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  • 251.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth . Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    "Surfing the Ironing Board" - The representation of women’s entrepreneurship in German newspapers2011In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 23, no 9-10, p. 763-786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite extensive attempts to enhance women's entrepreneurship in Germany, a gender gap continues to exist. This article sets out to analyse the representation of women's entrepreneurship in German media, by analysing how it is depicted in newspapers and how this changes over time. Images transported in media might regulate the nature of women's entrepreneurship, as they contain information about ‘typical’ and ‘socially desirable’ behaviour of women as well as of entrepreneurs. This article contributes to developing an understanding of the relevance of media representation of the entrepreneurship phenomenon for influencing the propensity towards entrepreneurial activity.

  • 252.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    The attractive blond lady in a pink business suit: Analyzing the discourse on female entrepreneurship in German newspapers between 1997 and 20032005In: Paper presented at the Interdisciplinary European Conference on Entrepreneurship Research, Amsterdam, February 2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 253.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth .
    "Unternehmergeist, komm aus der Flasche": der Entrepre­neurship-Diskurs in deutschen Zeitungen2008In: Stand und Perspektiven der deutschsprachigen Entrepreneurship- und KMU-Forschung / [ed] Sascha Kraus and K. Gundolf, Köln: Ibidem-Verlag, 2008, p. 135-150Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 254.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    zu Knyphausen-Aufsess, Dodo
    Fostering Doctoral Entrepreneurship Education in Germany2008In: Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, ISSN 1462-6004, E-ISSN 1758-7840, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 397-404Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 255.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    zu Knyphausen-Aufsess, Dodo
    Fostering Entrepreneurship Education and Research in Germany: The EXIST High Technology Entrepreneurship Postgraduate Programme2002In: Internationalizing entrepreneurship education and training: proceedings of the IntEnt-Conference, Technikon SA, Kruger National Park, South Africa, July 2-4, 2001, Lohmar: Eul , 2002, p. 299-316Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 256.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    zu Knyphausen-Aufsess, Dodo
    Managing the sharing of knowledge?: A comparative analysis of the cases of Open Source Software Development and Genomics2004In: Paper presented at the Strategic Management Society Annual Conference, Puerto Rico, November 2004: Strategic Balance: Driving Innovation and Maintaining Performance, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 257.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    zu Knyphausen-Aufsess, Dodo
    The Role of Regional Networks in New-Venture Creation Processes2001In: Frontiers of entrepreneurship research 2001: Proceedings of the twenty-first annual Entrepreneurship Research Conference, Babson Park, Mass.: Babson College , 2001, Vol. 55Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 258. Ackermann, Volker
    et al.
    Plate, Markus
    Wittener Institut für Familienunternehmen.
    Grillo2011In: Große deutsche Familienunternehmen: Generationenfolge, Familienstrategie und Unternehmensentwicklung / [ed] Markus Plate, Torsten Groth, Volker Ackermann, Arist von Schlippe, Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2011, p. 255-261Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 259. Ackermann, Volker
    et al.
    Plate, Markus
    Wittener Institut für Familienunternehmen.
    Schoeller Industries2011In: Große deutsche Familienunternehmen: Generationenfolge, Familienstrategie und Unternehmensentwicklung / [ed] M. Plate, T. Groth, V. Ackermann & A. v. Schlippe, Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2011, p. 383-392Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 260. Acs, Z. J.
    et al.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Introduction to Institutions, Entrepreneurship, and Firm Growth: From Sweden to the OECD2002In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 183-187Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 261.
    Acs, Zoltan J.
    et al.
    LSE, London, UK, George Mason University, Faifax, USA.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    Swedish Entrepreneurship Forum, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS). Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Philippe Aghion: recipient of the 2016 Global Award for Entrepreneurship Research2017In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Professor Philippe Aghion is the 2016 recipient of the Global Award for Entrepreneurship Research, consisting of 100,000 Euros and a statuette designed by the internationally renowned Swedish sculptor Carl Milles. He is one of the most influential researchers worldwide in economics in the last couple of decades. His research has advanced our understanding of the relationship between firm-level innovation, entry and exit on the one hand, and productivity and growth on the other. Aghion has thus accomplished to bridge theoretical macroeconomic growth models with a more complete and consistent microeconomic setting. He is one of the founding fathers of the pioneering and original contribution referred to as Schumpeterian growth theory. Philippe Aghion has not only contributed with more sophisticated theoretical models, but also provided empirical evidence regarding the importance of entrepreneurial endeavours for societal prosperity, thereby initiating a more nuanced policy discussion concerning the interdependencies between entrepreneurship, competition, wealth and growth.

  • 262. Aculai, Elena
    et al.
    Vinogradova, Natalia
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth . Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    How to be successful in an adverse business environment: Knitwear Factory in Moldova2008In: Innovation and Entrepreneurship: Successful Start-ups and Businesses in Emerging Economies, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar , 2008, p. 89-104Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 263.
    Adair, Brooke
    et al.
    School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Keen, Deb
    Autism Centre of Excellence, Griffith University, Mt Gravatt, Qld, Australia.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Imms, Christine
    School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia.
    The effect of interventions aimed at improving participation outcomes for children with disabilities: a systematic review2015In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 57, no 12, p. 1093-1104Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    Enhancement of participation has been described as the ultimate outcome for health and educational interventions. The goal of this systematic review was to identify and critically appraise studies that aimed to improve the participation outcomes of children with disabilities.

    Method

    Nine databases that index literature from the fields of health, psychology, and education were searched to retrieve information on research conducted with children with disabilities aged between 5 years and 18 years. Articles were included if the author(s) reported that participation was an intended outcome of the intervention. The articles included were limited to those reporting high-level primary research, as defined by Australia's National Health and Medical Research Council evidence hierarchy guidelines. No restrictions were placed on the type of intervention being investigated.

    Results

    Seven randomized controlled or pseudo-randomized studies were included. Only three of these studies identified participation as a primary outcome. Both individualized and group-based approaches to enhancing participation outcomes appeared to be effective. Studies of interventions with a primary focus on body function or activity level outcomes did not demonstrate an effect on participation outcomes.

    Intepretation

    Few intervention studies have focused on participation as a primary outcome measure. Approaches using individually tailored education and mentoring programmes were found to enhance participation outcomes, while exercise programmes, where participation was a secondary outcome, generally demonstrated little effect.

  • 264.
    Adair, Brooke
    et al.
    Centre for Disability and Development Research, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    Physiotherapy Department, Mälardalens University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Rosenbaum, Peter
    McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Keen, Deb
    Autism Centre of Excellence, Griffith University, Mt Gravatt, Qld, Australia.
    Imms, Christine
    Centre for Disability and Development Research, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia.
    Measures used to quantify participation in childhood disability and their alignment with the family of participation-related constructs: a systematic review2018In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 60, no 11, p. 1101-1116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    We aimed to identify measures used to assess the participation of disabled children and to map the measures' content to the family of participation-related constructs (fPRC) to inform future research and practice.

    METHOD:

    Six databases were searched to identify measures used to assess participation in health, psychology, and education research. Included studies involved children aged 0 to 18 years with a permanent impairment or developmental disability and reported use of a quantitative measure of participation. A second search sought relevant literature about each identified measure (including published manuals) to allow a comprehensive understanding of the measure. Measurement constructs of frequently reported measures were then mapped to the fPRC.

    RESULTS:

    From an initial yield of 32 767 articles, 578 reported one or more of 118 participation measures. Of these, 51 measures were reported in more than one article (our criterion) and were therefore eligible for mapping to the fPRC. Twenty-one measures quantified aspects of participation attendance, 10 quantified aspects of involvement as discrete scales, and four quantified attendance and involvement in a manner that could not be separated.

    INTERPRETATION:

    Improved understanding of participation and its related constructs is developing rapidly; thoughtful selection of measures in research is critical to further our knowledge base.

    WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS:

    The fPRC can support our rapidly evolving and expanding understanding of participation. Instruments selected to measure participation do not always align with emerging concepts. Matching research aims to a chosen measure's content will improve understanding of participation. Opportunities exist to develop validated participation measures, especially self-reported measures of involvement.

  • 265.
    Adam, Davey
    et al.
    Department of Public Health, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
    Takagi, Emiko
    Department of Health Science, Linthicum, Towson University, Towson, MD, USA.
    Sundström, Gerdt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    (In)Formal Support and Unmet Needs in the National Long-Term care Survey2013In: Journal of Comparative Family Studies, ISSN 0047-2328, E-ISSN 1929-9850, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 437-453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We linked individual-level data from the 2004 wave of the National Long-Term Care Survey with state-level data from the National Aging Program Information Systems (NAPIS) State Program Reports to predict care mix and unmet need for assistance. Our sample consisted of 2422 community-dwelling individuals aged 65 and older (69% women, 8% nonwhite) who reported at least one limitation in an instrumental or basic activity of daily living. We used the data to predict the mix of formal and informal support received, and the probability of having at least one unmet need from individual (predisposing, enabling, and need) characteristics with state-level home help coverage rates, intensity of home help services, and proportion of population aged 60+ residing in institutional settings. Consistent with past research, a majority (52.6%) of the disabled sample reported unmet need. At the individual level, enabling (availability of kin support) and need (number of basic and instrumental activity of daily living impairments, BADLs and IADLs) were most strongly associated with care mix and unmet need. State-level services were not associated with receipt of informal supports. In states providing home help services to a higher proportion of elders, women were more likely to receive formal help. In states providing more intensive services, women were less likely and individuals living alone more likely to receive formal supports. In states where a higher proportion of elders lived in nursing homes, individuals living alone were more likely to receive formal assistance, less likely overall to report unmet needs, but the oldest-old were more likely to report unmet need.

  • 266.
    Adam, Frane
    et al.
    Institute for Developmental and Strategic Analyses (IRSA).
    Westlund, Hans
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics. KTH, Urbana och regionala studier.
    The meaning and importance of socio-cultural context for innovation performance2013In: Innovation in Socio-Cultural Context, New York: Routledge, 2013, p. 1-21Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 267.
    Adams, Mary
    et al.
    King’s College London, UK.
    Maben, Jill
    King’s College London, UK.
    Robert, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). King’s College London, UK.
    ‘It’s sometimes hard to tell what patients are playing at’: How healthcare professionals make sense of why patients and families complain about care2018In: Health, ISSN 1363-4593, E-ISSN 1461-7196, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 603-623Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article draws from sociological and socio-legal studies of dispute between patients and doctors to examine how healthcare professionals made sense of patients’ complaints about healthcare. We analyse 41 discursive interviews with professional healthcare staff working in eight different English National Health Service settings to explore how they made sense of events of complaint and of patients’ (including families’) motives for complaining. We find that for our interviewees, events of patients’ complaining about care were perceived as a breach in fundamental relationships involving patients’ trust or patients’ recognition of their work efforts. We find that interviewees rationalised patients’ motives for complaining in ways that marginalised the content of their concerns. Complaints were most often discussed as coming from patients who were inexpert, distressed or advantage-seeking; accordingly, care professionals hearing their concerns about care positioned themselves as informed decision-makers, empathic listeners or service gate-keepers. We find differences in our interviewees’ rationalisation of patients’ complaining about care to be related to local service contingences rather than to fixed professional differences. We note that it was rare for interviewees to describe complaints raised by patients as grounds for improving the quality of care. Our findings indicate that recent health policy directives promoting a view of complaints as learning opportunities from critical patient/consumers must account for sociological factors that inform both how the agency of patients is envisaged and how professionalism exercised contemporary healthcare work.

  • 268.
    Adamsson, Mathias
    Department of Architecture and Built Environment, Lund University, Sweden.
    Non-image-forming effects of light: Implications for the design of living and working environments2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Seasonal variation in mood and subjective well-being are common at geographical locations further away from the equator. The 24-h light-dark cycle is the main time cue for synchronizing the human circadian clock to the external day and night.

    Nowadays, people spend more of their waking day indoors, with less exposure to the natural daylight cycle, relying on artificial lighting which differs to daylight in a number of aspects, including intensity, spectral composition and light exposure pattern.

    In parallel with the technology development that has been mainly driven by energy-saving reasons, it is important to investigate the non-image-forming effects of different properties of the daily and seasonal light exposure.

    The overall aim of the thesis was to identify characteristics of the daily light exposure that are important to support physiological and psychological needs of humans. To achieve this objective a number of research questions were posed concerning daily and seasonal light exposure, seasonal variation in physiological processes and psychological parameters, and evaluation of light exposure with respect to non-image-forming effects. The research questions were investigated in a longitudinal research design with measurements conducted each month during the year at a high latitude with large seasonal variation in day lengths.

    Self-report diaries and instruments for ambulatory- and static measurements were used to examine daily and seasonal light exposure in the working and living environments and for investigating the relationship between different parameters that can be used for evaluating light exposure according to non-image-forming effects of light. Seasonal variation in daily light exposure and regarding the pattern of light exposure was observed. Also, the results indicate a seasonal variation concerning the quality (i.e. spectral composition of the visible radiation) of the exposing light.

    Two biological markers, melatonin and cortisol, were used for investigating seasonal variation in physiological processes relating to the circadian clock. The results showed higher morning melatonin concentrations and peak level of melatonin during the winter although no seasonal change was observed concerning the phase position of the melatonin rhythm.

    Seasonal differences in mood and sleep-activity were studied by means of selfreport diaries and questionnaires. Seasonal variations were observed for both parameters. The results showed higher ratings of mood in the summer, particularly 6 in the evening, and a relationship between bedtime and evening light exposure and photoperiod length. Furthermore, longer sleep times was observed in the winter.

    Appraisal of lighting conditions in the offices during the year was rated by the use of a questionnaire. The results showed some seasonal differences concerning the perceived qualities of the light and some associations between characteristics of the lit environments and positive affect were found.

    Two methods, static- and ambulatory measurements, were used for recording lighting conditions in the working environments. Taken together, the results showed weak associations between the two methods.

    Research have demonstrated an increased need for taking non-image-forming effects into consideration when designing working and living environments, especially at geographical locations with large variations in day length where people are exposed to much of the daily light exposure at the workplace. Laboratory research has provided a good understanding of the basic concepts. However, more field research is needed. Also, current research has demonstrated that new methods of measuring and evaluating lighting conditions are needed.

  • 269.
    Adamsson, Mathias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Laike, Thorbjörn
    Department of Environmental Science, Fukuoka Women's University, Japan.
    Morita, Takeshi
    Department of Environmental Science, Fukuoka Women's University, Japan.
    Annual variation in daily light exposure and circadian change of melatonin and cortisol concentrations at a northern latitude with large seasonal differences in photoperiod length2016In: Journal of Physiological Anthropology, ISSN 1880-6791, E-ISSN 1880-6805, Vol. 36, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Seasonal variations in physiology and behavior have frequently been reported. Light is the major zeitgeber for synchronizing internal circadian rhythms with the external solar day. Non-image forming effects of light radiation, for example, phase resetting of the circadian rhythms, melatonin suppression, and acute alerting effects, depend on several characteristics of the light exposure including intensity, timing and duration, spectral composition and previous light exposure, or light history. The aim of the present study was to report on the natural pattern of diurnal and seasonal light exposure and to examine seasonal variations in the circadian change of melatonin and cortisol concentrations for a group of Swedish office workers.

    METHODS: Fifteen subjects participated in a field study that was carried out in the south of Sweden. Ambulatory equipment was used for monthly measurements of the daily exposure to light radiation across the year. The measurements included illuminance and irradiance. The subjects collected saliva samples every 4 h during 1 day of the monthly measuring period.

    RESULTS: The results showed that there were large seasonal differences in daily amount of light exposure across the year. Seasonal differences were observed during the time periods 04:00-08:00, 08:00-12:00, 12:00-16:00, 16:00-20:00, and 20:00-24:00. Moreover, there were seasonal differences regarding the exposure pattern. The subjects were to a larger extent exposed to light in the afternoon/evening in the summer. During the winter, spring, and autumn, the subjects received much of the daily light exposure in the morning and early afternoon. Regarding melatonin, a seasonal variation was observed with a larger peak level during the winter and higher levels in the morning at 07:00.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study adds to the results from other naturalistic studies by reporting on the diurnal and seasonal light exposure patterns for a group living at a northern latitude of 56° N, with large annual variations in photoperiod length. It seems to be seasonal variation in the lighting conditions, both concerning intensities as well as regarding the pattern of the light exposure to which people living at high latitudes are exposed which may result in seasonal variation in the circadian profile of melatonin.

  • 270.
    Adamsson, Mathias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Laike, Thorbjörn
    Department of Architecture and Built Environment, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Morita, Takeshi
    Department of Environmental Science, Fukuoka Women’s University, Higashi-Ku, Fukuoka, Japan.
    Comparison of Static and Ambulatory Measurements of Illuminance and Spectral Composition That Can Be Used for Assessing Light Exposure in Real Working Environments2019In: LEUKOS The Journal of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America, ISSN 1550-2724, E-ISSN 1550-2716, Vol. 15, no 2-3, p. 181-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reliable measurements are of utmost importance when investigating the relationship between light and human reactions. The aim of the present study was to compare two methods for measuring light exposure in real working environments. Ambulatory recordings of illuminance and irradiance were compared with static field measurements of horizontal illuminance at the normal working position, average horizontal illuminance in the room, vertical illuminance at the position of the eye in the normal angle of gaze, and spectral composition of the light radiation at the normal working position and at the position of the eye in the normal angle of gaze. The ambulatory measurements were carried out during a 3-day experimental period and were repeated monthly throughout the year. The static field measurements in the subjects’ offices were conducted five times during the year, in the morning and afternoon during one day. The relationship between the illuminances and irradiances measured with the portable instruments and the static measurements was statistically analyzed. Results from the analyses revealed that more than one third of the static measurements of vertical illuminances recorded were below 200 lx, and only 7% of the measurements exceeded 1000 lx. Measurements of the spectral composition of the light radiation in the rooms suggested that the light, although at a fairly low intensity, included relatively much radiation that can have a non-image forming effect. Furthermore, only a small number of significant correlations between the ambulatory and static measurements were found. Results from the t-tests showed that there were no differences between ambulatory measurements, and static measurements of horizontal illuminance at the normal position, average illuminance in the room and vertical illuminance at the position of the eye during three, five, and seven of the 10 measurements, respectively. There is a need to define appropriate parameters in order to describe the quality of a lit environment with respect to the non-image-forming effects of light radiation.

  • 271.
    Adamsson, Mathias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Laike, Thorbjörn
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Morita, Takeshi
    Fukuoka Women's University, Fukuoka, Japan.
    Seasonal variation in bright daylight exposure, mood and behavior among a group of office workers in Sweden2018In: Journal of Circadian Rhythms, ISSN 1740-3391, E-ISSN 1740-3391, Vol. 16, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to investigate seasonal variation in mood and behavior among a group of office workers in Sweden (56°N). Thirty subjects participated in this longitudinal study. The subjects kept a weekly log that included questionnaires for ratings of psychological wellbeing and daily sleep-activity diaries where they also noted time spent outdoors. The lighting conditions in the offices were subjectively evaluated during one day, five times over the year. There was a seasonal variation in positive affect and in sleep-activity behavior. Across the year, there was a large variation in the total time spent outdoors in daylight. The subjects reported seasonal variation concerning the pleasantness, variation and strength of the light in the offices and regarding the visibility in the rooms. Finally, the subjects spent most of their time indoors, relying on artificial lighting, which demonstrates the importance of the lighting quality in indoor environments. 

  • 272.
    Adanko, Carina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Built Environment.
    Küller, Marianne
    Lunds universitet, LTH, Inst arkitektur och byggd miljö, Miljöpsykologi.
    LED-belysning och brukaren2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lighting research is diversified and includes theory and methodology from disciplines as different as technology, medicine and social sciences. There is also an expectation on research results to be directly applicable in real environments. The introduction of LED has furthermore made previous research on incandescent lamps, fluorescent lamps and other light sources, outdated.    New knowledge – and new research – is needed.

    An inventory of current LED-research was made during 2013. The result of this inventory is the basis of the research review here presented. The presentation includes more than 400 articles, reported under the headings: The biological clock; Flicker and dimming of LED: Energy efficiency: daylight and lighting control; Colour rendering; Glare, and finally; Perceived lighting qualities.

    Underlying theoretical considerations as well as actual knowledge are presented in the text of the different sections, and references are given to relevant research publications. All publications have been provided with two or more keywords in Swedish, describing the content of the publication. After the text given under each heading the references supporting this text are presented. In the final section all LED-publications are given in alphabetical order according to author and with keywords. 

  • 273. Adelswärd, Viveka
    et al.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Other School Based Research.
    Discourse about children with mental disablement: An analysis of teacher-parent conferences in special education schools1998In: Language and Education, ISSN 0950-0782, E-ISSN 1747-7581, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 81-98Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 274.
    Adelswärd, Viveka
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Other School Based Research.
    …so one can plant a little seed…: An analysis of a teacher's way of solving a communicative problem in talks with parents2000In: Nordisk Pedagogik, ISSN 0901-8050, E-ISSN 1504-2995, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 191-205Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 275.
    Adelswärd, Viveka
    et al.
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Other School Based Research.
    Så kan man så ett litet frö: Analys av en lärares sätt att lösa ett kommunikativt problem i samtal med föräldrar1999In: Möten: En vänbok till Roger Säljö, Tema Kommunikation, Linköpings universitet , 1999Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 276.
    Adelswärd, Viveka
    et al.
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Other School Based Research.
    Who is Cindy?: Aspects of identity-work in a teacher- parent-pupil talk at a special school2000In: Text - an interdisciplinary journal for the study of discourse, ISSN 0165-4888, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 1-24Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 277. Adiels, Anne-Marie
    et al.
    Helkimo, Martti
    Magnusson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Tactile stimulation as a complementary treatment of temporomandibular disorders in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome: A pilot study.2005In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 17-25Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 278.
    Adiguna, Rocky
    University of Luxembourg.
    Organisational culture and the family business2015In: Theoretical perspectives on family businesses / [ed] Mattias Nordqvist, Leif Melin, Matthias Waldkirch and Gershon Kumeto, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, p. 58-77Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter aims to review the extant research on organizational culture in family business by covering its origin in organization studies along with its application in family business context. The review reveals that, despite the rich body of literature, the application of cultural perspectives in family business seemed to be one-sided—that is, dominated by those of positivistic and managerialist interests. In the attempt to rebalance the course of research in family business culture, this chapter discusses the different approaches in studying family business culture and, as a conclusion, proposes alternatives to advance our knowledge in both ways: to understand family business through cultural theories, as well as to understand culture through family business context.

  • 279.
    Adlemo, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Tarasov, Vladimir
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics, JTH, Jönköping AI Lab (JAIL).
    Fuzzy logic based decision-support for reshoring decisions2018In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Operations and Supply Chain Management, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 280.
    Adlemo, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics. Jönköping University / School of Engineering.
    Tan, He
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics, JTH, Jönköping AI Lab (JAIL).
    Tarasov, Vladimir
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics, JTH, Jönköping AI Lab (JAIL).
    Test case quality as perceived in Sweden2018In: Proceedings - International Conference on Software Engineering / [ed] Michael Unterkalmsteiner, ACM Digital Library, 2018, p. 9-12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to reach an acceptable level of confidence in the quality of a software product, testing of the software is paramount. To obtain "good" quality software it is essential to rely on "good" test cases. To define the criteria for what make up for a "good" test case is not a trivial task. Over the past 15 years, a short list of publications have presented criteria for "good" test cases but without ranking them based on their importance. This paper presents a non-exhaustive and non-authoritative tentative list of 15 criteria and a ranking of their relative importance. A number of the criteria come from previous publications but also from discussions with our industrial partners. The ranking is based on results collected via a questionnaire that was sent out to a limited number of randomly chosen respondents in the Swedish software industry. This means that the results are more indicative than conclusive.

  • 281.
    Adlemo, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Tarasov, Vladimir
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics, JTH, Jönköping AI Lab (JAIL).
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Knowledge intensive decision support for reshoring decisions2018In: Proceedings of the 30th Annual NOFOMA Conference: Relevant Logistics and Supply Chain Management Research, Kolding, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 282.
    Adlemo, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Tarasov, Vladimir
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics, JTH, Jönköping AI Lab (JAIL).
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Reshoring decision support in a Swedish context2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a decision-support system for reshoring decision-making based on fuzzy logic. The construction and functionality of the decision-support system are described, and the functionality is evaluated in a high cost environment exemplified through a Swedish context. Ten different reshoring scenarios, provided by Swedish reshoring experts, are entered into the decision-support system and the decision recommendations provided by the system are presented. The confidence that can be put on the recommendations is demonstrated by comparing them with those of the reshoring experts. The positive results obtained indicate that fuzzy logic is both feasible and that the quality of the results are sufficiently good for reshoring decision-making.

  • 283.
    Adler, Lennart
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Wadskog, Ingrid
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Chemical Engineering.
    Ion homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under NaCl stress2003In: Yeast stress responses / [ed] Stefan Hohmann, Willem H. Mager, Berlin: Springer , 2003, p. 201-239Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 284.
    Adler, Niclas
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Att använda företrädare för de empiriska miljöerna i validering av forskningsresultat1997Report (Other academic)
  • 285.
    Adler, Niclas
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Breaking the Code of Management Reflexivity: R&D on Management for Competitive Advantage2003Report (Other academic)
  • 286.
    Adler, Niclas
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Captured in Extrapolation by the Legacy of Scientific Legitimacy and Scientific Validity2004In: Paper presented at the The Academy of Management (AOM) 2004 Annual Meeting, New Orleans, USA, August 6-11, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 287.
    Adler, Niclas
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Ericsson Radar Electronics1995In: Organisatoriskt lärande: en antologi från projektet Utveckling av nyckelkompetenser för individer och företag, Göteborg: Institute for Management of Innovation Technology , 1995Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 288.
    Adler, Niclas
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Formation of Corporate Strategies in Science and Technology-based Companies: Managing the Dynamic Interplay between the Logics of Exploration and Exploitation2001Report (Other academic)
  • 289.
    Adler, Niclas
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Förutsättningar för hög prestation och organisatoriskt lärande i utvecklingsarbete: En komparativ studie av två olika utvecklingsorganisationer i telekommunikationsbranschen1995Report (Other academic)
  • 290.
    Adler, Niclas
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Gränsöverskridande kunskapsbildning: FoU som möjliggör forskare och praktikers gemensamma lärande?2003Report (Other academic)
  • 291.
    Adler, Niclas
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Management Reflexivity and the Search for R&D on Management and Management Innovations2004In: Paper presented at the The Academy of Management (AOM) 2004 Annual Meeting, New Orleans, USA, August 6-11, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 292.
    Adler, Niclas
    Stockholm School of Economics .
    Managing complex product development: three approaches1999Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 293.
    Adler, Niclas
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Managing Complexity1996In: Proceedings of the 5th European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management (EISAM) Conference, Paris, France, June 1996, 1996Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 294.
    Adler, Niclas
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Managing the Dynamic Interplay between Corporate and Regional Innovation Systems2002Report (Other academic)
  • 295.
    Adler, Niclas
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Next Generation Product Realization: Efficiency, Effectiveness and Flexibility2002Report (Other academic)
  • 296.
    Adler, Niclas
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Next Generation R&D Organization2003Report (Other academic)
  • 297.
    Adler, Niclas
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    The Art & Science of Business Creation2001In: Paper presented at the 1st International Consortium for Electronic Business (ICEB) Conference, Hong Kong, December 19-21, 2001, 2001Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 298.
    Adler, Niclas
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    The art and science of innovation2001In: Paper presented at the Annual Acreo Conference, Stockholm, Sweden, 2001, 2001Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 299.
    Adler, Niclas
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    The challenge of making management research relevant2002In: Paper presented at the 2nd Annual European Academy of Management Conference (EURAM), Stockholm, Sweden, May 9-11, 2002, 2002Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 300.
    Adler, Niclas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Beer, Michael
    Collaborative R&D in Management: The Practical Experience of Fenix and TruePoint in Bridging the Divide between Scientific and Managerial Goals2008In: Handbook of collaborative management research, Los Angeles, Calif.: Sage Publications , 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
3456789 251 - 300 of 19943
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