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  • 19801.
    Wass, Sofie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Information Technology and Information Systems (CenITIS). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Department of Computer and Information Science, Linköping University, Sweden .
    The Role of ICT in Home Care2017In: Context Sensitive Health Informatics: Redesigning Healthcare Work / [ed] Christian Nøhr, Craig E. Kuziemsky, Zoie Shui-Yee Wong, IOS Press, 2017, Vol. 241, p. 153-158Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With an ageing population and limited resources, ICT is often mentioned as a solution to support elderly people in maintaining an independent and healthy lifestyle. In this paper, we describe how ICT can support access to information and rationalization of work processes in a home care context. We do this by modelling the workflow and identifying the possible impact of ICT. The results show a complex process and indicate that the available resources are not used in the best possible way. The introduction of ICT could increase patient safety by reducing the risk of misplacing information about the care recipients and at the same time provide real time information about the care recipients’ needs and health at the point of care. However, to rationalize the work processes there is a need to combine ICT with a changed procedure for handling keys.

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  • 19802.
    Wass, Sofie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Department of Computer and Information Science/Human-Centered Systems, Linköping University, Sweden.
    The Role of PAEHRs in Patient Involvement2018In: Journal of medical systems, ISSN 0148-5598, E-ISSN 1573-689X, Vol. 42, no 11, article id 210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With increased patient access to data, healthcare services are experiencing change where patients are moving away from being mere passive actors towards becoming more active and involved participants. In this paper, we explore the role of patient accessible electronic health records (PAEHRs) with respect to this increase in patient involvement. The study was performed as a case study and included nine interviews with patients and a survey that was responded to by 56 patients. Our results show that PAEHRs have a role in the enhancement of patient involvement because PAEHRs (i) foster a more balanced relationship between patients and healthcare professionals and (ii) increase access to information.

  • 19803.
    Wass, Sofie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Ros, Axel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Exploring patients’ perceptions of accessing electronic health records: Innovation in healthcare2019In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 203-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The more widespread implementation of electronic health records has led to new ways of providing access to healthcare information, allowing patients to view their medical notes, test results, medicines and so on. In this article, we explore how patients perceive the possibility to access their electronic health record online and whether this influences patient involvement. The study includes interviews with nine patients and a survey answered by 56 patients. Our results show that patients perceive healthcare information to be more accessible and that electronic health record accessibility improves recall, understanding and patient involvement. However, to achieve the goal of involving patients as active decision-makers in their own treatment, electronic health records need to be fully available and test results, referrals and information on drug interactions need to be offered. As patient access to electronic health records spreads, it is important to gain a deeper understanding of how documentation practices can be changed to serve healthcare professionals and patients.

  • 19804.
    Wassén, Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting.
    Cao, Haiping
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting.
    The Effect of Mould Constraints on the 0.2% Proof Stress of As-Cast Mg-Al Alloys2005In: Materials Science Forum, ISSN 0255-5476, E-ISSN 1662-9752, Vol. 488-489, p. 165-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A mapping of fatigue crack growth rates in thick plates of a high strength aluminium alloy has been done. The plate thicknesses investigated was 100, 150 and 200 mm. In this work, material from near edge at near surface and mid-thickness has been investigated. Measurements of crack length has been performed using DC potential drop. Cyclic condensation is used in order to reveal crack growth behaviour for stage I and the earlier part of stage II crack growth. Influence of crack closure, crack branching and slow growing side cracks on fatigue crack growth rate of S-L and L-T oriented specimens are discussed. Variation of difference in growth rate in the upper part of the stage II growth between near surface and mid thickness positioned L-T specimens are found to vary with plate thickness.

  • 19805.
    Watanabe, Takashi
    et al.
    Tokyo Institute of Technology.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    "Break points" with respect to mold flux2008In: Proc. of the 4th International Congress on the Science and Technology of Steelmaking, 2008, p. 710-713Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19806.
    Weber, Florian
    et al.
    Karlsuhe Institute of Technology, Germany.
    Larsson Olaison, Ulf
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för ekonomistyrning och logistik (ELO).
    Corporate social responsibility accounting for arising issues2017In: Journal of Communication Management, ISSN 1363-254X, E-ISSN 1478-0852, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 370-383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Arising societal issues challenge corporate social responsibility. The purpose of this paper is to analyze how corporations account for arising issues under different institutional settings: the stakeholder oriented corporate governance model of Germany is hypothesized to produce a different response than the more state dominated Swedish welfare model.

    Design/methodology/approach

    This paper takes the reported CSR response of the largest corporations in Germany and Sweden, in relation to the 2015 European refugee crisis, as its case. In total, 157 annual reports are investigated by means of text analysis for statements in relation to the European refugee crisis.

    Findings

    Empirically, German corporations are more prone to communicate on this emerging issue, and deploying corporate resources to an emerging societal crisis. Based on that finding, this study concludes that the German model is more in line with international CSR-discourse than the Swedish.

    Research limitations/implications

    This study has implications for institutional theory perspectives on CSR accounting-related issues. By comparing two economies that would be characterized as “coordinated market economies” a somewhat different set of topics becomes apparent. Further considering country context could be useful when expanding the debate on CSR accounting.

    Originality/value

    This study is the first to empirically investigate corporate diplomacy with regard to the European refugee crisis. Besides others, corporations are important societal players. Therefore, corporations bear both, the obligation to deal with arising issues and the potential to participate in public opinion-forming with regard to those issues.

  • 19807. Weckström, P.
    et al.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Exploring Diversity and Dis/Ability in Theatre – Meeting Places and Conditions for Participation2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19808.
    Wedin, Åsa
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Schmidt, Catarina
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Literacy Research.
    Barbie, ninjakrigare och popstjärnor - populärkulturella texter i läs- och skrivundervisningen2015In: Critical Literacy i svensk klassrumskontext / [ed] Berit Lundgren & Ulla Damberg, Umeå: Umeå universitet, Institutionen för litteraturvetenskap och nordiska språk , 2015, p. 51-68Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kärnan i ett demokratiskt och kritiskt språksarbete utifrån utgångspunkterna i Critical Literacy (CL) är undersökandet av olika slags texter. Genom den snabba utvecklingen av informationstekniker och de olika modaliteter som följt i dess spår, har den textrepertoar som barn möter i sin vardag kommit att kraftigt expanderas. Behovet av att kunna tolka och förstå budskap och innehåll i olika slags texter har kanske aldrig varit större. I detta kapitel beskrivs ett klassrumsbaserat projekt, där elever i år två skriver berättelser baserade på deras populärkulturella erfarenheter.

    Utifrån detta belyser och problematiserar vi de möjliga lärandepotentialer som barns texter öppnar upp för i läs- och skrivundervisningen, men ställer också frågor och belyser dilemman ur såväl lärares som elevers perspektiv.

  • 19809.
    Weigand, Hans
    et al.
    Tilburg University, The Netherlands.
    Lind, Mikael
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Informatics.
    On the Pragmatics of Network Communication2008In: Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on the Pragmatic Web, ACM Digital Libraries , 2008, p. 49-58Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Because of globalization and the rise of Internet, the competitive environment of firms is undergoing a fundamental change. Firms are increasingly forced to collaborate in networks. At the same time, social networks are growing tremendously in use and in functionality. In this paper, the current network era is perceived from a communication perspective. How do people communicate in a network? How could the communication be improved? For the analysis we draw on the Language Action Perspective (LAP). Central to this analysis is the question what people try to achieve by communication in social terms. At its inception, LAP was used in an intra-organizational context. The question is whether the same analysis and the same models are also applicable in a network context.

  • 19810. Weinstein, M.
    et al.
    Green, Dido
    Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Geva, R.
    Schertz, M.
    Fattal-Valevski, A.
    Artzi, M.
    Myers, V.
    Shiran, S.
    Gordon, A. M.
    Gross-Tsur, V.
    Bashat, D. B.
    Interhemispheric and intrahemispheric connectivity and manual skills in children with unilateral cerebral palsy2014In: Brain Structure and Function, ISSN 1863-2653, E-ISSN 1863-2661, Vol. 219, no 3, p. 1025-1040Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated patterns of motor brain activation, white matter (WM) integrity of inter- and intrahemispheric connectivity and their associations with hand function in children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP-U). Fourteen CP-U (mean age 10.6 ± 2.7 years) and 14 typically developing children (TDC) underwent magnetic resonance imaging. CP-U underwent extensive motor evaluation. Pattern of brain activation during a motor task was studied in 12 CP-U and six TDC, by calculating laterality index (LI) and percent activation in the sensorimotor areas (around the central sulcus), and quantifying the activation in the supplementary motor area (SMA). Diffusivity parameters were measured in CP-U and eight other TDC for the corpus callosum (CC), affected and less affected cortico-spinal tracts (CST), and posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC). Abnormal patterns of brain activation were detected in areas around the central sulcus in 9/12 CP-U, with bilateral activation and/or reduced percent activation. More activation in areas around the central sulcus of the affected hemisphere was associated with better hand function. CP-U demonstrated more activation in the SMA when moving the affected hand compared to the less affected hand. CP-U displayed reduced WM integrity compared to TDC, in the midbody and splenium of the CC, affected CST and affected PLIC. WM integrity in these tracts was correlated with hand function. While abnormal pattern of brain activation was detected mainly when moving the affected hand, the integrity of the CC was correlated with function of both hands and bimanual skills. This study highlights the importance of interhemispheric connectivity for hand function in CP-U, which may have clinical implications regarding prognosis and management.

  • 19811. Weinstein, M.
    et al.
    Myers, V.
    Green, Dido
    Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Schertz, M.
    Shiran, S. I.
    Geva, R.
    Artzi, M.
    Gordon, A. M.
    Fattal-Valevski, A.
    Ben Bashat, D.
    Brain Plasticity following Intensive Bimanual Therapy in Children with Hemiparesis: Preliminary Evidence2015In: Neural Plasticity, ISSN 2090-5904, E-ISSN 1687-5443, Vol. 2015, article id 798481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuroplasticity studies examining children with hemiparesis (CH) have focused predominantly on unilateral interventions. CH also have bimanual coordination impairments with bimanual interventions showing benefits. We explored neuroplasticity following hand-Arm bimanual intensive therapy (HABIT) of 60 hours in twelve CH (6 females, mean age 11 ± 3.6 y). Serial behavioral evaluations and MR imaging including diffusion tensor (DTI) and functional (fMRI) imaging were performed before, immediately after, and at 6-week follow-up. Manual skills were assessed repeatedly with the Assisting Hand Assessment, Children's Hand Experience Questionnaire, and Jebsen-Taylor Test of Hand Function. Beta values, indicating the level of activation, and lateralization index (LI), indicating the pattern of brain activation, were computed from fMRI. White matter integrity of major fibers was assessed using DTI. 11/12 children showed improvement after intervention in at least one measure, with 8/12 improving on two or more tests. Changes were retained in 6/8 children at follow-up. Beta activation in the affected hemisphere increased at follow-up, and LI increased both after intervention and at follow-up. Correlations between LI and motor function emerged after intervention. Increased white matter integrity was detected in the corpus callosum and corticospinal tract after intervention in about half of the participants. Results provide first evidence for neuroplasticity changes following bimanual intervention in CH.

  • 19812.
    Weinstein, Maya
    et al.
    Centre for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, UK.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Centre for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, UK.
    Rudisch, Julian
    Centre for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, UK.
    Zielinski, Ingar M.
    Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Benthem-Muñiz, Marta
    Department of Neuroimaging, King's College London, London, UK.
    Jongsma, Marijtje L. A.
    Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    McClelland, Verity
    Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, King's College London, UK.
    Steenbergen, Bert
    Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Shiran, Shelly
    Department of Radiology, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Ben Bashat, Dafna
    The Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Barker, Gareth J.
    Department of Neuroimaging, King's College London, London, UK.
    Understanding the relationship between brain and upper limb function in children with unilateral motor impairments: A multimodal approach2018In: European journal of paediatric neurology, ISSN 1090-3798, E-ISSN 1532-2130, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 143-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atypical brain development and early brain injury have profound and long lasting impact on the development, skill acquisition, and subsequent independence of a child. Heterogeneity is present at the brain level and at the motor level; particularly with respect to phenomena of bilateral activation and mirrored movements (MMs). In this multiple case study we consider the feasibility of using several modalities to explore the relationship between brain structure and/or activity and hand function: Electroencephalography (EEG), both structural and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (sMRI, fMRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), Electromyography (EMG) and hand function assessments.

    Methods: 15 children with unilateral CP (ages: 9.4 ± 2.5 years) undertook hand function assessments and at least two additional neuroimaging and/or neurophysiological procedures: MRI/DTI/fMRI (n = 13), TMS (n = 11), and/or EEG/EMG (n = 8). During the fMRI scans and EEG measurements, a motor task was performed to study cortical motor control activity during simple hand movements. DTI tractography analysis was used to study the corpus-callosum (CC) and cortico-spinal tracts (CST). TMS was used to study cortico-spinal connectivity pattern.

    Results: Type and range of severity of brain injury was evident across all levels of manual ability with the highest radiological scores corresponded to children poorer manual ability. Evidence of MMs was found in 7 children, mostly detected when moving the affected hand, and not necessarily corresponding to bilateral brain activation. When moving the affected hand, bilateral brain activation was seen in 6/11 children while 3/11 demonstrated unilateral activation in the contralateral hemisphere, and one child demonstrated motor activation predominantly in the supplementary motor area (SMA). TMS revealed three types of connectivity patterns from the cortex to the affected hand: a contralateral (n = 3), an ipsilateral (n = 4) and a mixed (n = 1) connectivity pattern; again without clear association with MMs. No differences were found between children with and without MMs in lesion scores, motor fMRI laterality indices, CST diffusivity values, and upper limb function. In the genu, midbody, and splenium of the CC, higher fractional anisotropy values were found in children with MMs compared to children without MMs. The EEG data indicated a stronger mu-restoration above the contralateral hemisphere in 6/8 children and above the ipsilateral hemisphere in 2/8 children.

    Conclusion: The current results demonstrate benefits from the use of different modalities when studying upper-limb function in children with CP; not least to accommodate to the variations in tolerance and feasibility of implementation of the differing methods. These exposed multiple individual brain-reorganization patterns corresponding to different functional motor abilities. Additional research is warranted to understand the transactional influences of early brain injury, neuroplasticity and developmental and environmental factors on hand function in order to develop targeted interventions. 

  • 19813.
    Weiss, Jan F.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Essays on externalities, regulation, institutions, and firm performance2015Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is devoted to the empirical analysis of how externalities—the nonexistence of private markets in some good or the absence of sufficient incentives to establish such markets— affect firm performance and growth. A minor part investigates a direct link between positive externalities, in the form of localized knowledge spillovers, and firm growth, by testing the so-called local export spillover hypothesis: Exporting firms in a region may reduce export entry costs for other local firms through export-related informal knowledge and information flows. The results support the notion of the role of such local externalities as external input into firms’ export-specific knowledge function, while also providing some support for such export spillovers being more important in contract-intensive industries and small firms.

    The bulk of my articles examines indirect performance effects of negative pollution externalities. This type of externality calls for formal, as well as informal, institutions that take corrective measures to make polluting agents pay the social and environmental cost of their emissions, thereby restoring the social efficiency losses caused by those externalities. The operational tool to achieve an internalization of the social and environmental costs brought about by pollution externalities is environmental policy, with laws and regulations constituting common policy manifestations. In other words, protecting human health and the environment is the primary purpose of environmental policies. Increasingly, the economic growth paradigm of modern market economies has added a second argument to polluting societies’ welfare function: economic growth.

    Harmonizing these two arguments—social and environmental well-being and economic welfare—has traditionally been considered difficult, with conventional wisdom arguing that environmental regulation of polluting agents is costly and ultimately detrimental to growth. Harvard professor Michael Porter, in his widely debated Porter Hypothesis, has challenged this entrenched view, arguing that environmental policy, if ‘well-designed,’ can attain a ‘double dividend’ or ‘win-win’situation of simultaneous environmental and economic benefits. The present thesis aims to find empirical evidence of Porter’s reasoning. Using microdata on the Swedish pulp, paper and chemical industries, it attempts to empirically analyze whether there are adequate institutional configurations in the form of properly crafted environmental policies that allow for an internalization of pollution externalities such that a ‘win-win’ situation characterized by the simultaneous accomplishment of environmental benefits for society and economic benefits for the polluting agents can be created. The empirical results suggest that environmental regulation, if properly designed, indeed can induce mutual environmental and economic benefits, which provides valuable implications for modern environmental policy.

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  • 19814.
    Weiss, Jan F.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Anisimova, Tatiana
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Shirokova, Galina
    St. Petersburg University, Russia.
    The translation of entrepreneurial intention into start-up behaviour: The moderating role of regional social capital2019In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 473-501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the moderating role of regional social capital in the intention–behaviour link in entrepreneurship. We investigate to what extent the regional social capital context in which aspiring entrepreneurs are embedded strengthens or weakens the translation of individual entrepreneurial intentions into new venture creation activities. Our results suggest that the intention–behaviour link is weakened by cognitive regional social capital in the form of regional hierarchy values and strengthened by structural regional capital in the form of regional cultural diversity and regional breadth of associational activity, as well as by relational regional social capital in the form of high levels of regional generalised trust. Our findings suggest that to support new venture creation activity, there is a need to grow regional social capital via the enhancement of social trust, associational activities and regional cultural diversity – and at the same time decrease hierarchical social structures within regions.

  • 19815.
    Weiss, Jan Frederic
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Centre for Young and Family Enterprises (CYFE), Università degli Studi di Bergamo, Bergamo, Italy.
    Anisimova, Tatiana Anatolevena
    Centre for Young and Family Enterprises (CYFE), Università degli Studi di Bergamo, Bergamo, Italy.
    The innovation and performance effects of well-designed environmental regulation: evidence from Sweden2019In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 534-567Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides novel empirical insights into the Porter hypothesis (PH) and its dynamic nature. The PH posits that well-designed environmental regulations induce eco-innovations at polluting firms that improve both their environmental and business performance via ‘innovation offsets.’ We conduct an econometric test of this proposition, using Swedish pulp and paper plants as empirical application. Swedish environmental regulation of polluting industries provides an interesting case because it has been praised, due to containing elements of ‘well-designed’ regulations, for being conducive to accomplishing the ‘win-win’ situation of mutual environmental and economic benefits. The empirical results indicate that flexible and dynamic command-and-control regulation and economic incentive instruments have induced innovation offsets through improved energy efficiency. Our study bears important implications: empirical tests of the PH that do not account for its dynamic nature, and that do not measure ‘well-designed’ regulations, might provide misleading conclusions as to its validity.

  • 19816.
    Weiss, Jan Frederic
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Stephan, Andreas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Anisimova, Tatiana
    Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Well-designed environmental regulation and firm performance: Swedish evidence on the Porter hypothesis and the effect of regulatory time strategies2019In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 62, no 2, p. 342-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using recent data on a cross-section of Swedish chemical and pulp and paper firms, this paper provides novel empirical insights into the Porter hypothesis. Well-designed environmental regulation can stimulate firms’ innovative capabilities, while at the same time generating innovation offsets that may both offset net compliance costs and yield a competitive edge over those firms that are not affected by such regulations. In doing so, we also test the alleged effectiveness of regulatory time strategies in stimulating innovation activities of regulated firms. We find evidence for the effectiveness of such well-designed regulations: announced rather than existing regulation induces innovation and some innovation offsets. Our results imply that empirical tests of the Porter hypothesis that do not account for its dynamic nature, and that do not measure well-designed regulations, might provide misleading conclusions as to its validity.

  • 19817.
    Welch, Catherine
    et al.
    University of Sydney.
    Hewerdine, Lisa
    University of Sydney.
    Anisimova, Tatiana
    University of Sydney.
    Innovation-Led Internationalisation: Understanding the Internationalisation in Process of High-Tech SMEs2011In: Proceedings of the 53rd Annual Meeting of the Academy of International Business "International Business for Sustainable World Development"Nagoya, Japan June 24-28, 2011, 2011, p. -231Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19818.
    Welin, Anita
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research.
    Ahlberg, A
    Målqvist, Mabel
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research.
    Kompetens att möta alla elever2006In: Från naturvetenskap och specialpedagogik till hållbar utveckling inom lärarutbildning, Vasa: Åbo Akademi, Pedagogiska fakulteten , 2006, Vol. 19, p. 25-45Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19819.
    Wells, Michael B.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sweden.
    Bergnehr, Disa
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Barn. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten..
    Families and family policies in Sweden2014In: Handbook of Family Policies Across the Globe / [ed] Mihaela Robila, New York: Springer , 2014, p. 91-107Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is known as a social welfare state, whereby the people who reside in Sweden are entitled to certain public benefits at little or no cost to the individual. Over the past century, Sweden has reshaped its culture, growing from one of the poorest nations in Europe to a flourishing country that others emulate, especially with respect to their family policies. Sweden has developed several foundational family policies that have helped to encourage equality, while establishing a sense of individuality. Sweden has created similar rights for cohabiters/married couples, as well as for same-sex/opposite-sex couples. Parents receive a generous parental leave package, flexible employment choices, and there is a low gender wage gap, while children receive high-quality childcare, free health care, free dental care, free mental health services, and a substantial child welfare program. Swedish family policies encourage both parents to work and to help each other with household and childcare tasks. Despite the public benefits that Sweden provides for mothers, fathers, and children, there is still a need for further improvements regarding policies on domestic violence, poverty, and child welfare. Assessments of Sweden’s family policies are discussed.

  • 19820.
    Welmer, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Angleman, Sara
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University.
    Rydwik, Elisabeth
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University.
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University.
    Can chronic multimorbidity explain the age-related differences in strength, speed and balance in older adults?2012In: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 1594-0667, E-ISSN 1720-8319, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 480-489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: It is known that physical performance declines with age in general, however there remains much to be understood in terms of age-related differences amongst older adults across a variety of physical components (such as speed, strength and balance), and particularly in terms of the role played by multimorbidity of chronic diseases. We aimed to detect the age-related differences across four components of physical performance and to explore to what extent chronic diseases and multimorbidity may explain such differences. Methods: We analyzed cross-sectional data from a population-based sample of 3323 people, aged 60 years and older from the SNAC-K study, Stockholm, Sweden. Physical performance was assessed by trained nurses using several tests (grip strength, walking speed, balance and chair stands). Clinical diagnoses were made by the examining physician based on clinical history and examination. Results: Censored normal regression analyses showed that the 72- 90+ year-old persons had 17-40% worse grip strength, 44-86% worse balance, 30-86% worse chair stand score, and 21-59% worse walking speed, compared with the 60-66 year-old persons. Chronic diseases were strongly associated with physical impairment, and this association was particularly strong among the younger men. However, chronic diseases explained only some of the age-related differences in physical performance. When controlling for chronic diseases in the analyses, the age-related differences in physical performance changed 1-11 percent. Conclusion: In spite of the strong association between multimorbidity and physical impairment, chronic morbidities explained only a small part of the age-related differences in physical performance.

  • 19821.
    Welmer, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Karolinska Institutet.
    Rydwik, Elisabeth
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Angelman, Sara
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Wang, Hui-Xin
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Education-related differences in physical performance after age 60: a cross-sectional study assessing variation by age, gender and occupation2013In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Having a low level of education has been associated with worse physical performance. However, it is unclear whether this association varies by age, gender or the occupational categories of manual and non-manual work. This study examined whether there are education-related differences across four dimensions of physical performance by age, gender or occupational class and to what extent chronic diseases and lifestyle-related factors may explain such differences.

    Methods: Participants were a random sample of 3212 people, 60 years and older, both living in their own homes and in institutions, from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care, in Kungsholmen, Stockholm. Trained nurses assessed physical performance in grip strength, walking speed, balance and chair stands, and gathered data on education, occupation and lifestyle-related factors, such as physical exercise, body mass index, smoking and alcohol consumption. Diagnoses of chronic diseases were made by the examining physician.

    Results: Censored normal regression analyses showed that persons with university education had better grip strength, balance, chair stand time and walking speed than people with elementary school education. The differences in balance and walking speed remained statistically significant (p < 0.05) after adjustment for chronic diseases and lifestyle. However, age-stratified analyses revealed that the differences were no longer statistically significant in advanced age (80+ years). Gender-stratified analyses revealed that women with university education had significantly better grip strength, balance and walking speed compared to women with elementary school education and men with university education had significantly better chair stands and walking speed compared to men with elementary school education in multivariate adjusted models. Further analyses stratified by gender and occupational class suggested that the education-related difference in grip strength was only evident among female manual workers, while the difference in balance and walking speed was only evident among female and male non-manual workers, respectively.

    Conclusions: Higher education was associated with better lower extremity performance in people aged 60 to 80, but not in advanced age (80+ years). Our results indicate that higher education is associated with better grip strength among female manual workers and with better balance and walking speed among female and male non-manual workers, respectively.

  • 19822.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    All you need is trust? A critical review of the trust and entrepreneurship literature2012In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 193-212Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article critically reviews the literature pertaining to trust and entrepreneurship, highlighting the diversity and complexity of this construct. In addition, the interdependency of trust with context, as well as its dual nature in relation to control and as a sanctioning mechanism, is explored. Trust can be both a dispositional and a behavioural outcome; ‘genuine’ (personal) trust, sanctions and control coexist and co-evolve within and across different contexts. Trust influences entrepreneurship, not always positively, but entrepreneurial behaviour also has an impact on levels of personal and institutional trust. Future studies of trust and entrepreneurship need to acknowledge the bright and dark sides of trust, its duality and the different contexts in which it occurs. Ultimately, we need to develop a far more critical analysis of the importance and role of trust in the context of entrepreneurship.

  • 19823.
    Welter, Friederike
    RWI, Essen, Germany.
    Bedeutung des Konkursrechts im Transformationsprozeß der ostmitteleuropäischen Länder1994In: R W I - Mitteilungen, ISSN 0933-0089, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 325-344Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19824.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth .
    Book Review: Rethinking enterprise policy: Can failure trigger new understanding?2011In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 29, p. 733-734Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 19825.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth .
    Contextualising entrepreneurship - Conceptual Challenges and Ways Forward2011In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 165-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper sets out to explore contexts for entrepreneurship, illustrating how a contextualized view of entrepreneurship contributes to our understanding of the phenomenon. There is growing recognition in entrepreneurship research that economic behavior can be better understood within its historical, temporal, institutional, spatial, and social contexts, as these contexts provide individuals with opportunities and set boundaries for their actions. Context can be an asset and a liability for the nature and extent of entrepreneurship, but entrepreneurship can also impact contexts. The paper argues that context is important for understanding when, how, and why entrepreneurship happens and who becomes involved. Exploring the multiplicity of contexts and their impact on entrepreneurship, it identifies challenges researchers face in contextualizing entrepreneurship theory and offers possible ways forward.

  • 19826.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth . Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Culture versus branch?: Looking at trust and entrepreneurial behaviour from a cultural and sectoral perspective2005In: Trust and Entrepreneurship: A West-East Perspective, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar , 2005, p. 24-38Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19827.
    Welter, Friederike
    RWI, Essen, Germany.
    Das Gründungspotential in Deutschland: Konzeptionelle Überle­gungen, empirische Ergebnisse2001In: Gründungsforschungs-Forum 2000: Dokumentation des 4. G-Forums, Wien, 5./6. Oktober 2000, Lohmar: Eul , 2001, p. 31-46Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19828.
    Welter, Friederike
    University of Bochum, Germany.
    Der informelle Sektor in Entwicklungsländern dargestellt an Bei­spielen in Afrika1989Report (Other academic)
  • 19829.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth . Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Der Mittelstand an der Schwelle zur Informationsgesellschaft2005Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 19830.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Deutsche Gründungsregionen, edited by Rolf Sternberg, Berlin/Münster: Lit Verlag.2007In: Raumforschung und Raumordnung, ISSN 0034-0111, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 163-164Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 19831.
    Welter, Friederike
    RWI, Essen, Germany.
    Development of Small and Medium Enterprises and Entrepre­neurship Promotion in the Central European Economies in Transition1995In: The role of intermediary organisations in Entrepreneurship Promo­tion: Workshop of the OECD Expert Group on Entrepreneurial Development in Economies in Transition. NADSME, Bratislava, 1995, p. 20-48Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19832.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Die industrielle Gemeinschaftsforschung als kooperative For­schungsstrategie für kleine und mittlere Unternehmen1995In: Internationales Gewerbearchiv , ISSN 0935-4794, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 47-56Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19833.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth . Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Dynamik im Unternehmenssektor: Theorie, Empirie und Politik2005Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 19834.
    Welter, Friederike
    RWI, Essen, Germany.
    Eigeninitiative im Kleingewerbe und staatliche Förderprogramme: eine empirische Untersuchung am Beispiel Nigerias1993Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 19835.
    Welter, Friederike
    RWI, Essen, Germany.
    Einmal im Leben darf jeder etwas Risikoreiches tun: Fallstudien von Gründern und Gründerinnen2000Report (Other academic)
  • 19836.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth . Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Emergenzphänomene in der Entrepreneurshipforschung2008In: Steuerung versus Emergenz: Entwicklung und Wachstum von Unternehmen, Wiesbaden: Gabler , 2008, p. 163-186Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19837.
    Welter, Friederike
    RWI, Essen, Germany.
    Endogene Entwicklungspotenziale in Nordrhein-Westfalen und seinen Regionen2003In: Endogene Regionalentwicklung durch Existenzgründungen?: Empirische Befunde aus Nordrhein-Westfalen, Hannover: Akad. für Raumforschung und Landesplanung , 2003, p. 20-24Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19838.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth . Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Entrepreneurial behavior in differing environments2005In: Local heroes in the global village: globalization and the new entrepreneurship policies, New York: Springer , 2005, p. 93-112Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19839.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth . Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Entrepreneurship and development – Do we really know which entrepreneurship types contribute (most)?2010In: Strategic Entrepreneurship – The Promise for Future Entrepreneurship, Family Business and SME Research?: Papers presented to the Rencontres de St-Gall 2010 Beiträge zu den Rencontres de St-Gall 2010 / [ed] U. Fueglistaller, T. Volery, W. Weber, St. Gallen: KMU-Verlag HSG , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19840.
    Welter, Friederike
    RWI, Essen, Germany.
    Entrepreneurship and enterprise strategies in transition economies: an institutional perspective2001In: Proceedings of RENT XV (Research in Entrepreneurship and Small Business), November 22-23, 2001, Turku School of Economics and Business Administration, Finland, 2001Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19841.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth . Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Entrepreneurship in a Regional Context: The Role of Trust and Learning2010In: Social Capital and Development Trends in Rural Areas / [ed] Hans Westlund, Kiyoshi Kobayashi, Jönköping: RUREG, JIBS , 2010, volume 5, p. 13-26Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19842.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth . Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Entrepreneurship in its context(s): a review2008In: NSF-DFG Conference “Contextualizing Economic Behaviour”, August 21-23, 2008, New York City, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19843.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre.
    Entrepreneurship in West and East Germany2007In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 97-109Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19844.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Entrepreneurship: New Perspectives in a Global Age: edited by Anne de Bruin and Ann Dupuis.2005In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 104-107Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 19845.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Entrepreneurship-Förderung an Hochschulen2002In: R W I - Mitteilungen: Zeitschrift fuer Wirtschaftsforschung, ISSN 0933-0089, Vol. 53, p. 89-106Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19846.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Exploring Entrepreneurship and SME Development in a Post Soviet Context2006Report (Other academic)
  • 19847.
    Welter, Friederike
    RWI, Essen, Germany.
    Factors of success: what determines the survival and success of self-employed coming out of unemployment in Germany?2000Report (Other academic)
  • 19848.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Für manche ist es wie eine Geburt: Unternehmerinnen und Gründerinnen in der deutschen Presse2006In: Internationale Konferenz Vielfalt in der Unternehmerschaft: Das Selbstbild von Unternehmern und Unternehmerinnen im internationalen Vergleich, 19. June 2006, Gelsenkirchen, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19849.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Gründerinnenpotenziale2004In: Gründerinnen und selbstständige Frauen: Potenziale, Strukturen und Entwicklungen in Deutschland, Karlsruhe: Von-Loeper-Literaturverl. , 2004, p. 54-71Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19850.
    Welter, Friederike
    RWI, Essen, Germany.
    Gründungspotenzial und Gründungsprozess in Deutschland: eine konzeptionelle und empirische Betrachtung2000Report (Other academic)
394395396397398399400 19801 - 19850 of 21170
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