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  • 201.
    Lillvist, Anne
    et al.
    School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Anette
    School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    The construct of social competence: how preschool teachers define social competence in young children2009Inngår i: International Journal of Early Childhood, ISSN 0020-7187, E-ISSN 1878-4658, Vol. 41, nr 1, s. 51-68Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Preschool teachers share their environment with young children on a daily basis and interventions promoting social competence are generally carried out in the preschool setting. The aim was to find out if and how preschool teachers' definitions of social competence are related to factors in the preschool environment like: a) the number of children having problems related to social competence; b) the support provided to the children; and c) the preschool environment and current research definitions. Method: 481 preschools from 22 municipalities in Sweden participated. Data was analyzed using a mixed methods design in which a qualitative content analysis was followed by group comparisons using quantitative methods. Results: Preschool teachers defined social competence mainly as intrapersonal skills, or as interpersonal relations. The definitions of social competence were not related to the numbers of children having problems related to social skills or social competence in units, the amount of the support provided to the children or the preschool environment. Conclusion: Preschool teachers' definitions of social competence are partly multidimensional, which implies that the interventions aimed at promoting children's social skills and social competence also should be multidimensional. Preschool teachers' definitions of social competence have little relevance to environmental factors, which indicate that social competence, as a construct is more dependent upon perceptions of the individual than on contextual factors.

  • 202.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Mälardalen University.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Participation profiles in domestic life and peer relations as experienced by adolescents with and without impairments and long-term health conditions2019Inngår i: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 22, nr 1, s. 27-38Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To investigate how individual and environmental factors relate to self-reported participation profiles in adolescents with and without impairments or long-term health conditions.

    METHODS: A person-oriented approach (hierarchical cluster analysis) was used to identify cluster groups of individuals sharing participation patterns in the outcome variables frequency perceived importance in domestic life and peer relations. Cluster groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA).

    RESULTS: A nine-cluster solution was chosen. All clusters included adolescents with impairment and long-term health conditions. Perceived importance of peer relations was more important than frequent attendance in domestic-life activities. Frequency of participation in dialogues and family interaction patterns seemed to affect the participation profiles more than factors related to body functions.

    CONCLUSION: Type of impairment or long-term health condition is a weaker determinant of membership in clusters depicting frequency and perceived importance in domestic life or peer relations than dialogue and family environment.

  • 203.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Department of Psychology, Faculty of Education, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Department of Special Education, Oslo University, Oslo, Norway.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Huus, Karina
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Factors Associated With Participation and Change Over Time in Domestic Life, Peer Relations, and School for Adolescents With and Without Self-Reported Neurodevelopmental Disorders. A Follow-Up Prospective Study2018Inngår i: Frontiers in Education, ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 3, s. 1-13, artikkel-id 28Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though participation in everyday events is a vital part in the fulfilment of human rights, adolescents with neurodevelopmental disorders often face participation restrictions in every-day activities. Few studies have investigated the predictors for participation in different contexts, over time and in relation to the same outcome variables. The objective of the current study was therefore to investigate predictors of change in participation operationalized as frequency of attendance and perceived importance in domestic life activities, peer related activities, and school activities as experienced by adolescents with and without self-reported neurodevelopmental disorders. Method: Associations with participation, both in terms of frequency and perceived importance, in domestic life, peer relations, and the school setting were investigated using six independent variables measuring experience of time and self, sex, age, stress, support from siblings, and atmosphere in family at two-time (with approximately 2 years in between). The sample consisted of adolescents with and without self-reported neurodevelopmental disorders (n= 916). Adolescents with self-reported neurodevelopmental disorders were n=154 and adolescents without self-reported neurodevelopmental disorders was n= 762. Data was collected via self-reported questionnaires administered in schools. Results: Three key findings are presented. 1) more factors were associated with participation outcomes at time1 for adolescents without NDD than for adolescents with NDD, but this difference in the number of factors decreases with time; 2) few associations were related to time for both adolescents with and without NDD; and 3) patterns of predicting variables were different for adolescents with and without NDD. Conclusion: The findings indicate that the factors related to participation in and outside school differs between groups, when the impairment or disability is not considered as a predictor for participation. This study supports the need for using a multidimensional developmental and contextual perspective in addressing enhanced participation for adolescents with neurodevelopmental disorders.

  • 204.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Donohue, Dana
    Centre for Augumentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Bornman, Juan
    Centre for Augumentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    A Systematic review of Generic and Special Needs of Children with Disabilities Living in Poverty Settings in Low- and Middle-Income Countries2013Inngår i: Journal of Policy Practice, Vol. 12, nr 4, s. 296-315Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Children with disabilities living in poverty settings in low and middle-income countries are particularly in need of special support designed to meet the needs occurring in an environment where poverty is prevalent and resources are scarce. This paper presents a systematic review of the needs of children with disabilities living in poverty settings in low and middle-income countries using Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs as a theoretical framework.  The findings demonstrate that needs at the first level of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs are more frequently researched in low and middle-income countries.  Higher order needs should be further explored and children’s own voices should be taken into consideration when performing research, designing policies and services aiming at increased service user empowerment.

  • 205.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Kapetanovic, S.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Short-term longitudinal participation trajectories related to domestic life and peer relations for adolescents with and without self-reported neurodevelopmental impairmentsManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 206.
    Mahdi, Soheil
    et al.
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders at Karolinska Institutet (KIND), Division of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Albertowski, Katja
    Experimental Developmental Psychopathology, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine of the TU Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
    Almodayfer, Omar
    Mental Health Department, KAMC-R, MNGHA, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Arsenopoulou, Vaia
    Theotokos Foundation, Athens, Greece.
    Carucci, Sara
    Child & Adolescent Neuropsychiatric Unit, Department of Biomedical Science, University of Cagliari.
    Dias, José Carlos
    Childhood and Adolescence Psychiatry Department, Oporto Hospital Centre, Porto, Portugal.
    Khalil, Mohammad
    Human Development Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Knüppel, Ane
    Aalborg University Hospital Psychiatry, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Langmann, Anika
    Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, University Hospital of Marburg, Germany.
    Lauritsen, Marlene Briciet
    Aalborg University Hospital, Clinical Institute, Aalborg, Denmark.
    da Cunha, Graccielle Rodrigues
    TEAMM Clinic, Department of Psychiatry, Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo, Brazil.
    Uchiyama, Tokio
    Japan Centre for Applied Autism Research, Department of Clinical Psychology, Taisho University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Wolff, Nicole
    Experimental Developmental Psychopathology, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine of the TU Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
    Selb, Melissa
    ICF Research Branch, A Cooperation Partner Within the WHO Collaborating Centre for the Family of International Classifications in Germany (at DIMDI), Nottwil, Switzerland.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    de Vries, Petrus J.
    Division of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
    Bölte, Sven
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders at Karolinska Institutet (KIND), Division of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    An International Clinical Study of Ability and Disability in Autism Spectrum Disorder Using the WHO-ICF Framework2018Inngår i: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 48, nr 6, s. 2148-2163Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the fourth international preparatory study designed to develop International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF, and Children and Youth version, ICF-CY) Core Sets for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Examine functioning of individuals diagnosed with ASD as documented by the ICF-CY in a variety of clinical settings. A cross-sectional study was conducted, involving 11 units from 10 countries. Clinical investigators assessed functioning of 122 individuals with ASD using the ICF-CY checklist. In total, 139 ICF-CY categories were identified: 64 activities and participation, 40 body functions and 35 environmental factors. The study results reinforce the heterogeneity of ASD, as evidenced by the many functional and contextual domains impacting on ASD from a clinical perspective.

  • 207.
    Mahdi, Soheil
    et al.
    Division of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), CAP Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ronzano, Nadia
    Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatric Unit, Department of Biomedical Science, University of Cagliari, Italy.
    Knüppel, Ane
    Research Unit for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Dias, José Carlos
    Childhood and Adolescence Psychiatry Department, Oporto Hospital Centre, Porto, Portugal.
    Albdah, Ayman
    Child Psychiatry Division, King Abdullah Specialist Children Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Chien-Ho, Lin
    Department of Psychiatry, Chimei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Almodayfer, Omar
    Mental Health Department, KAMC-R, MNGHA, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Bluschke, Annet
    Cognitive Neurophysiology, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Technical University, Dresden, Germany.
    Karande, Sunil
    Learning Disability Clinic, Department of Paediatrics, Seth GS Medical College and KEM Hospital, Parel, India.
    Huang, Huei-Lin
    Institute of Behavioral Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, National Chen Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Christiansen, Hanna
    Department of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg, Germany.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete.
    de Vries, Petrus J.
    Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Coghill, David
    Departments of Paediatrics and Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
    Tannock, Rosemary
    Research Institute of the Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
    Rohde, Luis
    ADHD Outpatient Program, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    Bölte, Sven
    Division of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), CAP Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    An international clinical study of ability and disability in ADHD using the WHO-ICF framework2018Inngår i: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 27, nr 10, s. 1305-1319Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the fourth and final study designed to develop International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF, and children and youth version, ICF-CY) core sets for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). To investigate aspects of functioning and environment of individuals with ADHD as documented by the ICF-CY in clinical practice settings. An international cross-sectional multi-centre study was applied, involving nine units from eight countries: Denmark, Germany, India, Italy, Portugal, Saudi Arabia, Sweden and Taiwan. Clinicians and clinical researchers rated the functioning level of 112 children, adolescents and adults with ADHD using the extended ICF-CY checklist version 2.1a. The ratings were based on a variety of information sources, such as medical records, medical history, clinical observations, clinical questionnaires, psychometric tests and structured interviews with participants and family members. In total, 113 ICF-CY categories were identified, of which 50 were related to the activities and participation, 33 to environmental factors and 30 to body functions. The clinical study also yielded strengths related to ADHD, which included temperament and personality functions and recreation and leisure. The study findings endorse the complex nature of ADHD, as evidenced by the many functional and contextual domains impacted in ADHD. ICF-CY based tools can serve as foundation for capturing various functional profiles and environmental facilitators and barriers. The international nature of the ICF-CY makes it possible to develop user-friendly tools that can be applied globally and in multiple settings, ranging from clinical services and policy-making to education and research. 

  • 208.
    Mahdi, Soheil
    et al.
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Division of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Viljoen, Marisa
    Division of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Yee, Tamara
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
    Selb, Melissa
    ICF Research Branch, a cooperation partner within the WHO Collaborating Centre for the Family of International Classifications in Germany (at DIMDI), Nottwil, Switzerland.
    Singhal, Nidhi
    Action for Autism, The National Centre for Autism, New Delhi, India.
    Almodayfer, Omar
    Mental Health Department, KAMC-R, MNGHA, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    de Vries, Petrus J.
    Division of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie
    Bolte, Sven
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Division of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    An international qualitative study of functioning in autism spectrum disorder using the World Health Organization international classification of functioning, disability and health framework2018Inngår i: Autism Research, ISSN 1939-3792, E-ISSN 1939-3806, Vol. 11, nr 3, s. 463-475Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the third in a series of four empirical studies designed to develop International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Sets for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The present study aimed to describe functioning in ASD (as operationalized by the ICF) derived from the perspectives of diagnosed individuals, family members, and professionals. A qualitative study using focus groups and semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 stakeholder groups (N = 90) from Canada, India, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, and Sweden. Meaningful concepts from the focus groups and individual interviews were linked to ICF categories using a deductive qualitative approach with standardized linking procedures. The deductive qualitative content analysis yielded meaningful functioning concepts that were linked to 110 ICF categories across all four ICF components. Broad variation of environmental factors and activities and participation categories were identified in this study, while body functions consisted mainly of mental functions. Body structures were sparsely mentioned by the participants. Positive aspects of ASD included honesty, attention to detail, and memory. The experiences provided by international stakeholders support the need to understand individuals with ASD in a broader perspective, extending beyond diagnostic criteria into many areas of functioning and environmental domains. This study is part of a larger systematic effort that will provide the basis to define ICF Core Sets for ASD, from which assessment tools can be generated for use in clinical practice, research, and health care policy making.

  • 209.
    Maxwell, Gregor
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Alves, Ines
    School of Education, University of Manchester, UK.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Participation and environmental aspects in education and the ICF and the ICF-CY: findings from a systematic literature review2012Inngår i: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 15, nr 1, s. 63-78Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This paper presents findings from a systematic review of the literature related to participation and the ICF/ICF-CY in educational research.

    Objectives: To analyse how and investigate the application of participation in educational research. Specifically, how participation is related to the environmental dimensions availability, accessibility, affordability, accommodability and acceptability.

    Methods: A systematic literature review using database keyword searches and refinement protocols using inclusion and exclusion criteria at abstract, full-text and extraction.

    Results: Four hundred and twenty-one initial works were found. Twenty-three met the inclusion criteria. Availability and accommodations are the most investigated dimensions. Operationalization of participation is not always consistent with definitions used.

    Conclusion: Research is developing a holistic approach to investigating participation as, although all papers reference at least one environmental dimension, only four of the 11 empirical works reviewed present a fully balanced approach when theorizing and operationalizing participation; hopefully this balanced approach will continue and influence educational policy and school practice.

  • 210.
    Maxwell, Gregor
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Does thinking and doing the same thing amount to involved participation? Empirical explorations for finding a measure of intensity for a third ICF-CY qualifier2012Inngår i: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 15, nr 4, s. 274-283Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Participation as involvement in a situation includes two dimensions; doing the activity and the experience of involvement.

    Objectives: The ICF-CY only measures doing using the capacity and performance qualifiers, a dimension measuring the experience is needed; a third qualifier. Hypothesis: The experienced involvement of pupils in school activities is higher when thinking and doing coincided.

    Methods: By comparing self-reported experiences of involvement of children, data about what children were thinking and doing during activities were gathered from 21 children with and 19 without disabilities in inclusive classrooms.

    Results: A relationship exists between an index of the subjective experience of involvement and whether children were thinking and doing the same things.

    Conclusion: This index can be constructed using measures of concentration, control, involvement, and motivation. Choice is influential, as knowledge about why an activity is undertaken affects involvement. Additionally, increased subjective experience of involvement gives better psychological health and well-being.

  • 211.
    Maxwell, Gregor
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    How are conditions for participation expressed in education policy documents?: A review of documents in Scotland and Sweden2011Inngår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 26, nr 2, s. 251-272Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study approaches inclusive schools by looking at how conditions for participation are expressed for pupils with additional support needs in education policy documents in Sweden and Scotland. By using five dimensions of the environment – availability, accessibility, affordability, accommodability, and acceptability – expressions of conditions for participation are explored in 41 documents. This is done in a vertical manner by analysing national laws, regional policy documents, and local-level documents which directly influence classroom practices. A deductive content analysis approach using a protocol based on the five environmental dimensions is used to extract information and identify meaning units. In the meaning units meaningful concepts are identified and linked to ICF-CY categories. These are used as reference points. It is suggested, from the documents analysed, that conditions for participation are easy to express as available, accessible opportunities, or affordability issues, but not as involvement experiences linked to accommodations made and acceptability issues within a context. Documents in Scotland and Sweden also have different foci in terms of conditions for participation.

  • 212.
    Maxwell, Gregor R.
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Inclusive and Special Education Section, Department of Education, UiT Norway's Arctic University, Tromsø, Norway.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Department of Special Education, Oslo University, Oslo, Norway.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Department of Psychology, Faculty of Education, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Inclusion through participation: Understanding participation in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health as a methodological research tool for investigating inclusion2018Inngår i: Frontiers in Education, ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 3, artikkel-id 41Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the use and validity of the International Classification of Functioning disability and health (ICF) as a common language for describing inclusive educational settings. There is a specific focus on investigating participation through the ICF as one aspect of inclusion as an improved understanding of participation as a measure of inclusion will greatly benefit children with additional support needs. In addition there will be a better understanding of the operationalization of participation, in terms of both policy and practice, and improved applications of the ICF. The study uses a narrative summary to review to analyse the findings from a selection of studies where the ICF has been used as a methodological tool in the field of education. In the 16 included studies the ICF is either used to present a new theoretical position, synthesize a new research approach or tool, or is integrated into the framework of an existing research method. Findings also show that the ICF is used in a number of different ways and that when it is used directly, variation is found in the type of information that was linked to ICF codes or categories. In conclusion further clarity on defining and measuring participation with the ICF framework is required in order to create a more consistent tool for investigating inclusive education. One way to improve the construct of participation is to take a bi-dimensional approach. It is the authors’ belief that this newer approach to modelling participation will be considered in any future revisions of the ICF/ICF-CY – a so-called ‘ICF-2’. This would thus create a more accountable classification framework that succeeds in capturing the involvement experience of the individual and in doing so achieves a more effective and useful classification framework for the field of inclusive education.

  • 213.
    Niia, Anna
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Mälardalen University.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Mälardalen University.
    Ellinor, Brunnberg
    Mälardalen University.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Student participation and parental involvement in relation to academic achievement2015Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 59, nr 3, s. 297-315Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study shows that students, teachers, and parents in Swedish schools ascribe differing meanings and significance to students' participation in school in relation to academic achievement. Students see participation as mainly related to social interaction and not academic achievement, whilst teachers view students' participation as more closely related to activity and academic performance. Despite these differences, teachers and students are in close agreement regarding activities of a social nature. Teachers' and parents' ratings of parents' involvement in school demonstrate a higher agreement, but also correlate negatively with the academic achievement of the student. This is likely because communication is more frequent with parents of underachieving students than students demonstrating high academic performance. The partly inconsistent results in previous research regarding the relation between participation and academic achievement can here be explained by the choice of raters, as this connection only exists in ratings carried out by teachers.

  • 214.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Borås University, Borås, Sweden.
    Björkman, Berit
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Almqvist, Anna-Lena
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Björk-Willén, Polly
    Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Donohue, Dana
    Centre for AAC, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Enskär, Karin
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Hvit, Sara
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Children’s voices – Differentiating a child perspective from a child’s perspective2015Inngår i: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 18, nr 3, s. 162-168Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this paper was to discuss differences between having a child perspective and taking the child's perspective based on the problem being investigated.

    Methods: Conceptual paper based on narrative review.

    Results: The child's perspective in research concerning children that need additional support are important. The difference between having a child perspective and taking the child's perspective in conjunction with the need to know children's opinions has been discussed in the literature. From an ideological perspective the difference between the two perspectives seems self-evident, but the perspectives might be better seen as different ends on a continuum solely from an adult's view of children to solely the perspective of children themselves. Depending on the research question, the design of the study may benefit from taking either perspective. In this article, we discuss the difference between the perspectives based on the problem being investigated, children's capacity to express opinions, environmental adaptations and the degree of interpretation needed to understand children's opinions.

    Conclusion: The examples provided indicate that children's opinions can be regarded in most research, although to different degrees.

  • 215.
    Norderyd, Johanna
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Faulks, D.
    Molina, G.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Klingberg, G.
    What determines dental caries treatment under general anaesthesia in children with disabilities: number of cavities, child functioning or dental organisation?Manuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 216.
    Norderyd, Johanna
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. National Oral Disability Centre for Rare Disorders, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Faulks, Denise
    CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Service d'Odontologie, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
    Molina, Gustavo
    Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Cordoba, Argentina.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete.
    Klingberg, Gunilla
    Departement of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Which factors most influence referral for restorative dental treatment under sedation and general anaesthesia in children with complex disabilities: Caries severity, child functioning or dental service organisation?2018Inngår i: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 28, nr 1, s. 71-82Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child gives all children right to the highest standard of services for treatment and rehabilitation. For children with disabilities, sedation and general anaesthesia (GA) are often indicated for dental treatment; however, accessibility to this varies. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health – Child and Youth version (ICF-CY) enables a biopsychosocial description of children undergoing dental treatment.

    Aim

    To investigate conscious sedation and GA in children with complex disabilities and manifest caries and analyse how caries, child functioning, and dental service organisation relate to dental GA (DGA), comparing Argentina, France, and Sweden using the ICF-CY.

    Design

    Quantitative, cross-sectional; data collected through structured interviews, observation, and dental records.

    Results

    Sedation and DGA were common. Children with limitations in interpersonal interactions and relationships were more likely to have had DGA (OR: 5.3, P = 0.015). Level of caries experience was strongly correlated with experience of DGA. There were significant differences between countries regarding caries prevalence, sedation, DGA, and functional and environmental factors.

    Conclusions

    Although caries experience and child functioning are important, dental health service organisation had the most impact on the incidence of DGA, and for the use of conscious sedation, for children with complex disabilities.

  • 217.
    Norderyd, Johanna
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. National Oral Disability Centre for Rare Disorders, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Klingberg, Gunilla
    Departement of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Faulks, Denise
    CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Service d'Odontologie, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete.
    Specialised dental care for children with complex disabilities focusing on child's functioning and need for general anaesthesia2017Inngår i: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 39, nr 24, s. 2484-2491Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To describe and analyse dental care and treatment modalities for children with complex disabilities from a biopsychosocial perspective, with special focus on dental treatment under general anaesthesia (GA) and its relationship to child's functioning.

    METHOD: An ICF-CY Checklist for Oral Health was completed using structured interview, direct observations, and dental records for patients attending a specialist paediatric dentistry clinic. Descriptive and comparative data analysis was performed. Performance qualifiers from the ICF-CY component Activities and participation were used to calculate functional factors.

    RESULTS: Median referral age was 1.5 years and the majority were referred by their paediatrician. Almost all visited a dental hygienist regularly. Dental treatment under GA was common and was combined in 78% of sessions with medical treatment. Children with limitations in their interpersonal interactions and relationships were most likely to have dental GA.

    CONCLUSION: Children without caries experience had been referred for specialist dental care at an earlier age than children with caries experience. GA was a common treatment modality and dental and medical treatments were coordinated under the same GA for a majority of children. By using the ICF-CY, it was possible to identify functional limitations characterising children with disabilities that require dental treatment under GA. Implications for Rehabilitation Early referral to a specialist in paediatric dentistry is valuable for oral disease prevention in children with disabilities. Availability of dental treatment under general anaesthesia (GA) is also important. Combining dental and medical interventions during the same GA session optimises resources both for the individual and for the health organisation. Children with limitations in interpersonal interactions and relationships are more likely to need dental treatment under GA than other children.

  • 218.
    Norderyd, Johanna
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Klingberg, Gunilla
    Tandvårdshögskolan, Malmö högskola.
    Faulks, Denise
    Clermont Université, Université d’Auvergne, EA3847, Centre de Recherche en Odontologie Clinique, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Oral health, medical diagnoses, and functioning profiles in children with disabilities receiving paediatric specialist dental care – a study using the ICF-CY2015Inngår i: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 37, nr 16, s. 1431-1438Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To describe 0–16-year-old children with disabilities receiving paediatric specialist dental care from a biopsychosocial perspective, with focus on relationship between oral health, medical diagnosis, and functioning. Method: A questionnaire with an International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health – Children and Youth version (ICF-CY) Checklist for Oral Health was completed using structured interview, direct observation, and information from dental records. Descriptive data analysis was performed together with principle component analysis to calculate factors of functioning used in cluster analysis in order to present functioning profiles. Results: Ninety-nine children with at least one major medical diagnosis were included. Twenty had previous caries experience. Two factors of functioning were calculated, labelled “Physical ability” and “Intellectual ability, communication, and behaviour”. Based on functioning profiles three clusters were determined. There were no statistically significant differences in caries experience between medical diagnoses or clusters. Conclusion: It was possible to identify profiles of functioning in children with disabilities receiving specialist dental care. Despite complex disabilities, the children had good oral health. Neither medical diagnosis nor functioning was found to have a clear relationship with oral health. To understand the environmental context leading to high-quality oral health, further studies of dental management in relation to medical and oral diagnoses and child functioning are needed.

    Implications for Rehabilitation

    • Child Oral Health

    • The use of ICF-CY makes it possible for paediatric dentists to assess children’s functioning, disability, and health from a biopsychosocial perspective, showing that the medical diagnosis alone is not enough to assess functions relevant for oral health in the individual.

    • In order to adequately organize, plan, and improve dental care for this heterogenic group of young patients with disabilities a biopsychosocial approach is valuable, aiding a holistic perspective on oral health.

    • Despite complex medical and functional disabilities that may challenge oral health and dental care, this study finds oral health to be good in a group of children with disabilities attending a specialist dental clinic.

  • 219. Olsson, C
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Presymbolic Communication Intervention2003Inngår i: The efficacy of augmentative and alternative communication: towards evidence-based practice, New York: Academic Press , 2003, s. 299-323Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 220.
    Olsson, Lena
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Elgmark Andersson, Elisabeth
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi.
    Integration of pupils with mild intellectual disability in mainstream school settings - goog or bad for social service utilisation? A longitudinal study among children with mild intellectual disability in SwedenManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 221.
    Olsson, Lena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. SALVE (Socialt arbete, Livssammanhang, Välfärd). Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Elgmark Andersson, Elisabeth
    Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi. Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Social service utilisation in relation to class setting - a longitudinal study among children with mild intellectual disability in Sweden2020Inngår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591XArtikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    TThe aim of this study was to investigate if the type of class setting is related to the utilisation of disability-related services and child welfare services outside school over time among children with mild intellectual disability (ID). A quantitative study with a longitudinal and comparative design was carried out including data from archival records concerning service utilisation among 405 children. Children in special classes were more likely than children integrated into regular classes to utilise disability-related services. Integrated children who changed school setting from regular classes to special classes were more likely to begin to utilise such services and to increase the number of services utilised, compared to children who remained integrated. Professionals in social services and schools may need to improve their collaboration around families of children with mild ID when assessing needs and providing services. Special attention may need to be devoted to children integrated into regular classes.

  • 222.
    Olsson, Lena
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. SALVE (Socialt arbete, Livssammanhang, Välfärd).
    Elgmark Andersson, Elisabeth
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Habilitation service utilization patterns among children with mild intellectual disability2017Inngår i: Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, ISSN 1741-1122, E-ISSN 1741-1130, Vol. 14, nr 3, s. 233-239Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    There is a need for more knowledge about the utilization of habilitation services outside school among children with mild intellectual disability (ID). Specific aims. The aim of this study was to describe the patterns of habilitation service utilization among children with mild ID living in Sweden.

    Method

    A quantitative cross-sectional total population study was performed using data from service providers’ existing records.

    Findings

    The most common types of services utilized were those by physicians, counselors, and psychologists. Compared with children with mild ID who were in special classes, children with mild ID who were integrated into mainstream classes utilized significantly fewer types of services. Increasing age of the child was associated with a lower number of service types utilized. Children integrated into mainstream classes were significantly less likely to utilize habilitation services than children attending special classes. The likelihood of utilizing habilitation services decreased with age. Approximately two-thirds of the children utilized habilitation services.

    Discussion

    It is urgent that integration/inclusion in one organizational system, that is, school, does not result in exclusion in another system, such as pediatric habilitation services, which also aim to promote active participation in society. Pediatric habilitation professionals, teachers, and health units at schools need to interact in a manner so that children with mild ID, independent of type of school setting, have access to disability-related services outside school.

  • 223.
    Olsson, Lena M.
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Elgmark, Elisabeth
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Social service utilisation patterns among children with mild intellectual disability – differences between children integrated into mainstream classes and children in self-contained classes2015Inngår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 30, nr 2, s. 220-236Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Children with a mild intellectual disability (ID) and their families often require social services; however, because of the characteristics of the formal service system, these families may be at risk of not receiving necessary services. The aim of this study was to obtain knowledge regarding the types and number of services that families receive from social services because of the child’s disability and because of social problems. Another aim was to acquire knowledge regarding the percentage of families receiving services and to evaluate the received services in relation to the child’s gender, school setting and age. Method. Utilisation of social services among 84 children with a mild ID and their families in two municipalities in Sweden was examined using existing social services records. Results. Approximately one-third of the families received services because of the child’s disability and one-fourth because of social problems. Children integrated into mainstream classes were significantly less likely to receive services from social services because of their disability than children in self-contained classes. The most commonly utilised services because of the child’s disability were companion service, short period of supervision for schoolchildren and special transportation services. The services most utilised because of social problems were help from a personal contact, a contact family for the child’s siblings and financial assistance for the child’s parents. Conclusions. Social services must engage in outreach activities, especially in schools, so that families having a child with mild ID are recognised and receive necessary services.

  • 224.
    Pinto, Ana I
    et al.
    Porto University , Porto , Portugal.
    Grande, Catarina
    Porto University , Porto , Portugal.
    Coelho, Vera
    Porto University , Porto , Portugal.
    Castro, Susana
    University of Roehampton , London , UK.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. SALVE (Socialt arbete, Livssammanhang, Välfärd).
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Beyond diagnosis: the relevance of social interactions for participation in inclusive preschool settings2018Inngår i: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 22, nr 6, s. 390-399Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: This study aims to explore the role of three specific factors within the child-environment interaction process - engagement, independence and social interactions - in influencing development and learning of children with disabilities in inclusive preschool settings. The main question is whether children can be categorised in homogenous groups based on engagement, independence and social interactions (proximal variables within a biopsychosocial framework of human development). The study also examined whether children with the same diagnosis would group together or separately, when trying to identify clusters of engagement, independence and social interactions, and additionally whether such clusters vary as a function of individual child characteristics, and/or as a function of structural and process characteristics of preschool environment.

    METHODS: Data was taken from an intervention study conducted in mainstream preschools in Portugal. A person-centered cluster analysis was conducted to explore group membership of children with various diagnoses, based on their engagement, independence and social interaction profiles.

    RESULTS: Results show that children clustered based on similarity of engagement, independence and social interaction patterns, rather than on diagnosis. Besides, it was found that quality of peer interaction was the only predictor of cluster membership.

    CONCLUSION: These findings support the argument that participation profiles may be more informative for intervention purposes than diagnostic categories, and that preschool process quality, namely peer interaction, is crucial for children's participation.

  • 225. Pless, M
    et al.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Ibragimova, N
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Validity and feasibility in the ICF-model2007Inngår i: Paper presented at the 5th Nordic-Baltic Conference on ICF, 4-5 June, 2007, Oslo, Norway, 2007Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 226. Pless, Mia
    et al.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Om evidens för ICF2011Inngår i: Handbok i att använda ICF och ICF-CY / [ed] Mia Pless & Mats Granlund, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2011, 1:1, s. 185-195Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 227.
    Pless, Mia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala , Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Implementation of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and the ICF Children and Youth Version (ICF-CY) within the context of augmentative and alternative communication2012Inngår i: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, Vol. 28, nr 1, s. 11-20Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the implementation of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), and the ICF version for Children and Youth (ICF-CY), within the context of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). First, the use of the ICF and the ICF-CY in AAC research is analyzed. Second, examples of training and implementation of ICF from other contexts besides AAC are provided. Finally, we synthesize data to provide directions for future implementation of the ICF and ICF-CY in the field of AAC. We conclude that, within AAC, organizational routines and intervention documents need to be adapted to the universal language and classification framework of the ICF and ICF-CY. Furthermore, examples are needed to demonstrate how factors affect implementation at organizational and individual levels.

  • 228.
    Pless, Mia
    et al.
    Uppsala university, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ibragimova, Nina
    Mälardalen university, School of Education, Culture, and Communication.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Evaluation of in-service training in using the ICF and ICF version for children and youth2009Inngår i: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 41, nr 6, s. 451-458Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To study the effects of in-service training on staff's self-reported knowledge, understanding use of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and ICF Children and Youth version (ICF-CY).

    DESIGN:

    Quasi-experimental with a questionnaire prior to training and another one year after training.

    METHODS:

    Intervention was in-service training in using the ICF and ICF-CY. Subjects were 113 professionals working in habilitation services. Two subgroups were compared: (i) subjects who reported one year after the training that they had used the ICF and ICF-CY in daily practice; and (ii) subjects who had not used these frameworks.

    RESULTS:

    The gender, age, and years of work experience of the members in the subgroups were similar. The professionals who used what they learnt from the training, and who already had knowledge about and a positive attitude to the ICF/ICF-CY prior to the training, were found to benefit most from the training. They also increased their ability to apply it to statements about everyday work. These professionals should focus on increasing their understanding and use of the ICF/ICF-CY in their everyday work and in assessment, while those who have limited prior knowledge of the ICF/ICF-CY should focus on gaining knowledge and understanding the purpose, terms and components of the framework.

    CONCLUSION:

    It is recommended that in-service training in using the ICF and ICF-CY is tailored to different groups of professionals depending on their degree of knowledge of the ICF/ICF-CY.

  • 229.
    Raghavendra, Pammi
    et al.
    Novita Children’s Services, Flinders University, and University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.
    Bornman, Juan
    University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    The World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health: implications for clinical and research practice in the field of augmentative and alternative communication2007Inngår i: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, Vol. 23, nr 4, s. 349-361Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2001, the World Health Organization (WHO) ratified and published a new classification system, the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). There has been a varying amount of discussion and debate across the health and disability fields about what the ICF means and what it has to offer. However, there has been little discussion of its use and value in the field of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). This article describes the earlier International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities, and Handicaps (ICIDH), upon which the current ICF was based; and outlines the ICF and the preliminary, derived Child and Youth version of the ICF (ICF-CY). The article also proposes what the ICF has to offer the AAC field, from both a clinical and research perspective; and concludes with a discussion of the advantages and challenges of using the ICF.

  • 230. Roll-Pettersson, L
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Steénsson, A-L
    Familjers behov - lärares behov1999Inngår i: Elever med flera funktionsnedsättningar i särskolan: utbildningens effekter och effektivitet, Stockholm: Stiftelsen Ala , 1999Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 231.
    Rowlands, Charity
    et al.
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon , USA.
    Fried-Oken, Melanie
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon , USA.
    Steiner, Sam
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon , USA.
    Lollar, Donald
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon , USA.
    Phelps, Randall
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon , USA.
    Simeonsson, Rune J.
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina , USA.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Developing the ICF-CY for AAC profile and code set for children who rely on AAC2012Inngår i: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, Vol. 28, nr 1, s. 21-32Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the ICF-CY for AAC Profile, a tool to integrate information about the multiple factors affecting communication skill development and use in school-aged children with complex communication needs. The Profile uses the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health − Children & Youth Version (WHO, 2007) as its framework. We propose that the ICF-CY for AAC Profile constitutes a code set for AAC users and discuss the iterative process of code-set development. The Profile is one component of a proposed process to guide the development of educational goals for children in Grades kindergarten-12 who currently or potentially rely on AAC.

  • 232. Sandberg, A
    et al.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Disabilities and the Play Environment: A Study of adults with Visual Disability, Motor Disability, and Asberger Syndrome Play Experiences from Childhood2003Inngår i: Mental Health and Mental Retardation: A lifespan Multidisciplinary Approach: Abstract Book from the 4th European Congress, 17 – 20th September 2003, Italy, Rome, 2003Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 233.
    Sandberg, Anette
    et al.
    Department of Social Sciences, Mälardalens University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Play in retrospection: play experiences from childhood in adults with visual disability, motor disability and Asperger syndrome2004Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 6, nr 2, s. 111-129Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to analyze and describe how adults with visual disability, motor disability and Asperger syndrome retrospectively identify and experience play in their childhood. Fifteen adults, aged 25 to 76 years, were interviewed about their play experiences. A qualitative approach was adopted with the aim to describe qualitatively different experiences of play. The findings indicate that play experiences merge like mirror images with participation and exclusion as two divergent sides of play. The data suggest that niches for play experiences include three components related to participation and exclusion: a personal component, a social component and an environmental component. Type of disability is one of many aspects making up the three components without being a central feature within any of the components. Type of disability affects personal characteristics and preferences, form of social interaction and the environmental requirements for participating in play but not the experience of play per se. Unique to this study is the importance assigned to the concept of niche. Perceived niches are based on memories and also influence the construction of memories. Thus, they function as a link between perceptions of experiences of play from childhood to adulthood.

  • 234.
    Sandberg, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Institutionen för samhälls- och beteendevetenskap.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Mälardalens högskola, Institutionen för samhälls- och beteendevetenskap.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Mälardalens högskola, Institutionen för samhälls- och beteendevetenskap.
    Eriksson, Lilly
    Mälardalens högskola, Institutionen för samhälls- och beteendevetenskap.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Mälardalens högskola, Institutionen för samhälls- och beteendevetenskap.
    Hur definieras barn i behov av särskilt stöd?2005Inngår i: Excellence in Special Education - Time to move on, Mälardalens högskola, 26-27 sep, 2005Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 235.
    Sandberg, Anette
    et al.
    School of Education, Culture and Communication, The Research Program CHILD , Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Lillvist, Anne
    School of Education, Culture and Communication, The Research Program CHILD , Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Lilly
    Institute of Public Health, Östersund, Sweden.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    "Special support" in preschools in Sweden: Preschool staff's definition of the construct2010Inngår i: International journal of disability, development and education, ISSN 1034-912X, E-ISSN 1465-346X, Vol. 57, nr 1, s. 43-57Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the definitions of the construct “young children in need of special support” given by preschool staff in Sweden in 540 preschool units. The study has a mixed‐methods design based on qualitative analysis of an open‐ended question and quantitative analysis of questionnaire responses. The results reveal two general perspectives in definitions of the construct, a child perspective and an organisational perspective. Units with a child perspective had a higher proportion of children in need of special support, especially girls. The study highlights that the term “children in need of special support” is partially socially constructed and is partially based on perceived child characteristics. The perceptions of what is considered to be a child in need of special support held by staff in a unit may impact on the services provided to children in need of special support.

  • 236. Sandström-Kjellin, M
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Children's engagement in different classroom activities2006Inngår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 21, nr 3, s. 285-300Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 237.
    Simeonsson, Rune
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Classifying mental retardation: impairment, disability, handicap, limitations or restrictions?2002Inngår i: What is mental retardation?: Ideas for an evolving disability, Washington DC.: American Association on Mental retardation , 2002, s. 309-329Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 238.
    Simeonsson, Rune
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    The Concept and Classification of Mental Retardation2006Inngår i: What is mental retardation?: Ideas for an evolviong Disability in the 21st Century, Washington D.C.: American Association on Mental Retardation , 2006, s. 245-264Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 239.
    Simeonsson, Rune J.
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Lollar, Don
    Public Health & Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR, USA.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Brown, Scott C.
    Westat, Washington, DC, USA.
    Zhuoying, Qiu
    Rehabilitation Institute, Beijing, China.
    Gray, David
    Occupational Therapy & Neurology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USA.
    Pan, Yi
    FPG Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
    ICF and ICF-CY lessons learned: Pandora’s box of personal factors2014Inngår i: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 36, nr 25, s. 2187-2194Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this article is to examine the component of “personal factors” described as a contextual factor in the ICF and ICF-CY.

    Methods: A critical examination of the construct of “personal factors” and description of the component was made with reference to conceptual and taxonomic criteria.

    Results: The “personal factors” component in the ICF/ICF-CY is not defined, there is no taxonomy of codes, there is no explicit purpose stated for its use and no guidelines are provided for its application. In spite of these constraints, the component of “personal factors” is being applied as part of the classifications. Such uncontrolled applications constitute significant risks for the status of ICF/ICF-CY as the WHO reference classification in that: (a) the component is accepted for use by default simply by being applied; (b) component content is expanded with idiosyncratic exemplars by users; and (c) there is potential misuse of “personal factors” in documenting personal attributes, including “blaming the victim”.

    Conclusion: In the absence of formal codes, any application of the component of “personal factors” lacks the legitimacy that documentation with a scientific taxonomy should provide. Given the growing use of the ICF/ICF-CY globally, a priority for the revision process should be to determine if there is in fact need for “personal” or any other factors in the ICF/ICF-CY.

  • 240.
    Simeonsson, Rune J.
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Sauer-Lee, Andrea
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Developmental and Health Assessment in Rehabilitation with the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth2010Inngår i: Rehabilitation and Health Assessment: Applying ICF Guidelines / [ed] Elias Mpofu and Thomas Oakland, New York: Springer , 2010, s. 27-46Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 241.
    Simmeborn Fleischer, Ann
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Students with disabilities in higher education - perceptions of support needs and received support: a pilot study2013Inngår i: International Journal of Rehabilitation Research, ISSN 0342-5282, E-ISSN 1473-5660, Vol. 36, nr 4, s. 330-338Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Students with disabilities in higher education frequently need support to succeed in their studies. Perceived problems in managing studies and everyday life may be the same for students with different disabilities although the reasons for support may vary between them. In this pilot study, a questionnaire aimed to survey everyday functioning in students with disabilities was tested. Thirty-four students with Asperger syndrome (AS), motor disabilities or deafness/hearing impairments were asked 55 close- and open-ended questions regarding participation restrictions and available support programmes. One aim was to test the usefulness of the questionnaire. Another aim was to identify students’ perceptions of their everyday student-life and the support they are offered, with a special focus on comparing perceptions of needs and support between student with AS and the other student groups. The results indicate the need to plan recruitment of participants carefully and that the questionnaire was useful. The descriptive analyses conducted, indicated that the groups primarily reported the same difficulties, but the open-ended comments indicated that the reasons for the problems vary between the groups. It indicates that likert type responses to questions concerning perceived difficulties need to be supplemented by open-ended questions concerning perceived reasons to problems.

  • 242.
    Sjöman, Madeleine
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, Lärandepraktiker i och utanför skolan (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU). Mälardalens Högskola.
    Interaction processes as a mediating factor between children's externalized behaviour difficulties and engagement in preschool2016Inngår i: Early Child Development and Care, ISSN 0300-4430, E-ISSN 1476-8275, Vol. 186, nr 10, s. 1649-1663Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined social interaction as a mediator between externalized behaviour difficulties and children's engagement in preschool. Data from 663 children (340 boys), aged 18–71 months, were collected at 81 Swedish preschool units in six municipalities to test a path model that included child, teacher, and child groups. The results indicated that behaviour difficulties and engagement may occur simultaneously. Hyperactivity had a direct negative influence on engagement, which was not the case with conduct problems. Teachers’ responsiveness as well as positive interactions with peers had an indirect influence on the relationship between hyperactivity and engagement. Responsive staff and positive interactions within the child group seem to contribute to children's engagement despite hyperactivity. Children's engagement, as well as special support to stimulate engagement in preschool, is discussed.

  • 243.
    Sjöman, Madeleine
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Axelsson, A.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Mälardalens högskola.
    Danielsson, H.
    Social interactions - predictor of children’s engagement and hyperactivity in preschoolManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 244. Sonnander, K
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Utvecklingsstörning2007Inngår i: Barn som har föräldrar med utvecklingsstörning, Stockholm: Socialstyrelsen , 2007, , s. 27-34s. 27-34Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 245.
    Strand, Anne-Sofie
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. SALVE (Socialt arbete, Livssammanhang, Välfärd).
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    The School Situation for Students with a High Level of Absenteeism in Compulsory School: Is There a Pattern in Documented Support?2014Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 58, nr 5, s. 551-569Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a retrospective descriptive content analysis of all identified school documents for 90 ninth-grade students with a history of truancy, collected from two Swedish compulsory schools. The study investigates individual, school, and psychosocial factors in the documents and three analyses are presented: (1) a general analysis of the documents, (2) a comparison of truant students with and without learning difficulties (LD), and (3) a comparison between students with LD who received no special educational support and those who did receive support. Predictors for truancy were credits in the fall of the eighth grade, difficulties in mathematics, and relationship problems. For 50% of the students, frequent truancy first became evident after the seventh grade. No connections were found between documented educational and social support, learning difficulties, and level of truancy.

  • 246.
    Strand, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Anbäcken, Els-Marie
    Department of Social Work, Linköping University.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Social support for adolescents with a high level of truancy in Swedish compulsory schooling2015Inngår i: Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk, ISSN 1082-4669, E-ISSN 1532-7671, Vol. 20, nr 4, s. 293-311Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to explore whether 15 students with a high level of truancy have experienced social support at school. The analysis is based on systems theory with a focus on the social context at school. The study is based on data collected in an earlier school document study (Strand & Granlund, 2013) and on 2 earlier interview studies with the school staff (Strand & Cedersund, 2013) and the students themselves (Strand, 2012). Data triangulation was conducted using person-based content analysis. The students were divided in three groups of the school system. For the winners, we found that engaged adults close to them made a positive difference that restored their relationship with school. The unchallenged and the losers of the school system had poor social relationships with the school staff, especially within the classroom. A dearth of relationships with classmates was observed for all 3 groups. There was a low level of agreement between the information taken from the school documents, what the school staff members said, and what the students themselves said for all of the groups. What the students perceived as support was not the same as the school had noted as provided and received support.

  • 247.
    Ståhl, Ylva
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Almborg, Ann-Helene
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Contents of Swedish school health questionnaires2011Inngår i: British Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1752-2803, Vol. 6, nr 2, s. 82-88Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This study aims to analyse and link the content of the health information requested in questionnaires used locally in Swedish child and school health services. Background: In industrialized countries, children's health needs are changing from physical to psychosocial needs and the questionnaires used for health screening and guiding health promotion must therefore adapt to these changes. Methods: Questionnaires were analysed, together with health items linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth (ICF-CY). The inter-rater agreement for linking was 80%. Standard age groups were used to improve the comparability across different questionnaires. Results: The information requested for the youngest children focused on communication and acquiring language. For the children aged 6 years and above, health questionnaires related to mental functions, the school situation, psychosomatic symptoms and issues associated with taking care of one's health. Conclusions: The information relating to health in questionnaires revealed that interest focused on health items strongly related to the different age groups and to psychosocial health. The focus was the child as a person rather than the child within a family and school environment.

  • 248.
    Ståhl, Ylva
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Kvalitetsförbättringar, innovationer och ledarskap inom vård och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Enskär, Karin
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Mapping of children's health and development data on population level using the classification system ICF-CY2011Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 39, s. 51-57Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate if essential health and development data of all children in Sweden in the Child Health Service (CHS) and School Health Service (SHS) can be linked to the classification system International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - Children and Youth (ICF-CY). Method: Lists of essential health terms, compiled by professionals from CHS and SHS, expected to be used in the national standardised records form the basis for the analysis in this study. The essential health terms have been linked to the codes of ICF-CY by using linking rules and a verification procedure. RESULTS: After exclusion of terms not directly describing children's health, a majority of the health terms could be linked into the ICF-CY with a high proportion of terms in body functions and a lower proportion in activity/participation and environment respectively. Some health terms had broad description and were linked to several ICF-CY codes. The precision of the health terms was at a medium level of detail. CONCLUSION: ICF-CY can be useful as a tool for documenting child health. It provides not only a code useful for statistical purposes but also a language useful for the CHS and SHS in their work on individual as well as population levels. It was noted that the health terms used by services mainly focused on health related to body function. This indicates that more focus is needed on health data related to child's functioning in everyday life situations.

  • 249.
    Ståhl, Ylva
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Kvalitetsförbättringar, innovationer och ledarskap inom vård och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Enskär, Karin
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Views on health information and perceptions of standardized electronic records among staff in Child and School Health Services2011Inngår i: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 19, nr 2, s. 201-208Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To investigate how nurses and physicians in the Child and School Health Services view the documentation and transfer of health information. Another aim concerns their perceptions of a nationally standardized electronic health record.

    BACKGROUND: Problems of mental health among children and adolescents currently pose one of the greatest challenges facing all European countries. The continuity of health work demands that all health information follow the child's development, disregarding the organizational arrangement.

    METHODS: The study was descriptive and comprised 484 questionnaires to nurses and physicians in the Child and School Health Services in Sweden.

    RESULTS: More information about children's health was transferred than documented in the health record when children started school. This additional health information concerned psychosocial health and foremost family function. There was a consensus concerning the usefulness of a nationally standardized electronic health record, although there were group differences between nurses and physicians.

    CONCLUSIONS: All information about children's health is not documented although the professional's positive perceptions to electronic health records may provide a basis to improve documentation.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: The results indicate challenges to develop a common language to document psychosocial issues necessary for providing a holistic view of children's health.

  • 250.
    Ståhl, Ylva
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Simeonsson, Rune
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Kvalitetsförbättring och ledarskap inom hälsa och välfärd.
    Enskär, Karin
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Psychosocial health information in free text notes of Swedish children's health records2013Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 27, nr 3, s. 616-623Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: High-quality documentation of children’s health is an important priority in health care given trends of declining mental health and reduced well-being in children. There is a lack of information concerning psychosocial health in the standardized part of the national health record in the Child Health Service and the School Health Service in Sweden. Further, little is known if the free text notes in the health record, besides information on physical health, also include information on children’s psychosocial health. The aim of this study was to describe what is recorded concerning children’s health and development in free text notes.

    Methods: The study was based on a retrospective analysis of text using an inductive approach for qualitative analyses of content.

    Results: The analysis of the free text notes in the health records yielded seven categories: development, family, health problems, living habits, medical issues, preschool/school and leisure, and well-being. The categories mainly covered psychosocial aspects of health and were not only about health and development problems of the child but also what was covered during the visits. The information was unevenly distributed across the ages. A stronger focus on the youngest age groups within a family and preschool setting is needed. There was novel information in the free text notes such as pain, general health, emotions, mother’s mental health and leisure activities, which was not covered in the standardized part of the health records.

    Conclusion: The free text notes mainly reflected a psychosocial perspective on health. The findings of this study suggest that requesting more information on children’s psychosocial health in the standardized part of the health records could contribute to more comprehensive and informative health records in the Child health Service and the School Health Service in Sweden.

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