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  • 251.
    Brundin, Ethel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Florin Samuelsson, Emilia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Finance.
    The Logic of Ownership in Family Controlled Businesses2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 252.
    Brundin, Ethel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Keep the flow going: The strategic dialogue as a key to transgenerational entrepreneurial behavior2007In: Presented at the 3rd Workshop on Family Firms Management Research (EIASM), Jönköping, Sweden, June 3-5, 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 253.
    Brundin, Ethel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Strategic Dialogue as an Important Practice of Strategizing2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 254.
    Brundin, Ethel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Strategic Dialogues: An Important Practice in Family Businesses2008In: Paper presented at the 4th Family Enterprise Research Conference (FERC), Milwaukee, WI, April, 2008., 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 255.
    Brundin, Ethel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Beyond Facts and Figures: The Role of Emotions in Boardroom Dynamics2008In: Corporate governance: An International Review, ISSN 0964-8410, E-ISSN 1467-8683, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 326-341Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 256.
    Brundin, Ethel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Emotionalizing the board: emotions as power and status energizers in board processes2007In: EURAM Annual Conference 2007, Paris, France, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 257.
    Brundin, Ethel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Emotions as Power Energizers: The Role of Emotions in Strategizing2003In: Presented at the 17th Nordic Conference on Business Studies in Reykjavik, Iceland, August 14-16, 2003: New Perspectives in Strategy Research, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 258.
    Brundin, Ethel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Entrepreneurial orientation across generations in family firms: the role of owner-centric culture for proactiveness and autonomy2010In: Transgenerational Entrepreneurship: Exploring Growth and Performance in Family Firms Across Generations / [ed] Mattias Nordqvist and Thomas M. Zellweger, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar , 2010, 1, p. 123-141Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 259.
    Brundin, Ethel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Entrepreneurial orientation across generations in family firms: the role of owner-centric culture in for proactiveness and autonomy2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 260.
    Brundin, Ethel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Kultur och entreprenörskap över generationer2012In: Familjeföretagande: affärer och känslor / [ed] Ethel Brundin, Anders W. Johansson, Bengt Johannisson, Leif Melin, Mattias Nordqvist, Stockholm: SNS förlag, 2012, p. 69-89Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 261.
    Brundin, Ethel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Patzelt, Holger
    Sheperd, Dean
    Managers' Emotional Displays and Employees' Willingness to Act Entrepreneurially2008In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 221-243Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 262.
    Brundin, Ethel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Patzelt, Holger
    Max Planck Institute of Economics, Jena, Germany .
    Sheperd, Dean A.
    Kelley School of Business, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, United States .
    Managers' Emotional Displays and Employees' Willingness to Act Entrepreneurially2016In: Decision Making in Entrepreneurship: Selected Joint Papers of Dean A. Shepherd / [ed] Dean A. Shepherd, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016, p. 119-141Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we draw on the literature of emotions and entrepreneurial motivation to analyze how and why emotional displays of managers influence the willingness of employees to act entrepreneurially. Using an experimental design and 2912 assessments nested within 91 employees from 31 small entrepreneurially oriented firms, we find that managers' displays of confidence and satisfaction about entrepreneurial projects enhance employees' willingness to act entrepreneurially, whereas displays of frustration, worry, and bewilderment diminish employees' willingness. Moreover, we find that displays of satisfaction, frustration, worry, and bewilderment moderate the effect of managers' displayed confidence on employees' willingness to act entrepreneurially. Our findings have implications for the emotions and entrepreneurial motivation literature. 

  • 263.
    Brundin, Ethel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Schiede, Christian
    Entrepreneurial orientation as a dynamic concept in the family business context: governance, psychological contracts, and transgenerational potential2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 264.
    Brundin, Ethel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Sharma, Pramodita
    School of Business Administration, University of Vermont, Burlington, USA .
    Love, Hate, and Desire: The Role of Emotional Messiness in the Business Family2012In: Understanding Family Businesses: Undiscovered Approaches, Unique Perspectives, and Neglected Topics / [ed] Alan Carsrud and Malin Brännback, New York: Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2012, 1, p. 55-71Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The bakery is in its second and third generations. While the father owns and manages it, his elder daughter, Sarah, is employed in it. She is a trained confectioner who has worked in the firm for 7 years. Sarah continues to upgrade her skills and has innovative ideas for renewal of her family’s enterprise. She loves her work and the business and is willing to work real hard to make it prosper in the future. Her husband, Eric, works in the production and has been with the firm for 10 years. Sarah’s younger sister, Anna, is still a student, and has no interest either in confectionary or in her family firm. Their father, John, who has been running the firm since 1980 when he took it over from his father, has declared his desire to retire in about 5 years. However, at this point he has not clarified to his family who his successor will be.

  • 265.
    Brundin, Ethel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Wigren, Caroline
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    How family business owners give voice to their past, present and future: Caught in the past or stuck in the future?2006In: Presented at the 2nd Workshop on Family Firm Management Research (EIASM): Nice, France, June 1-2, 2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 266.
    Brundin, Ethel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Wigren, Caroline
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Isaacs, Eslyn
    Friedrich, Chris
    Visser, Kobus
    Triple Helix Networks in a Multicultural Context: Triggers and Barriers for Fostering Growth and Sustainability2008In: Journal of Developmental Entrepreneurship, ISSN 1084-9467, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 77-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with Triple Helix (university, industry and government co-operation) from an institutional theory perspective. The empirical context is the Western Cape Region in South Africa and the focus is entrepreneurship development. The purpose is twofold: first, the existing Triple Helix model is adapted to the South African context; and second, facilities and impediments for working according to Triple Helix in South Africa are identified. The empirical material consists of a survey and three longitudinal case studies illustrating the degree of co-operation between the three parties. The article contributes to knowledge about how the Triple Helix model works on a regional level in a developing country. The study draws the following conclusions: when co-operation is to be identified between the three actors, only two of the three are involved; one missing link in the Triple Helix model is the focus on the entrepreneur; co-operation between the three parties are incidental rather than planned and there is lack of structure. In turn, some of these conclusions may be an effect of institutional changes on a national level. For a normative legacy, the article proposes a set of suggestions for incorporating all relevant parties on a practical level.

  • 267.
    Brundin, Ethel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Wigren, Caroline
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Visser, Kobus
    Isaacs, Eslyn
    Solomon, Goosain
    Friedrich, Chris
    Triple Helix Networks in a Multi-Cultural Context: Triggers and Barriers for Fostering Growth and Sustainability2005In: Presented at the Scandinavian Academy of Management Conference, Aarhus, Denmark, August 2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 268.
    Brundin, Ethel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Wigren Kristoferson, Caroline
    Lunds universitet, Malmö högskola.
    Älskar, älskar inte? Exkludering i familjeföretag2012In: Familjeföretagande: Affärer och känslor / [ed] Ethel Brundin, Anders W. Johansson, Bengt Johannisson, Leif Melin, Mattias Nordqvist, Stockholm: SNS Förlag , 2012, p. 294-315Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 269.
    Brundin, Ethel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Wigren-Kristoferson, Caroline
    Lund University.
    Where the two logics of institutional theory and entrepreneurship merge: are family businesses caught in the past or stuck in the future?2013In: South African Journal of Economic and Management Sciences, ISSN 1015-8812, E-ISSN 2222-3436, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 452-467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to investigate how owners of family businesses combine their traditional heritage with changes in a new competitive arena. This is done by allowing the owners and managers of six vineyards to give voice to their concerns about the past, present, and future. The findings suggest that family businesses in the South African wine industry are subject to a process of institutionalisation in which entrepreneurial activities, which are part of this process, may not be as entrepreneurial as they appear at first. It is found that the two forms of logic behind the institutionalisation of the family firm and entrepreneurial activities in the context of the post-apartheid era can be successfully merged. Theoretical and practical implications bring the article to a close.

  • 270.
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Börsen bra. Hemma bäst: MSAB köps ut från börsen. Att familjebolag avnoteras har sina förklaringar.2017In: Affärsvärlden, ISSN 0345-3766, no 47, p. 4p. 28-31Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The main owners of the Swedish famly firm Melker Schörling AB (MSAB) have made an offer to the minority owners to repurchase their shares. The intention is to delist MSAB from the stock exchange. It is not uncommon that owning families choose to delist their firms from the stock exchange. One reaseon to do so is that being listed may have negative implications for the socioemotional wealth (SEW) of the owners. Family owners need to consider both financial wealth and socioemotional wealth in their corporate governance decisions. 

  • 271.
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Connecting and disconnecting historical epochs through heritage brands.: The case of the Latvian confectionary brand Laima.2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper addresses how heritage brands can survive and develop in highly changing political and economic contexts. Examining the case of the Latvian Confectionary Brand Laima, I discuss how the brand relates back to two periods of Latvian independence and two periods of Russian/Soviet/German occupation from 1870-2016.

  • 272.
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Constructing family firm identity over generations: The case of the Swedish pulp and paper firm MoDo 1872-19902010In: History by Generations. Generational Dynamics in Modern History: Conferece at the German Historical Institute in Washington, DC in collaboration with the graduate school "Generations in modern history" at Göttingen University / [ed] Hartmut Berghoff, Bernd Weisbrod, Uffa Jensen & Christina Lubinski, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 273.
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Family heritage in corporate heritage branding: opportunities and risks2017In: Foundations of Corporate Heritage, Oxford: Routledge, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter explores the opportunities and risks associated with addressing family heritage in the context of corporate heritage branding. Family businesses are particularly interesting for the communication of corporate heritage , as the heritage of the company and that of the owner family are usually closely connected. Firms communicating their corporate heritage often aim at assuring stakeholders that central traits of the company will endure even in the future. Such trait constancy can become embodied, reinforced, and extended by the inclusion fo family heritage. However family heritage can become a liability when stakeholders discover negative traits in the family's past.

  • 274.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Ericson, Mona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Helin, Jenny
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Growth Histories: How high-growth family firms relate to company history2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 275.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Fridriksson, Helgi-Valur
    Malmö University.
    ”We have always been responsible”: A social memory approach to responsibility in supply chains2017In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 372-383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Drawing on the social memory literature, we discuss what implications referencing to the past can have for how firms manage their supply chains and communicate about them.

    Design/Methodology/Approach: In a conceptual manner, we connect the field of responsible supply chain management to the growing literature on corporate heritage and social memory in organizations.

    Findings: We develop seven propositions related to the communication of the past and its connection to responsible supply chain management.

    Research limitations/implications: A social memory perspective can inform supply chain management research, by helping to better understand how and with what consequences the past can be used in communication about supply chains. Our paper is conceptual in nature and empirical investigations would be needed to support and/or modify our literature-based findings.

    Practical implications: Managers should be aware that both opportunities and risks are associated withcommunicating the past in connection to responsible supply chain management. Deployed in the right way, such communication can be valuable both in marketing and in internal management processes.

    Originality/value: This article introduces the social memory perspective to the supply chain management field and shows what implications it can have for research on responsibility in supply chains. 

  • 276.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Hartmann, Benjamin J.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Inventing a past: Corporate heritage as dialectical relationships of past and present.2018In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this commentary, we focus on invented corporate heritage, where organizations present falsified accounts of a corporate past. The extant corporate heritage literature has highlighted how the time frames of the past, present and future (omni temporality) are merged in those organizations where there is trait constancy. Focusing on invented corporate heritage, we argue that this represents an extreme case of these dialectics, where present and future precede “the past”, or more appropriately “invented past”. Although lacking in authenticity, an invented corporate heritage may still be attractive to consumers since it can construct an aura of authenticity by delivering an enchanting experience to consumers, irrespective of its substantive genuineness. However, such inventions carry considerable risk since they represent a fabrication of the past.

  • 277.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Helin, Jenny
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Kjellander, Björn
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Corporate Museums as Creators of Organizational Memory2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 278.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Helin, Jenny
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Kjellander, Björn
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Corporate Museums, Memoralization and Organizational Memory2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 279.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Melander, Anders
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Det entreprenöriella familjeföretagets uppgång och fall2012In: Familjeföretagande: affärer och känslor / [ed] Ethel Brundin, Anders W Johansson, Bengt Johannisson, Leif Melin, Mattias Nordqvist, Stockholm: SNS förlag, 2012, p. 45-68Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 280.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Melander, Anders
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Family firm longevity and resource management: Financial and social-emotional wealth rationalities2015In: New ways of studying emotions in organizations / [ed] Charmine E. J. Härtel , Wilfred J. Zerbe , Neal M. Ashkanasy, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2015, p. 173-213Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, we explore the impact of socioemotional and financial wealth on the resource management of family firms. We use MoDo, a Swedish pulp and paper firm, covering three generations of owner-managers from 1873 to 1991, to grasp the shifting emphases on socioemotional and financial wealth in the management of the company. Identifying four strategic issues of decisive importance for the development of MoDo, we analyze the organizational values that guided the management of these issues. We propose that financial and socioemotional wealth stand for two different rationalities that infuse organizational values. The MoDo case illustrates how these rationalities go hand in hand for extended periods of time, safeguarding both financial success and socioemotional endowments. However, in a situation where the rationalities are no longer in line with the development of the industry context, the conflict arising between the two rationalities may have fatal consequences for the firm in question.

  • 281.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Melander, Anders
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Family-Firm Identity Across Generations: The Swedish Pulp and Paper Firms MoDo (1872-1990) and Korsnäs (1855-2011)2013In: History by Generations: Generational Dynamics in Modern History / [ed] Hartmut Berghoff, Uffa Jensen, Christina Lubinski, Bernd Weisbrod, Göttingen: Wallstein Verlag, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter builds on a longitudinal study of two family-owned Swedish pulp and paper firms: MoDo and Korsnäs. Drawing on the concept of "family firm identity" we investigate how the character of the two firms as family businesses has been sustained over generations and through changes in the firms' startegies and business contexts. We conclude that the concept of family firm identity needs to be applied in a differentiated manner in order to capture the reality of family busineeses. Based on our cases we identify three dimensions along which family firm identity differs: 1) explicit vs. implicit family firm identity, 2) owbership vs. management oriented family firm identity and 3) general vs. specific family firm identity.

  • 282.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Melander, Anders
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    The contextual embeddedness of enactment processes the rise and fall of an entrepreneurial family firm Modo 1872-19902010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the familiness literature it is assumed that family businesses control idiosyncratic resources thanks to the interaction between family and business. These resources are a source of sustainable competitive advantage, as they are difficult to imitate. One such resource is “the family business identity”. At the same time are family business often accused of being stuck in historical path-dependent routes, preventing them from renewal. This tension between path-dependent resources creating family-specific advantages and path-dependent resources as an obstacle to entrepreneurship is in focus in this paper.

    Reviewing the history of a Swedish family firm MoDo, We discuss how a family business identity with entrepreneurial elements developed over time. From the case we theorize on the inherent paradox between change and stability embedded in this family business identity and argue that the apparent paradox is resolved when institutions at two analytical levels (the company and the industry) are combined.

  • 283.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Melander, Anders
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    The dynamics of path dependence on the individual, organizational and the field levels: MoDo, the Kempe family and the Swedish pulp and paper industry 1873–19902016In: Management & Organizational History, ISSN 1744-9359, E-ISSN 1744-9367, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 189-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Path dependence is a promising and increasingly popular perspectivefor analysing long-term historical developments in firms, industriesor referring to other units of analysis. A central assumption is thatpaths can narrow down as a result of self-reinforcing processesthat eventually result in a lock-in that is difficult, if at all possible, toreverse. Typically, path dependence is investigated relating to onepath on a specific unit of analysis, e.g. an organization. The presentarticle explores how different paths on different levels of analysis caninfluence each other. Empirically, we use the long-term developmentof the Swedish pulp and paper company MoDo as the focal level ofanalysis. The organizational level paths are then related to paths onthe field level of the Swedish pulp and paper industry and to pathsrepresented by individual owner-managers’ ways of thinking. Weconceptualize the dynamic interplay between paths by elaboratingon processes of path-spreading, path-breaking, path-convergenceand path-divergence.

  • 284.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Melander, Anders
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    The dynamics of path dependence on the organizational and the industry level: MoDo and the Swedish pulp and paper industry 1872-19902010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 285.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Melander, Anders
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Blombäck, Anna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Imprints and self-reinforcement: The case of corporate value statements2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 286.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Continuity in Change: Path Dependence and Transformation in Two Swedish Multinationals2009In: The Hidden Dynamics of Path Dependence: Institutions and Organizations / [ed] Georg Screyögg & Jörg Sydow, Houndmills: Palgrave , 2009, 1, p. 94-109Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 287.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Board Composition and Strategic Change: Some Findings from Family Firms and Venture Capital Backed Firms2001In: Corporate Governance in SMEs / [ed] Morten Huse, Hans Landström, Halmstad: Scandinavian Institute for Research in Entrepreneurship (SIRE) , 2001, p. 45-68Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 288.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Ownership Structure, Board Composition and Entrepreneurship: Evidence from Family Firms and Venture-Capital Backed Firms2004In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research, ISSN 1355-2554, E-ISSN 1758-6534, Vol. 10, no 1/2, p. 85-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to investigate how ownership structure, especially family and/or venture-capital involvement, as well as entrepreneurial activities, defined as strategic change and renewal, help explain the involvement of independent members on boards of directors. The CEOs of 2,455 small and medium-sized, private enterprises from practically all industries were contacted in a telephone survey, resulting in an exceptionally high response rate. The findings reveal that family firms are more reluctant to involve independent directors on their boards than non-family firms that presence of venture capitalists increases the frequency of independent board members and that ownership has an impact on board roles. The results do not support the hypothesised relationship that independent directors enhance entrepreneurial activities. One implication of our study is that the often-argued-for strategic contribution of outsiders to the boards in family firms may be overemphasised. Another implication is that family firms that choose to acquire additional capital should be aware that this could result in a change in the board composition and the loss of control of the business. However, new and external owners’ inclusion on the board seems to be negotiable since there are also venture capitalists that do not insist on board representation.

  • 289.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Wiklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Corporate governance and strategic change in SMEs: The effect of ownership, board composition and top management teams2007In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 295-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper investigates how governance mechanisms affect the ability off small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to introduce strategic change. Previous research typically assumes that governance mechanisms operate independently of each other. Building on agency theory and insights from the literature on small firm governance, we hypothesize that governance variables related to ownership, the board of directors and the top management team all affect strategic change and that it is important to examine the interaction effects of these governance mechanisms. Using a longitudinal sample of over 800 SMEs, our general logic and hypotheses are supported by the analyses. We find that closely held firms exhibit less strategic change than do SMEs relying on more widespread ownership structures. However, to some extent, closely held firms can overcome these weaknesses and achieve strategic change by utilizing outside directors on the board and/or extending the size of the top management teams. Implications for theory and management practice are discussed.

  • 290.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Swedish School of Textiles, Borås.
    Wramsby, Gunnar
    Swedish School of Textiles, Borås.
    Avoiding to get stuck in a successful business model.: Business Model Adaptation at a high technology textile company2013In: RENT XXVII. Research in Entrepreneurship and Small Business: Entrepreneurship, Institutions and Competitiveness, European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management (EIASM) , 2013, p. 36-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM

     

    The development of successful business models has become recognized as an important element of entrepreneurial processes (George & Bock, 2011). Business models are depicted as loci of innovation shaping the mechanisms that derive value from business opportunities (Amit & Zott, 2001; Chesbrough & Rosenbloom, 2002). Yet, a major challenge even for entrepreneurial firms with successful business models is to avoid getting stuck in their business model in situations where environmental changes call for business model alignment or where an established business model might be an obstacle to pursuing new opportunities. While firms need to adapt and change their business models, we know that organizations tend to get stuck in their early strategies and structures (Hannan & Freeman, 1977) and that firms may get locked into previously successful paths (Sydow; Schreyögg & Koch, 2009). Hence, Johnson et al. (1996) propose that new business models are most likely to emerge with new organizations. The present paper aims at exploring how innovative firms can avoid getting stuck in their business models. As a theoretical lens we are going to use the literature on path dependence that allows analyzing why firms get locked-in on specific patterns, but also how such lock-ins can be avoided. 

     

    CONTRIBUTION

     

    Being a buzzword during the time of the dot.com bubble (Magretta 2002), the ‘business model’ concept has become widely used among practitioners and in normatively oriented publications (Casadesus-Masanell & Ricart 2011; Johnson et al. 2008; Magretta 2002). So far, research on business models suffers from a lack of consensus as to what business models actually refer to (Morris et al. 2005), leading to a fragmented body of knowledge (George & Bock 2011) that is sometimes characterized by conceptual obscurity (Hedman & Kalling 2003).

     

    There have been attempts to bring more clarity and coherence to the use of the business model concept, most notably George & Bock’s (2011) recent article where they both review the existing business model literature and make an attempt to investigate how practitioners actually use the concept. Their literature review identifies six major themes, focusing on product and service design, the deployment of resources, narrative accounts of business models, innovation frameworks, transaction structures, and the enactment of opportunities. The findings relating to practitioners’ business model conceptions are no less diverse, yet they identify an emphasis on the pursuit of opportunities. George & Bock (2011), warn that if the business model concept comprises too many aspects, it may be difficult to distinguish business models from other management concepts such as strategy. Their solution is to propose a business model definition related to the enactment of opportunities. On the other hand, a primarily opportunity-based definition leads to the question, if such phenomena are not yet sufficiently addressed in classical conceptions of entrepreneurship (e.g. Stevenson 1995). Morris, Schindehutte & Allen (2005), thus choose to emphasize the logic of profit generation in their conception of business models. While the enactment of a business opportunity is important for any business model, it is only the inclusion of the profit generation logic that clearly distinguishes the business model from other concepts.    

     

    It is undisputed that in a changing environment. Business models have to be changed or even replaced in order to sustain the success of the firm in the long run (Brunninge & Achtenhagen 2011, Doz & Kosonen 2009; Johnson, Christensen & Kagerman 1996). Still, we have rather little knowledge relating to the question how such dynamic adaptation of business models is created in practice. Johnson et al. (1996) distinguish between reactive and opportunity driven business model changes. In general, they see severe obstacles to change in established organizations. Hence, they have relatively little to say about how business model change can be accomplished in established firms. Their description of inertia comes close to the phenomenon of organizational path dependence (Sydow, et al. 2009). The literature on path dependence goes back to the work of (Arthur 1989; David 1985) departing from the assumption that increasing returns, i.e. a positive feedback process that eventually results in a lock-in where changes of the selected solution become hard, if not impossible, to bring about (Sydow, Schreyögg & Koch 2009). It is thus essentially initial success that leads to inertia, making an effective business model a potential trap preventing future change. A key element of path dependent processes is a narrowing down of options that result from the increasing returns generated by a specific solution.

     

    Method

     

    As indicated initially, our emphasis in this paper lies on the change of business models. Despite some contributions on this issue (Brunninge & Achtenhagen 2011, Doz & Kosonen 2009; Johnson, Christensen & Kagerman 1996), surprisingly little has yet been done to understand what makes business models changeable and how business model change can be accomplished. In order help filling this gap we have conducted a longitudinal single case study of an entrepreneurial firm. Case studies are particularly suited for research on change processes, as they capture longitudinal developments in context (Pettigrew 1990, 1997). As they allow for empirically-based exploration, they are particularly suited for relatively novel research topics (Eisenhardt 1989) such as business models.

     

    Our case company Oxeon, was founded in 2003 by a team of three entrepreneurs and is based in Borås/Sweden. It has so far been focusing on developing, producing and marketing a specific type of carbon-fiber based composite textiles. Two members of the entrepreneurial team were students to one of the authors of this paper, who has been able to follow the development of Oxeon since the time before the company’s formal start-up. Over time, the entrepreneurs have documented the development of their firm and in particular its business model. We have had access to this written documentation. In addition we conducted semi-structured interviews with all three entrepreneurs. Based on the data, we constructed a case study covering the development of the firm over a period of 10 years.

     

    Results & Implications

     

    Our paper provides in-depth insight into the development process of an entrepreneurial firm’s business model. The Oxeon case reveals that any change in a business model enables and constrains the pursuit of future business opportunities. Choices entrepreneurs are making along the way result in the business model taking shape. While choices, such as Oxeon’s opting for carbon fibre created opportunities, but at the same time it also implied that potential opportunities associated with other materials were foregone. What is interesting about Oxeon’s choice however, is that the choice of carbon fibre left relatively many application opportunities open as opposed to the alternative options the company had. Likewise, choices to engage in raw material manufacturing, machine production as well as the combination of producing carbon fibre as well as licensing the process to customers avoided the typical narrowing down of options that tends to be typical of path dependent processes. In relatively short time, Oxeon pursued various business opportunities in manufacturing, machine development and raw material manufacturing. Likewise different revenue generating mechanisms, i.e. sales and licensing were applied simultaneously. The entrepreneurs themselves emphasize that that they consciously strive for leaving many options for the future development of their business model open. They just consciously seek to avoid the risk of lock-in to a path dependent development.

     

    While the path-dependence literature has recently been pointing at the fact that paths can actually be unlocked Ericson & Lundin (2013), the option of avoiding lock ins in the first place seems far more attractive to entrepreneurs that want to retain the strategic flexibility of being able to adapt and change their business model. Even though the Oxeon case does not mean that firms can retain an unlimited range of options for business model change, the conscious choice to pursue paths that allow for many future options creates a lot of possibilities for pursuing new business opportunities and for aligning the business model with environmental changes.

     

    Entrepreneurs who are aware of this, can adapt their business model in a way that always keeps a wide range of business opportunities open. So far the business model literature included few in-depth longitudinal studies exploring the dynamic adaptation of business model and the role of individual entrepreneurs in such processes. With our paper we show how the development of a business model evolves over time and how entrepreneurs can maintain a high flexibility in their business model by keeping options for a wide spectrum of future choices open.

  • 291.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Swedish School of Textiles, Borås.
    Wramsby, Gunnar
    Swedish School of Textiles, Borås.
    Avoiding to get stuck in a successful business model: Dynamic business model adaptation from a path dependence perspective2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 292.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Swedish School of Textiules, Borås.
    Wramsby, Gunnar
    Swedish School of Textiles, Borås.
    Continuous business model adaptation: The case of a high-growth Swedish textile company2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 293.
    Button, Kenneth J.
    et al.
    Schar School of Policy and Government, George Mason University, Arlington VA, USA.
    Eklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Department of Industrial Economics, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Are there inherent biases in applying cost–benefit analysis?2018In: Applied Economics Letters, ISSN 1350-4851, E-ISSN 1466-4291, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 461-464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article extends discussions of potential biases that can exist in applying cost–benefit analysis. While there is extensive evidence that capture can result in stakeholder manipulation of inputs, there are also claims that the analysis is inherently theoretically bias in favour of over acceptance. The article shows that, contrary to these latter claims, treating projects in isolation is unlikely to produce such bias; indeed, it is as likely as not to lead to suboptimally low acceptance rates. The reason for excessive acceptance of projects therefore is largely due to institutional capture of the analysis for either self-interest or natural human over-optimism.

  • 294.
    Bäckvall, Lisa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    A Bourdieusian view of strategizing in the context of a family business2011In: Colloquium Program: Sub-theme 41: Strategizing as Wayfinding: A Process Perpective, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 295.
    Bäckvall, Lisa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    A practice perspective of transgenerational entrepreneuring in the context of a family business2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 296.
    Bäckvall, Lisa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Foreigner or Family?: Exploring succession through practice perspective within family business2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 297.
    Caccamo, Marta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Pittino, Daniel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Tecnológico de Monterrey, EGADE Business School, San Pedro Garza García, Mexico.
    Family firm density and likelihood of failure: An ecological perspective2019In: The Palgrave handbook of heterogeneity among family firms / [ed] S. Memili & C. Dibrell, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, p. 821-846Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter aims at establishing a link between family business research and regional science. Drawing from the density dependence model from organizational ecology and embeddedness theory, we develop four testable propositions to inquire about the effect of the emergence of family firms’ agglomerations in the territory on firms’ survival.

    We theorize that increased family firm density reduces the likelihood of firm failure and this effect is (a) higher for family firms than for non-family firms, (b) lower in urban than in rural areas, and (c) higher in fine-grained variable environments than in stable environments. Contributions and future research implications are detailed in the concluding section.

  • 298.
    Campopiano, Giovanna
    et al.
    Witten/Herdecke University, Witten, Germany.
    De Massis, Alfredo
    Lancaster University Management School, Centre for Family Business, IEED, Lancaster, UK.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Firm Philanthropy in Small- and Medium-Sized Family Firms: The Effects of Family Involvement in Ownership and Management2014In: Family Business Review, ISSN 0894-4865, E-ISSN 1741-6248, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 244-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on stewardship theory and arguments in relation to social and reputational capital, this study investigates how family involvement affects engagement in firm philanthropy in small- and medium-sized family firms. Specifically, we argue that family involvement in ownership positively influences firm philanthropy while its interaction with family involvement in management produces a negative effect. Based on a sample of 130 Italian family firms, our findings offer important implications for theory and practice and pave the way for future research in the field of philanthropy in the family firm context.

  • 299.
    Carlsson, Georg
    et al.
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Röös, Elin
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Stephan, Andreas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Tidåker, Pernilla
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Witthöft, Cornelia
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    ”Ät hälften så mycket kött och mer ärtor och bönor”2018In: Dagens Nyheter 2018-10-13, ISSN 1101-2447Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 300.
    Carnes, Christina
    et al.
    University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA.
    Hitt, Michael A.
    Texas A&M University and TCU, USA.
    Sirmon, David
    University of Washington, USA.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Wook Huh, Dong
    Frostburg State University, USA.
    The Contingent Effect of Synchronization on Leveraging Resources for Innovation2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leveraging resources to exploit opportunities in external markets is at the heart of innovation. However, research suggests that leveraging resources is complicated and fraught with challenges. Building on work in resource orchestration by integrating behavioral logic relating to search behaviors and use of slack resources, we argue synchronization of internal activities enhances the innovation gains of a firm’s leveraging strategy (resource advantage, market opportunity, and entrepreneurial). We further suggest that this impact of synchronization on leveraging strategy and innovation is dependent on firms’ performance relative to social aspirations, elucidating boundary conditions of resource orchestration. Our findings offer theoretical and practical implications for understanding the influence of synchronization, leveraging strategies, and firm performance on innovation.

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