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  • 201.
    D’Arcy, Emily
    et al.
    Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; School of Allied Health, Curtin University, Bentley, Western Australia, Australia; Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Long Pocket, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Curtin Autism Research Group, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya
    School of Allied Health, Curtin University, Bentley, Western Australia, Australia; Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Long Pocket, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Curtin Autism Research Group, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Allied Health, Curtin University, Bentley, Western Australia, Australia; Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Long Pocket, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Curtin Autism Research Group, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Allied Health, Curtin University, Bentley, Western Australia, Australia; c Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Long Pocket, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Curtin Autism Research Group, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Whitehouse, Andrew J.O.
    Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Long Pocket, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Wray, John
    University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; State Child Development Service, Western Australia Department of Health, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Eapen, Valsamma
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Long Pocket, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
    Evans, Kiah
    Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Long Pocket, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Curtin Autism Research Group, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Get it right, make it easy, see it all: Viewpoints of autistic individuals and parents of autistic individuals about the autism diagnostic process in Australia2021In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 85, article id 101792Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The clinical process for being evaluated for an autism diagnosis is often time consuming and stressful for individuals and their caregivers. While experience of and satisfaction with the diagnostic process has been reviewed in the literature, few studies have directly investigated the viewpoints of individuals diagnosed with autism and caregivers of autistic individuals about what is important in the autism diagnostic process.

    Method: A Q methodological design was employed to capture the subjective viewpoints about the diagnostic process of individuals on the autism spectrum and caregivers of autistic individuals. Thirty-eight participants responded to a set of 66 statements representing different aspects of the autism diagnostic process.

    Results: The analysis identified three significant viewpoints: Get it Right, Make it Easy, and See it All. Participants reflected upon the importance of a comprehensive diagnostic assessment process, ease of diagnostic processes, and a holistic approach to autism diagnosis for autistic individuals and caregivers of autistic individuals.

    Conclusions: The findings provide a consumer perspective that encourages reform of the current process for diagnosing autism in Australia, and an insight into what consumers are wanting from diagnostic services. This information is useful for policy-makers and service providers to create a more supportive and client-centred diagnostic process at all levels of service delivery.

  • 202.
    Darcy, Laura
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    The everyday life of young children through their cancer trajectory2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The young child’s experiences of living with cancer are crucial to providing evidence based care. The overall aim of this thesis was to explore and describe experiences of health and functioning in the everyday life of young children with cancer, over a three year period from diagnosis, to provide insights and suggestions to improve evidence based care.

    The first and second papers in the series of four for this thesis used a qualitative content analysis to describe the child’s experiences shortly after diagnosis and six and 12 months later. The third paper used mixed methods to identify a comprehensive set of ICF-CY codes describing everyday health and functioning in the life of the young child with cancer. The fourth paper used the identified comprehensive set of ICF-CY codes to follow changes in everyday health and functioning over the study’s entire three year period from diagnosis.

    Entry into the health-illness transition was characterised by trauma and isolation. Health and functioning in everyday life was utterly changed and physical difficulties were at their peak. The passage through transition was characterised by an active striving on the part of the child to make a normal everyday life of the cancer experience. Difficulties affecting health and functioning in everyday life decreased and changed during the trajectory, though feelings of loneliness prevailed. A new period of stability in the child’s post treatment life was seen from two years after diagnosis and onwards, with (re)-entry to preschool/school and other social activities. However, an increase in difficulties with personal interactions with others and access to, and support from healthcare professionals was seen. Variances were seen within individual children’s’ trajectories.

    In summary it can be stated that the everyday life of young children with cancer changes over time and health care services are not always in phase with these changes. Young children living with cancer want to be participatory in their care and to have access to their parents as protectors.

    They need access to and ongoing contact with peers and preschool. Although physical difficulties in living an everyday life with cancer reduce over time, new difficulties emerge as the child post cancer treatment re-enters society. A structured follow-up throughout the cancer trajectory and not just during active treatment is necessary. A child-centered philosophy of care would guide the child towards attainment of health and well-being.

    Both the child’s own perspective and a child’s perspective as described by adults caring for them should be seen on a continuum, rather than as opposites. This view could help ensure that young children become visible and are listened to as valuable contributors to care planning. Knowledge of health-illness transition can be useful in illustrating everyday health and functioning through long term illness trajectories.

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  • 203.
    Darcy, Laura
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    The process of striving for an ordinary, everyday life, in young children living with cancer, at six months and one year post diagnosis2014In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 605-612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Health care focus is shifting from solely looking at surviving cancer to elements of attention relating to living with it on a daily basis.The young child's experiences are crucial to providing evidence based care. The aim of this study was to explore the everyday life of young children as expressed by the child and parents at six months and one year post diagnosis.

    METHODS: Interviews were conducted with children and their parents connected to a paediatric oncology unit in Southern Sweden. A qualitative content analysis of interview data from two time points, six months and one year post diagnosis, was carried out.

    RESULTS: The process of living with cancer at six months and at one year post diagnosis revealed the child's striving for an ordinary, everyday life. Experiences over time of gaining control, making a normality of the illness and treatment and feeling lonely were described.

    CONCLUSION: Nurses have a major role to play in the process of striving for a new normal in the world post-diagnosis, and provide essential roles by giving the young child information, making them participatory in their care and encouraging access to both parents and peers. Understanding this role and addressing these issues regularly can assist the young child in the transition to living with cancer. Longitudinal studies with young children are vital in capturing their experiences through the cancer trajectory and necessary to ensure quality care.

  • 204.
    Darcy, Laura
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    ICF applications in health care for children with cancer in Sweden2017In: An emerging approach for education and care: Implementing a worldwide classification of functioning and disability / [ed] S. Castro & O. Palikara, London: Routledge, 2017, p. 178-186Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and its version for children and youth, the ICF-CY, can contribute to the present knowledge on the lives of young children with cancer, with an international and interdisciplinary language. In this context, the term health can be seen as a multidimensional concept in which both illness and non-illness/well-being are dimensions that can be present at the same time, rather than two opposite concepts. Health is the result of a continuous process rather than something that one individual has; it is a resource for everyday life rather than the objective of living (WHO, 1986). The ICF was developed to classify different dimensions on individuals’ health as a unified standardised common language and framework, to be used across disciplines (WHO, 2007). It acknowledges that health and illness are complex concepts and promotes a biopsychosocial model of health, in which the context is as important as the individual and his/her needs. The view of health as functioning in everyday life can be operationalised using the ICF model of body structure, body function, activities and participation and environmental factors (Rosenbaum & Gorter, 2012).

  • 205.
    Darcy, Laura
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Following young children's health and functioning in everyday life through their cancer trajectory2016In: Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1043-4542, E-ISSN 1532-8457, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 173-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Knowledge of living with childhood cancer, through the trajectory, is sparse.

    Aim: The aim of this study was to follow young children’s health and functioning in everyday life through their cancer trajectory.

    Methods: Data were gathered longitudinally from a group of 13 young children and their parents connected to a pediatric oncology unit in Sweden. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth structure was used to identify difficulties in health and functioning in everyday life, in interview and questionnaire data. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed to show patterns of difficulty over a 3-year period from diagnosis.

    Results: Difficulties experienced by children declined and changed over time. An increase in difficulties with personal interactions with others and access to and support from health care professionals was seen 2 to 3 years after diagnosis and start of treatment. Similar patterns are seen within individual children’s trajectories in relation to diagnosis but individual patterns were seen for each child.

    Conclusions and Clinical Implications: Health care professionals need to plan for ongoing contact with school services and information and support pathways, beyond the treatment period. A person-centered philosophy of care is required throughout the cancer trajectory.

  • 206.
    Darcy, Laura
    et al.
    Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Young children's experiences of living an everyday life with cancer – A three year interview study2019In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 39, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The young child's experiences of living with cancer are crucial to providing evidence based care. This study explores and describes experiences of everyday life of young children with cancer, over a three year period from diagnosis.

    Method

    This is a longitudinal, inductive interview study with young children with cancer, and their parents. Interviews from shortly after diagnosis, six and 12 months after diagnosis have been reanalysed. Interviews with the same children and their parents from 18 to 36 months after diagnosis have been analysed for the first time in the present paper. A longitudinal temporal analysis at category level for five synchronic data sets forms the basis for the results.

    Results

    The child living with cancer over a three year period is described as a child apart, striving to live an everyday life. This description is built on three categories: I want to be a child like any other, I need security and control and I feel lonely and left out. Young children with cancer actively strive to understand their illness, participate in care and live an ordinary everyday life- but with ongoing feelings of social isolation and loneliness.

    Conclusions

    Young children with cancer need access to and ongoing contact with peers and preschool. A structured follow-up throughout the cancer trajectory and not just during active treatment, is necessary. A child-centred philosophy of care would guide the child towards attainment of health and wellbeing.

  • 207.
    Darcy, Laura
    et al.
    Institution of Health Science, University College Borås.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Simeonsson, Rune J
    Petersson, Christina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Health and functioning in the everyday lives of young children with cancer: documenting with the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - Children and Youth (ICF-CY).2015In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 475-482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Health care focus is shifting for children from surviving childhood cancer to living with it on a daily basis. There is a need to document health and function in the everyday lives of young children with cancer using the multidimensional framework and language of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - Children and Youth (ICF-CY).

    AIMS: The aims of this study were (1) to document health and functioning in the everyday lives of young children with cancer using ICF-CY codes and (2) to identify a comprehensive code set that can aid clinical assessment.

    METHOD: Interviews with children diagnosed with cancer and their parents, were transcribed, reviewed for content and coded to the ICF-CY using linking procedures.

    RESULTS: A comprehensive code set (n = 70) for childhood cancer was identified. The majority of content identified to codes was related to activity and participation describing social relations with family, peers and professionals, preschool attendance and play, as well as issues related to support and independence.

    CONCLUSIONS: The ICF-CY can be used to document the nature and range of characteristics and consequences of cancer experienced by children. The identified comprehensive code set could be helpful to health care professionals, parents and teachers in assessing and supporting young children's health and everyday life through the cancer trajectory. The comprehensive code set could be developed as a clinical assessment tool for those caring for young children with cancer. The universal language of the ICF-CY means that the utility of a clinical assessment tool based on identified codes can have wide reaching effects for the care of young children with cancer.

  • 208.
    Darcy, Laura
    et al.
    Department of Caring Science, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    The development of the Clinical Assessment Tool "Health and Everyday Functioning in Young Children with Cancer"2020In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 445-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Key messages

    • The aim of this study was to select and validate the content of a clinical assessment tool (CAT) for health and everyday functioning in young children with cancer.
    • Items were developed based on frequently occurring ICF-CY codes identified in the transcripts of 12 interviews with young children with cancer and their parents.
    • The CAT consists of 52 items grouped in four dimensions, “The child her/himself”, “The child’s everyday life”, “The child’s need for support” and “The child’s contacts with health care”.
    • The items correlate well with known research results
    • The CAT can be used by both parents and health care personnel to highlight aspects of care for the young child with cancer
  • 209.
    Darcy, Laura
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Institution of Health Science, University College Borås, Sweden.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    The everyday life of the young child shortly after receiving a cancer diagnosis, from both children's and parent's perspectives2014In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 445-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Providing qualified, evidence-based healthcare to children requires increased knowledge of how cancer affects the young child's life. There is a dearth of research focusing on the young child's experience of everyday life.

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore young children's and their parents' perceptions of how cancer affects the child's health and everyday life shortly after diagnosis.

    Methods: Thirteen children with newly diagnosed cancer aged 1 to 6 years and their parents, connected to a pediatric oncology unit in Southern Sweden, participated in this study through semistructured interviews. Child and parent data were analyzed as a family unit, using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Everyday life was spent at hospital or at home waiting to go back to hospital. Analysis led to the following categories: feeling like a stranger, feeling powerless, and feeling isolated.

    Conclusions: The child wants to be seen as a competent individual requiring information and participation in care. Parents need to be a safe haven for their child and not feel forced to legitimize painful and traumatic procedures by assisting with them. Nurses play a major role in the lives of children. Research with and on the young child is necessary and a way of making them visible and promoting their health and well-being.

    Implications for practice: Nurses need to reevaluate the newly diagnosed child's care routines so as to shift focus from the illness to the child. This requires competent nurses, secure in their caring role.

  • 210.
    Davoust, Maria
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Petersson, Hanna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Barnsjuksköterkors erfarenhet att möta barn som misstänkts fara illa.: "Det borde inte vara en rättighet att få bli förälder, men det borde vara en rättighet att få en vettig förälder"2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 211.
    Day, Annika L.
    et al.
    Department of Physiotherapy, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Währborg, Peter
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Golsäter, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Futurum Akademi for Health and Care Region Jönköping County.
    Rydå, Ulla
    Jansson, Marian
    An evaluation of daily relaxation training and psychosomatic symptoms in young children2016In: Health Behavior and Policy Review, ISSN 2326-4403, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 198-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: We evaluated the efficacy of daily relaxation training on psychosomatic symptoms during one school year among 8-year-old children. Methods: Cortisol in saliva, abdominal circumference including body mass index (BMI), heart rate, rate pressure product (RPP), and stress in children (SIC) were measured. Teachers in the intervention classes were interviewed. The intervention consisted of a daily relaxation therapy (RT). Results: The intervention group showed reduced heart rate. Individuals of the intervention group showed an improvement regarding headaches and the ability to fall asleep. The qualitative results showed that the RT had a calming effect on both the children and the teachers. Conclusions: RT among children may be of use to cope with stress as interpreted by some improved parameters in the intervention group.

  • 212.
    de Schipper, Elles
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lundequist, Aiko
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Coghill, David
    University of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, UK.
    de Vries, Petrus J.
    University of Cape Town, South Africa.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Holtmann, Martin
    Ruhr University Bochum, Hamm, Germany.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Karande, Sunil
    Seth G.S. Medical College & K.E.M. Hospital, Mumbai, India.
    Robison, John E.
    US Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC.
    Shulman, Cory
    Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel.
    Singhal, Nidhi
    Action for Autism, New Delhi, India.
    Tonge, Bruce
    Monash University, Victoria, Australia.
    Wong, Virginia C. N.
    The University of Hong Kong, China.
    Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie
    University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
    Bölte, Sven
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Ability and disability in autism spectrum disorder: A systematic literature review employing the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health-Children and Youth Version2015In: Autism Research, ISSN 1939-3792, E-ISSN 1939-3806, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 782-794Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study is the first in a series of four empirical investigations to develop International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Sets for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The objective was to use a systematic review approach to identify, number, and link functional ability and disability concepts used in the scientific ASD literature to the nomenclature of the ICF-CY (Children and Youth version of the ICF, covering the life span).

    Methods: Systematic searches on outcome studies of ASD were carried out in Medline/PubMed, PsycINFO, ERIC and Cinahl, and relevant functional ability and disability concepts extracted from the included studies. These concepts were then linked to the ICF-CY by two independent researchers using a standardized linking procedure. New concepts were extracted from the studies until saturation of identified ICF-CY categories was reached.

    Results: Seventy-one studies were included in the final analysis and 2475 meaningful concepts contained in these studies were linked to 146 ICF-CY categories. Of these, 99 categories were considered most relevant to ASD (i.e., identified in at least 5% of the studies), of which 63 were related to Activities and Participation, 28 were related to Body functions, and 8 were related to Environmental factors. The five most frequently identified categories were basic interpersonal interactions (51%), emotional functions (49%), complex interpersonal interactions (48%), attention functions (44%), and mental functions of language (44%).

    Conclusion: The broad variety of ICF-CY categories identified in this study reflects the heterogeneity of functional differences found in ASD—both with respect to disability and exceptionality—and underlines the potential value of the ICF-CY as a framework to capture an individual's functioning in all dimensions of life. The current results in combination with three additional preparatory studies (expert survey, focus groups, and clinical study) will provide the scientific basis for defining the ICF Core Sets for ASD for multipurpose use in basic and applied research and every day clinical practice of ASD.

  • 213.
    de Schipper, Elles
    et al.
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundequist, Aiko
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wilteus, Anna Löfgren
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Coghill, David
    University of Dundee, UK.
    de Vries, Petrus J.
    University of Cape Town, South Africa .
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Holtmann, Martin
    Ruhr University Bochum, Hamm, Germany.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karande, Sunil
    Seth G.S. Medical College and K.E.M. Hospital, Mumbai, India.
    Levy, Florence
    Prince of Wales Hospital and University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
    Al-Modayfer, Omar
    College of Medicine, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Rohde, Luis
    Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    Tannock, Rosemary
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Tonge, Bruce
    Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Bölte, Sven
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Stockholm, Sweden.
    A comprehensive scoping review of ability and disability in ADHD using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health-Children and Youth Version (ICF-CY)2015In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 859-872Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the first in a series of four empirical investigations to develop International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Sets for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The objective here was to use a comprehensive scoping review approach to identify the concepts of functional ability and disability used in the scientific ADHD literature and link these to the nomenclature of the ICF-CY. Systematic searches were conducted using Medline/PubMed, PsycINFO, ERIC and Cinahl, to extract the relevant concepts of functional ability and disability from the identified outcome studies of ADHD. These concepts were then linked to ICF-CY by two independent researchers using a standardized linking procedure. Data from identified studies were analysed until saturation of ICF-CY categories was reached. Eighty studies were included in the final analysis. Concepts contained in these studies were linked to 128 ICF-CY categories. Of these categories, 68 were considered to be particularly relevant to ADHD (i.e., identified in at least 5 % of the studies). Of these, 32 were related to Activities and participation, 31 were related to Body functions, and five were related to environmental factors. The five most frequently identified categories were school education (53 %), energy and drive functions (50 %), psychomotor functions (50 %), attention functions (49 %), and emotional functions (45 %). The broad variety of ICF-CY categories identified in this study underlines the necessity to consider ability and disability in ADHD across all dimensions of life, for which the ICF-CY provides a valuable and universally applicable framework. These results, in combination with three additional preparatory studies (expert survey, focus groups, clinical study), will provide a scientific basis to define the ICF Core Sets for ADHD for multi-purpose use in basic and applied research, and every day clinical practice.

  • 214.
    de Schipper, Elles
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Mahdi, Soheil
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Coghill, David
    University of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, United Kingdom.
    de Vries, Petrus J.
    University of Cape Town, South Africa.
    Gau, Susan Shur-Fen
    National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Holtmann, Martin
    Ruhr University Bochum, Hamm, Germany.
    Karande, Sunil
    Seth G.S. Medical College and K.E.M. Hospital, Mumbai, India.
    Levy, Florence
    School of Psychiatry, Prince of Wales Hospital and University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
    Almodayfer, Omar
    Psychiatry Section, King Abdulaziz Medical City, College of Medicine, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Rohde, Luis
    Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    Tannock, Rosemary
    The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Canada.
    Bolte, Sven
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Towards an ICF core set for ADHD: a worldwide expert survey on ability and disability2015In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 24, no 12, p. 1509-1521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the second in a series of four empirical studies designed to develop International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF and Children and Youth version, ICF-CY) core sets for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The objective of this stage was to gather the opinions from international experts on which ability and disability concepts were considered relevant to functioning in ADHD. An email-based survey was carried out amongst international experts in ADHD. Relevant functional ability and disability concepts were extracted from their responses and linked to the ICF/-CY categories by two independent researchers using a standardised linking procedure. 174 experts from 11 different disciplines and 45 different countries completed the survey. Meaningful concepts identified in their responses were linked to 185 ICF/-CY categories. Of these, 83 categories were identified by at least 5 % of the experts and considered the most relevant to ADHD: 30 of these were related to Body functions (most identified: attention functions, 85 %), 30 to Activities and Participation (most identified: school education, 52 %), 20 to Environmental factors (most identified: support from immediate family, 61 %), and 3 to Body structures (most identified: structure of brain, 83 %). Experts also provided their views on particular abilities related to ADHD, naming characteristics such as high-energy levels, flexibility and resiliency. Gender differences in the expression of ADHD identified by experts pertained mainly to females showing more internalising (e.g. anxiety, low self-esteem) and less externalising behaviours (e.g. hyperactivity), leading to a risk of late- and under-diagnosis in females. Results indicate that the impact of ADHD extends beyond the core symptom domains, into all areas of life and across the lifespan. The current study in combination with three additional preparatory studies (comprehensive scoping review, focus groups, clinical study) will provide the scientific basis to define the ADHD ICF/-CY core sets for multi-purpose use in basic and applied research and every day clinical practice.

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  • 215. de Schipper, Elles
    et al.
    Mahdi, Soheil
    de Vries, Petrus
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Holtman, Martin
    Karande, Sunil
    Almodayfer, Omar
    Shulman, Cory
    Tonge, Bruce
    Wong, Virginia V. C. N.
    Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie
    Bölte, Sven
    Functioning and disability in autism spectrum disorder: A worldwide survey of experts2016In: Autism Research, ISSN 1939-3792, E-ISSN 1939-3806, Vol. 9, no 9, p. 959-969Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study is the second of four to prepare International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF; and Children and Youth version, ICF(-CY)) Core Sets for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).The objective of this study was to survey the opinions and experiences of international experts on functioning and disability in ASD.

    Methods: Using a protocol stipulated by the World Health Organization (WHO) and monitored by the ICF Research Branch, an email-based questionnaire was circulated worldwide among ASD experts, and meaningful functional ability and disability concepts were extracted from their responses. These concepts were then linked to the ICF(-CY) by two independent researchers using a standardized linking procedure.

    Results: N  = 225 experts from 10 different disciplines and all six WHO-regions completed the survey. Meaningful concepts from the responses were linked to 210 ICF(-CY) categories. Of these, 103 categories were considered most relevant to ASD (i.e., identified by at least 5% of the experts), of which 37 were related to

    Activities and Participation, 35 to Body functions, 22 to Environmental factors, and 9 to Body structures. A variety of personal characteristics and ASD-related functioning skills were provided by experts, including honesty, loyalty, attention to detail and creative talents. Reported gender differences in ASD comprised more externalizing behaviors among males and more internalizing behaviors in females.

    Conclusion: The ICF(-CY) categories derived from international expert opinions indicate that the impact of ASD on functioning extends far beyond core symptom domains

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  • 216.
    Desai, Priti P.
    et al.
    East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, United States.
    Flick, Samantha L.
    Cardiac Center, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA, United States.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Brimhall, Andrew S.
    East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, United States.
    Practices and perceptions of nurses regarding child visitation and child life role in adult intensive care units practices and perceptions of nurses regarding child visitation and child life role in adult intensive care units2020In: American Journal of Critical Care, ISSN 1062-3264, E-ISSN 1937-710X, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 195-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Provision of developmentally appropriate support for child visitors in adult intensive care units (ICUs) would benefit patients and young visitors. Research on best practices for child visitation in adult ICUs is limited.

    Objectives

    To explore the perceptions and practices of nurses working in adult ICUs in the United States regarding child visitation and the role of child life specialists in this setting.

    Methods

    Data were collected from 446 adult ICU nurses via a cross-sectional survey. The survey explored perceptions and practices regarding child visitation, access to child-friendly resources, and the feasibility of having a child life specialist in adult ICUs.

    Results

    Several participants (303, 67.9%) felt that children were at risk for psychological trauma from visiting an adult ICU. Some participants (122, 27.4%) reported that their ICUs did not have policies for child visitation. Logistic regression showed that nurses with a master’s degree were 1.8 times (P < .05) more likely to believe that young children (0-5 years) should visit. Nurses (105 of 197, 53.3%) were more likely to allow young children to visit if the patient was the child’s parent or if the patient was dying. Child-friendly resources were not routinely available. Nurses expressed that adult ICUs could benefit from child life specialists facilitating child visitation.

    Conclusions

    Nurses were inconsistently open to child visitation. Exceptions for older children (> 6 years), children whose parent was the patient, patients’ illness severity, and end of life allowed more child visitation. Ways to facilitate child-friendly visitation in adult ICUs are discussed.

  • 217.
    Diaz Cruz, Maria Araceli
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Lundh, Dan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Szekeres, F.
    Department of Biomedicine, School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Sandra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Larsson, D.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothia Forum for Clinical Research, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Cis-regulatory elements in conserved non-coding sequences of nuclear receptor genes indicate for crosstalk between endocrine systems2021In: Open Medicine (Poland), ISSN 2391-5463, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 640-650Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate gene expression when bound to specific DNA sequences. Crosstalk between steroid NR systems has been studied for understanding the development of hormone-driven cancers but not to an extent at a genetic level. This study aimed to investigate crosstalk between steroid NRs in conserved intron and exon sequences, with a focus on steroid NRs involved in prostate cancer etiology. For this purpose, we evaluated conserved intron and exon sequences among all 49 members of the NR Superfamily (NRS) and their relevance as regulatory sequences and NR-binding sequences. Sequence conservation was found to be higher in the first intron (35%), when compared with downstream introns. Seventy-nine percent of the conserved regions in the NRS contained putative transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) and a large fraction of these sequences contained splicing sites (SS). Analysis of transcription factors binding to putative intronic and exonic TFBS revealed that 5 and 16%, respectively, were NRs. The present study suggests crosstalk between steroid NRs, e.g., vitamin D, estrogen, progesterone, and retinoic acid endocrine systems, through cis-regulatory elements in conserved sequences of introns and exons. This investigation gives evidence for crosstalk between steroid hormones and contributes to novel targets for steroid NR regulation.

  • 218.
    Dierckens, M.
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Weinberg, D.
    Department of Interdisciplinary Social Science, Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Huang, Y.
    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Elgar, F.
    Institute for Health and Social Policy, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
    Moor, I.
    Institute of Medical Sociology, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Salle), Germany.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Lyyra, N.
    Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyvaskyla, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    De Clercq, B.
    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Stevens, G. W. J. M.
    Department of Interdisciplinary Social Science, Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Currie, C
    Global Adolescent Health and Behaviour Research Unit, GCU London, London, United Kingdom.
    National level wealth inequality and socioeconomic inequality in adolescent mental wellbeing2020In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 30, no Supplement 5, article id ckaa165.337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Previous research established a positive association between national income inequality and socioeconomic inequalities in adolescent health, but little is known about the extent to which national level inequalities in accumulated financial resources (i.e. wealth) are associated with these health inequalities. Therefore, we examined the association between national wealth inequality and income inequality and socioeconomic inequalities in adolescent mental wellbeing.

    Methods

    Data were from 17 countries participating in three successive waves (2010, 2014 and 2018) of the cross-sectional Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study. We combined individual-level data on adolescents' life satisfaction, psychological and somatic symptoms and socioeconomic status (SES) with country-level data on income and wealth inequality (n = 244771). We performed time-series analysis on a pooled sample of 48 country/year groups.

    Results

    Higher levels of national wealth inequality were associated with fewer average psychological and somatic symptoms, while higher levels of national income inequality were associated with more psychological and somatic symptoms. No associations between either national wealth inequality or income inequality and life satisfaction were found. Smaller differences in somatic symptoms between higher and lower SES groups were found in countries with higher levels of national wealth inequality. In contrast, larger differences in psychological symptoms and life satisfaction (but not somatic symptoms) between higher and lower SES groups were found in countries with higher levels of national income inequality.

    Conclusions

    Although both national wealth and income inequality are associated with (socioeconomic inequalities in) adolescent mental wellbeing, associations are in opposite directions. Further research is warranted to gain better understanding in the role of national wealth inequality on (socioeconomic inequalities in) adolescent health.

    Key Messages

    • This is one of the first studies to examine if socioeconomic inequalities in adolescent mental wellbeing are associated with national wealth inequality independently from national income inequality.
    • Opposing effects of national wealth inequality and income inequality on socioeconomic inequalities in adolescents’ mental wellbeing warrant further research before policy recommendations can be made.
  • 219.
    Dierckens, M.
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Weinberg, D.
    Department of Interdisciplinary Social Science, Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Huang, Y.
    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Elgar, F.
    Institute for Health and Social Policy, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
    Moor, I.
    Institute of Medical Sociology, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Salle), Germany.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Lyyra, N.
    Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyvaskyla, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Deforche, B.
    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    De Clercq, B.
    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Stevens, G. W. J. M.
    Department of Interdisciplinary Social Science, Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Currie, C.
    Global Adolescent Health and Behaviour Research Unit, GCU London, London, United Kingdom.
    National-Level Wealth Inequality and Socioeconomic Inequality in Adolescent Mental Well-Being: A Time Series Analysis of 17 Countries2020In: Journal of Adolescent Health, ISSN 1054-139X, E-ISSN 1879-1972, Vol. 66, no 6, p. 21-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Although previous research has established a positive association between national income inequality and socioeconomic inequalities in adolescent health, very little is known about the extent to which national-level wealth inequalities (i.e., accumulated financial resources) are associated with these inequalities in health. Therefore, this study examined the association between national wealth inequality and income inequality and socioeconomic inequality in adolescents' mental well-being at the aggregated level. Methods: Data were from 17 countries participating in three consecutive waves (2010, 2014, and 2018) of the cross-sectional Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study. We aggregated data on adolescents' life satisfaction, psychological and somatic symptoms, and socioeconomic status (SES) to produce a country-level slope index of inequality and combined it with country-level data on income inequality and wealth inequality (n = 244,771). Time series analyses were performed on a pooled sample of 48 country-year groups. Results: Higher levels of national wealth inequality were associated with fewer average psychological and somatic symptoms, while higher levels of national income inequality were associated with more psychological and somatic symptoms. No associations between either national wealth inequality or income inequality and life satisfaction were found. Smaller differences in somatic symptoms between higher and lower SES groups were found in countries with higher levels of national wealth inequality. In contrast, larger differences in psychological symptoms and life satisfaction (but not somatic symptoms) between higher and lower SES groups were found in countries with higher levels of national income inequality. Conclusions: Although both national wealth and income inequality are associated with socioeconomic inequalities in adolescent mental well-being at the aggregated level, associations are in opposite directions. Social policies aimed at a redistribution of income resources at the national level could decrease socioeconomic inequalities in adolescent mental well-being while further research is warranted to gain a better understanding of the role of national wealth inequality in socioeconomic inequalities in adolescent health.

  • 220.
    Dijkshoorn, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Inclusive Education for Refugees and Asylum Seeking Children: A Systematic Literature Review2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of children with a refugee background in the Netherlands. All of these children who are under 18 years of age must go to school, but they face many barriers towards inclusion. Appropriately educating this diverse group of children presents schools with challenges. Supportive programs are needed to overcome these barriers and challenges. AIM The aim of this paper was to explore what supports are put in place to foster refugee students’ inclusion in school. METHOD A systematic literature review was conducted to synthesize research on school-based programs and practices. RESULTS A broad range of supports were identified. Most studies addressed access barriers to learning by offering emotional and educational support, while fewer studies focused on opportunity barriers such as negative attitudes and lack of parental involvement. CONCLUSION It was concluded that schools can play an important role in supporting the inclusion of refugee children and their families because of their accessibility, but that more high quality research is necessary in order to assess the effectiveness of supports that minimize barriers towards learning and promote their inclusion in school.

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  • 221.
    Dillon, M. P.
    et al.
    Department Physiotherapy, Podiatry, Prosthetics and Orthotics. La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Fatone, S.
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Hafner, B. J.
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
    Ramstrand, Nerrolyn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    2020 in Review: A Perspective From the Immediate Past Editors-in-Chief2021In: Prosthetics and Orthotics International, ISSN 0309-3646, E-ISSN 1746-1553, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 1-5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 222. Dillon, M. P.
    et al.
    Fatone, S.
    Hafner, B. J.
    Ramstrand, Nerrolyn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Keeping pace with the ever-growing orthotic and prosthetic profession: New faces and changes at Prosthetics and Orthotics International2019In: Prosthetics and Orthotics International, ISSN 0309-3646, E-ISSN 1746-1553, Vol. 43, no 2, p. i-iiiArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 223.
    Dillon, Michael P.
    et al.
    Department of Physiotherapy, Podiatry, and Prosthetics and Orthotics, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Fatone, Stefania
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Ramstrand, Nerrolyn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Hafner, Brian J.
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
    Prosthetics and Orthotics International welcomes qualitative research submissions2019In: Prosthetics and Orthotics International, ISSN 0309-3646, E-ISSN 1746-1553, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 366-368Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 224.
    Dillon, Michael P.
    et al.
    Department of Physiotherapy, Podiatry, and Prosthetics and Orthotics, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Ramstrand, Nerrolyn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Fatone, Stefania
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Hafner, Brian J.
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
    2019 in review: A perspective from the Editors-in-Chief2020In: Prosthetics and Orthotics International, ISSN 0309-3646, E-ISSN 1746-1553, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 6-9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 225.
    Dinu, Radu Harald
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Communication, Culture and Diversity (CCD).
    Bengtsson, StaffanJönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Disability and labour in the twentieth century: Historical and comparative perspectives2023Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume puts disability and labour at the centre of historical enquiry. It offers fresh perspectives on the history of disability and labour in the twentieth century and highlights the need to address the topic beyond regional boundaries. Bringing together historians and disability scholars from a variety of disciplines and regions, the chapters investigate various historical settings, ranging from work cooperatives to disability associations and informal workplaces, and analyse multiple meanings of labour in different political and economic systems through the lens of disability.

    The book’s contributors demonstrate that the nexus between labour and disability in modern, industrialised societies resists easy generalisations, as marginalisation and integration were often two sides of the same coin: While the experience of many disabled people has been marked by exclusion from mainstream production, labour also became a vehicle for integration and emancipation. Addressing one of the research gaps of the disability history field, which has long been dominated by British and North American perspectives, the book sheds light on less-studied examples from Scandinavian countries and Eastern Europe including Czechoslovakia, Poland, the Soviet Union, Bulgaria and Romania.

    Cutting across national, cultural and class divides the volume provides a springboard for reflections on common experiences of disability and labour during the twentieth century. It will be of interest to all scholars and students working in the field of disability studies, sociology and labour history.

  • 226.
    Dinu, Radu Harald
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Communication, Culture and Diversity (CCD).
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Funktionshinder och arbete – internationella utblickar i ett historiskt perspektiv2022In: Det nionde svenska arbetarhistorikermötet: Abstracthäfte, 2022, p. 2-2Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hur har arbetets alltmer centrala roll under 1900-talet kommit att påverka personer med funktionsnedsättning? Och vilka skillnader fanns det mellan statssocialistiska samhällen i Öst och liberal-demokratiska samhällen i Väst? Dessa frågor står i centrum för föreliggande bidrag. Vi tar avstamp i en nyutkommen antologi där vi tillsammans med forskare från Nordamerika, Väst- och Östeuropa har undersökt vilka inklusions- och exklusionsmekanismer förvärvsarbete har skapat för människor med funktionsnedsättningar (Disability and Labour in the Twetieth Century. Comparative and Historical Perspectives. London: Routledge, 2023). Trots att arbete har löpt som en röd tråd genom funktionshinderforskningen har sambandet mellan arbete och funktionshinder inte beforskats mycket ur ett historiskt perspektiv. Funktionshinder har även förblivit i utkanten av den etablerade arbetarhistoriska forskningen. Med vårt bidrag vill vi fylla denna forskningslucka och kasta nytt ljus på förvärvsarbete under 1900-talets andra hälft. Staffan Bengtsson diskuterar Kommitténs för partiellt arbetsföra betänkande från 1946 och efterkrigstidens socialpolitiska ansträngningar att få ”partiellt arbetsföra människor” i arbete. Radu Harald Dinu belyser hur synskadade skulle integreras i arbetslivet under efterkrigstiden. Som exempel tjänar de Blindas Förbund i Rumänien under statssocialismen.

  • 227.
    Dinu, Radu Harald
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Communication, Culture and Diversity (CCD).
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Introduction: Disability and labour in modern societies2023In: Disability and labour in the twentieth century: Historical and comparative perspectives / [ed] R. H. Dinu & S. Bengtsson, London: Routledge, 2023, p. 1-14Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume is the first of its kind to take a comprehensive and comparative historical perspective on labour and disability during the twentieth century. The project started in 2020 when the editors received a Research Initiation Grant from the Swedish Riksbankens Jubileumsfond foundation to organise an international symposium. Recognising that historical research on disability varied across regions, with the symposium, we aimed to gather scholars from Eastern and Western Europe as well as North America and to facilitate an academic exchange on this topic. The symposium, which was hosted by Jönköping University and the Swedish Institute for Disability Research, brought together emerging and established scholars from ten countries and explored the nexus between disability and labour from a historical and comparative perspective. We decided early on to publish the conference papers, which eventually gave rise to the present volume.

  • 228. Dols, J.
    et al.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Peters, B.
    Bekiaris, E.
    Baten, G.
    Establishment of a common pan-european psn driving assessment scheme: The consensus project.2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 229. Dols, J.
    et al.
    Pardo, J
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Foerst, R.
    The TRAINER project: a new concept for novice drivers' training simulators2001Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 230. Dols, J.
    et al.
    Pardo, J.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Uneken, E.
    Verwey, W.
    The TRAINER project: a new simulator-based driver training curriculum2001Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 231. Donlau, Marie
    et al.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Independence in the toilet activity in children and adolescents with myelomeningocele - managing clean intermittent catheterization in a hospital setting2009In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 98, no 12, p. 1972-1976Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 232. Donlau, Marie
    et al.
    Imms, Christine
    Glad Mattsson, Gunilla
    Mattsson, Sven
    Sjörs, Anna
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Children and youth with myelomeningocele’s independence in managing clean intermittent catheterization in familiar settings.2011In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 100, no 3, p. 429-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:  To examine the ability of children and youth with myelomeningocele to independently manage clean intermittent catheterization.

    Methods:  There were 50 participants with myelomeningocele (5–18 years); 13 of them had also participated in a previous hospital-based study. Their abilities and interest in completing the toilet activity were examined at home or in school using an interview and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). Actual performance was observed and rated. Background variables were collected from medical records and KatAD+E tests.

    Results:  In total, 48% were observed to perform the toilet activity independently, in comparison with 74% who self-reported independence. Univariate analyses found KatAD+E could predict who was independent. COPM failed to do so. Ability to remain focused and ambulation were predictors of independence, but age, sex and IQ were not. Multivariable analysis found time to completion to be the strongest predictor of independence. Four children were independent in their familiar environment, but not in the hospital setting, and six of 13 children maintained focus only in their familiar environment.

    Conclusions:  Interviews were not sufficiently accurate to assess independence in the toilet activity. Instead, observations including time to completion are recommended. The execution of the toilet activity is influenced by the environmental context.

  • 233.
    Donohue, Dana
    et al.
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Bornman, Juan
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Household size is associated with unintelligible speech in children who have intellectual disabilities: A South African study2015In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 402-406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine whether four socioeconomic factors, namely caregiver age, caregiver education, family income and/or household size were related to the presence of motor delays or unintelligible speech in South African children with intellectual disabilities. Methods: Caregivers of children with intellectual disabilities completed a biographical questionnaire regarding their home environments. Other items on the questionnaire queried whether their children experienced co-occurring developmental impairments of motor delays or unintelligible speech. Results: A total of 145 caregivers were included in the analyses. Two logistic regressions were run with the set of four socioeconomic factors as predictors, and motor delays and intelligible speech as the outcome variables. Household size was a statistically significant predictor of whether children evidenced intelligible speech. Conclusion: Children living in dwellings with more people were less likely to have intelligible speech. The processes through which large household size might influence children’s language are discussed.

  • 234.
    Donohue, Dana K.
    et al.
    University of Pretoria, SA.
    Bornman, Juan
    University of Pretoria, SA.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Examining the rights of children with intellectual disability in South Africa: Children's perspectives2014In: Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 55-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Human rights provide fundamental conditions for people to maintain dignity and self-determination and protect a nation's most vulnerable citizens. In South Africa, children with intellectual disability who experience socioeconomic disadvantage may be particularly vulnerable due to their cognitive impairments and inability to garner needed resources.

    Method The perceptions of children with intellectual disability regarding their access to basic amenities in their home environments were examined to determine whether their positive human rights were met. Risk factors were examined in relation to these perceptions.

    Results The results suggested that participants generally reported high degrees of access to basic resources. Logistic regressions suggested socioeconomic risk factors (e.g., income, education, household size, relationship status) were negatively related to children's reports of access to food and their own beds and positively related to having someone available to explain confusing concepts to them.

    Conclusions The positive human rights of children living in high-risk environments should be monitored to ensure all South Africans have their rights met.

  • 235.
    Downie, Angela
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Chamberlain, Angela
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Kuzminski, Rebecca
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Cuomo, Belinda
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Road vehicle transportation of children with physical and behavioral disabilities: A literature review2020In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 309-322Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A literature review in 2001 found that children with disabilities were frequently transported in unsafe conditions and further research was required to investigate the gap between regulations, standards and actual transportation practices.

    OBJECTIVES: To synthesize available evidence on the transportation of children with disabilities in road vehicles.

    METHODS: Four databases were systematically searched: CINAHL; Medline; National Transport Library Catalogue (Sweden); and Transport Research International Documentation.

    RESULTS: Nineteen studies ranging in methodological quality from poor to excellent were included in the review. The findings are presented under the following six major themes: child safety restraints, wheelchairs, vehicles, travel habits, parental and professional knowledge. The results are mapped onto two groups of children, those with behavioral problems and those with physical disabilities.

    CONCLUSION: The literature reflected little change across the six major themes since the previous review. Children with disabilities continue to be inappropriately restrained in vehicles, constituting an ongoing road safety problem. There is a strong need to increase parent knowledge, upskill health professionals and provide families with financial assistance to enable them to ensure the safe transportation of children with disabilities to minimize the risk of injury and fatalities on the road, and enhance their participation in the community.

  • 236.
    Dreaver, Jessica
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Thompson, Craig
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Black, Melissa H.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Success Factors Enabling Employment for Adults on the Autism Spectrum from Employers' Perspective2020In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 1657-1667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Employment outcomes for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are poor and there is limited understanding on how best to support individuals with ASD in the workplace. Stakeholders involved in the employment of adults with ASD, including employers and employment service providers have unique insights into the factors influencing employment for this population. Organisational and individual factors facilitating successful employment for adults with ASD across Australia and Sweden were explored, including the supports and strategies underpinning employment success from an employers' perspective. Three themes including Knowledge and Understanding of ASD, Work Environment and Job Match emerged, suggesting that a holistic approach was key to supporting success, with employer knowledge and understanding of ASD underpinning their ability to facilitate employment.

  • 237.
    Dzidic, Majda
    et al.
    Department of Health and Genomics, Center for Advanced Research in Public Health, Valencia, Spain.
    Collado, Maria C.
    Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology (IATA-CSIC), Department of Biotechnology, Unit of Lactic Acid Bacteria and Probiotics, Valencia, Spain.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Pediatrics, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Artacho, Alejandro
    Department of Health and Genomics, Center for Advanced Research in Public Health, Valencia, Spain.
    Stensson, Malin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Jenmalm, Maria C.
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Autoimmunity and Immune Regulation, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Mira, Alex
    Department of Health and Genomics, Center for Advanced Research in Public Health, Valencia, Spain.
    Oral microbiome development during childhood: an ecological succession influenced by postnatal factors and associated with tooth decay2018In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 12, no 9, p. 2292-2306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information on how the oral microbiome develops during early childhood and how external factors influence this ecological process is scarce. We used high-throughput sequencing to characterize bacterial composition in saliva samples collected at 3, 6, 12, 24 months and 7 years of age in 90 longitudinally followed children, for whom clinical, dietary and health data were collected. Bacterial composition patterns changed through time, starting with “early colonizers”, including Streptococcus and Veillonella; other bacterial genera such as Neisseria settled after 1 or 2 years of age. Dental caries development was associated with diverging microbial composition through time. Streptococcus cristatus appeared to be associated with increased risk of developing tooth decay and its role as potential biomarker of the disease should be studied with species-specific probes. Infants born by C-section had initially skewed bacterial content compared with vaginally delivered infants, but this was recovered with age. Shorter breastfeeding habits and antibiotic treatment during the first 2 years of age were associated with a distinct bacterial composition at later age. The findings presented describe oral microbiota development as an ecological succession where altered colonization pattern during the first year of life may have long-term consequences for child's oral and systemic health. 

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  • 238.
    Earl, Robyn
    et al.
    Curtin University.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Curtin University.
    Girdler, Sonya
    Curtin University.
    Dahlman, Joakim
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Rehnberg, Anette
    The Swedish Transport Administration.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Curtin University.
    Visual search strategies of pedestrians with and without visual and cognitive impairments in a shared zone: A proof of concept study2016In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 57, p. 327-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shared zones have gained increasing popularity in urban land use and design as a means of incorporating the needs of multiple modes of transport, while at the same time promoting social interaction between users. Interactions within shared zones are based on a set of informal social protocols, communicated via eye contact and social cues. This proof of concept study utilised eye-tracking technology to examine the visual search strategies of individuals, with and without visual and cognitive impairments as they navigated a strategically chosen shared zone. In total 3960 fixations were analysed and the fixations were distributed across the shared zone and a pedestrian crossing. Those with impairments were more likely to fixate on traffic specific areas and objects compared to those without, suggesting that they required more input ascertaining when and where it was safe to perform tasks. However, the duration of fixation was not significantly different for an object whether it was traffic related or not, indicating a global need for increased processing time of the surrounding environment. Shared zones are claimed to increase driver awareness and safety and reduce congestion, but the implications on participation and safety for those with visual and cognitive impairments is yet to be extensively explored.

  • 239.
    Earl, Robyn
    et al.
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia and Linköping University & Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, Linköping, Sweden.
    Girdler, Sonya
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Morris, Susan L.
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Viewpoints of pedestrians with and without cognitive impairment on shared zones and zebra crossings2018In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 9, article id e0203765Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Shared zones are characterised by an absence of traditional markers that segregate the road and footpath. Negotiation of a shared zone relies on an individual’s ability to perceive, assess and respond to environmental cues. This ability may be impacted by impairments in cognitive processing, which may lead to individuals experiencing increased anxiety when negotiating a shared zone.

    Method

    Q method was used in order to identify and explore the viewpoints of pedestrians, with and without cognitive impairments as they pertain to shared zones.

    Results

    Two viewpoints were revealed. Viewpoint one was defined by “confident users” while viewpoint two was defined by users who “know what [they] are doing but drivers might not”.

    Discussion

    Overall, participants in the study would not avoid shared zones. Pedestrians with intellectual disability were, however, not well represented by either viewpoint, suggesting that shared zones may pose a potential barrier to participation for this group.

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  • 240.
    Earl, Robyn
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Morris, Susan
    School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Cowan, Georgia
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Visual search strategies in a shared zone in pedestrians with and without intellectual disability2019In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 94, article id 103493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People with intellectual disability (ID) may find shared zones troublesome to negotiate because of the lack of the traditional clearly defined rules and boundaries. With the built environment identified as a barrier to active travel and community access, it is vital to explore how pedestrians with ID navigate shared zones to ensure that this group is not placed in harm's way or discouraged from active travel because of the implications of shared zones. This study investigated the visual strategies of 19 adults with ID and 21 controls who wore head mounted eye trackers in a Shared Zone and at a zebra crossing (as a contrast traffic environment). In total 4750 valid fixations were analysed. Participants with ID fixated on traffic relevant objects at a rate of 68 percent of the control participants. Furthermore, the males with ID were 9(4.4–18.7) times more likely to fixate on non-traffic relevant objects compared with traffic relevant objects, much higher odds than that of females with ID 1.8(0.4–1.7). Zebra crossings appeared to act as a cue, drawing pedestrians' visual attention to the traffic environment, with both groups more likely to look at traffic relevant objects on/at the zebra crossing (66%: 34%). Future implementation of shared zones needs to be carefully considered in relation to the safety of road users with ID and their capacity to identify and assess salient environmental information.

  • 241. Edbom, T
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Lichtenstein, P
    Larsson, J-O
    Long-term relationship between symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and self-esteem in a prospective longitudinal study of twins2006In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 95, no 6, p. 650-657Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To study the long-term relationship between symptoms of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and the developing self-esteem in a population-based sample of twins. Methods: The cohort is all twin pair families born in Sweden between May 1985 and December 1986 (n = 1.480). Wave 1 took place in 1994 when the twins were 8 years old and wave 2 in 1999 when the children were 13 years old. In wave 1 and 2 the parents completed questionnaires regarding ADHD-symptoms about their children. In wave 2 the twins completed a questionnaire about self-esteem and Youth Self Report (YSR). ADHD-symptoms and self-esteem were analyzed in the total study group. Results: There was a long-term relationship between high scores of parental-reported ADHD-symptoms at 8 and 13 years of age and low scores in measures of self-reported self-esteem at 13 years of age. In the cotwin control method controlling for YSR internalizing problem, paired comparisons within the twin pairs revealed that a high score of ADHD-symptoms at age 8 was related to significantly lower scores at age 13 in the self-esteem. Conclusions: The long-term relationships between ADHD-symptoms and a low self-esteem in a population-based sample were confirmed by the co-twin analyses.

  • 242. Edbom, T
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Lichtenstein, P
    Larsson, J-O
    Self concepts in children with attention - deficit - hyperactive disorder: a person oriented approach2003In: Developmental medicine and child neurology. Supplement 97, Volume 45: Abstracts: European Academy of Childhood Disability, 15th annual meeting, Oslo, 2003, London: MacKeith , 2003, p. 22-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 243.
    Edbom, T
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Malmberg, K
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Lichtenstein, P
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Larsson, J-O
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    High sense of coherence in adolescence is a protective factor in the longitudinal development of ADHD symptoms2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 541-547Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The key feature of salutogenesis is that good health can be directly sustained by positive factors. The Sense of Coherence (SOC) scale was developed by Antonovsky as a measure related to the concept of salutogenesis including aspects of comprehensibility, manageability and meaningfulness.

    Aim:  The aim was to investigate whether Sense of Coherence can serve as a salutogenetic factor modifying the long-term development of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Symptoms.

    Subjects and methods:  Twin study of Child and Adolescent Development (TCHAD) is a longitudinal study of all twin pairs born in Sweden between May 1985 and December 1986. The present project is a sub-sample of 312 individuals (135 boys and 177 girls). At 16 years of age, the young persons and their parents were interviewed with K-SADS especially symptoms of ADHD. The young person also completed the SOC questionnaire. At 21 years of age, the young person completed a questionnaire about symptoms of ADHD.

    Findings:  Higher (worse) ADHD scores at 16 years of age were associated with higher (worse) ADHD scores at 21 years of age. However, this relationship was stronger for lower (worse) SOC. A higher (better) SOC at 16 years was associated with lower (better) ADHD at 21 years and this relationship was stronger for higher (worse) ADHD at 16 years.

    Conclusion:  A high Sense of Coherence in adolescence was a protective factor for the long-term development of ADHD.

  • 244. Edbom, Tobias
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Liechtenstein, Paul
    Larsson, Jan-Olov
    ADHD Symptoms Related to Profiles of Self-Esteem in a Longitudinal Study of Twins: A person-oriented approach2008In: Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing, ISSN 1073-6077, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 228-237Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 245.
    Efvergren, Rickard
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Nordqvist, Emelie
    Glatz, Terese
    Elgmark, Elisabeth
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Uppfylls behoven av habilitering/rehabilitering hos brukare som tillhör LSS personkrets?2007Report (Other academic)
  • 246.
    Egonsdotter, Gunilla
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Reflections in Case-Based Learning: Experiences of Computer-Based Simulations in Social Work Education2023In: Journal of social work education, ISSN 1043-7797, E-ISSN 2163-5811, Vol. 59, no 4, p. 964-976Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Case-based learning has a long history in social work education, but has been relatively unaffected by the advances of information and computer technology. The aim of this study is to discuss new, and perhaps more rewarding, forms of decision case learning by using a computer-based simulation, SimChild, that puts the student in the position of a professional social worker assessing a child protection case. Aggregated statistics from the SimChild exercise form the basis for seminars where the students can reflect on their decisions. The study indicates that the simulation promotes reflections and learning insights among students as well as new insights into the importance of more collective and interactive learning.

  • 247.
    Egonsdotter, Gunilla
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work.
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Israelsson, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Borell, Klas
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work.
    Child protection and cultural awareness: Simulation-based learning2020In: Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work, ISSN 1531-3204, E-ISSN 1531-3212, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 362-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social work educators have long struggled with the challenge of finding appropriate strategies for fostering cultural awareness among their students. The purpose of this study is to illustrate how a computer-based simulation, SimChild, can be used in teaching about child protection to enhance cultural awareness among students and expand their insight into how personal biases can affect professional practice. In SimChild, individual students can assume the role of social worker and then collectively discuss the patterns emerging after their individual assessments have been aggregated. This study, based primarily on focus group data, reflects testing conducted at three Swedish universities.

  • 248.
    Einberg, Eva-Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    To promote health in children with experience of cancer treatment2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this thesis was to develop knowledge about how to promote health in children treated for cancer and how health promotion interventions based on such knowledge can be evaluated. In this thesis, a descriptive and explorative design has been used, comprising both qualitative (Papers I-III) and quantitative (Papers I and IV) methods. A nationwide cohort of 144 childhood cancer survivors (24-42 years) answered a questionnaire about the support they had received from health care services (Paper I). Fifteen children (8-12years), with experience of cancer treatment, participated in five focus groups with two sessions per group (Paper II and III). The focus group methodology was combined with participatory and art-based techniques, such as draw and tell and photography. The children discussed what promotes health and what friendship is about. A methodological design was used to psychometrically test the Swedish version of the Minneapolis-Manchester Quality of Life instrument (MMQL) (Paper IV). The study included 950 pupils in grade 6 and 9 from seven primary schools. In addition to this, a comparison of the MMQL instrument with the health-promoting factors described by children in the focus groups was performed.

    The findings showed that there is a need for health-promoting factors, such as knowledge and psychosocial support, from health care services for childhood cancer survivors. Their family and friends may contribute with support and then serve as health-promoting factors. Health-promoting factors, according to children 8-12 years of age and with experience of cancer treatment, are meaningful relationships, recreational activities and a trustful environment. The children expressed a holistic view of what promotes their health. Friendship, from the perspective of the children, is a process of equal and mutual commitment that develops over time and with interactions occurring face-to-face and digitally. The MMQL instrument may be valid and reliable in a sample of healthy children. However, less than one-third of the items in the MMQL instrument could be linked to the health-promoting factors that the children participating in the focus groups highlighted. In conclusion, the findings in this thesis contribute knowledge from a participant perspective regarding the needs and the experiences of health-promoting factors for those who have received treatment for cancer. This knowledge could form a basis for development of health promotion interventions aimed at children who have received treatment for cancer. It is suggested that if the MMQL instrument is used to evaluate health promotion among children who have received treatment for cancer, the MMQL should be complemented with items that capture aspects of health that are important to the children.

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  • 249.
    Einberg, Eva-Lena
    et al.
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Nursing and Integrated Health Sciences, CYPHISCO Research Group, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Golsäter, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Futurum-Academy for Health and Care, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden; Department of Health, Medicine and Caring, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Clausson, Eva K.
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Nursing and Integrated Health Sciences, CYPHISCO Research Group, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Swedish schoolchildren's voices of health-promoting factors: a focus group study2023In: Health Promotion International, ISSN 0957-4824, E-ISSN 1460-2245, Vol. 38, no 4, article id daab176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children have the right to express their views on all issues related to their health and development. The aim was to explore health-promoting factors voiced by 8- to 12-year-old children, to determine how the children prioritize those factors and inform school personnel how to develop health-promoting approach based on those findings. Focus groups, with the use of photographs, were conducted with 15 children. A deductive content analysis was used, with overall results showing that health-promoting factors are meaningful relationships and recreational activities. The results add new perspectives to the earlier model of health-promoting factors. By highlighting children's experience of what promotes health, measures at the individual, group and community level can be adapted to children's priorities, based on their own needs.

  • 250.
    Einberg, Eva-Lena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Hamlstad.
    Kadrija, Ibadete
    School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Brunt, David
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Psychometric evaluation of a Swedish version of Minneapolis-Manchester quality of life-youth form and adolescent form2013In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 11, no 79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    It has become important to measure long-term effects and quality of life in survivors of childhood cancer. The Minneapolis- Manchester Quality of Life (MMQL) instrument has been proven to better capture the quality of life (QoL) perspective of health than other instruments. The instrument has age appropriate versions and is therefore favourable for longitudinal studies of QoL of children surviving from cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of MMQL-Youth Form and the Adolescent Form focusing on: 1) face and content validity 2) the internal consistency and 3) the test-retest reliability.

    Methods

    The sample consisted of 950 pupils (11–16 years old) from 7 schools in the western Sweden who completed the questionnaire. For the test-retest evaluation 230 respondents completed the questionnaire two weeks later.

    Results

    Face and content validity was supported and internal consistency was found to be acceptable for the total scale for both the MMQL-Youth Form (8–12 years of age) and the Adolescent Form (13–20 years of age). Test-retest reliability for the MMQL-Youth Form was moderate for 50% of the items and good for the remaining. For the MMQL-Adolescent Form the test-retest showed moderate or good agreement for 80% of the items and fair for 20%.

    Conclusions

    The result indicated that the Swedish version of the MMQLYouth Form and Adolescent Form was valid and reliable in a sample of healthy children in a Swedish context. It is recommended to test the instrument among diverse samples of children such as survivors of childhood cancer in order to validate its usefulness in research and clinical settings.

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