Change search
Refine search result
2345678 201 - 250 of 514
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 201.
    Falkmer, Marita
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Barnett, Tania
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Horlin, Chiara
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Olov
    Lund University.
    Siljehav, Jessica
    Lund University.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Lee, Hoe C.
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Chee, Derserri Y.
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Wretstrand, Anders
    Lund University.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Viewpoints of adults with and without Autism Spectrum Disorders on public transport2015In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 80, p. 163-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Public transport is low cost, allows for independence, and facilitates engagement and participation for non-drivers. However, the viewpoints of individuals with cognitive disabilities are rarely considered. In Australia, the prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) is approximately 1% and increasing. Many individuals with ASD do not possess a driver's licence, indicating that access to public transport is crucial for their independence. However, at present, there is no research on the opinions of adults with ASD on public transport. Aim: To identify the viewpoints of adults with ASD regarding the barriers and facilitators of public transport usage and their transportation preferences, and to contrast these against the viewpoints of neurotypical adults. Methods: Q. method was used to identify the viewpoints of both participant groups on public transport. Participants consisted of 55 adults with a diagnosis of ASD and a contrast group of 57 neurotypical adults. Both groups completed a Q sort task which took place in either Perth or Melbourne, Australia. Results: The most prominent viewpoint indicated that both groups preferred to use public transport over driving and believed that it supported their independence. This viewpoint also indicated that both groups preferred to use electronic ticketing when using public transport. Interestingly, the second most prominent viewpoint indicated that both groups preferred to drive themselves by private car rather than use public transport. Discussion: It appears that the viewpoints of adults with and without ASD regarding public transportation were largely similar. However, questions arose about whether the preference for public transport in the ASD group may be more a result of difficulties obtaining a driving licence than a deliberate choice. The only barrier specified by adults with ASD related to crowding on public transport. Safety and convenience in relation to location and timing of services were barriers reported by neurotypical adults.

  • 202.
    Falkmer, Marita
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Bjällmark, Anna
    Department of Medical Engineering, School of Technology and Health, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Mathilda
    Department of Medical Engineering, School of Technology and Health, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    The influences of static and interactive dynamic facial stimuli on visual strategies in persons with Asperger syndrome2011In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 935-940Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies, using eye tracking methodology, suggest that different visual strategies in persons with autism spectrum conditions, compared with controls, are applied when viewing facial stimuli. Most eye tracking studies are, however, made in laboratory settings with either static (photos) or non-interactive dynamic stimuli, such as video clips. Whether or not these results are transferable to a “real world” dialogue situation remains unclear. In order to examine the consistency of visual strategies across conditions, a comparison of two static conditions and an interactive dynamic “real world” condition, in 15 adults with Asperger syndrome and 15 matched controls, was made using an eye tracker. The static stimuli consisted of colour photos of faces, while a dialogue between the participants and the test leader created the interactive dynamic condition. A within-group comparison showed that people with AS, and their matched controls, displayed a high degree of stability in visual strategies when viewing faces, regardless of the facial stimuli being static or real, as in the interactive dynamic condition. The consistency in visual strategies within the participants suggests that results from studies with static facial stimuli provide important information on individual visual strategies that may be generalized to “real world” situations.

  • 203.
    Falkmer, Marita
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Bjällmark, Anna
    KTH, Medicinsk bildteknik.
    Larsson, Matilda
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Recognition of facially expressed emotions and visual search strategies in adults with Asperger syndrome2011In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 210-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Can the disadvantages persons with Asperger syndrome frequently experience with reading facially expressed emotions be attributed to a different visual perception, affecting their scanning patterns? Visual search strategies, particularly regarding the importance of information from the eye area, and the ability to recognise facially expressed emotions were compared between 24 adults with Asperger syndrome and their matched controls. While wearing a head mounted eye tracker, the participants viewed 12 pairs of photos of faces. The first photo in each pair was cut up into puzzle pieces. Six of the 12 puzzle pieced photos had the eyes bisected. The second photo showed a happy, an angry and a surprised face of the same person as in the puzzle pieced photo. Differences in visual search strategies between the groups were established. Adults with Asperger syndrome had greater difficulties recognizing these basic emotions than controls. The distortion of the eye area affected the ability to identify emotions even more negatively for participants with Asperger syndrome.

  • 204.
    Falkmer, Marita
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Black, Melissa
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (CHIRI), Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia.
    Tang, Julia
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (CHIRI), Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia.
    Fitzgerald, Patrick
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (CHIRI), Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (CHIRI), Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia.
    Leung, Denise
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (CHIRI), Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia.
    Ordqvist, Anna
    Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences (IMH), Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University & Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, Linköping, Sweden.
    Tan, Tele
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Local visual perception bias in children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders; do we have the whole picture?2016In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 117-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: While local bias in visual processing in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) has been reported to result in difficulties in recognizing faces and facially expressed emotions, but superior ability in disembedding figures, associations between these abilities within a group of children with and without ASD have not been explored.

    Methods: Possible associations in performance on the Visual Perception Skills Figure–Ground test, a face recognition test and an emotion recognition test were investigated within 25 8–12-years-old children with high-functioning autism/Asperger syndrome, and in comparison to 33 typically developing children.

    Results: Analyses indicated a weak positive correlation between accuracy in Figure–Ground recognition and emotion recognition. No other correlation estimates were significant.

    Conclusion: These findings challenge both the enhanced perceptual function hypothesis and the weak central coherence hypothesis, and accentuate the importance of further scrutinizing the existance and nature of local visual bias in ASD.

  • 205.
    Falkmer, Marita
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    From my perspective - Perceived participation in mainstream schools in students with autism spectrum conditions2012In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 191-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To examine perceived participation in students with ASC and their classmates in mainstream schools and to investigate correlations between activities the students wanted to do and actually participated in.

    Methods: Twenty-two students with ASC and their 382 classmates responded to a 46-item questionnaire regarding perceived participation in mainstream schools.

    Results: On 57% of the items, students with ASC perceived lower participation than their classmates. These results emphasize the importance of knowledge about students’ perceived participation. However, positive correlations between what the students wanted to do and actually did indicate that students with ASC may be participating to the extent that they wanted.

    Conclusion: Students with ASC perceived lower overall participation in mainstream school than their classmates. The correlations between “I want to” and “I do” statements in students with ASC indicated that aspects of autonomy are important to incorporate when studying, and interpreting, self-rated participation in mainstream schools.

  • 206.
    Falkmer, Marita
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Larsson, M
    Bjällmark, Anna
    Department of Medical Engineering, School of Technology and Health, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    The importance of the eye area in face identification abilities and visual search strategies in persons with Asperger syndrome2010In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 724-730Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Partly claimed to explain social difficulties observed in people with Asperger syndrome, face identification and visual search strategies become important. Previous research findings are, however, disparate. In order to explore face identification abilities and visual search strategies, with special focus on the importance of the eye area, 24 adults with Asperger syndrome and matched controls viewed puzzle pieced photos of faces, in order to identify them as one of three intact photos of persons. Every second puzzle pieced photo had the eyes distorted. Fixation patterns were measured by an eye tracker. Adults with Asperger syndrome had greater difficulties in identifying faces than controls. However, the entire face identification superiority in controls was found in the condition when the eyes were distorted supporting that adults with Aspergers syndrome do use the eye region to a great extent in face identification. The visual search strategies in controls were more effective and relied on the use of the ‘face information triangle’, i.e. the two eyes and the mouth, while adults with Asperger syndrome had more fixations on other parts of the face, both when obtaining information and during the identification part, suggesting a less effective use of the ‘face information triangle’.

  • 207.
    Falkmer, Marita
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Oehlers, K
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Can you see it too? Correlations between observed and self-rated participation in mainstream schools for students with and without autism spectrum conditions.2012Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 208.
    Falkmer, Marita
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Curtin Univeristy, Perth, Australia.
    Oehlers, Kirsty
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA , Australia.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Curtin Univeristy, Perth, Australia.
    Can you see it too? Observed and self-rated participation in mainstream schools in students with and without autism spectrum disorders2015In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 365-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To examine the degree to which observations can capture perception of participation, observed and self-rated levels of interactions for students with and without autism spectrum disorders (ASD) were explored.

    Methods: Frequencies and levels of involvement in interactions with classmates were observed and compared in 22 students with ASD and 84 of their classmates in mainstream schools, using a standardized protocol. Self-reported participation measurements regarding interactions with classmates and teachers from five questionnaire items were correlated with the observations. In total, 51 516 data points were coded and entered into the analyses, and correlated with 530 questionnaire ratings.

    Results: Only one weak correlation was found in each group. Compared with classmates, students with ASD participated less frequently, but were not less involved when they actually did.

    Conclusions: Observations alone do not capture the individuals’ perception of participation and are not sufficient if the subjective aspect of participation is to be measured.

  • 209.
    Falkmer, Marita
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Parsons, Richard
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work and Curtin Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University Perth, WA, Australia.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Looking through the Same Eyes?: Do Teachers’ Participation Ratings Match with Ratings of Students with Autism Spectrum Conditions in Mainstream Schools?2012In: Autism Research and Treatment, ISSN 2090-1925, E-ISSN 2090-1933, Vol. 2012, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To create an inclusive classroom and act accordingly, teachers’ understanding of the experiences of participation of students with autism spectrum conditions (ASCs) is crucial. This understanding may depend on the teachers’ professional experiences, support and personal interests. The aim of the present questionnaire study was to investigate how well the teachers’ ratings of their students with ASCs’ perception of participation matched with the students’ own ratings. Furthermore, possible correlations between the accuracy of teachers’ ratings and the teachers’ self-reported professional experience, support (including support-staff), and personal interest were investigated. Teachers’ ratings were also used to examine how their understandings correlated with classroom actions. The agreements between teachers’ and students’ ratings were moderate to high, and the ability to attune to the students’ perception of participation was not affected by the presence of a support-staff. The teachers’ personal interest in teaching students with ASC correlated with their accuracy, suggesting that this is a factor to consider when planning for successful placements in mainstream schools. Teachers’ understandings of the students with ASCs’ perception of being bullied or unpopular correlated with implementation of activities to improve the attitudes of classmates, but not with actions to enhance social relations for the students with ASC.

  • 210.
    Falkmer, Marita
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Stuart, G
    Danielsson, H
    Brahm, S
    Lönebrink, M
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Visual acuity in adults with Asperger's syndrome: No evidence for "eagle-eyed" vision2011In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 70, no 812, p. 812-816Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Autism spectrum conditions (ASC) are defined by criteria comprising impairments in social interaction and communication. Altered visual perception is one possible and often discussed cause of difficulties in social interaction and social communication. Recently, Ashwin et al. suggested that enhanced ability in local visual processing in ASC was due to superior visual acuity, but that study has been the subject of methodological criticism, placing the findings in doubt.

    Methods: The present study investigated visual acuity thresholds in 24 adults with Asperger’s syndrome and compared their results with 25 control subjects with the 2 Meter 2000 Series Revised ETDRS Chart.

    Results: The distribution of visual acuities within the two groups was highly similar, and none of the participants had superior visual acuity.

    Conclusions: Superior visual acuity in individuals with Asperger’s syndrome could not be established, suggesting that differences in visual perception in ASC are not explained by this factor. A continued search for explanations of superior ability in local visual processing in persons with ASC is therefore warranted.

  • 211.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Anderson, Katie
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia .
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Horlin, Chiara
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Diagnostic Procedures in Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Systematic Literature Review2013In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 329-340Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At present, ‘gold standard’ diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is a lengthy and time consuming process that requires suitably qualified multi-disciplinary team (MDT) personnel to assess behavioural, historical, and parent-report information to determine a diagnosis. A number of different tools have been developed to assist in determination. To optimise the diagnostic procedures, the best diagnostic instruments need to be identified. This study is a systematic review addressing the accuracy, reliability, validity and utility of reported diagnostic tools and assessments. To be included in this review, studies must have (1) identified an ASD diagnostic tool; (2) investigated either diagnostic procedure or the tools or personnel required; (3) be presented in English; (4) be conducted in the Western world; (5) be one of three types of studies [adapted from Samtani et al. in Cochrane Database Syst Rev 3:1–13, 2011], viz. (a) cohort studies or cross-sectional studies, (b) randomised studies of test accuracy, (c) case–control studies. MEDLINE, PsychINFO, Scopus, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were scrutinised for relevant literature published from 2000 inclusive on 20th January 2012. In total, 68 articles were included. 17 tools were assessed. However, many lacked an evidence base of high quality-independent studies. The Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) and Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) stood out with the largest evidence base and highest sensitivity and specificity. When the ADI-R and ADOS were used in combination they revealed levels of accuracy very similar to the correct classification rates for the current ‘gold standard’ diagnostic procedure viz. 80.8 % for ASD. There is scope for future studies on the use of the ADI-R and ADOS in combination.

  • 212.
    Faniyan, Funmilayo Bola
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE PARTICIPATION IN LEARNING IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 213.
    Ferm, Ulrika
    et al.
    DART – Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication and Assistive Technology, Regional Habilitation Centre, Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital , Sweden.
    Ahlsén, Elisabeth
    SSKKII Interdisciplinary Center, Department of Applied Information Technology, Chalmers/University of Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Patterns of Communicative Interaction between a Child with Severe Speech and Physical Impairments and her Caregiver during a Mealtime Activity2012In: Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability, ISSN 1366-8250, E-ISSN 1469-9532, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 11-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Interaction between caregivers and children with severe impairments is closely related to the demands of daily activities. This study examines the relationship between interaction and the routine mealtime activity at home.

    Method: Patterns of interaction between a child (aged 6 years and 6 months) with severe speech and physical impairments and her caregiver (focus dyad) and a child without impairments (aged 6 years and 6 months) and her caregiver (comparison dyad) were analysed using video recordings and activity-based communication analysis.

    Results: The focus dyad's interaction was unaided. The dyad did not use the Blissymbol board but communicated using words, vocalisations, word approximations, and body communication. Interaction in the focus dyad included relatively few pauses and frequent interchanges of short and sometimes simultaneous communicative contributions. Strong relations between patterns of interaction and immediate activity management goals such as assisting with eating, eating and drinking were found and compared for the two dyads. Results were discussed with regard to child development and communication intervention.

    Conclusions: The focus dyad showed interactive efficiency and the fulfilment of goals relating to basic understanding and closeness, but mainly with regard to immediate mealtime issues. The comparison child and caregiver were more independent in the activity which made it possible for them to reach more extensive, and from a child perspective, age-adequate goals than the focus dyad.

  • 214.
    Ferm, Ulrika
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Ahlsén, Elisabeth
    Göteborgs unuiversitet.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Spontaneous Communication with Blissymbolics between a mother and her daughter at home: What do they talk about and how?2013In: Aided Communication in Everyday Interaction / [ed] Niklas Norén, Christina Samuelsson, Charlotta Plejert, Guildford, Surrey: J&R Press Ltd , 2013, 1, p. 281-313Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 215.
    Fernando, Nipunika
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Barriers to participation in physical activity for children and adolescents with Down Syndrome: A systematic literature review2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Children and adolescents with Down Syndrome have demonstrated lower levels of participation in Physical Activity than their typically developing peers. Persons diagnosed with Down Syndrome are at a higher prevalence rate for many health conditions, specifically obesity. Physical Activity has proven to be very beneficial in creating and maintaining good friendships, self-esteem and is essential to maintain a healthy life. Yet children and adolescents face many challenges to participate in these environments. Therefore, this study is focusing on the environmental barriers to participation in Physical Activity.

    Method: A literature search on four databases namely ERIC, CINAHL, PsycINFO and PubMed alongside with a hand search on the reference lists of the relevant articles were conducted for suitable literature to be retrieved. The inclusion criteria included were studies published in English, after the year 2000 which focus on barriers to Physical Activity among children and adolescents aged 0-18.

    Results: Six articles from six different countries were utilized to meet the aim of the review. The identified environmental barriers were lack of transport, negative attitudes, parental responsibilities, lack of specifically designed activities and lack of opportunities. Although some results contrasted with each other, it was identified that children and adolescents with Down Syndrome have many difficulties in the environment that obstructs them from partaking in activities.

    Conclusions: The hindrances to Physical Activity are different depending of various cultures the child lives. It is important to identify these barriers and find ways to eradicate them by means of supportive factors. Although children and adolescents with Down Syndrome are more prone to various health conditions that possess numerous challenges, more attention should be given in consideration for future research and interventions.

  • 216.
    Florida, Julie
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Interventions in Solving Equations for Students with Mathematics Learning Disabilities: A Systematic Literature Review2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Approximately 5 to 14% of school age children are affected by mathematics learning disabilities. With the implementation of inclusion, many of these children are now being educated in the regular education class- room setting and may require additional support to be successful in algebra. Therefore, teachers need to know what interventions are available to them to facilitate the algebraic learning of students with mathemat- ics learning disabilities. This systematic literature review aims to identify, and critically analyze, interventions that could be used when teaching algebra to these students. The five included articles focused on interven- tions that can be used in algebra, specifically when solving equations. In the analysis of the five studies two types of interventions emerged: the concrete-representational-abstract model and graphic organizers. The concrete-representational-abstract model seems to show it can be used successfully in a variety of scenarios involving solving equations. The use of graphic organizers also seems to be helpful when teaching higher- level algebra content that may be difficult to represent concretely. This review discovered many practical implications for teachers. Namely, that the concrete-representational-abstract model of intervention is easy to implement, effective over short periods of time and appears to positively influence the achievement of all students in an inclusive classroom setting. The graphic organizer showed similar results in that it is easy to implement and appears to improve all students’ learning. This review provided a good starting point for teachers to identify interventions that could be useful in algebra; however, more research still needs to be done. Future research is suggested in inclusive classroom settings where the general education teacher is the instructor and also on higher-level algebra concepts. 

  • 217.
    Fried-Oken, Melanie
    et al.
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Guest editorial: AAC and ICF: A Good Fit to Emphasize Outcomes2012In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 218.
    Fräjdin, Evelina
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    "Våra guldstunder": En kvalitativ studie om lärares beskrivning av arbete med högläsning i årskurs 1 och 2.2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study is about teachers’ read-aloud in the classroom. Reading comprehension is important in all subjects of the school and a recurring knowledge requirement throughout the compulsory school. The purpose is therefore to investigate how teachers in grades 1 – 2 describe their read-aloud. The following questions have been the starting point of this study: What purpose do teachers have with their read-aloud? How do teachers work with read-aloud? Which advantages and disadvantages do teachers see with read-aloud? This study is based on the sociocultural theory assuming that people develop through social activities where scaffolding is important for development. Semi-structured interviews have been used and six teachers have been interviewed. The material has been analyzed and discussed in relation to the field. The result shows that the teachers have several different purposes of read-aloud. The purpose can be to create a mutual reading experience or increase pupils’ interest in reading. Also, the purpose can be to develop pupils’ reading comprehension. How and how much the teachers use read-aloud differs. According to the teachers there are major advantages of read-aloud while the disadvantages are few.

  • 219.
    Garrels, Veerle
    et al.
    Department of Special Needs Education, Faculty of Educational Science, University of Oslo, Norway.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden.
    Promoting self-determination for students with intellectual disability: A Vygotskian perspective2019In: Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, ISSN 2210-6561, E-ISSN 2210-657X, Vol. 22, article id 100241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite weak correlations between IQ scores and self-determination, research indicates that individuals with intellectual disability (ID) show lower levels of self-determination than their non-disabled peers, and that they experience lower effects of self-determination interventions. From a Vygotskian perspective, self-determination skills can be considered complex cognitive abilities that develop through social interaction with and adequate scaffolding by competent tutors. This approach raises the need to look into how self-determination interventions can be adapted to the cognitive profiles of individuals with ID. In this article, the Self-Determined Learning Model of Instruction was used with eight adolescents with mild ID over a three-month period. Typical challenges that were encountered are described, and suggestions for how these challenges can be addressed are discussed. Findings from this study illustrate how the development of self-determination skills may be facilitated when there is congruence between the individual's neurobiological development and the social conditions for development. 

  • 220.
    Garrels, Veerle
    et al.
    Department of Special Needs Education, faculty of Educational Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Department of Special Needs Education, faculty of Educational Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Measuring self-determination in Norwegian students: adaptation and validation of the AIR Self-Determination Scale2018In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 466-480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study describes the adaptation and validation of the American Institute for Research (AIR) Self-Determination Scale for use in Norwegian research and education. The study contributes to the field by enabling reliable assessment of self-determination of Norwegian students with intellectual disability. The operational equivalence of the construct of self-determination in American and Norwegian culture were examined. The article further describes the adaptations that were made to the scale to ensure its fitness for intended use. Psychometric reliability (Cronbach's α and test-retest reliability) was tested on 121 students, and the underlying structure of the scale was examined by means of principal component analysis. The adapted version of the questionnaire (AIR-S-NOR) shows respectable psychometric properties. Suggestions for how the AIR-S-NOR can be used in future research and educational practices are presented.

  • 221.
    Gilhuber, Christina
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    How children of parents with intellectual disabilities experience their everyday life: A systematic literature review from 1985 to 20172017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Various findings indicate that children of parents with intellectual disabilities have a higher risk for various difficulties, but only few studies interview children for an account of their experiences. This study aimed at assessing how children of parents with intellectual disabilities reflected their upbringing and their everyday life regarding their parent’s disability. Eight studies were identified through a systematic literature review, with publication ranging from 1985 to 2017. Results show that the accounts contain both positive and negative experiences and reflect an ambivalent relationship towards the parents. The small population of the analyzed studies, as well as differences in the context and the method of the studies, allowed no general conclusions to be drawn. Further research is required to allow an evaluation of the experiences of children of parents with intellectual disabilities in a bigger context.

  • 222.
    Glasberg, Sara
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Interventions for children at risk of developmental delay in Low- and Middle income countries: A systematic litterature review2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Due to poverty and a lack of stimulation, many children living in Low- and Middle income countries suffer from developmental delay and do not develop to their full potential. Yet, remarkable recovery is often possible given that early interventions are available.

    The aim of this systematic literature review was to find out what could be done to decrease the gap between the current development and the developmental potential among children aged 0-8 years, living in Low –and Middle income countries. The research questions were the following: What intervention programs are provided by communities in Low- and Middle income counties with the intention of training parents´ to support their children reaching their developmental potential? What are the impacts of the interventions on children’s development, and what are the impacts of the interventions on parents´ knowledge about children`s development?

    Twelve studies were identified through a database search. After analyzing the data two different types of intervention programs emerged: parenting programs and stimulation programs. The gap between children´s current developmental levels and their developmental potential was not measured in the studies.  However, the intervention programs show to have positive effects on informing parents regarding child development, as well as making positive impacts on children’s cognitive development and social skills. The interventions mainly focus on children under the age of three, while interventions focusing on older children are few and need to be further researched. Simple matters, such as home-made toys and interactive communication with the children, can make a big impact on children’s development, which prepares children for future education.

  • 223.
    Gorjy, Rebecca Soraya
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work Curtin University Perth, Western Australia Australia.
    Fielding, Angela
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work Curtin University Perth, Western Australia Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    "It's better than it used to be": Perspectives of adolescent siblings of children with an autism spectrum condition2017In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 1488-1496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on the lived experiences of 11 adolescents who have a brother or a sister with a diagnosis of autism spectrum condition. Through semistructured, in-depth, in-person interviews, these adolescents shared their experiences and perceptions. These exploratory findings can be used to inform the practice of social workers and other health professionals, and future research. Implications for practice focus on the importance of exploring experiences and perceptions of siblings of children diagnosed with autism spectrum condition to enhance support services for these siblings.

  • 224.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Barn i behov av särskilt stöd.2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 225.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Defining positive outcomes for children in need of special support2006In: Poster presented at Research Symposium on Intervention and Positive Functioning, 27-29 September, 2006, Pretoria, South Africa, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 226.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Invited presentation: Measuring participation, is it enough with capacity and performance?2007In: Presentation at the 5th conference on International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Oslo, June, 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 227.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Is independence the same as participation for young people with disabilities?2019In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 116-117Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 228.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Om delaktighet, kontroll och livskvalitet: Key note2008In: Särskolans Rikskonferens, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 229.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Participation – challenges in conceptualization, measurement and intervention2013In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 470-473Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 230.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Participation: a positive aspect of health2006In: Proceedings from the 6th ISAAC research symposium, Düsseldorf, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 231.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Presents characteristics of AAC interventions for students with severe disabilities, but judgements about effectiveness do not follow from methodology2007In: Evidence-Based Communication Assessment and Intervention, ISSN 1748-9539, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 67-68Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 232.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Studies of participation related to ICF-C/Y2006In: Invited presentation MHADIE meeting, Prague, Checkia, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 233.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Tvärprofessionell tillämpning av ICF-CY.2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 234.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Ibragimova, Nina
    Mälardalens högskola.
    ICF-CY som ett stöd i interventionsarbete för barn i behov av AKK2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 235.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Almqvist, L
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Participation in school environments of children and youth with disabilities2001In: Developmental medicine and child neurology. Supplement 89, Volume 43: Abstracts: European Academy of Childhood Disability, 13th annual meeting, Göteborg, 2001, London: MacKeith , 2001, p. 19-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 236.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Almqvist, L
    Boudin, L
    Eriksson, L
    Sundin, A
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Små barns delaktighet i förskolevardagen: Ett delprojekt i Forskningsprogrammet CHILD2001Report (Other academic)
  • 237.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd.
    Eriksson, Lilly
    Delaktighet i skolmiljöer för barn och ungdomar med funktionshinder2002In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 79, no 6, p. 538-545Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 238.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Niia, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Simeonsson, Rune J
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Maxwell, Gregor
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Eriksson-Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Swedish Institute of Public Health, Östersund.
    Pless, Mia
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala universitet.
    Differentiating activity and participation of children and youth with disability in Sweden: A third qualifier in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health for Children and Youth?2012In: American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, ISSN 0894-9115, E-ISSN 1537-7385, Vol. 91, no 13, p. S84-S96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This article discusses the use of a third qualifier, subjective experience of involvement, as a supplement to the qualifiers of capacity and performance, to anchor activity and participation as separate endpoints on a continuum of actions.

    Design: Empirical data from correlational studies were used for secondary analyses. The analyses were focused on the conceptual roots of the participation construct as indicated by the focus of policy documents, the support for a third qualifier as indicated by correlational data, differences between self-ratings and ratings by others in measuring subjective experience of involvement, and the empirical support for a split between activity and participation in different domains of the activity and participation component.

    Results: Participation seems to have two conceptual roots, one sociologic and one psychologic. The correlational pattern between the qualifiers of capacity, performance, and subjective experience of involvement indicates a possible split between activity and participation. Self-ratings of participation provide information not obtained through ratings by others, and later domains in the activities and participation component fit better with measures of experienced involvement than earlier domains did.

    Conclusions: The results from secondary analyses provide preliminary support for the use of a third qualifier measuring subjective experience of involvement to facilitate the split between activity and participation in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth version, activity and participation domain.

  • 239.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Inservice training of pre-school consultants in family-oriented intervention: Training process and outcome1996In: British Journal of Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0969-7950, Vol. 42, p. 1-23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 240.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Integrating training in family-centered practices in context: Implications for implementing change activities2000In: Infants and young children, ISSN 0896-3746, E-ISSN 1550-5081, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 46-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     

    In the last decade there has been a trend towards family-centered intervention for children with disabilities in Sweden. However, most professionals are trained in child-focused intervention. The shift in the focus of intervention has made it necessary to train professionals in services for children with disabilities in a family context. This article discusses inservice training of professionals in habilitation services in family centered practices. The training has been implemented on an interdiciplinary team basis in the context of ordinary services. Inservice training is described as one of several options for improvement activities within an organization. Implications for educational needs assessment, preparatory work before training, implementation and evaluation of training, when the moderators of change are integrated into ordinary services is discussed.

  • 241.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Participation and general competence: do type and degree of disability really matter?2005In: Resistance, reflection and change: Nordic disability research, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2005, p. 277-294Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 242.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    The ecology of early intervention2000In: Proceedings of the International symposium Excellence in Early Childhood: Mälardalen University, October 11th -12th, 1999, Västerås: Mälardalen University Press , 2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 243.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Alant, E
    Family-centered early childhood intervention: new perspectives?2005In: Augmentative and alternative communication and severe disabilities: beyond poverty, London: Whurr , 2005, p. 219-240Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 244.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Brodin, J
    Olsson, C
    Communication intervention for persons with profound disabilities: A Swedish perspective.1995In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, no 1, p. 49-59Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 245.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Lillvist, A
    Sandberg, A
    Young children in need of special support in Sweden: definitions and prevalence rates2007In: Paper presented at the 2nd ISEI Conference, University of Zagreb, Croatia, June 14-16, 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 246.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Olsson, C
    Rydeman, B
    Working with families to introduce augmentative and alternative communication systems2002In: Communicating without speech: practical augmentative & alternative communication, London.: McKeith Press , 2002, p. 88-102Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 247. Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Steenson, A-L
    Roll-Petterson, L
    Sundin, M
    Kylén, A
    Elever med flera funktionsnedsättning i särskolan: Utbildningens effekter och effektivitet1999Book (Other academic)
  • 248.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Stéenson, A-L
    Styrning genom fortbildning: Fortbildning av personer som ger indirekt service till barn med funktionshinder1999In: Elever med flera funktionsnedsättningar i särskolan: Utbildningens effekter och effektivitet, Stockholm: Stiftelsen ALA & Skolverket , 1999, p. 383-472Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 249.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Wilder, Jenny
    Mälardalen University.
    Ylvén, Regina
    AAC Interventions for Children in a Family Environment: Implementing Evidence in Practise2008In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 207-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interventions that focus on implementing augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) strategies and methods have been available to children in need of AAC and their families for at least 30 years. To date, most of the research that has considered AAC in family settings has been focused on gathering evidence of the effects of AAC interventions, rather than on implementing evidence-based strategies in everyday practice to improve outcomes. The purpose of this article is to discuss the research that has focused on parents as AAC interventionists, the family as a context for AAC intervention, and the effects of AAC interventions on children and other family members. The discussion is framed within the four steps associated with the process of knowledge translation: (a) deciding on desired outcomes of interventions, (b) evaluating evidence of the effectiveness of different AAC methods to obtain the desired outcomes, (c) translating the research evidence into everyday practice, and (d) implementing knowledge in practice.

     

  • 250.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Eriksson, L
    Welander, J
    Time sampling of teenagers participation in schoolactivities2007In: The 10 years anniversary research conference of Nordic Network on Disability Research (NNDR). Göteborg. Sweden, 10-12th May, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
2345678 201 - 250 of 514
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf