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  • 201.
    Dahl, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Reynolds, Chandra A.
    Deparment of Psychology, University of California – Riverside, Riverside, United States of America.
    Accuracy of Recalled Body Weight-A Study with 20-years of Follow-Up2013In: Obesity, ISSN 1930-7381, E-ISSN 1930-739X, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 1293-1298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:

    Weight changes may bean important indicator of an ongoing pathological process.Retrospective self-report might be the only possibility to capture prior weight. The objective of the study was to evaluate the accuracy of retrospective recallof body weight in old age and factors that might predict accuracy.

    Design and Methods:

    In 2007, 646 participants (mean age, 71.6 years) of the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging (SATSA)answered questions about their present weight and how much they weighed 20-years ago. Of these, 436 had self-reported their weighttwenty years earlier and among these 134 had also had their weight assessed at this time point.

    Results:

    Twenty yearretrospectively recalled weight underestimated the prior assessed weight by -1.89 ± 5.9 kg and underestimatedprior self-reported weight by -0.55 ±5.2 kg.Moreover, 82.4% of the sample were accurate within 10%, and 45.8% were accurate within 5% of their prior assessed weights;similarly, 84.2% and 58.0 %were accurate within 10% and 5% respectively, forprior self-reported weight. Current higher body mass index and preferences of reporting weights ending with zero or five was associated with an underestimation of prior weight, while greater weight change over 20 year, and low Mini-Mental State Scores (MMSE) (<25) led to an overestimation of prior weight.

    Conclusions:

    Recalled weight comes close to the assessed population mean, but at the individual level there is a large variation. The accuracy is affected by current BMI, changes in weight, end-digit preferences, and current cognitive ability. Recalled weight should be used with caution.

  • 202.
    Dahl, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Reynolds, Chandra
    Department of Psychology, University of California Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521, USA.
    Fall, Tove
    Uppsala University.
    Magnusson, Patrik
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Pedersen, Nancy
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Multifactorial analysis of changes in body mass index across the adult life course: a study with 65 years of follow-up2014In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 38, no 8, p. 1133-1141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although the negative consequences on health of being obese are well known, most adults gain weight across the lifespan. The general increase in body mass index (BMI) is mainly considered to originate from behavioral and environmental changes; however, few studies have evaluated the influence of these factors on change in BMI in the presence of genetic risk. We aimed to study the influence of multifactorial causes of change in BMI, over 65 years.

    Methods and Findings: Totally, 6130 participants from TwinGene, who had up to five assessments, and 536 from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging, who had up to 12 assessments, ranging over 65 years were included. The influence of lifestyle factors, birth cohort, cardiometabolic diseases and an individual obesity genetic risk score (OGRS) based on 32 single nucleotide polymorphisms on change in BMI was evaluated with a growth model. For both sexes, BMI increased from early adulthood to age of 65 years, after which the increase leveled off; BMI declined after age of 80 years. A higher OGRS, birth after 1925 and cardiometabolic diseases were associated with higher average BMI and a steeper increase in BMI prior to 65 years of age. Among men, few factors were identified that influence BMI trajectories in late life, whereas for women type 2 diabetes mellitus and dementia were associated with a steeper decrease in BMI after the age of 65 years.

    Conclusions: There are two turning points in BMI in late adulthood, one at the age of 65 years and one at the age 80 years. Factors associated with an increase in BMI in midlife were not associated with an increase in BMI after the age of 65 years. These findings indicate that the causes and consequences of change in BMI differ across the lifespan. Current health recommendations need to be adjusted accordingly.

  • 203.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Starr, John M.
    Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh.
    Pattie, Alison
    Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh.
    Deary, Ian
    Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh.
    Cognitive consequences of overweight and obesity in the ninth decade of life?2015In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 59-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: the association between late-life obesity and late-life cognitive abilities is poorly understood. We studied the association between body mass index (BMI) and cognitive change in longitudinal population-based study spanning over the ninth decade of life.

    SUBJECTS/METHODS: in total, 475 participants free of dementia at baseline from the Lothian Birth Cohort 1921 (mean age: 79.1 years, SD: 0.6) were included. Height and weight were assessed at baseline. BMI was calculated as kg/m(2). Cognitive abilities were assessed at age ∼11 years and at age ∼79, ∼83, ∼87 and ∼90 years.

    RESULTS: latent growth models showed that men being overweight and obese had a 0.65 (SD: 0.3) and 1.10 (SD: 0.5) points less steep decline in general cognitive ability (as measured by the Moray House Test) for each year than people of normal weight. These associations were to some extent confounded by childhood intelligence. No other association between BMI and cognition was significant, either for men or women. People who were obese in old age had significantly lower childhood intelligence (m = 43.6, SD: 1.3) than people who were normal in weight (m = 47.0, SD: 0.8) and persons being overweight (m = 47.5, SD: 0.8), F (472, 3) = 3.2, P = 0.043.

    CONCLUSIONS: the current study shows weak or no evidence for an association between BMI in old age and cognitive function, especially not when childhood intelligence is controlled for. Lower intelligence at the age of 11 years predicted obesity at the age of 79 years.

  • 204. Darin Mattsson, A
    et al.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Is work complexity associated with psychological distress after retirement age?2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 205. Darin Mattsson, Alexander
    et al.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Fors, Stefan
    Social stratification, work complexity, and psychological distress in old age: Exploring the associations2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 206. Darin-Mattsson, A.
    et al.
    Andel, R.
    Keller-Celeste, R.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Linking financial hardship and psychological distress from childhood to old age: testing the sensitive period, chain of risks, and accumulation of risks hypotheses2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 207. Darin-Mattsson, A.
    et al.
    Fors, S.
    Nilsen, C.
    Fritzell, J.
    Andel, R.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Occupational complexity in relation to late life physical functioning in Sweden2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 208.
    Darin-Mattsson, Alexander
    et al.
    Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Andel, Ross
    University of South Florida and International Clinical Research Center, Tampa, USA.
    Celeste, Roger Keller
    Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Faculdade de Odontologia, Department Preventive and Social Dentistry, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Linking financial hardship throughout the life-course with psychological distress in old age: Sensitive period, accumulation of risks, and chain of risks hypotheses.2018In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Elsevier, Vol. 201, p. 111-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary objective was to investigate the life course hypotheses - sensitive period, chain of risks, and accumulation of risks - in relation to financial hardship and psychological distress in old age. We used two Swedish longitudinal surveys based on nationally representative samples. The first survey includes people 18-75 years old with multiple waves, the second survey is a longitudinal continuation, including people 76 + years old. The analytical sample included 2990 people at baseline. Financial hardship was assessed in childhood (retrospectively), at the mean ages of 54, 61, 70, and 81 years. Psychological distress (self-reported anxiety and depressive symptoms) was assessed at the same ages. Path analysis with WLSMV estimation was used. There was a direct path from financial hardship in childhood to psychological distress at age 70 (0.26, p = 0.002). Financial hardship in childhood was associated with increased risk of psychological distress and financial hardship both at baseline (age 54), and later. Financial hardship, beyond childhood, was not independently associated with psychological distress at age 81. Higher levels of education and employment decreased the negative effects of financial hardship in childhood on the risk of psychological distress and financial hardship later on. There was a bi-directional relationship between psychological distress and financial hardship; support for health selection was slightly higher than for social causation. We found that psychological distress in old age was affected by financial hardship in childhood through a chain of risks that included psychological distress earlier in life. In addition, financial hardship in childhood seemed to directly affect psychological distress in old age, independent of other measured circumstances (i.e., chains of risks). Education and employment could decrease the effect of an adverse financial situation in childhood on later-life psychological distress. We did not find support for accumulation of risks when including tests of all hypotheses in the same model.

  • 209.
    Darin-Mattsson, Alexander
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden; Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Andel, Ross
    School af Aging Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa, USA; International Clinical Research Center, St. Anne’s University Hospital, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Fors, Stefan
    Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden; Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden; Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Are Occupational Complexity and Socioeconomic Position Related to Psychological Distress 20 Years Later?2015In: Journal of Aging and Health, ISSN 0898-2643, E-ISSN 1552-6887, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 1266-1285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To assess occupational complexity in midlife in relation to psychological distress in older adulthood (69+ years) and explore the role of socioeconomic position.

    Method: Baseline data from the Swedish Level of Living Survey and follow-up data from the Swedish Longitudinal Study ofLiving Conditions of the Oldest Old were combined, resulting in 20+ years of follow-up. Data were analyzed using ordered logistic regressions.

    Results: Higher occupational complexity was associated with less psychological distress 20 years later adjusted for age, sex, follow-up year, hours worked the year before baseline, and psychological distress at baseline. Higher socioeconomic position yielded the same pattern of results. Socioeconomic position partially accounted for the association between occupational complexity and psychological distress.

    Discussion: With social gradient not easily amenable to modification, efforts to increase engagement at work may offer a viable option to attenuate the influence of work environment on psychological distress later in life.

  • 210.
    Darin-Mattsson, Alexander
    et al.
    Aging Research Centre (ARC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Fors, Stefan
    Aging Research Centre (ARC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Aging Research Centre (ARC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Different indicators of socioeconomic status and their relative importance as determinants of health in old age2017In: International Journal for Equity in Health, ISSN 1475-9276, E-ISSN 1475-9276, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Socioeconomic status has been operationalised in a variety of ways, most commonly as education, social class, or income. In this study, we also use occupational complexity and a SES-index as alternative measures of socioeconomic status. Studies show that in analyses of health inequalities in the general population, the choice of indicators influence the magnitude of the observed inequalities. Less is known about the influence of indicator choice in studies of older adults. The aim of this study is twofold: i) to analyse the impact of the choice of socioeconomic status indicator on the observed health inequalities among older adults, ii) to explore whether different indicators of socioeconomic status are independently associated with health in old age.

    Methods: We combined data from two nationally representative Swedish surveys, providing more than 20 years of follow-up. Average marginal effects were estimated to compare the association between the five indicators of SES, and three late-life health outcomes: mobility limitations, limitations in activities of daily living (ADL), and psychological distress.

    Results: All socioeconomic status indicators were associated with late-life health; there were only minor differences in the effect sizes. Income was most strongly associated to all indicators of late-life health, the associations remained statistically significant when adjusting for the other indicators. In the fully adjusted models, education contributed to the model fits with 0-3% (depending on the outcome), social class with 0-1%, occupational complexity with 1-8%, and income with 3-18%.

    Conclusions: Our results indicate overlapping properties between socioeconomic status indicators in relation to late-life health. However, income is associated to late-life health independently of all other variables. Moreover, income did not perform substantially worse than the composite SES-index in capturing health variation. Thus, if the primary objective of including an indicator of socioeconomic status is to adjust the model for socioeconomic differences in late-life health rather than to analyse these inequalities per se, income may be the preferable indicator. If, on the other hand, the primary objective of a study is to analyse specific aspects of health inequalities, or the mechanisms that drive health inequalities, then the choice of indicator should be theoretically guided. 

  • 211.
    Darin-Mattsson, Alexander
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Andel, Ross
    University of South Florida, Tampa, USA.
    Economic hardship and income before retirement in relation to anxiety and depression in older adulthood. (2015) Work-related stress in midlife and all-cause mortality: the role of sense of coherence.2015In: Life Courses in Cross-­National Comparison: Similarities and Differences: Abstract book, 2015, p. 69-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 212. Davey, A
    et al.
    Kwee, E E
    Shea, D G
    Zarit, S H
    Sundström, Gerdt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Smyer, M A
    How much do families help?: A cross- national comparison1996In: 49th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Gerontological Society of America, Washington, 1996Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 213. Davey, Adam
    et al.
    Femia, Elia
    Shea, Dennis G
    Zarit, Steven H
    Sundström, Gerdt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    How many elders receive assistance?: A cross-national comparison1999In: Journal of Aging and Health, ISSN 0898-2643, E-ISSN 1552-6887, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 199-220Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 214. Davey, Adam
    et al.
    Fermia, Elia E.
    Zarit, Steven H
    Shea, Dennis G.
    Sundström, Gerdt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Smayer, Michael A.
    Salva, Jyoti
    Life on the Edge: Patterns of Formal and Informal Help to Older Adults in the United States and Sweden2005In: The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, ISSN 1079-5014, E-ISSN 1758-5368, Vol. 60, no 5, p. 281-288Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 215.
    Davey, Adam
    et al.
    Department of Public Health, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Sundström, Gerdt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Aging in Sweden: Local variation, local control2014In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 525-532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aging in Sweden has been uniquely shaped by its history—most notably the long tradition of locally controlled services for older adults. We considered how local variations and local control shape the experience of aging in Sweden and organized the paper into 3 sections. First, we examine aging in Sweden along demography, economy, and housing. Next, we trace the origins and development of the Swedish welfare state to consider formal supports (service provision) and informal supports (caregiving and receipt of care). Finally, we direct researchers to additional data resources for understanding aging in Sweden in greater depth. Sweden was one of the first countries to experience rapid population aging. Quality of life for a majority of older Swedes is high. Local control permits a flexible and adaptive set of services and programs, where emphasis is placed on improving the quality and targeting of services that have already reached a plateau as a function of population and expenditures.

  • 216. Davey, Adam
    et al.
    Savla, Jyoti
    Sundström, Gerdt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Zarit, Steven H.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    How equitable is Sweden's changing care-mix?: Linking individual and regional characteristics over time2007In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 511-532Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 217. Dehlin, O
    et al.
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Back symptoms and psychological perception of work: A study among nursing aides' in a geriatric hospital1977In: Scandinavian Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 0036-5505, E-ISSN 1940-2228, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 61-65Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 218. Dehlin, O
    et al.
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Henenrud, B
    Andersson, G
    Grimby, G
    Muscle training, psychological perception of work and low-back symptoms in nursing aides: A study in a geriatric hospital1978In: Scandinavian Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 0036-5505, E-ISSN 1940-2228, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 201-209Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 219. del Barrio, Élena
    et al.
    Castejón, Penélope
    Sancho Castiello, Mayte
    Ángeles Tortosa, Maria
    Sundström, Gerdt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    La soledad de las personas mayores en España y Suecia: contexto y cultura2010In: Revista Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, ISSN 0211-139X, E-ISSN 1578-1747, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 189-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Older people in Spain and other Southern European countries are reported to feel lonelier than the older people in the North of Europe. Data from the 1970s and onwards consistently show this. The present study explores feelings of loneliness as a product of both cultural and situational determining factors, by comparing survey data for Spain and Sweden.

    Material and method: Data derived from several national surveys of the older people in Spain and Sweden with questions about loneliness. For closer analysis we use the Spanish 2006 Encuesta de Condiciones de Vida (Living conditions Questionnaire), and the Swedish 2002–2003 Survey of Living Conditions.

    Results: On average, 24% of older people in Spain and 10% of elderly Swedish people expressed sentiments of loneliness in the surveys used here (2006 and 2002-03 respectively). Living arrangements and perceived health are related with factors of loneliness in both countries, although levels differ. For example, people in good health who live alone are five times more likely to feel lonely in Spain (45%) than in Sweden (9%) and two-three times more likely when living alone in poor health (82% and 32% respectively). People in good health who live with their spouse/partner only are equally unlikely in both Spain and Sweden to express loneliness (4–5%). It often seems — when it occurs — to be due to caring for a spouse/partner, or problems in the relationship.

    Conclusions: Results highlight the importance of contextual features — health and living arrangements — and cultural expectations in interpreting reported loneliness.

  • 220. Duggan, Emily C.
    et al.
    Piccinin, Andrea M.
    Clouston, Sean
    Koval, Andriy V.
    Robitaille, Annie
    Zammit, Andrea R.
    Wu, Chenkai
    Brown, Cassandra L.
    Lee, Lewina O.
    Finkel, Deborah
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Psychology, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, IN, USA.
    Beasley, William H.
    Kaye, Jeffrey
    Muniz-Terrera, Graciela
    Katz, Mindy
    Lipton, Richard B.
    Deeg, Dorly
    Bennett, David A.
    Björk, Marcus Praetorius
    Johansson, Boo
    Spiro, Avron
    Weuve, Jennifer
    Hofer, Scott M.
    A multi-study coordinated meta-analysis of pulmonary function and cognition in aging2019In: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, ISSN 1079-5006, E-ISSN 1758-535XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Substantial research is dedicated to understanding the aging-related dynamics among individual differences in level, change, and variation across physical and cognitive abilities. Evaluating replicability and synthesizing these findings has been limited by differences in measurements and samples, and by study design and statistical analyses confounding between-person differences with within-person changes. In this paper, we conducted a coordinated analysis and summary meta-analysis of new results on the aging-related dynamics linking pulmonary function and cognitive performance.

    METHODS: We performed coordinated analysis of bivariate growth models in data from 20,586 participants across eight longitudinal studies to examine individual differences in baseline level, rate of change, and occasion-specific variability in pulmonary and cognitive functioning. Results were summarized using meta-analysis.

    RESULTS: We found consistent but weak baseline and longitudinal associations in levels of pulmonary and cognitive functioning, but no associations in occasion-specific variability.

    CONCLUSIONS: Results provide limited evidence for a consistent link between simultaneous changes in pulmonary and cognitive function in a normal aging population. Further research is required to understand patterns of onset of decline and differences in rates of change within and across physical and cognitive functioning domains, both within-individuals and across countries and birth cohorts. Coordinated analysis provides an efficient and rigorous approach for replicating and comparing results across independent longitudinal studies.

  • 221. Dybjer, E.
    et al.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Nilsson, P.
    Hassing, L.
    Trajectories of survival in men with type 1 diabetesfFollowed for 56 years after conscript testing at 18 years of age2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 222.
    Edberg, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Högskolan, Kristianstad.
    Ernsth Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Kompetensen måste höjas på särskilda boenden för äldre2013In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 110, no 45, p. 1984-1986Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Personer som bor och vårdas på särskilt boende (säbo) har omfattande omvårdnadsbehov och ofta nedsatt kognitiv funktion, de är ofta multisjuka och har många olika läkemedel samtidigt.

    Om en god vårdkvalitet ska kunna garanteras, måste kompetensen bland vårdpersonalen höjas, framför allt avseende specifik geriatrisk kompetens.

    En betydande andel av de äldre som bor och vårdas på säbo avlider också där, trots att förutsättningarna för att ge en god palliativ vård vid livets slut är begränsade.

  • 223.
    Elavsky, Steriani
    et al.
    Department of Kinesiology, The Pennsylvania State University, PA, USA.
    Gold, Carol
    Gerontology Center, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, USA.
    Rovine, Michael
    Human Development and Family Studies, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, USA.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Behavioral correlates of depressive symptoms in older unlike-sex twin-pairs2013In: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 1594-0667, E-ISSN 1720-8319, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 257-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: This study examines gender-specific behavioral correlates of depressive symptoms using a secondary data analysis of a cross-sectional, population-based sample of older unlike-sex twins.

    Methods: Unlike-sex twins aged 69–88 were identified through a national Swedish registry and sent a survey about health, including depressive symptoms (CES-D) and the frequency of engaging in physical, social and mental activities. A total of 605 complete twin pairs responded.

    Results: Depressive symptom scores were associated with frequency of engagement in physical and mental activities, but only in men. No statistically significant associations with depressive symptom scores for any of the three types of activities were found in women.

    Conclusions: The results suggest that engaging in physical and mental activities may protect older men from developing depressive symptoms, but longitudinal data are needed to offer more conclusive findings on the role that physical, mental, and social activities play in the maintenance of psychological health in older men and women.

  • 224. Elmståhl, Sölve
    et al.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Annerstedt, Lena
    Caregiver's Burden of Patients 3 Years After Stroke Assessed by a Novel Caregiver Burden Scale1996In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0003-9993, E-ISSN 1532-821X, Vol. 77, no 2, p. 177-82Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 225.
    Emery, Charles F.
    et al.
    Ohio State University, USA.
    Finkel, Deborah
    Indiana University, USA.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Gatz, Margaret
    University of South California, USA.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Greater depressive symptoms lead to increased body fat in older adults2015In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 55, article id 323Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 226.
    Emery, Charles F.
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Ohio State University, Columbus, USA.
    Finkel, Deborah
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Psychology, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, USA.
    Gatz, Margaret
    Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Evidence of bi-directional associations between depressive symptoms and body mass among older adults2019In: The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, ISSN 1079-5014, E-ISSN 1758-5368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Body fat, measured with body mass index (BMI), and obesity are associated with depressive symptoms. Among younger adults there is stronger evidence of obesity leading to depressive symptoms than of depressive symptoms leading to obesity, but the temporal relationship is unknown among older adults. This study utilized dual-change-score models (DCSMs) to determine the directional relationship between body mass and depressive symptoms among older adults.

    METHOD: Participants (n=1743) from the Swedish Twin Registry (baseline age range 50-96 years) completed at least one assessment of BMI (nurse measurement of height and weight) and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale (CESD). More than half the sample completed three or more assessments, scheduled at intervals of 2-4 years. DCSMs modeled the relationship of BMI and CESD across age, both independently and as part of bivariate relationships.

    RESULTS: Depressive symptoms contributed to subsequent changes in BMI after age 70, while BMI contributed to subsequent changes in depressive symptoms after age 82. Thus, there is a reciprocal relationship that may change with age. The effect was more pronounced for women.

    DISCUSSION: The association of BMI and depressive symptoms is bi-directional among older adults, and it appears to be affected by both age and sex.

  • 227.
    Enache, D.
    et al.
    Division of Neurogeriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fereshtehnejad, S.-M.
    Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cermakova, P.
    Division of Neurogeriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Garcia-Ptacek, S.
    Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johnell, K.
    Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Religa, D.
    Division of Neurogeriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jelic, V.
    Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Winblad, B.
    Division of Neurogeriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ballard, C.
    Wolfson Centre for Age-Related Diseases, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Aarsland, D.
    Division of Neurogeriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fastbom, J.
    Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksdotter, M.
    Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Antidepressants and mortality risk in a dementia cohort: data from SveDem, the Swedish Dementia Registry2016In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-690X, E-ISSN 1600-0447, Vol. 134, no 5, p. 430-440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The association between mortality risk and use of antidepressants in people with dementia is unknown.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the use of antidepressants in people with different dementia diagnoses and to explore mortality risk associated with use of antidepressants 3 years before a dementia diagnosis.

    METHODS: Study population included 20 050 memory clinic patients from the Swedish Dementia Registry (SveDem) diagnosed with incident dementia. Data on antidepressants dispensed at the time of dementia diagnosis and during 3-year period before dementia diagnosis were obtained from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register. Cox regression models were used.

    RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 2 years from dementia diagnosis, 25.8% of dementia patients died. A quarter (25.0%) of patients were on antidepressants at the time of dementia diagnosis, while 21.6% used antidepressants at some point during a 3-year period before a dementia diagnosis. Use of antidepressant treatment for 3 consecutive years before a dementia diagnosis was associated with a lower mortality risk for all dementia disorders and in Alzheimer's disease.

    CONCLUSION: Antidepressant treatment is common among patients with dementia. Use of antidepressants during prodromal stages may reduce mortality in dementia and specifically in Alzheimer's disease.

  • 228.
    Enache, Daniela
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Solomon, Alina
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, and Institute of Clinical Medicine/Neurology, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
    Cavallin, Lena
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kramberger, Milica Gregoric
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, and Department of Neurology, University Medical Centre, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Aarsland, Dag
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, and Center for Age-Related Diseases, Psychiatric Clinic, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway.
    Kivipelto, Miia
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, and Institute of Clinical Medicine/Neurology, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
    Eriksdotter, Maria
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Memory Clinic, Karolinska University Hospital-Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Winblad, Bengt
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jelic, Vesna
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Memory Clinic, Karolinska University Hospital-Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    CAIDE Dementia Risk Score and biomarkers of neurodegeneration in memory clinic patients without dementia2016In: Neurobiology of Aging, ISSN 0197-4580, E-ISSN 1558-1497, Vol. 42, p. 124-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore cross-sectional associations between Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Dementia Study (CAIDE) Dementia Risk Score and dementia-related cerebrospinal fluid and neuroimaging biomarkers in 724 patients without dementia from the Memory Clinic at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden. We additionally evaluated the score's capacity to predict dementia. Two risk score versions were calculated: one including age, gender, obesity, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension; and one additionally including apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 carrier status. Cerebrospinal fluid was analyzed for amyloid β (Aβ), total tau, and phosphorylated tau. Visual assessments of medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA), global cortical atrophy-frontal subscale, and Fazekas scale for white matter changes (WMC) were performed. Higher CAIDE Dementia Risk Score (version without APOE) was significantly associated with higher total tau, more severe MTA, WMC, and global cortical atrophy-frontal subscale. Higher CAIDE Dementia Risk Score (version with APOE) was associated with reduced Aβ, more severe MTA, and WMC. CAIDE Dementia Risk Score version with APOE seemed to predict dementia better in this memory clinic population with short follow-up than the version without APOE.

  • 229. Era, Pertti
    et al.
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Schroll, Marianne
    Psychomotor speed and physical activity in 75-year-old residents in three nordic localities1995In: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 1594-0667, E-ISSN 1720-8319, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 195-204Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 230.
    Ericsson, Iréne
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Egen tid = tid för aktivitet2008In: Tidningen Äldreomsorg, ISSN 1403-7025, no 5, p. 52-55Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 231.
    Ericsson, Iréne
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    "Egen tid": välbefinnande för personen med demens och arbetstillfredsställelse hos personal2006Report (Other academic)
  • 232.
    Ericsson, Iréne
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Egentid för personer med demenssjukdom2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 233.
    Ericsson, Iréne
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Förhållningssätt i vården och omsorgen av äldre.2011In: Äldre och åldrande.: Grundbok i gerontologi. / [ed] Marie Ernsth Bravell, Stockholm: Gothia Förlag AB , 2011, p. 308-321Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 234.
    Ericsson, Iréne
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Hur personer med demens kommunicerar innebörden av oral hälsorelaterad livskvalitet2009In: Oral hälsa och livskvalitet: Bidrar tandvården?, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 235.
    Ericsson, Iréne
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    It is a bit difficult with the others: An Etnographic Study of the Situation for Persons with Dementia in an Integrated Institution2005In: The First International Conference in honour of Professor Astrid Norberg and Professor Bengt Winblad, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 236.
    Ericsson, Iréne
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Kunskap är inte bara sunt förnuft: en utvärdering av demensutbildning i Aneby kommun2003Report (Other academic)
  • 237.
    Ericsson, Iréne
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Oral Hälsa och Livskvalitet - Presentation av aktuell forskning: Innebörden av oral hälsorelaterad livskvalitet för äldrepersoner med demens2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 238.
    Ericsson, Iréne
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Personcentrering i röntgenarbetet ger bildenen bättre skärpa- Mötet med personen med kognitiv nedsättning2009In: Röntgenveckan 2009, 2009, p. 76-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 239.
    Ericsson, Iréne
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    To communicate with triggers2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 240.
    Ericsson, Iréne
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Vad är god vård för demenssjuka, som bor I egna hemmet? -Närstående och professionella vårdgivares uppfattningar2002In: 16. Nordiske kongres i gerontologi, 25-28 maj Århus, 2002Conference paper (Other scientific)
  • 241.
    Ericsson, Iréne
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Vilken kunskap krävs för att vårda personer med demens?2008In: Tema:Salutogen äldreomsorg: meningsfull, begriplig och hälsofrämjande, 2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 242.
    Ericsson, Iréne
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Välbefinnande hos personer med måttlig till svår demenssjukdom2012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 243.
    Ericsson, Iréne
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Välbefinnande och demens: Aspekter på välbefinnande hos äldre personer med måttlig till svår demens2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Personer som lever med demenssjukdom såväl som mentalt friska människor behöver uppleva välbefinnande. Ett viktigt mål i vården och omsorgen av personer med demens är därför att hitta vägar för att försöka främja välbefinnande hos personen. Avhandlingens övergripande syfte varatt utveckla kunskap om aspekter av betydelse för att äldre personer med måttlig till svår demens ska uppleva välbefinnande.

    Avhandlingen baseras på empiriskt material från fyra delstudier. Den första delstudien, I(etnografi) genererade fältanteckningar från 31 observationstillfällen samt nio kvalitativa intervjuer med vårdgivare, så kallade kontaktmän till personen med demens. Delstudie II(testutveckling/tvärsnittsstudie) utgjordes av 336 testprotokoll som bearbetades statistiskt. Materialet i delstudie III (reformulerad grundad teori) innefattade 18 kvalitativa intervjuer med personer med demens samt 18 observationsprotokoll från observation av icke-verbalt språk. Den sista delstudien (IV) (konstruktivistisk grundad teori) bestod av fältanteckningar från 24 videoinspelningar av Egentids-situationer och 24 kvalitativa intervjuer med personer med demens samt åtta kvalitativa intervjuer med vårdgivare.

    Resultatet från avhandlingens studier visar att de kognitivt friska personerna som finns i personens närhet har en avgörande betydelse för upplevelsen av välbefinnande hos personer med måttlig till svår demens. För att interaktion ska vara önskvärd och ge välbefinnande måste den mentalt friska parten ha kunskap och insikt om att det finns en större medvetenhet hos personen med måttlig till svår demens än vad det omedelbara intrycket av förmågor ger. Om denna insikt saknas finns risk att interaktionen kan leda till kränkning i stället för välbefinnande. Det är förmodligen av betydelse att ha kunskap om och försöka fånga personens kvarvarande förmågor istället för att fokusera på brister. Kunskap om kvarvarande förmågor och till exempel överinlärda förmågor som fångas i anpassade test kan bidra till en mer positiv syn på personen och innebära att kvarvarande förmågor bättre tas tillvara, vilket kan bidra till välbefinnande. Personen med måttlig till svår demens kan kommunicera ett välbefinnande men det kräver lyssnarens förmåga och förmåga att tolka. Det kan också kräva en del praktiska ansträngningar med hänsyn till personens kognitiva nedsättningar som till exempel hjälpmedel i form av bilder och ting. Förmodligen ger interaktion som leder till en relation alltid en upplevelse av välbefinnande. Tid är en avgörande faktor för att upprätta relationer som ger välbefinnande hos personer med måttlig till svår demens. Det är därför viktigt att i vården avsätta tillräcklig tid, som vid till exempel Egentid, för att upprätta relationer och därigenom främja välbefinnande.

  • 244.
    Ericsson, Iréne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Välbefinnande vid demens är beroende av omgivningen2012In: Neurologi i Sverige, ISSN 2000-8538, no 2, p. 12-16Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 245.
    Ericsson, Iréne
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    What is Good Care for Persons with Dementia, living at Home2000In: INSCOA- the 6th meeting, Santa Catarina University, Florianopolis, Brasil, 2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 246.
    Ericsson, Iréne
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Aronsson, Kerstin
    Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum., Landstinget Östergötland.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Jonsson, Margareta
    Landstinget Jönköpings län.
    Wärnberg Gerdin, Elisabeth
    Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum., Landstinget Östergötland.
    The meaning of oral health-related quality of life for elderly persons with dementia2009In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 67, no 4, p. 212-221Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 247.
    Ericsson, Iréne
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Hellström, I
    Lundh, Ulla
    Nolan, Mike
    What constitutes Good care for persons with dementia2001In: British Journal of Nursing, ISSN 0966-0461, Vol. 10, no 11, p. 710-714Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 248.
    Ericsson, Iréne
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Kjellström, Sofia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Sliding interactions: An ethnography about how persons with dementia interact in housing with care for the elderly.2011In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 523-538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This ethnography describes how persons with dementia interact with cognitively intact persons in housing with care for the elderly. The results, drawing upon 31 observation sessions and nine interviews, are described under the following themes, which were interpreted from the standpoint of social interaction theory: interaction with expression of satisfaction, disorientation, and dissociation. Interaction provided satisfaction, but did not always reflect a positive experience. Awareness in persons with dementia seemed to be greater than others perceived and, as a result, interaction was adversely affected by frequent well-intentioned corrections and comments. Participation in interaction can be encouraged and feelings of indignation avoided by assuming that persons with dementia are aware of their situation and how others behave toward them. Sensitivity is required to interpret individuals' expressions of desire not to participate, while simultaneously it is important to try to interpret why they want to refrain.

  • 249.
    Ericsson, Iréne
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Kjellström, Sofia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University.
    Creating relationships with persons with moderate to severe dementia2013In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 63-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study describes how relationships are created with persons with moderate to severe dementia. The material comprises 24 video sequences of Relational Time (RT) sessions, 24 interviews with persons with dementia and eight interviews with professional caregivers. The study method was Constructivist Grounded Theory. The categories of 'Assigning time', 'Establishing security and trust' and 'Communicating equality' were strategies for arriving at the core category, 'Opening up', which was the process that led to creating relationships. Both parties had to contribute to create a relationship; the professional caregiver controlled the process, but the person with dementia permitted the caregiver’s overtures and opened up, thus making the relationship possible. Interpersonal relationships are significant to enhancing the well-being of persons with dementia. Small measures like RT that do not require major resources can open paths to creating relationships.

  • 250.
    Ericsson, Iréne
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Läkemedelsgenomgång på boendet Blomstervägen i Gislaved 2008 och 2009.2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
2345678 201 - 250 of 1147
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