, oral health related behaviour and attitudes to oral health. These questionnaires were distributed in addition to the clinical and radiographical examination. Results: A total of 525 individuals participated in the study, 261 men and 264 women. Mean SOC scores increased with age, and the youngest group (20-year-olds) had a significantly lower SOC score compared to the other age groups. Bivariate results showed that individuals with higher SOC scores had statistically significant relationships with oral clinical status such as more decayed filled surfaces (DFS), less caries severity, less teeth with calculus and a higher degree of periodontal health. SOC was also significantly associated with gingivitis and dental plaque, after controlling for socioeconomic and demographic factors. Conclusions: Younger individuals had lower SOC scores compared to elderly individuals. Some statistical associations were found between SOC scores and oral health with regard to several important oral clinical variables and higher SOC scores may indicate a protective determinant for gingivitis and plaque.

     

  • 294.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Känsla av sammanhang och oral hälsaIn: Sveriges Tandhygienistförening - Nationell konferens, GöteborgConference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syfte: Det finns få studier som analyserat den komplexa interaktionen mellan biologiska, sociala och miljömässiga faktorer och dess inverkan på oral hälsa. Det finns därför behov av att öka kunskapen om dessa samband avseende individers hälso- respektive ohälsobeteende i relation till oral hälsa. Ett sätt att mäta individens hälsobeteende är med ’Känslan av sammanhang’ (KASAM), vilket skattar en persons förhållningssätt till sin omvärld, och därmed förmåga till upprätthållande av hälsa . Övergripande målsättning med forskningsprojektet är att hos vuxna individer studera och analysera personers förmåga till upprätthållande av hälsa, i termer av KASAM, i relation till oral hälsa, kost, attityder till tandvård och prevention. Material och Metod: Ett slumpmässigt urval med 589 individer från Jönköpings kommun i åldrarna 20-80 år deltog i studien. I samband med en odontologisk klinisk och röntgenologisk undersökning besvarade deltagarna frågeformulär om tandvårdsvanor, tandhälsa och Antonovsky`s frågeformulär (13 frågor). Statistiska analyser görs med hjälp av SPSS, 14.0. Resultat: Analys av KASAM och dess fördelning i en normalpopulation visar att 20-åringar har en statistiskt signifikant lägre KASAM jämfört med övriga åldersgrupper. KASAM tenderar att stiga med åldern. Äldre män har ett statistiskt signifikant högre KASAM jämfört med jämnåriga kvinnor. Preliminära resultat av KASAM och oral hälsa visar på signifikanta skillnader mellan individer med hög och låg KASAM relaterat till karies- och fyllningsfrekvens. Slutsatser: Distributionen av KASAM fördelar sig olika för olika åldrar och kön. Det föreligger ett samband mellan KASAM och oral hälsa.

  • 295.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    "Sense of coherence" and oral health in an adult population: an epidemiological study2007In: 7th conference on advances in health care science research, 2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim was to investigate the individual distribution regarding ‘Sense of coherence’ (SOC) and oral health in an adult population. Method: A random sample of 589 individuals from Jönköping, Sweden, aged 20,30,40,50,60,70 and 80 years old, was used. Clinical and radiographical examinations were performed and a questionnaire measuring attitudes, knowledge of oral health and SOC (13-items) was included. Total SOC score and the three components; comprehensibility, manageability and meaningfulness which SOC is built upon was analyzed. Results: A total of 526 individuals participated in the study, 263 men and 263 women. The individual SOC score showed an increase with age, and the youngest group (20 years) had a significantly lower SOC score compared to the other age groups. Elderly men had a statistical significantly higher SOC compared to the elderly women (60 and 70 age groups). Analysing the three components, comprehensibility had statistical significantly higher mean SOC score, compared to manageability and meaningfulness. When dividing the participants into two subgroups, one with low (<66 points) and one with high (> 76 points) SOC score respectively, 55% among 20 years old had low SOC score compared to 18% for 80 years olds. The result described different personalities, depending on high and low SOC scores in comprehensibility, manageability and meaningfulness, according to Antonovsky´s model about the dynamic relations between the three components in SOC. Preliminary results showed that individuals with high SOC had statistical significant more number of decayed and filled surfaces (DFS) compared to individuals with low SOC. Conclusion: The distribution of SOC score differed regarding age and gender. Younger individuals had lower SOC scores compared to elderly individuals. A clear association was found between SOC scores and oral health measured by number of DFS.

  • 296.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    The distribution of 'sense of coherence' and oral health among Swedish adults: an epidemiological study2008In: Scientific conference On the occation of the 45th Foundation Anniversary cermony, DaNang, Vietnam, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Antonovsky´s concept ‘Sense of coherence’ (SOC) has shown to be related with health, and a person with high level of SOC has an adaptive health behavior. The aim was to investigate the individual distribution regarding ‘Sense of coherence’ and oral health in an adult population. Method: A random sample of 589 individuals from Jönköping, Sweden, aged 20,30,40,50,60,70 and 80 years old, was used. Clinical and radio graphical examinations were performed and a questionnaire measuring attitudes, knowledge of oral health and SOC (13-items) was included. Total SOC score and the three components; comprehensibility, manageability and meaningfulness which SOC is built upon was analyzed. Results: A total of 526 individuals participated in the study, 263 men and 263 women. The individual SOC showed an increase with age, and the youngest group (20-year-olds) had a significantly lower SOC compared to the other age groups. Elderly men had a significantly higher SOC compared to women in the same age (60 and 70 age groups). Analysing the three components, comprehensibility has significantly lower mean, compared to manageability and meaningfulness for the 20-year-olds. When divided SOC score in low (<66 points) and high (>76 points) SOC score, 55% among 20-years-old had low SOC score compared to 18% for 80-years-old. Preliminary results showed that individuals with high SOC score had significant more number of decayed and filled surfaces (DFS) compared to individuals with low SOC. Conclusion: The distribution of SOC score differed regarding age and gender. Younger people had a lower SOC score compared to elderly age groups. A clear association was found between SOC scores and oral health measured by number of DFS.

  • 297.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. HHJ. Oral health.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. HHJ. Oral health.
    Stenström, Ulf
    Socialhögskolan, Växjö Universitet.
    Wärnberg Gerdin, Elisabeth
    Centrum för folkhälsovetenskap, Linköping.
    Oral hälsa och individens känsla av sammanhang, en epidemiologisk studie2005In: Odontologisk riksstämma, 2005Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 298.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Jansson, Henrik
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Periodontology, Centre of Oral Health Sciences, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lannering, Christina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Region Jönköping County, Futurum, Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Johansson, Linda
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Oral health matters for the nutritional status of older persons: A population-based study2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 5-6, p. 1143-1152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore the association between oral health and nutritional status in the context of daily care for older people.

    BACKGROUND: Oral problems often increase with age and affect a person's ability to chew and swallow. They might also influence the ability to maintain a satisfactory nutritional status. Oral health awareness is therefore of great importance in nursing care for older people.

    DESIGN: A retrospective cross-sectional study.

    METHODS: Data from the Swedish quality register, Senior Alert, were used, including structured assessments of both oral and nutritional status using the Revised Oral Assessment Guide-Jönköping and the Mini Nutritional Assessment. In total, 1,156 persons (mean age: 82.8 ± 7.9) had both oral and nutritional assessments registered by the nursing staff in daily care.

    RESULTS: Approximately 29% of participants had moderate oral health problems. Another 12% had severe problems. Over 60% of the persons were considered at risk of malnutrition or were malnourished. There was a weak correlation between poor nutritional status and poor oral health, and approximately one-third of the persons who were at risk or malnourished had simultaneous oral problems. A multivariate logistic regression revealed that when problems involving voice and swallowing were present, there was also a greater possibility of being assessed as at risk of malnourishment or being malnourished.

    CONCLUSION: There is a relationship between oral health problems and nutritional status, indicating the importance of evaluating oral health status in older persons with nutritional problems.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nursing staff involved in care for older people should be aware of the importance of including regular oral health check-ups in their work. There is also a need for nursing staff members and oral health professionals to exchange knowledge.

  • 299.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Norderyd, O.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
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