Change search
Refine search result
35363738394041 1851 - 1900 of 2044
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1851.
    Vallström, Hanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Lindholm, Towe
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    AbuBakr, Ala
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    “CSR is not important to us because...”: A moral disengagement theory approach to CSR improvement in Swedish companies2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is a moral disengagement theory approach to CSR improvements in Swedish companies. The purpose is to investigate what and how justifications are a barrier for middle managers’ contributions to a firm's CSR improvements in Swedish companies. There is a shift towards a need for a new CSR and on a more personal bases where individual contributions are crucial. Bandura, Bero and White’s (2009) moral disengagement mechanisms will be used to explain how and why middle managers justify avoiding CSR initiating and improvements. The main purpose with this thesis is to answer the questions of what justifications are used and how they are barriers for middle manager’s contribution to CSR improvement in companies? This has been conducted through qualitative semi-structured individual interviews with middle managers in 10 Swedish companies. The findings show that only six of Bandura et al’s. (2009) moral disengagement mechanisms were used by middle managers, Moral Justification, Euphemistic Labelling, Advantageous Comparison, Displacement of Responsibility, Diffusion of Responsibility, Distortion of Consequences, together with one new justification unique to these findings, Lack of Demand. Findings shows that the more justifications used, the weaker CSR the firm shows, both through their own records/publications and during the interview. It is clear that one barrier for CSR improvements can be the thought about barriers itself. Middle managers easily identify material, strategic and financial barriers but fail to acknowledge that their thoughts on barriers can actually be a barrier. Findings show that justifications used by middle managers appear to be a key factor in why companies do not pursue ambitious CSR improvements. This thesis has contributed to existing literature by expanding the research field regarding new CSR approaches and Bandura et al.’s (2009) moral disengagement mechanisms. These findings could be of value for companies with the need to improve CSR since our findings show that justifications are barriers in the development of CSR within a company. 

  • 1852.
    van de Wiel, Wimjan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Kristopher Bock, Felix
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Real Estate Financing and Interest Rate Hedging: A quantitative real estate investment case study2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The expansive monetary policy of the European Central Bank has been leading to all-time-low interest rates and to a strong move into real estate investment. Low interest rates can work in favor of the investor (due to low interest rate expenditures), but increasing interest rates can jeopardize real estate investments. Since changes in interest rates are unpredictable, an investor needs to deal with this volatility. The capital market offers several financial instruments (so-called “derivatives”) to overcome the above-mentioned obstacle. There is no “one-size-fits-all” strategy. The investor needs to decide which financing structure to combine with which form of derivative.

    Purpose: The investigation not only explains and shows how real estate financing and hedging strategies on a given project in Germany can work but also explains why it is crucial to link these segments. To achieve this purpose, the return on equity and return cash flows at risk are numerically estimated. The evaluative purpose will be served by using the above-mentioned ratios and cash flows to derive recommendations of action. In doing so, this study will illustrate the importance of hedging, particularly for real estate investors and investors in general.

    Method: Interest rates on a monthly basis for the period of June 1990 until March 2017 from Thomson Reuters Eikon and real life data from a German real estate investor and a German financial institution were collected. Thereafter, these numbers were used as a basis to perform interest rate and cash flow simulations (Monte Carlo). The simulations were used to determine superior financing and hedging strategies for the investor.

    Conclusion: The results of this study highlight the benefits from leveraged financing and the necessity of interest rate risk management (hedging) to obtain stabilized future cash flows and reduce volatility caused by fluctuating interest rates. Fixed rate loans offer protection against rising interest rates, but lack flexibility. Floating loans offer more flexibility but are riskier due to the unhedged interest rate exposure.  

  • 1853.
    van der Heijden, Jillian
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Zhang, Luyang
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    The effect of gender diversity on firm performance: Evidence of Norway2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 1854.
    van der Kooij, Leo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Telegdi, Kata
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Emotions and New Product Development: The Influence of Emotions on the Decision Making of Corporate Entrepreneurs in NPD2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Our decision making is strongly influenced by emotions and most of our complex decisions would be even impossible without them. Emotions do also play an im-portant role in new product and service development (NPD) as the entrepreneurs engage in an emotional relationship with their project. These emotions of both posi-tive and negative in nature will then guide their decision making through the im-plementation of new products and services.

    This study purposes to discover how emotions affect the decision making in the different stages of front-end, development, and commercialisation during new product and service development together with unveiling the most salient emotions. Through the research, we aim to improve corporate entrepreneurs’ understanding on how their emotional reactions reflect upon their decisions in the NPD stages. We further aim to increase their consciousness by applying the appraisal theory explaining why they feel these emotions and see whether there are any emotional patterns influencing decision making in the stages.

    In order to gain a rich understanding of the context, a qualitative case study has been used as a research strategy. The influence of emotions in the decision making process in NPD is the particular phenomenon which has been investigated. In addition, semi-structured interviews and vignettes have been used to collect qual-itative data. Throughout the research 16 semi-structured interviews have been con-ducted, from which 9 were related to service based companies while 7 were done in product related ones. As an interview tool we have used 4 vignettes providing hypothetical scenarios for collecting qualitative data. Findings were analysed through the interpretivist philosophical approach of the re searchers, using voice records, and personal observations.

    Our findings show that positive emotions overrule negative ones in every stage of NPD. Throughout the process, self-confidence and hope were interpreted to be the main drivers that overcome even the most influential negative emotions such as nervousness, fear, and frustration. The professional background of the corporate entrepreneur, their experience and personality together with organisational empowerment, support their self-confident and optimistic decision making. Negative emotions as nervousness, fear, and frustration lead only to a delay in their decisions and had not enough power to change the direction regarding their decision making leading to a possible termination of the project.

  • 1855.
    van der Meer, Marloes
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Kjellson, Ida
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    The impact of narcissistic and humble  leadership styles: Examining employee satisfaction and the role of the family business2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 1856.
    van Helvert, Judith
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Entrepreneurship from a Family Business Perspective2017In: The SAGE Handbook of Small Business and Entrepreneurship / [ed] Robert Blackburn, Dirk De Clercq & Jarna Heinonen, Sage Publications, 2017, p. 7-123Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1857.
    Van Helvert-Beugels, Judith
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    The emerging role of advisory boards in strategizing in family firms: A sensemaking perspective2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis addresses the emerging role of advisory boards in strategizing in privately held family firms. The thesis focuses on the period in which family firms start considering to work with an advisory board through the board’s first several years of existence. A micro-level strategy perspective is combined with insights from sensemaking theory to understand how the practitioners involved make sense of this new arena involved in strategizing. Empirically, the study is based on four real-time case studies that primarily use observations along with interviews and secondary documents. The within- and cross case interpretations are integrated into a conceptual model that explains how the roles of advisory boards in strategizing emerge over time.

    The most important finding of this study is that advisory boards emerge into unique configurations through the sensemaking activities of the practitioners involved. Moreover, this study shows that practitioners make sense of both the content that should be addressed and the role and tasks of the advisory board. This sensemaking is achieved in different ways and in different forms (individual versus mediated versus collective sensemaking), which explains the substantial differences between the advisory boards in different situations. It is suggested that the lack of an institutional frame or institutional norms provides considerable freedom in interpreting the role of the advisory boards, through which such boards largely become a contextualized practice. Two underlying causal mechanisms have been identified that drive the sensemaking processes of the practitioners involved in advisory board meetings: the learning orientation of the practitioners involved and the (a)symmetry between the advisory board members on the one hand and the family firm decision makers on the other hand.

    This dissertation contributes to our current understanding of advisory boards using a micro-level strategy lens instead of a governance lens to understand the emerging role of the advisory board in strategizing in the family firm context. This approach has helped to characterize the advising and sensemaking processes at play and how advisory boards emerge into unique configurations over time. Second, this dissertation contributes to the strategy as practice literature by devoting attention to a new arena involved in strategizing that emerges over time and the elements that play a role in this process. Instead of studying how an existing arena is performed, this study focuses on the emergence of a new strategy arena along with the practices used, the praxis performed and the practitioners involved. Thus I show how such a new arena is contextualized and becomes situated over time, attending to the processual dimensions, the content dimensions, the outcomes of the process and the outcomes generated by strategizing.

  • 1858.
    van Huynh, Fredrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Gonzalez, Aaron
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Yousef, Waseem
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Sustainable packaging: A study of consumers' loyalty and behavior2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

     

    The ecological consumer has been a significant and central character in the development of green marketing. In an effort to enhance brand equity and increase consumers’ loyalty, companies are relying on environmental claims. From advances in processes, to product design and packaging materials that diminish waste, companies are more and more emphasizing on sustainability. The findings of previous research aiming to link purchasing and environmental concerns to socio-demographic factors have been generally inconclusive and inconsistent (Peattie, 2001). Therefore, the purpose of this study aims to identify if sustainable packaging can be used as a marketing tool to increase brand equity. In addition, the authors intended to identify who is consuming sustainable products and particularly sustainable packaging.

    The review of previous research concerning this topic led us to express two hypotheses. First, women are more involved by the purchasing process than men. Second, sustainable consumption is seen as a time consuming activity, economically disadvantageous and stressful (Valor, 2008).

    Through both a quantitative and a qualitative study we analyzed consumers’ behavior and attitude towards sustainable packaging and green consumption in general.

    The findings of the study allowed us to conclude that the gap between consumers’ attitude and purchasing decision concerning ecological products in general is important. The main reasons are a lack of communication, promotion and availability regarding these products as well as the high-proposed price. Furthermore, the study confirmed that women are much more involved than men in the consumption decision making process in both “classic and green” purchasing.

     

  • 1859.
    van Leuven, Sander
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Eriksson, Oscar
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    HPWP's Role on Product Innovation in Family Firms: A Study of Swedish Family Firms2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation is of central concern for all businesses. The concern for innovation is particularly sensitive for family firms as they often face the challenge of being less entrepreneurial and innovative than nonfamily firms du e to their, sometimes contradictory goals, between economic efficiency and family interest. Researchers has begun to acknowledge t professional human resource (HR) he importance of practices regarding innovation. However, academia becomes short in understanding how these pr actices affects a firm's product innovation, especially in a family business context. Therefore, this thesis aims to enlarge how high performance work practices (HPWP), consisting of five practices, influences product innovation in family firms. To achieve this, our study included a multiplecomparative case study of three Swedish family firms, plus two expert interviews to reach further support to our findings. Moreover, for these cases, we conducted semi structured interviews, observation and secondary da ta using an abductive approach. Based on previous theoretical standpoints, we derived our own model which served as an analytic tool to our empirical data. From our analysis, we conducted a new, slightly modified, model to support and illustrate our empiri cal findings. To make a thorough and accurate analysis, we separated each practice of HPWP and found every practice´s unique influence on product innovation in family firms. Additionally, we contribute to the HPWP literature by revealing an interplay betwe en these five practices where they appear to strengthen and support each other. From a practitioner's point of view, our study is helpful to achieve a higher personorganizational fit for family firms and it can provide practical insights of how HPWP affec ts the product innovation process.

  • 1860.
    van Weezel, Aldo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Entrepreneurial Strategy-Making Mode and Performance: A study of the Newspaper Industry2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Almost everywhere, the newspaper industry today is facing major transformations due mainly to increased competition, changes in consumer behaviour, and technological advancements. These factors are having an impact on the organisational structure and performance of newspaper firms. Managers likewise are face-to-face with new environmental conditions in terms of uncertainty and munificence. In the presence of these challenges, the literature on corporate entrepreneurship justifies a firm’s entrepreneurial behaviour in order to be able to detect and seize new opportunities. Although there seems to be sufficient proof of a positive relationship between being entrepreneurial and performance, there is no clear evidence in the literature regarding the extent these organisational and environmental factors may enhance or curb the effects that an entrepreneurial strategy-making mode might have on performance.

    This study examines the complexities of the relationship between an entrepreneurial strategy-making mode and the firm’s performance as it investigates the moderating effects of the organisational structure and environmental factors on the newspaper publishing industry. A mixed method research design is employed thus complementing the findings of quantitative analyses by means of exploring three newspaper case studies assessing the various dimensions of the entrepreneurial strategy-making mode.

    The results show that entrepreneurial newspapers attain better performance than non-entrepreneurial ones, particularly the ones that have developed proactiveness and an entrepreneurial culture as essential elements of their strategy-making mode. From a configurational perspective, performance is enhanced when entrepreneurial newspapers present a higher level of organisational integration and are prone to outsourcing various activities while facing low environmental munificence. Nevertheless, newspaper firms competing in munificent and less uncertain environments may perform well albeit lack of entrepreneurial behaviour. These findings and the novel research design employed contribute to strategic management, corporate entrepreneurship and media management fields of research.

  • 1861.
    Vara, Alicia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Bogdanzaliev, Dimiter
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    The role of positive emotions in project failure and their impact on Corporate Entrepreneurs’ decision-making and motivation.2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The  purpose  of  this  thesis  is  to  identify  the  role  of positive  emotions  in  project  failure  and  how  these emotions  affect  corporate  entrepreneurs´  decision-making and motivation.

    Theoretical perspective

    Entrepreneurial Failure, Emotions, Appraisal Theory, Attribution  Theory,  Psychological  Ownership,  Psychological Capital.

    Empirical foundation

    Seventeen respondents from 14 entrepreneurial companies  were  interviewed to identify  the role of positive emotions in  project failure and  their impact  on corporate entrepreneurs’  decision-making  and motivation in subsequent projects. Interviews were conducted by phone (1), audio conference (2), video conference (3) and face-to-face interviews (4).

    Conclusion

    We  offer  a  model,  which  shows  the  three  positive emotions that were found to be experienced in project failure, namely relief, confidence and challenge and their  impact  on  corporate  entrepreneurs’  decision-making and motivation in subsequent projects.

  • 1862.
    Varaksina, Polina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Challenges in cross-cultural communication of Swedish companies internationalizing in Russia: Implications for international business2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 1863.
    Varta, Maria
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Kämper, Jennifer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    CSR perceptions - its role in daily working life and organisational commitment: An employees’ & managers’ perspective2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this thesis is to explore the employees’ and managers’ perceptions on corporate social responsibility (CSR), its incorporation in the daily working life, as well as its role in building organisational commitment.

    Design/methodology/approach – The thesis draws on a multiple-case study throughout three companies and two non profit organisations (NPO), which have an extensive CSR approach. The main data collection methods are individual and focus group interviews.

    Findings – The thesis suggests that employees have different percpetions about CSR, based on its different dimensions. The paper also shows that an ethical working environment, based on ethical values, leadership, etc., plays a crucial role in perceiving the CSR presence on a dalily basis at work. The findings revealed that CSR initiatives, with a greater extent the ones aimed at the welfare of the employees, play an important role in the organisational commitment,.

    Research limitations – Further qualitative studies, comprising a bigger and a more diverse sample would be needed.

    Originality/value – This qualitative study contributes to the literature with new insights on the employees’ perceptions on CSR, its daily infusion at work and its role in organisational commitment.

  • 1864.
    Vasconcelos e Sá, Vera
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Deihle, Vera
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    #Homemade: An explanatory study on the influence of Social Media on young adults’ home cooking behaviour.2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 1865.
    Venemyr, Henrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Ericson, Per Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Corporate Social Responsibility: whose responsibility is it?2006Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Magister), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The society is becoming more aware of the importance of corporate social responsibility (CSR) work. CSR has also be-come a competitive tool in order to reach out to potential cus-tomers. There are also many definitions of what CSR actually means. These are things that makes it interesting to find out how multinational corporations, who has a lot of power, per-ceive and work with CSR, as well as what can be done to make corporations work more with CSR.

    Purpose: The purpose of this thesis is to describe what CSR as a con-cept means, whose responsibility it is, as well as why corpora-tions work with it. We also intend to find out what it takes to make CSR a more prevailing and decisive instrument for cor-porations?

    Method: We conducted six unstructed interviews with multinational corporations in Sweden.

    Conclusion: Today the phenomena of CSR has no unified definition, this is why we believe that a definition that is precise in describing what CSR is can be useful. We think that transparency is something important since information provided to the pub-lic, provides consumers and stakeholders with power to make information based investment, and purchase decisions. We have also concluded that we think that the most important factor in driving the CSR work forward and making it grow in size, is to make consumers reward the corporations that per-form well in their CSR activities.

  • 1866.
    Vettersand, Elina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Tran, Thao
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Fairtrade - A Competitive Imperative?: An Investigation to Understand the Role of Fair Trade in Company Strategy in the Chocolate Industry2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The rise in ethical consumerism has become evident through an increase in sales of fair trade products in recent years. Consumers are prepared to pay a premium for fair trade chocolate, and with a steady future growth in the fair trade movement, this is an attractive market for new entrants. Of particular focus are the Swedish and German markets for fair trade chocolate as they show promising growth rates and interest in this field.

    Problem:       The chocolate industry is very competitive, and the observation that consumers reward companies that act socially responsible presents an opportunity for ethical companies to compete. This is attractive for entrepreneurial firms, but there exist numerous motivations why firms choose to engage in fair trade.

    Purpose:        The purpose of this thesis is to understand the role of fair trade in corporate strategy (either in partial or entire assortment), its relation to entrepreneurial opportunity-seeking behaviour, and examining how the strategic resource of Fairtrade certification is used to gain competitive advantage.

    Method:         A qualitative interview study was applied, and ten chocolate companies active in the Swedish and German markets were included in the sample. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews (four telephone interviews and six email responses), and complemented with secondary data from company websites and press releases. The interviewees were mainly representatives of the marketing department and CEOs. Empirical findings were analysed using relevant models and theories, and organized under the two categories of ‘firm use of fair trade’ and ‘visibility of fair trade.’

    Conclusion:   The findings in this thesis show that there are multiple reasons why chocolate companies engage in fair trade including reputation, spreading awareness, proactive opportunity-seeking behaviour, strategic differentiation, as a means of communicating to producers and consumers, and for quality insurance of raw ingredients. Fair trade engagement is visible through its role as a social resource. This image is created by ethical and social commitment and wholeness in values, non-exploitative respectful business network relationships, consistency in firm behaviour, and through wealth creation in terms of benefiting the firm, society, and the environment. The Fairtrade label is not imperative to achieving a state of competitive advantage, but can inevitably lead to that result through the firm wholeness created by mission- and vision-driven values.

  • 1867.
    Viberg, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Sweden .
    Eslami, Mohammad H.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Malm, Anna
    Combitech, Linköping, Sweden.
    The potentials of machine learning in knowledge integration2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 1868.
    Viberg, Robert
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Åberg, Kristin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    The future of equity risk premiums: A study of equity risk premium in the Swedish market2006Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Magister), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Marknadens riskpremie kan förklaras som den förväntade avkastning en investerare kräver för att acceptera en viss risk. Hur riskpremien skall bestämmas har stått i fokus för omfattande debatter de senaste åren men fortfarande har ingen ultimat lösning infunnit sig. Det finns två huvudsakliga tillvägagångssätt för att uppskatta riskpremien. Det ena att använda historisk data över aktieutvecklingen och därefter förvänta sig att en framtida utveckling kommer att vara likvärdig. Den andra är att göra uppskattningar av den framtida utvecklingen, så som framtida utdelningar, framtida vinster, BNP och inflation och därifrån göra en uppskattning utav riskpremien. Att använda sig av historiska värden har tidigare varit en accepterad metod både i den akademiska och finansiella värden men då den på senare tid har mötts av omfattande kritik, har modeller baserade på uppskattningar av framtiden vuxit sig starkare.

    Syfte: Syftet med denna uppsats är att ge en djupgående beskrivning av hur svenska finansiella företag uppskattar och hanterar riskpremium för den svenska aktiemarknaden. Därigenom fanns en avsikt att studera vilken metod som främst användes, hur viktigt riskpremium i form av ett investeringsinstrument var, och morgondagens betydelse av riskpremium.

    Metod: Författarna använde sig av en kvalitativ metod, där det empiriska materialet samlades in med hjälp av personliga intervjuer. Intervjufrågor av öppen karaktär skickades ut till respondenterna i förväg, och intervjuerna ägde därefter rum i Stockholm och Göteborg. I den teoretiska referensramen användes både så kallad primär och sekundär litteratur för att kunna redogöra en övergripande bild av problemområdet. Den primära litteraturen, som framförallt ligger till grund för kapitel tre, sågs extra viktig att inkludera då den möjliggjorde en minskad subjektivitet som annars hade riskerat att belasta uppsatsen.

    Resultat: Resultaten visade en varierad syn mellan respondenterna där vissa ansåg att riskpremien hade ringa betydelse och andra att det var en mycket viktig variabel. Överlag fanns det dock ett ökat intresse de senaste åren. Även val av metod varierade och vare sig historisk data eller framtida uppskattningar kunde sägas ha ett övertag bland användarna. Avslutningsvis såg författarna ett ökat intresse för de ingående variablerna i modeller som baseras på framtida förväntade värden och kunde därav visa att den framtida debatten sannolikt kommer att behandla vilka variabler som bör inkluderas i denna typ av modeller och hur de bör uppskattas.

  • 1869.
    Vicic, Marko
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Hermansson, Filip
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    How Does Service Management Affect Customer Satisfaction?: A Study Within the Swedish Consumer Electronics Retail Industry2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Research about service management strategies effect on customer satisfaction is scarce. Service management and its implications on firms’ performance is a timely topic as many industries experience increased competition. This study attempts to contribute to this field by examining relationships between service management strategies and customer satisfaction within the Swedish high-end consumer electronics retail industry. The study also attempts to explore which service management strategies that store managers use as well as how they adopt themThis is done by combining data from interviews with a number of store managers and sellers, with data about customer satisfaction and customer’s perceptions of the service quality. 

    The authors of this thesis found that store managers use a range of strategies to varying extent, for example empower employees and develop service oriented internal processes, and that these strategies are used actively and consciously to pursue a specific outcome. In addition, the study shows that there is a positive relationship between empowering sellers and customer satisfaction, this relationship is stronger when the sellers are properly informed about their authority. The thesis also suggests that well-functioning internal processes, such as inventory management, affect service quality and therefore also customer satisfaction positively. On the opposite, dysfunctional internal processes can be harmful for the service quality. At last, the authors found indications that a structured and ambitious effort to train sellers in technical skills increase customer satisfaction.

  • 1870.
    Vidgren, Katriina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Derksen, Anastasia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Blooming Flowers or Just Firm Roots?: Traditions in the Innovation Process of Family Businesses – Combining the Agency and Stewardship Perspective2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The economical situation is constantly changing and competition is forcing companies to become more innovative than ever. Family businesses are thought to be less innovative and stagnant compared to other organizations. Yet, they manage to survive and thrive in this competitive world. Some family businesses have been able to use their unique traditions to obtain competitive advantage. The purpose of this study is to gain insight how family businesses are leveraging on their traditions and how different governing styles affect the process of innovation. Thus, the research question we are trying to answer is How are family businesses with different governance styles exploiting their traditions in their product innovations? This qualitative study is conducted by using case study strategy consisting of a total eight case companies. The data is collected from semi-structured interviews and secondary data. The analysis of the collected data is conducted in five steps, and patterns are formed based on the analysis. Our results showed that companies behaving according to the agency theory perceived tradition as something static. Thus, did not fully take advantage of it. Family businesses behaving according to the stewardship Theory perceived tradition as dynamic and were able to reinterpret it to use it in their product innovation process.

  • 1871.
    Vietsch, Rik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    de Mol, Jessica
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    New Product Development in the Mobile Device Industry: Agility as the 10th Success Factor2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 1872.
    Vigren, Alexander
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Environmental, Social and Governance Aspects Impact on Financial Performance: An event study on ESG improvement2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    During the past decade, corporate transparency has become a fundamental value and strong signifier in today’s business environment. Today, companies must reveal more Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) information about their operations than ever. This study investigates if asset managers can benefit from ESG information by incorporating it into the investment process. An event study is conducted on companies that improved their ESG performance and the financial results is evaluated post of the improvement. Three different time-perspectives are used, 1-year, 3-years and 5 years to see if the relationship is sensitive to changes in time. In sum, only the mid-term test give a statistical significant result, with indication of a negative impact from ESG improvements on financial performance. There is weak evidence that the financial performance may improve in the ultra-long run, but additional research needs to be done to confirm such hypothesis. I suggest that regardless of how the relationship between ESG and financial performance is, more integrated ESG models will be important for asset managers in the future. 

  • 1873.
    Viljama, Jesse
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Sepponen, Eetu
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    How innovation culture affects the performance of Internal Corporate Venturing (ICV)?2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 1874.
    Villagomez Garcia, Ivan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Pecikoza, Senada
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Pac Yurrita, Jorge
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Entrepreneurial Coping: Entrepreneurial Reactions and Coping Methods Towards Failur2008Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    An entrepreneur is an innovator, someone who transforms innovations and ideas intoeconomically viable entities; independent on whether in the process she creates oroperates a firm (Baumol 1993). When these firms are created however, sometimes theydo not achieve a viable sustainability; they often face problems and are forced to gobankrupt. When Bankruptcy occurs the entrepreneur is logically affected not onlyeconomically but also mentally and emotionally. Different situations have differenteffects on the entrepreneur´s emotions.

    Lazarus´ Cognitive Appraisal Theory states that when faced with a problem or situationpeople "appraise" or perceive it in different ways. The Primary Appraisal happens whenthe entrepreneur first comes into the realization of the problem; she can view itdifferently, either as an event that deserves indifference, an opportunity, or as a harmfulthreat. The Secondary Appraisal happens when the entrepreneur analyses what resourceshe has available and what strategy he will proceed to use in order to tackle the situation.Furthermore, during the course of the situation the entrepreneur may come into therealization of new information that might change his way of perceiving things, this iscalled an Appraisal. The Cognitive Appraisal Theory is closely linked to the CopingTheory which talks about how entrepreneurs "cope" or deal emotionally with theiradversities. Coping can be divided into two types, Problem focused and Emotion focusedCoping. Problem focused coping intents on coming up with viable and practical solutionsto improve the situation, whereas Emotion focused intends on externalizing the blame andreacting with a worsened emotional state that does not help the situation in the long run.

    This report is an exploratory research and bases its empirical data on the case studyapproach of five different cases of entrepreneurs leaving in Sweden who had theexperience of engaging in an enterprise that ended up in bankruptcy. During the course ofthis investigation a qualitative method was used and the empirical findings wheregathered by engaging in interviews that were later analyzed and correlated with thetheoretical framework.

    In the Analysis we take apart the information gathered in the interviews and try tocorrelate the events to the theories while at the same time striving to find similarities ordifferences between the subjects. We also try to find patterns that may help us understandmore about the subject and finally allows us to address the problem and achieve thepurpose of this report which is to understand how an entrepreneur copes when faced witha business failure.

    In our conclusion we came to the realization that people tend to follow specific patterns ofemotional reaction that concretely support the pre established theories. This report servesas a base or foundation of a tool for entrepreneurs. We find that if entrepreneurs hadprevious knowledge of ways to deal with failure they might be more prompt to avoid itentirely and consequently this can be an invaluable tool for them..3

  • 1875.
    Villanueva, Jaume
    et al.
    Universitat Ramon Lull.
    Markowska, Magdalena
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Universitat Ramon Lull.
    Storytelling in the development of entrepreneurial identities2013In: 5th Conference on Rhetoric and Narratives, ESADE, Barcelona, 25-27 March, 2013., 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion that the development of an entrepreneurial identity in individuals has important consequences for their subsequent entrepreneurial intentions and behaviors has gained increased attention in the entrepreneurship literature (Fauchart & Gruber, 2011). Most of this emerging literature has hitherto focused on the relationship between an individual’s entrepreneurial identity, i.e. between people’s self-concepts based on some form of entrepreneurial role identity (Cardon et al., 2009), or an entrepreneurial social identity (Fauchart & Gruber, 2011), and a broad set of entrepreneurial processes and outcomes. The main idea is thus that if a person’s self- concept is aligned with what could be construed as an entrepreneurial identity, a set of predictions could be made regarding this person’s entrepreneurial motivations, intentions and behaviors, all of which has important consequences for the study of entrepreneurship.

    But how does an entrepreneurial role or social identity develop in an individual? The literature has so far been rather silent not only on the antecedents of entrepreneurial identities, but also on the processes by which such identities develop over time. Theories of narrative identity and the psychology of life stories (McAdams, 2001), which posit that a person’s identity is an internalized narrative of the self that evolves over time, provide relevant insights for understanding where entrepreneurial self-concepts may come from and how they may develop. People construe stories to imbue their life experiences with meaning, and to integrate what could be disparate life episodes and events into a coherent life trajectory that can be understood by themselves and by others.

    Hence, the development of an entrepreneurial identity could be conceptualized as a specific type of evolving self-narrative with a specific kind of meaning. This self-narrative should not only include the basic elements that would make it “entrepreneurial” in meaning, but it should also include the main elements that would make it a “story.” In this paper, we draw on narrative theories to make a number of propositions regarding what constitutes an entrepreneurial identity in terms of narrative structure, drawing on McAdams’ (2001) conceptualization of a life story as a narrative complete with setting, scenes, characters, plot and themes. We also draw on theories of entrepreneurship and develop propositions regarding what constitutes an identity with entrepreneurial meaning. Furthermore, we explain a number of mechanisms by which these elements may change over time, explaining why some individuals may develop entrepreneurial identities over the span of their life courses.

    According to McAdams’ life story model of identity (2001), a person’s identity can be conceptualized as an internalized and evolving self-story that provides meaning to one’s experience. In other words, an individual’s identity can be thought of as a psychosocial construction (a construction that is coauthored by the person and its cultural context) that takes the structural form of a story. But what constitutes a story? And, more specifically, what constitutes a life story in terms of narrative structure? Drawing on McAdams’ (2001) model, we conceptualize a life story as a canonical type of narrative structure that includes the following components: (1) a set of identifiable themes that weave together (2) a plot line that is projected on (3) a character (or focal actor) that is embedded in (4) a social and cultural setting

    Stories differ in their constitutive elements (i.e. themes, plot, characters and setting), so what is that makes a story an “entrepreneurial story? In terms of themes identified in the literature, a common thematic thread that weaves entrepreneurial stories is the creation and engagement with a new economic (and social) activity (Davidsson, 2004). This theme usually implies the arrangement of activities and motivations around identifying new means-ends frameworks and organizing and managing resources required for their execution (Chandler & Hanks, 1994). An entrepreneurial story can have many alternative plot lines. The plot line allows the storyteller to convey the significance of some events and not others, to elaborate on some events while omitting others, to draw connections between events that may not seem related, or to omit making connections between events that appear related. In short, the plot allows the storyteller to imbue meaning into a sequence of events and allows the audience to understand the significance of these specific events or, in other words, to make sense of the story. A narrative structure in the form of a story will thus contain “poetic tropes,” which are mechanisms aimed at linking the events of a story and to imbue them with meaning. Examples of these mechanisms are: attributions of causal connections, attributions of agency, attributions of responsibility, attributions of motives or attributions of emotion (Gabriel, 2004). A common plot line in an entrepreneurial story consists of the identification of a problem and the creation of a solution, resulting in a satisfactory outcome for both the entrepreneur and society (Bhave, 1994). This plot line represents a canonical type of cause-effect relationship expressed in the problem-solution dichotomy. The character of a life story consists obviously of the focal person in question and, in the case of an entrepreneurial story, the focal actor is the entrepreneur. Finally, an entrepreneurial story is embedded in a social and cultural setting that helps imbue it with meaning. An entrepreneurial story often invokes an individual’s human and social capital – the acquired knowledge and experience as well as social group membership (Stryker, 1980; Tajfel & Turner, 1985), as well as cultural norms that are proper and acceptable given a set of socially constructed system of norms, values, beliefs and definitions (Suchman, 1995).

    In short, in this paper we develop a series of propositions linking the key constitutive components of a life story to entrepreneurship constructs, thus offering a theoretical explanation of how an entrepreneurial identity, conceptualized as a specific type of story, comes into being. Furthermore, we theorize about how these elements may change over time and its impact on the emergence and development of an entrepreneurial identity over the life course.

  • 1876.
    Virensjö, Johanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Rolfson, Julia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    The implications of diversification and flexibility for SME's in Sweden2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 1877.
    Virkkunen, Paula
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Norhio, Elsi
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Becoming a Social Media Influencer: Describing the journey of becoming a successful social media influencer2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 1878.
    Virta, Sari
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Ambidextrous tensions in media content development 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 1879.
    Virta, Sari
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Complexities and tensions of transformative boundary-crossing: Case study on ambidextrous HRM in a creative organizationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to inform theory and practice on the features of ambidextrous HRM that are required to transform creativity into content innovation within the rapidly changing context of creative media organizations. An empirical, qualitative case study is utilized to examine ambidextrous HRM as a response to dual tensions that are characteristic of media content development work, especially in relation to exploration and exploitation. The analysis focuses on issues that hamper the establishment of an ambidextrous HRM system in a traditional and established media organization, thus shedding light on the development of an ambidextrous HRM system more generally in knowledge-intensive industries facing disruptive change. The findings suggest that creative content development work, which is deeply dependent on individual creative talent, requires an ambidextrous approach to HRM for the successful management of innovation initiatives (i.e. exploration) alongside on-going production processes (i.e. exploitation), including that the lack of ambidextrous HRM may severely harm development initiatives. The results of the analysis indicate that bridging conventional and ambidextrous HRM principles is essential for sustainable co-existence of production and innovation in organizational contexts characterized by tensions. The qualitative case study offers new understanding regarding managing development work and organizational creativity for innovation in a traditional company in turbulent change, and elaborates especially on the constraints, conflicts, tensions and complications of the necessary boundary-crossing for integrating exploration and exploitation.

  • 1880.
    Virta, Sari
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Constraints and complications of innovation in content development: Case Yle in Finland2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the current turbulent environment, media organisations are expected to be on the leading edge of innovation to survive – and especially to thrive. However, the established practices and preferred work patterns of traditional organizations impose systemic constraints on the realization of media innovations (Ess 2014). Research into creativity leading to innovation in media organizations has been scarce, and similarly case studies about creative work practices (Mierzejewska 2011, Hesmondhalgh & Baker 2011, Küng 2008). Addressing these topics in media management research is an urgent need.

    This paper explores theoretical assumptions regarding the realization of innovation in creative media work. The literature and previous research on creativity (as the prerequisite for innovation), especially organizational creativity in the workplace and operationalizing innovation (as the outcome of creativity), as well as studies on management of both interdependent aspects, are utilized. Special emphasis is placed on the constraints (see e.g. Rosso 2014), conflicts and complications of crossing boundaries and borders in a creative media organisation striving for innovation.

    Achieving innovation in media content requires management expertise in development work. This work differs from routine production because it requires experimentation and involves higher risk of failures. Further, content development work presupposes creative organization capabilities, rather than the traditional emphasis on efficiency and uniformity via standardisation (see Mintzberg 1989 for innovative organization). Theories on creativity and innovation suggest that new things come from differences ‘colliding’ (e.g. Amabile et al. 2005), i.e. result from variation in e.g. makers, genres or media. Sustaining innovation creates a complex and paradoxical situation because managers must on the one hand ‘back off’ and allow for failures and individual proclivities that are characteristic in development work, which depends on creativity, while at the same time they must create and enforce procedures to ensure the work meets stipulated objectives and achieves a useful outcome. This often leads to conflict because organisations have political systems with varying interests and understandings. This fuels power struggles and creates complications as a routine fact of organizational dynamics (Morgan 2006, see also Mintzberg et al. 2005).

    Media production requires diverse specialists and a creative organisation spans levels from the individual to teams and all of this contextualized in an organisational work culture that is often actually a range of work cultures. An organization features a dynamic that is simultaneously interdependent and controversial. Focusing on one aspect is not sufficient for understanding the totality. However, creativity and innovation have been sparsely studied using multi-level perspectives and this approach is vital for understanding creativity leading to innovations in media management theory and in the practice of media organizations. Because development work is a complex task, a systems perspective on creativity (see e.g. Csikzentmihalyi 2006, McIntyre 2013, Tan 1998) is a useful theoretical frame for analysing creativity and innovation management in media organizations (and beyond).

    After sketching the theoretical basis, the paper analyses an empirical case: the programme development initiative that Yleisradio (Yle), the PSB of Finland, accomplished in the early to mid 2000s. The analysis emphasizes the conflict-sensitive nature of relationships that depend on interaction between innovation teams and their projects and the ongoing operations that can be understood as “the Performance Engine” (Govindarajan & Trimble 2010). The paper looks at the organizational and work setting (see e.g. Mumford 2012) in retrospect, and specifically analyzes the reasons for the initiative’s failure and dissolution despite being a good concept and a productive practice in the task of media content development.

    The case usefully illustrates the paradoxes discussed in this abstract by assessing a creative organization tasked with innovation inside a traditional media company. The results demonstrate a constant need to work across boundaries and borders both within and outside the firm, keyed to complexities of many types in relationships, e.g. in ways of thinking, unit priorities and systems, media, cultures, specializations, etc. The paper explores the difficulties, conflicts and complications that are characteristic of development work, being both different from Yle’s routine operations and, at the same time, a constituent part of them. The author has access to all of the data (e.g. strategy and operational documents, personal notes, evaluations, development procedures, negotiations, etc.) for the entire period that chronicles the experiment from 2002 to 2005. The case opens valuable possibilities for learning about managing organizational creativity for innovation in a media company, and especially for understanding constraints, conflicts and complications that are typical.

  • 1881.
    Virta, Sari
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Managing tensions in creative content development work: Cases from the media industry2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation explores organisational tensions and their management in creative content development work in the context of creative industries, particularly media. The study focuses on the dynamic relationship and complexities between current business (exploitation) and future business (exploration), where tensions become managerial issues. It builds on dualities as the overarching analytical concept. The combination of theorisations on ambidexterity, value networks and hybrid organisations is used to examine organisational tensions as dynamic interrelationships between the elements of dualities.

    This compilation dissertation builds on three qualitative case studies, which are investigated in six individual, empirical papers. The case organisations include a company from both public and private media, as well as a collaborative arrangement in a creative industry cluster. The longitudinal empirical data comprises diary writings, interviews, documentation and participant observations.

    The study extends the understanding about how and why organisational tensions pose a demanding managerial challenge to established companies. It suggests that these tensions cannot be solved as such; instead, they need to be managed “with” rather than “against”. The study contributes to previous literature by combining theoretical perspectives to create links between existing approaches on ambidexterity. Regarding clusters, the study offers new knowledge by shifting the focus from mere spatial co-location to shared value creation through collaborative relationships.

    As implications for practice, the study suggests that managerial effort is required to anticipate, identify, evaluate, and navigate tensions in creative work. The results emphasise the key importance of embracing interrelated, coexisting, enduring, and complex tensions as a multifaceted package.

  • 1882.
    Virta, Sari
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Managing tensions of collaboration in a hybrid organisation: A case study of the Mediapolis cluster in FinlandManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cross-sector collaboration combining public (noncommercial) and private (commercial) organisational orientations is expected to provide support for the flexible and dynamic responses required in the disruptive operational environments, which challenge the performance and survival of creative industry organisations. However, such collaboration features complexity and tensions. This article explores inherent tensions of cross-sector collaboration by utilising theorisations on hybrid organisations. A qualitative case study of a hybrid organisation, which was created to manage a creative industry cluster, is used as means to explore and analyse the tensions. The focus is on tensions because their successful management increases the value-creation potential of cross-sector collaborations. The results contribute to emergent scholarly discussions on hybrid organisations and hybrid organising, focusing on the central role of tensions as a management challenge. In addition to the theoretical contributions, the results have implications for managers aiming to cope with collaborative tensions in practice.

  • 1883.
    Virta, Sari
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. University of Tampere, Finland.
    Value Networks for Renewal and Innovation: Managerial Challenges for PSB2016In: Mediated (dis)continuities: contesting pasts, presents and futures, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public service media organisations face increasing demands for renewal in their output, production processes and management practices due to the rapidlytransforming environment. The traditional in-house, channel-based production approach and structures for innovation development and managementdo not suffice in the current realities. Instead, PSB organisations need to develop co-operative arrangements with various partners in the media industriesand beyond, to be able to cope with the rapidly growing demands for renewal, efficiency and relevance. In the situation described above, the concept andtheories of value networks become useful. Value is no longer created internal to a single organisation, but in complex co-opetitive (competitive and co-operativeat the same time) relationships between various actors. Accordingly, managerial arrangements and practices need renewal. However, managementof value networks is a complex endeavour due to the various tensions between different aims, arrangements or approaches of the value network members.Skilful management of boundary-crossing relationships and dependencies is crucial for building, maintaining and developing value networks that potentiallyenable innovative co-operation between PSM and private media organisations for renewal and innovation. This qualitative paper explores managerialchallenges of value networks, aiming at creating new understanding for media management research, especially. A new media cluster, Mediapolis (http://mediapolis.fi/en/), is being created in Tampere, Finland. Mediapolis aims at becoming a network for content production and digital industries with a vision”Mediapolis is a centre for storytelling and digital industries, where interdisciplinary innovations are born”. The Mediapolis campus was launched in the autumn2014. In January 2016, the key partners of Mediapolis, including Yle, founded an official co-operative organisation as the Mediapolis “organisational”structure. The next challenge is to develop the operational structures and practical management procedures for the Mediapolis value network. The paperlooks at value networks as a managerial challenge especially for the traditional public service company in Finland. The focus is on management practicesand processes in a value network between media organisations. The qualitative, empirical case study utilizes semi-structured interviews from differentstages of Mediapolis development as well as and documentation of the project. The author has followed the development of Mediapolis over several years,from the real-estate development stage of the project to the current development aims towards a network of media organisations for co-productions,innovation and shared value creation. The Mediapolis case opens useful possibilities for analysing of co-operative arrangements and practices betweena traditional PSB company and private media organisations. The managerial challenges in creating and developing the Mediapolis operational model havebeen significant, which is still the case to the date. The paper provides a timely opportunity to explore the forming stage of a collaborative value network inthe media industry, involving a PSB company as a major player and contributor.

  • 1884.
    Virta, Sari
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Lowe, Gregory F.
    School of Communication, Media and Theatre, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Integrating media clusters and value networks: Insights for management theory and research from a case study of Mediapolis in Finland2017In: Journal of Management and Organization, ISSN 1833-3672, E-ISSN 1839-3527, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 2-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We argue that there is scholarly potential in linking theory on industry clusters with theory on value networks. To date, these two theoretical streams have developed largely in parallel, limiting understanding of how the two are integrated in practice. By considering these theories in combination and the unique context of creative industries, we generate insight on the management of clusters as value networks. Our ongoing longitudinal empirical case is a new media cluster called ‘Mediapolis’ in the city of Tampere, Finland. The case study commenced at the time the cluster was in the planning and early operational stage. Results demonstrate the usefulness of linking the two theories, and support a future research agenda examining the types of cluster configurations meeting the criteria of value networks, and the conditions under which value network cluster configurations are more sustainable than simply a spatial agglomeration of clusters.

  • 1885.
    Virta, Sari
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. University of Tampere, Finland.
    Lowe, Gregory Ferrell
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Crossing Boundaries for Innovation: Content Development for PSM at Yle2016In: Crossing borders and boundaries in public service media / [ed] Gregory Ferrell Lowe & Nobuto Yamamoto, Göteborg: Nordicom, 2016, p. 229-246Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors explain the crucial importance of crossing boundaries to achieve innovation in PSM content development. The reasons are explained with reference to creative organisation and innovation theories, and demonstrated in practice via analysis of an empirical case from Yle, the Finnish Broadcasting Corporation. The chapter focuses on characteristic challenges and practices in boundary crossing at three levels: organisational, group (or team) and individual. Key findings include lessons about the complexity of building and maintaining a creative media organisation in practice, especially in relation to designing structures, organisational arrangements and tools to make it happen, i.e. the move from ideation to realisation. Internal politics, organisational resistance, and managerial complications are confounding factors. The chapter demonstrates how and why nurturing collaboration across boundaries is a complex task that requires a particular and special skills set for media managers.

  • 1886.
    Virta, Sari
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). University of Tampere, Finland.
    Lowe, Gregory Ferrell
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Managing Dependencies and Tensions in Value Networks Development: Case Mediapolis in Finland2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Media organisations face growing demands for co-operation. Achieving innovation that is vital requires collaborative arrangements based on creative interaction. Collaboration is often realized in networked operations between media organisations (e.g. Baumann, 2013), media clusters as one example. At the same time, competition in the media field intensifies. It is here that the concept and theory of value networks becomes useful (e.g. de Man, Berends, Lammers, van Raaij & van Weele 2008; Bathelt, Malmberg & Maskell, 2004). Also, the intensity, i.e. the frequency and range of interactions in clusters of media companies becomes a central factor for consideration (Picard, 2008). In this reality, managerial challenges, especially, in relation to interaction, collaboration and co-opetition are considerable, and respective competences need to be developed and utilized for success.

    Collaborative production is typical for innovation-intensive industries (Nohria & Eccles, 1992), and media firms are no different in this respect. However, the configuration of collaborative relationships in and between media organisations in networks is a complex managerial task, especially in the rapidly changing environment of diminishing resources. Media managers must be competent in handling various dependencies in value networks for shared value creation (e.g. Bilton, 2007), and especially the related tensions. To be useful, co-operative relationships need to be created and built, and the network development happens in stages (Büchel & Raub, 2002).

    The empirical case of the paper is Mediapolis (http://mediapolis.fi/en/) in Tampere, Finland. It is a new media centre and a cluster, an ecosystem and a network for content production and digital industries with a vision ”Mediapolis is a centre for storytelling and digital industries, where interdisciplinary innovations are born”. The Mediapolis campus was launched in the autumn 2014, although the planning started some years before. It is an interesting case for analysis, because its viability depends on the creation and management of a creative value network.

    Mediapolis development illustrates challenges and tensions of simultaneous collaboration and competition, i.e. co-opetition in a value network aiming for innovation. Especially, the managerial challenges in creating and developing the Mediapolis operational model have been significant, and continue to be so. The paper explores the first years of Mediapolis, providing a unique access to the forming stage of a creative media cluster development and its management. Thus, the paper contributes directly to the conference theme by developing understanding about creative collaboration and coopetition aiming at achieving media innovation, especially focusing on the complexity of interactions and tensions between Mediapolis partners.

    The empirical research material consists of semi-structured interviews, including the main Mediapolis partners’ management representatives as interviewees. The interviews have been conducted in different stages of Mediapolis development, e.g. in the early stages of planning and after the campus launch. Also, Mediapolis documentation has been collected from open sources (e.g. websites) and acquired from partner organisations. The study utilizes a qualitative case study approach (Stake, 1995), suitable for analysing unique cases in detail to create understanding about a phenomenon. Document analysis (Bowen, 2009) and qualitative thematic coding with ‘factual’ approach (e.g. Patton, 2002; Alastalo & Åkerman, 2010) are used as methodological approaches, and Atlas.ti software is utilized for analysis.

    In conclusion, the purpose of the paper is to discuss and elaborate on the various managerial and organisational dependencies and tensions in creating Mediapolis. Further, a central focus will be on the managerial competences required to deal with the new realities of value networks successfully in the media industry. The methodological approach is qualitative, with the aim of creating new knowledge on the scholarly field of media management for both academic and practical purposes. In media management, value networks have been scarcely researched, but the topic is highly timely and worthy of scholarly attention.

  • 1887.
    Virta, Sari
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Malmelin, Nando
    Aalto University School of Business, Finland.
    Ambidextrous Tensions: Dynamics of Creative Work in the Media Innovation Process2017In: Journal of Media Innovations, ISSN 1812-7592, E-ISSN 1894-5562, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 44-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses creative work in one of Europe’s largest media organizations, in which a newly formed development team was tasked with creating a new multi-platform media product. The objective of this article is to explore the dynamics of team creativity in the process of developing and managing media content innovation. To do this, this study utilizes the concept of ambidexterity for understanding multi-level tensions between the on-going media production work and innovation processes typically co-existing in media operations. The results of the analysis indicate that, due to pressures created by the routine media production, media innovations require specific focus and prioritization to succeed. This requires recognizing, balancing and managing the ambidextrous tensions between exploration and exploitation in creative media work. In addition to practical implications for management of media innovations, this study contributes to research on media innovations, particularly from the perspectives of creative work and organizational creativity.

  • 1888.
    Virta, Sari
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Malmelin, Nando
    Aalto University, Finland.
    Dynamics of organisational creativity in media innovation processes2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 1889.
    Visintin, Francesca
    et al.
    University of Udine, Italy.
    Pittino, DanielJönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Fast Growing Firms in a Slow Growth Economy: Institutional Conditions for Innovation2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Europe needs more innovative companies that grow quickly and end up big. This book examines SME growth, innovation and success, to suggest that fast growing firms could offer a major contribution to the recovery of a European economy. The contributors examine 11 case studies from Italian firms, breaking the book up into three parts: context, actors and strategy. The topics discussed include entrepreneurship and technological clusters, innovative start-ups and growth factors, and family firms as the incubators of new ventures.

  • 1890.
    Visintin, Francesca
    et al.
    University of Udine, Italy.
    Pittino, Daniel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Minichilli, Allessandro
    Bocconi Universitt, Italy.
    Financial performance and non‐family CEO turnover in private family firms under different conditions of ownership and governance2017In: Corporate governance: An International Review, ISSN 0964-8410, E-ISSN 1467-8683, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 312-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manuscript Type: Empirical 

    Research Question/Issue

    Family firms, as insider-controlled companies, should be less likely to exhibit CEO turnover after poor performance and may thus promote enhanced focus on long-term goals. However, when a non-family CEO is in charge, the relatively limited empirical evidence is contrasting. Some studies find that only family CEOs are immune from the threat of dismissal following poor financial performance, while other studies show that family firms discipline their CEOs for poor financial performance regardless of their family status. In this work, we try to reconcile these contrasting findings and investigate what ownership and governance conditions influence the owners’ pressure on the CEO to achieve short-term financial results.

    Research findings/insights

    Drawing on a longitudinal dataset that covers the entire population of Italian medium and large family companies, we find that when family ownership is concentrated in the hands of few family shareholders or there is a low number of family members involved in the board of directors, non-family CEOs are less likely to be dismissed after poor performance.

    Theoretical/Academic Implications

    Our study, adopting the behavioral agency theory as the guiding framework, highlights the importance for governance decisions of the potential goal divergence among principals in closely held ownership structures. Our results also add to the still scant literature on the relationship between family owners and non-family CEOs.

    Practitioner/Policy Implications

    Our research suggests that, in the decision to hire a non-family CEO, family business owners should not only assess their gaps in managerial skills but also carefully consider the ownership structure and family involvement conditions. On the side of professional non-family managers, our results offer insights on ways to address the employment relationship with the controlling family.

  • 1891.
    Vo, Mai-Thuy-Tien
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Muntasira, Rafia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Jiang, Ming-ming
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Push-pull’s factors influencing exchange student’s destination choice for study abroad: A case study of the students at JIBS2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    ‘Internationalisation of higher education’ is considered a significant issue in many countries.One effective way to achieve internationalisation is by having an exchange study program. Thisis something which has been promoted by universities all around the globe. It has been foundthat the experience of studying abroad is beneficial to the students. There has been a trend ofincreasing number of students going to study abroad. In Sweden, Jönköping InternationalBusiness School (JIBS) is one of the most internationalised business schools that promoteexchange studies extensively. To promote study abroad it is important to know what motivatesand influences the students to go on exchange. There has been previous research oninternationalisation and push-pull factors of student mobility which acted as a guideline for thisthesis. Thus it was appealing to study the reasons behind the phenomenon of students goingabroad for exchange studies.The purpose of this paper is to explore the push-pull factors influencing student’s destinationchoice for exchange study abroad. JIBS is the institution where the case study was conducted.The empirical data have been gathered by using a qualitative approach combining face-to-faceinterviews and focus groups with international exchange students and Swedish students. Toanalyse the findings, theories relating to marketing communications in service and productattribution were used.The results derived from the empirical findings show the push-pull factors which motivatestudents to go on exchange. The initial push factor is the promotion and encouragement tostudents for studying abroad by the university. Exchange studies helps to enhance students’personal development with intercultural communication, practicing language skills andtravelling. These skills and experiences add value to their CV.On the other hand the pull factors which the students take into consideration for deciding ontheir host countries and institutions are geographic location, weather, culture, and the economicand social position of the country. Living cost and the education system which includeslanguage used, courses offered, perceived image, communication and cooperation andrecommendations are factors influencing the choices of a student’s decision on the destinationfor studying abroad. The authors in this thesis summarised their findings in a model of pushpullfactors which is specialised only for exchange students. The process of considering thesefactors leads to the outcome of choosing the destination for studying abroad. The authorsbelieve the results of this study can be applied on other universities for further research andmay be appropriate for its own case to focus on areas where it needs to improve.ii

  • 1892.
    von Briel, Frederik
    et al.
    School of Management, QUT Business School, QUT, Brisbane, Australia.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research, QUT Business School, QUT, Brisbane, Australia.
    Recker, Jan
    Faculty of Management, Economics and Social Sciences, University of Cologne, Germany.
    Digital Technologies as External Enablers of New Venture Creation in the IT Hardware Sector2018In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 47-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We develop theory about how and when digital technologies enable new venture creation processes. We identify two fundamental properties of digital technologies-specificity and relationality-and develop propositions that link these properties to six enabling mechanisms: compression, conservation, expansion, substitution, combination, and generation. We use the linked properties and mechanisms to determine how and when in the venture creation process-from prospecting to developing to exploiting-digital technologies have enabled start-ups in the IT hardware sector and develop stage-dependent propositions about their sector-level effects. We conclude our theorizing by discussing its implications beyond digital technologies and the IT hardware sector.

  • 1893.
    von Briel, Frederik
    et al.
    QUT Business School, Australia.
    Recker, Jan
    Faculty of Management, Economics and Social Sciences, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research, QUT Business School, Australia.
    Not all digital venture ideas are created equal: Implications for venture creation processes2018In: Journal of strategic information systems, ISSN 0963-8687, E-ISSN 1873-1198, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 278-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital ventures are formed around ideas that have digital artifacts at their core. We develop theory that explains how the composition of digital artifacts influences venture creation processes. First, we develop propositions that link differences in the embodiment and coupling of digital artifact components to tensions in venture creation process inputs, behaviors, and outputs. Second, we link compositional differences in digital artifacts to differences in venture creation process initiation, duration, and outcome. Our theorizing establishes a foundation for future research on digital artifacts within and beyond entrepreneurship contexts, and for future research on entrepreneurship within and beyond digital artifact contexts. 

  • 1894.
    von Lüttichau, Max
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Villmann, Chris
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Governance in Small Family Firms: Laying the Groundwork in a Swedish Study2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The governance field is well studied. However, small family firms do not receive their fair amount of coverage, despite their importance. In this work the field of governance in small family firms is qualitatively explored, using a sample of eight Swedish firms with a total of ten interview partners. Using a Constructivist Grounded Theory, informed by previous literature, we find nine key themes characterizing governance in small family firms: (1) Ownership & Board, (2) Holding Company, (3) Advisor & External Help, (4) Responsibility, (5) Formality, (6) Informality, (7) Conflict, (8) Succession and (9) Discussion & Conversation. Our findings suggest that all small family businesses employ some form of governance, however, this is not always recognized as such in previous literature, showing that corporate governance is too narrowly defined. We also investigate why governance structures are (not) implemented and how this is done. In connection to this, we visualize the factors influencing whether or not a small family firm implements formal governance structures. Additionally, we discuss what actually makes a family firm small. We contribute by investigating governance concepts in another context, namely the one of small family businesses, and seeing to what extent they hold up. The work allows us to conclude that some findings confirm existing theory, while others question it or cannot be found therein at all. 

  • 1895.
    Voorbij, Priscilla
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Handbaek, Filip
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Better Together: Co-leadership Dynamics in Start-ups2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although leadership is a topic which has been extensively researched, there is limited literature concerning co-leadership, especially in connection to start-ups. Moreover, as those who are co-leaders in start-ups often also are co-founders and co-owners, it is vital that their co-leadership dynamic is functional as a way of staying in business. Co-leadership is described as a leadership form which has become more commonly used, which further adds urgency of exploring the topic of co-leadership dynamics, and how to make it functional. Purpose: The purpose of this thesis is to explore how a functional co-leadership dynamic can be created between leaders who are simultaneously founders and owners of a start-up. Method: This is a qualitative study, for which is used semi-structured interviews to collect data from 11 co-leaders in 10 companies. The transcribed interviews have been used together with secondary data to point out specific elements that have shown to be important for a functional co-leadership dynamic. Both the themes of co-leadership dynamics and the context of entrepreneurship, foundership and ownership were used to find and highlight these elements. The elements have been discussed in the Analysis and are thereafter presented in a model. Conclusion: Six elements have been pointed out as important for a functional co-leadership dynamic: Collaborative Attitude, Shared Values & Vision, Open & Continuous Communication, Synergy, Learning & Personal Growth, and Trust. These elements are interrelated, and Collaborative Attitude, Shared Values & Vision, Synergy and Trust are also connected to the contextual factors.

  • 1896.
    Vrablova, Adriana
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Kalinic, Stjepan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Technology acceptance of IKEA mobile application2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the past few years, rapid development of mobile technologies has been changing the way people approach purchasing. Using Technology Acceptance Model (Davis, 1986), the authors believe that IKEA’s furniture mobile application creates a certain value to its users. The study aims at examining the importance of perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use and compatibility dimensions of IKEA’s app and their impact on consumers’ behavioral intentions to see whether or not they lead to actual purchase.

     

    The thesis findings reveal that IKEA mobile application is not widely used. The results should have been applicable for similar companies as IKEA especially those which promote in-store app usage. However, it is not possible since the thesis contradicts the assumption of broad usage of such mobile application.

     

    The analysis of the surveys releaved gender having a role in IKEA mobile app perception as well as occupation. The analysis is also contributing by a realization that mobile technologies lead to faster decision-making, more information availability, and therefore, can create better marketing communication strategies.

  • 1897.
    Vreeburg, Frank
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Hesshaus, Daniela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Leadership in Born Globals: The Global Leader and their Influence on Individuals2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Globalisation has led to the perception of a “flat” world, meaning that it is fairly easy to cross geographical boundaries and do business in different countries. With globalisation, a new phenomenon arose, termed Born Globals. Born Globals seek international operations from or near their inception. These companies become more and more economically important, and their appearance has increased significantly over the last decades due to economic and technological developments. In this context, global leadership has gained importance, especially competencies such as the global mindset, cultural intelligence, and deutero learning.

    Purpose

    The purpose of this thesis is to analyse global leadership, specifically cultural intelligence, the global mindset, deutero learning and the development of global leaders, and how it influences the entrepreneurial attitude of individual employees in Born Global Companies. To do so, we have analysed Prezi, a Born Global company, specifically from the employee’s perspective, complementing self-perception leadership research.  

    Method

    We have suggested four propositions, namely that the leader in Born Global Companies has high cultural intelligence, a global mindset, that these characteristics influence the entrepreneurial attitude of the individual, and that human resource management is highly involved in the development of global leaders. These have been tested in a case study strategy with both qualitative and qualitative methods.

    Conclusion

    We confirmed the propositions concerning the cultural intelligence and the global mindset, however we had to reject the propositions concerning the entrepreneurial attitude of the individual, since we could not establish a relationship between the individual entrepreneurial attitude and global leadership characteristics. Our research suggests that a relationship with the global culture in the company is more likely. Finally, the last proposition had to be rejected, because human resource management was not highly involved in developing the global leadership characteristics, but the diversity and culture within the company served as an “informal” intercultural training.

  • 1898.
    Vu, Long
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Phan, Nga
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Truong, Ha
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    E-Customer values in Vietnamese apparel industry: A study from customers' perception2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Key words:         Customer value, value-adding factors, e-commerce, apparel industry, Vietnamese market, customers’ perception. 

    Background:      Along with the development of many applications from Internet, Electronic Commerce (e-commerce) has changed the business scene in the global economy by emerging as a new, efficient channel of doing business. The apparel industry has also been approaching this way of doing business as an attempt to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of operations at various extents. In the Vietnamese market, Ninomaxx being well-known as leading fashion brand for young and proactive people is in the process of launching its very first online shop. However, the lack of information and the vagueness in regard to customers preference and shopping habit in the context of e-commerce leads to many difficulties for fashion companies like Ninomaxx. These lacking can all be traced back to one universal cause that is the insufficiency in understanding customers’ perceived value. Accordingly, it raises the authors’ interests to conduct a research of customers’ perception concerning customer value in Vietnamese apparel industry within the e-commerce context.

    Purpose:             The purpose of this thesis is to identify elements of e-commerce that customers perceive as value-adding factors in the context of Vietnamese apparel industry. Accordingly, thesis will examine how value can be created and enhanced for customers in the case of Ninomaxx and Vietnamese apparel firms in general.

    Method:              In this thesis, authors chose to collect and analyze data mainly through a quantitative approach. Prospective customers of Ninomaxx, whose ages were from 17 to 30, were the surveyed group. A questionnaire was employed to collect response from the group and was distributed in two ways: an online link and offline papers. Various nonparametric statistical techniques and one extensive model were used to analyze results of the survey.

    Conclusion:    From the perception of Vietnamese customers from 17 to 30 years old, there are 5 elements of e-commerce that are identified as very strong value-adding factors, namely, availability of information on the website, accuracy of demonstrating products’ color on website, seller’s ensuring products’ quality, seller’s trustworthiness and safety of using products. There are additionally 11 strong value-adding factors from perception of apparel customers in Vietnam. However, there is evidence of differences in customers’ response regarding their demographic characteristics and Internet usage. Apparel companies should consider accordingly in order to form the optimal strategy for e-commerce retail channel in Vietnam.

  • 1899.
    Wachauf-Tautermann, Sebastian
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Weichert, Stefanie
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Impact of External Situational Factors on the Agility of Humanitarian Supply Chains: A Case Study of Haiti Earthquake 20102015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Developing, emerging and developed countries are vulnerable to disasters and might require external assistance to cope with their aftermaths. It is forecasted that disasters will increase five-fold over the next 50 years. In an environment, which is characterized by many uncertainties, humanitarian supply chains are created to provide disaster relief in a highly complex and dynamic setting. This environment is unique for every disaster, where infrastructure, government, physical, socio-economic and security situational factors can either facilitate or restrict humanitarian operations. Agile supply chain principles enable humanitarian organizations to quickly respond to disasters.

    Purpose

    The purpose of this thesis is to explore and analyze the impact of external situational factors on the agility of humanitarian supply chains and humanitarian organizations’ actions taken to address those external situational factors during the immediate response phase of an emergency event.

    Methodology

    For the purpose of this study a combination of an inductive and deductive research approach was applied. The study was of exploratory and qualitative nature with a single case study in its focus. Empirical data was collected by conducting semi-structured interviews with nine respondents involved in the disaster relief operations of Haiti Earthquake 2010. Empirical findings were analyzed by using the template analysis.

    Conclusion

    External situational factors have a strong impact on capabilities enabling humanitarian supply chains to be agile during the immediate response phase. Humanitarian organizations are able to reduce the negative impact of external situational factors while in other cases the negative impact of external situational factors is further intensified by actions taken by humanitarian organizations. Furthermore, humanitarian organizations are able to utilize and enhance some of the positive impacts of external situational factors. However, the initially positive impact of some external situational factors may be reduced by inappropriate actions taken by humanitarian organizations. Therefore, understanding the context of the disaster’s broader environment is a prerequisite to an effective emergency response. 

  • 1900.
    Wadbring, Ingela
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Lagerström, Ann
    Ots, Mart
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Särskilt yttrande2013In: SOU 2013:66 Översyn av det statliga stödet till dagspressen: Slutbetänkande av Presstödskommittén, Stockholm: Fritzes, 2013, p. 451-454Chapter in book (Other academic)
35363738394041 1851 - 1900 of 2044
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf