Endre søk
Begrens søket
12345 151 - 200 of 238
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Treff pr side
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
Merk
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 151.
    Joosten, Annette
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Albrecht, Matthew A.
    School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Horlin, Chiara
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Leung, Denise
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Ordqvist, Anna
    Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences (IMH), Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University & Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, Linköping, Sweden.
    Fleischer, Håkan
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Gaze and visual search strategies of children with Asperger syndrome/high functioning autism viewing a magic trick2016Inngår i: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 19, nr 2, s. 95-102Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine visual search patterns and strategies used by children with and without Asperger syndrome/high functioning autism (AS/HFA) while watching a magic trick. Limited responsivity to gaze cues is hypothesised to contribute to social deficits in children with AS/HFA.

    Methods: Twenty-one children with AS/HFA and 31 matched peers viewed a video of a gaze-cued magic trick twice. Between the viewings, they were informed about how the trick was performed. Participants’ eye movements were recorded using a head-mounted eye-tracker.

    Results: Children with AS/HFA looked less frequently and had shorter fixation on the magician’s direct and averted gazes during both viewings and more frequently at not gaze-cued objects and on areas outside the magician’s face. After being informed of how the trick was conducted, both groups made fewer fixations on gaze-cued objects and direct gaze.

    Conclusions: Information may enhance effective visual strategies in children with and without AS/HFA.

  • 152. Kircher, K.
    et al.
    Thorslund, B.
    Kircher, A.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Anund, A.
    Passering av buss i 30 km/h: Utvärdering av säkerhetseffekter i samband med hastighetsgräns 30 km/h vid passering av buss - en simulatorstudie.2007Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 153. Knoll, C.
    et al.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Gregersen, N.P.
    deWaard, D.
    Pardo, J.
    Bekiaris, E.
    Rothermel, S.
    User Interface of Interactive Multimedia Tool2003Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 154.
    Kuzminski, Rebecca
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Netto, Julie
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Wilson, Joel
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Long Pocket Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
    Chamberlain, Angela
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Linking knowledge and attitudes: Determining neurotypical knowledge about and attitudes towards autism2019Inngår i: PLoS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, nr 7, artikkel-id e0220197Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    "Why are neurotypicals so pig-ignorant about autism?" an autistic person wrote on the Curtin Autism Research Group's on-line portal as a response to a call for research questions. Coproduced with an autistic researcher, knowledge about and attitudes towards autism were analysed from 1,054 completed surveys, representing the Australian neurotypical adult population. The majority, 81.5% of participants had a high level of knowledge and 81.3% of participants had a strong positive attitude towards autism. Neither age, nor education level had an impact on attitudes. However, attitudes were influenced by knowledge about 'Societal Views and Ideas'; 'What it Could be Like to Have Autism'; and the demographic variables 'Knowing and having spent time around someone with autism'; and gender (women having more positive attitudes than men). Thus, targeted interventions, geared more towards men than women, to increase knowledge about autism could further improve attitudes and increase acceptance of the autistic community.

  • 155. Larsson, H
    et al.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Åldrande - livsvillkor och hälsa.
    Off-road and On-Road driving Assessment Methods, What do They Say?: A Clinical Sample2007Inngår i: Paper Presented at the Fourth International Driving Symposium on Human factors in Driver Assessments, Training and Vehicle Design. Portland, 335-342, 2007Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 156.
    Larsson, Helena
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Lundberg, Catarina
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Åldrande - livsvillkor och hälsa.
    Johansson, Kurt
    A Swedish Survey of Occupational Therapists' Involvement and Performance in Driving Assessments2007Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 14, nr 4, s. 215-220Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which occupational therapists (OTs) are involved in driving assessments in Sweden and how these assessments are performed. A questionnaire was sent to 154 geriatric, rehabilitation, and neurological clinics, and additionally directly to 19 OTs who had purchased a test battery specifically used for driving assessments. The response rate was 60%. Of those responding, 57% reported being involved in fitness-to-drive assessments. However, such assessments were carried out in various manners and diverse methods were used, ranging from unstandardized activity assessments to a test developed specifically for driving assessments. Only 19% used on-road driving tests as a complement to the clinical assessments. Apart from the lack of appropriate methods, the respondents said that they did not have sufficient knowledge to perform driving assessments and expressed a need for further education. In the future it seems necessary for OTs in Sweden to undergo specialized training and perform the assessments on a regular basis to maintain a high level of competence as driving assessors.

  • 157.
    Lee, Elinda A. L.
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Australia.
    Black, Melissa H.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Australia.
    Tan, Tele
    Curtin Autism Research Group, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Australia.
    “I’m Destined to Ace This”: Work experience placement during high school for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder2019Inngår i: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 49, nr 8, s. 3089-3101Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    As postsecondary outcomes of adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are poor, there is a need for programs that aim to improve employment and education outcomes. This study employed a grounded theory approach to explore the key factors contributing to successful work placement experience and the perceived benefits of these placements from the perspective of adolescents with ASD (n = 5), their parents (n = 6) and employers (n = 6). Key factors contributing to success include preparing for the workplace, harnessing strengths and interests and developing work related skills, while the benefits include insight into the workplace, recognising and realising potential, working as a team and the pathway ahead. The findings articulate a framework which could underpin future transition interventions for adolescents with ASD. 

  • 158.
    Lee, H
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering.
    Cordell, R
    Granger, A
    Vieira, B
    Lee, A
    Validity of driving Simulator in Assessing Drivers with Parkinson Disease2007Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 159. Lee, H
    et al.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Åldrande - livsvillkor och hälsa.
    Rosenwax, L
    Cordell, R
    Granger, A
    Vieria, B
    Lee, A
    Validity of Driving Simulator in Assessing Drivers with Parkinson's Disease2007Inngår i: Advances in Transportation Studies, ISSN 1824-5463, Vol. Special issue, s. 81-90Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 160.
    Lee, Hoe Chung-Yeung
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Flavell, Helen
    Faculty of Health Science, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Parsons, Dave
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Parsons, Richard
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Developing agentic learners for 21st century practice: A pedagogic approach in occupational therapy2016Inngår i: Journal of Allied Health, ISSN 0090-7421, E-ISSN 1945-404X, Vol. 45, nr 1, s. 8-13aArtikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, an approach to teaching occupational therapy students how to create orthoses, whilst at the same time developing higher-order critical thinking, reflective, and clinical reasoning skills is described. The scaffolded nature of the learning activities, incorporating Kolb's reflective learning cycle, was used to support students' capacity for clinical reasoning and better prepare them for clinical placement. The peer-assessment element was also designed to support the experiential learning by allowing students to test their evaluation of hand orthoses, compare their assessment with an expert's, and identify areas for improvement. Students who demonstrated higher grades for the written reflection assessment showed better agreement with the experts (smaller bias, p<0.01). This study concluded there was a correlation between students' capacity for reflective thinking and the development of clinical reasoning. Furthermore, the reflective writing exercise encouraged students to generalise their skills beyond the classroom. The approach and findings of this study are relevant to a range of allied health professions through providing a process to support the development of higherorder critical thinking, reflection, and reasoning skills. Furthermore, the study provides an evidence base to demonstrate that higher reflective skill capacity and critical thinking are crucial to creating agentic learners.

  • 161.
    Lee, Wee Lih
    et al.
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Tan, Tele
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Curtin University, Perth, AustraliaDepartment of Mechanical Engineering, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Works, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Leung, Yee Hong
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Single-trial event-related potential extraction through one-unit ICA-with-reference2016Inngår i: Journal of Neural Engineering, ISSN 1741-2560, E-ISSN 1741-2552, Vol. 13, nr 6, artikkel-id 066010Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. In recent years, ICA has been one of the more popular methods for extracting event-related potential (ERP) at the single-trial level. It is a blind source separation technique that allows the extraction of an ERP without making strong assumptions on the temporal and spatial characteristics of an ERP. However, the problem with traditional ICA is that the extraction is not direct and is time-consuming due to the need for source selection processing. In this paper, the application of an one-unit ICA-with-Reference (ICA-R), a constrained ICA method, is proposed.

    Approach. In cases where the time-region of the desired ERP is known a priori, this time information is utilized to generate a reference signal, which is then used for guiding the one-unit ICA-R to extract the source signal of the desired ERP directly.

    Main results. Our results showed that, as compared to traditional ICA, ICA-R is a more effective method for analysing ERP because it avoids manual source selection and it requires less computation thus resulting in faster ERP extraction.

    Significance. In addition to that, since the method is automated, it reduces the risks of any subjective bias in the ERP analysis. It is also a potential tool for extracting the ERP in online application.

  • 162.
    Leung, Denise
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Ordqvist, Anna
    Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences (IMH), Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University & Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, UHL, County Council, Linköping, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Parsons, Rickard
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Facial emotion recognition and visual search strategies of children with high functioning autism and Asperger syndrome2013Inngår i: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 7, nr 7, s. 833-844Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Adults with high functioning autism (HFA) and Asperger syndrome (AS) are often less able to identify facially expressed emotions than their matched controls. However, results regarding emotion recognition abilities in children with HFA/AS remain equivocal. Emotion recognition ability and visual search strategies of 26 children with HFA/AS and matched controls were compared. An eye tracker measured the number of fixations and fixation durations as participants were shown 12 pairs of slides, displaying photos of faces expressing anger, happiness or surprise. The first slide of each pair showed a face broken up into puzzle pieces. The eyes in half of the puzzle piece slides were bisected, while those in the remaining half were whole. Participants then identified which of three alternative faces was expressing the same emotion shown in the preceding puzzle piece slide. No differences between the participant groups were found for either emotion recognition ability or number of fixations. Both groups fixated more often on the eyes and performed better when the eyes were whole, suggesting that both children with HFA/AS and controls consider the eyes to be the most important source of information during emotion recognition. Fixation durations were longer in the group with HFA/AS, which indicates that while children with HFA/AS may be able to accurately recognise emotions, they find the task more demanding.

  • 163.
    Lim, Yi Huey
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Lee, Hoe C.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Allison, Garry T.
    School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Tan, Tele
    School of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Lee, Wee L.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Morris, Susan L.
    School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Effect of visual information on postural control in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder2019Inngår i: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Visual information is crucial for postural control. Visual processing in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was hypothesized to be less efficient and thus they would display a less stable standing posture than typically developing children. The present study compared the static standing responses and attentional demands of 15 children with ASD and 18 control participants in conditions of eyes open and eyes closed. The results showed that postural responses and attention invested in standing were similar between the participant groups in the two visual conditions. Both groups displayed a more stable posture when their eyes were open in comparison to eyes closed. The finding suggests that normal postural control development could occur in children with ASD. 

  • 164.
    Lim, Yi Huey
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Lee, Hoe C.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Allison, Garry T.
    School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Tan, Tele
    School of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Lee, Wee Lih
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Morris, Susan L.
    School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Effect of optic flow on postural control in children and adults with autism spectrum disorder2018Inngår i: Neuroscience, ISSN 0306-4522, E-ISSN 1873-7544, Vol. 393, s. 138-149Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have been associated with sensorimotor difficulties, commonly presented by poor postural control. Postural control is necessary for all motor behaviors. However, findings concerning the effect of visual motion on postural control and the age progression of postural control in individuals with ASD are inconsistent. The aims of the present study were to examine postural responses to optic flow in children and adults with and without ASD, postural responses to optic flow in the central and peripheral visual fields, and the changes in postural responses between the child and adult groups. Thirty-three children (8–12 years old) and 33 adults (18–50 years old) with and without ASD were assessed on quiet standing for 60 seconds under conditions of varying optic flow illusions, consisting of different combinations of optic flow directions and visual field display. The results showed that postural responses to most optic flow conditions were comparable between children with and without ASD and between adults with and without ASD. However, adults with ASD appeared more responsive to forward-moving optic flow in the peripheral visual field compared with typically developed adults. The findings suggest that children and adults with ASD may not display maladaptive postural responses all the time. In addition, adults in the ASD group may have difficulties prioritizing visual information in the central visual field over visual information in the peripheral visual field when in unfamiliar environments, which may have implications in understanding their motor behaviors in new surroundings. 

  • 165.
    Lim, Yi Huey
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Lee, Hoe C.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Allison, Garry T.
    School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Tan, Tele
    School of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Lee, Wee Lih
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Morris, Susan L.
    School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Effect of visual information on postural control in adults with autism spectrum disorder2019Inngår i: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 49, nr 12, s. 4731-4739Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Sensory processing difficulties affect the development of sensorimotor skills in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, the effect of sensory information on postural control is unclear in the ASD adult population. The present study examined the effect of visual information on postural control as well as the attentional demands associated with postural control in fourteen adults with ASD and seventeen typically developed adults. The results showed that postural sway and attention demands of postural control were larger in adults with ASD than in typically developed adults. These findings indicate that visual processing used for postural control may be different in adults with ASD. Further research in visual field processing and visual motion processing may elucidate these sensorimotor differences.

  • 166.
    Lim, Yi Huey
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Lee, Hoe C.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Allison, Garry T.
    School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Tan, Tele
    School of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Lee, Wee Lih
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Morris, Susan L.
    School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Postural control adaptation to optic flow in children and adults with autism spectrum disorder2019Inngår i: Gait & Posture, ISSN 0966-6362, E-ISSN 1879-2219, Vol. 72, s. 175-181Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Sensory reweighting is important for humans to flexibly up-weigh and down-weigh sensory information in dynamic environments. There is an element of time involved in the sensory reweighting process. A longer time spent on sensory reweighting may increase the destabilizing effect of postural control. Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are reported to have poor postural control. It is uncertain if a different sensory reweighting process underlies the postural control deficit in children and adults with ASD.

    Research question: To explore the sensory reweighting capability in ASD, the present study examined whether the temporal domains of postural control differed in children and adults, with and without ASD under various optic flow conditions.

    Methods: Thirty-three children (8–12 years old) and 33 adults (18–50 years old) with and without ASD underwent quiet standing in six radial optic flow conditions. Each condition lasted for 60 s and was shown twice to all participants. For each optic flow condition, changes in postural response within-trial and between-trials were measured.

    Results: Under various optic flow illusions, both children with and without ASD took a longer time to restore their posture compared with adults with and without ASD. Nonetheless, all groups demonstrated comparable abilities to adjust their posture to one that is close to the baseline position after one exposure to the optic flow stimulation.

    Significance: The present study showed that the temporal domains of postural control under different optic flow conditions were similar between individuals with and without ASD from the same age group. The ability to down-weigh visual information efficiently comes with the developmental progression of the sensory reweighting system. These findings suggest that the sensory reweighting process does not elucidate the postural control deficits in individuals with ASD and thus alternative explanations to determine the underlying mechanism for postural instability are needed. 

  • 167. Lövgren, A.
    et al.
    Rydh, C.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Peters, B.
    The Role of Occupational Therapists in the Automobility Process2007Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 168.
    McAuliffe, Tomomi
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Cordier, Reinie
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Thomas, Yvonne
    Allied Health and Social Sciences, Institute of Health & Society, University of Worcester, Worcester, UK.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Quality of Life, Coping Styles, Stress Levels, and Time Use in Mothers of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Comparing Single Versus Coupled Households2017Inngår i: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 47, nr 10, s. 3189-3203Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to examine the influence of differences in household status on the parental stress, coping, time use and quality of life (QoL) among mothers of children with autism spectrum disorders. Forty-three single and 164 coupled mothers completed the survey. Data were analysed using multivariate logistic regression. We found that single mothers were 1.05 times more likely to report lower levels of environmental QoL. Whilst they were 1.73 times more likely to use acceptance coping style, this association did not persist after adjusting for total number of children, household income and employment status. There was no difference in time use and stress between these mothers. Possible environmental issues for single mothers and implications for future research are discussed.

  • 169.
    McAuliffe, Tomomi
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Thomas, Yvonne
    Allied Health and Social Sciences, Institute of Health & Society, University of Worcester, Worcester, United Kingdom.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Cordier, Reinie
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    The experiences of mothers of children with autism spectrum disorder: Managing family routines and mothers’ health and wellbeing2019Inngår i: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, ISSN 0045-0766, E-ISSN 1440-1630, Vol. 66, nr 1, s. 68-76Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/aim: Families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) use family routines to provide predictability and structure to support occupational engagement of their family members. Mothers assume the major role to orchestrate occupations in constructing family routines, which may impact their health and wellbeing. However, the experiences of mothers in managing family routines and their health and wellbeing have not been the main focus in previous research. Thus, this study explored the experiences of mothers of children with ASD in managing family routines and their perceptions of the impact of family routines on their health and wellbeing.

    Methods: An interpretive phenomenological approach was used. Twenty mothers of children with ASD, aged between 28 and 56 years, participated in semi-structured interviews. Data were transcribed verbatim and each transcript was analysed.

    Results: Five themes that summarise mothers’ perceptions towards health and wellbeing when managing family routines emerged: (i) Keeping on track keeping healthy; (ii) My life is busy, because I do everything for everyone else; (iii) Keeping on track all the time is tiring or frustrating; (iv) Looking after my family by looking after myself; and (v) I am not perfect and it is OK.

    Conclusion: This study highlighted the substantial efforts required in constructing family routines that may be at the cost of mothers’ health and wellbeing. However, mothers may be able to cope with everyday demands in managing family routines by changing their perspectives. By integrating ‘me-time’ activities in family routines, mothers may be able to support their own health and wellbeing. Mothers’ values and needs are reflected in family routines; hence, thorough understanding of family routines may be a key to support mothers’ occupational engagement. 

  • 170.
    McAuliffe, Tomomi
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Vaz, Sharmila Vaz
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Cordier, Reinie
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    A comparison of families of children with autism spectrum disorders in family daily routines, service usage, and stress levels by regionality2017Inngår i: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, nr 8, s. 483-490Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To explore whether family routines, service usage, and stress levels in families of children with autism spectrum disorder differ as a function of regionality.

    Methods: Secondary analysis of data was undertaken from 535 surveys. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to investigate differences between families living in densely populated (DP) areas and less densely populated (LDP) areas.

    Results: Families living in LDP areas were found to: (1) have reduced employment hours (a two-parent household: Exp (B) = 3.48, p < .001, a single-parent household: Exp (B) = 3.32, p = .011); (2) travel greater distance to access medical facilities (Exp (B) = 1.27, p = .006); and (3) report less severe stress levels (Exp (B) = 0.22, p = .014).

    Conclusions: There were no differences in family routines; however, flexible employment opportunities and travel distance to medical services need to be considered in families living in LDP areas. 

  • 171. Middelton, H
    et al.
    Breker, SM
    Henriksson, P
    Rothermel, S
    Falkmer, T
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. HHJ. Åldrande - livsvillkor och hälsa.
    The situation of ageing drivers: what older drivers tell us and what accident data reveal.2006Inngår i: Geriatrica Y Gerontologica, Vol. 38, nr Supp 1, s. 139-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 172.
    Middleton, H
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Breker, S
    Rothermel, S
    Henriksson, P
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering.
    The situation of ageing: what older persons tell us and accident data reveal2003Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 173. Middleton, H
    et al.
    Westwood, D
    Robson, J
    Henriksson, P
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering.
    Sirén, A
    Inventory of assessment and decision criteria for elderly drivers, including particular age-related disabilities2003Rapport (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 174.
    Milbourn, Ben
    et al.
    Curtin Univ, CHIRI, Sch Occupat Therapy & Social Work, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Curtin Univ, CHIRI, Sch Occupat Therapy & Social Work, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Black, Melissa H.
    Curtin Univ, CHIRI, Sch Occupat Therapy & Social Work, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya
    Curtin Univ, CHIRI, Sch Occupat Therapy & Social Work, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Curtin Univ, CHIRI, Sch Occupat Therapy & Social Work, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Horlin, Chiara
    Curtin Univ, CHIRI, Sch Occupat Therapy & Social Work, Perth, WA, Australia.
    An exploration of the experience of parents with children with autism spectrum disorder after diagnosis and intervention2017Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychology, E-ISSN 2245-8875, Vol. 5, nr 3, s. 104-110Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Delays and difficulties in both diagnosis and access to services can compound existing stressors experienced by families with children with autism spectrum disorder Early and accurate diagnosis and appropriate intervention may not only improve child-specific outcomes but may also mitigate some of the stressors impacting family relationships and quality of life. We aimed to understand the experience of over 500 families that had sought autism spectrum disorder diagnosis and intervention, their perceptions of the efficacy of these services, and the impact that this process had on their family life. Parents overwhelmingly described frustration with access to a timely diagnosis, specialized intervention services, and funding that impacted their family life and relationships. However, parents simultaneously reported positive perceptions of change as a consequence of diagnosis and effective intervention.

  • 175.
    Murray, Nina
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Hatfield, Megan
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Evaluation of career planning tools for use with individuals with autism spectrum disorder: A systematic review2016Inngår i: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 23, s. 188-202Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This systematic review aimed to identify tools published in peer reviewed journals that could be utilised in career planning for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and to describe their clinical utility and psychometric properties. Due to limited results for ASD-specific tools, the search was broadened to career planning tools for individuals with a cognitive or developmental disability, which could be used by individuals with ASD. Six databases were electronically searched. Main search terms used were 'disability', 'young adult', 'assessment' and 'employment'. Boolean operators expanded the search strategy. Two independent reviewers undertook data extraction and quality assessment. Electronic searches located 2348 literature items; 14 articles met inclusion criteria covering 10 career planning tools. Identified tools were of a predictive nature; however, none of the studies assessed all the psychometric properties necessary for evaluating a sound predictive tool. Only one addressed all three components of clinical utility. None of the identified tools had strong reliability or validity and their clinical utility remains unexplored. 

  • 176. Nalmpantis, D
    et al.
    Naniopoulos, A
    Bekiaris, A
    Panou, M
    Gregersen, NP
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    "TRAINER" project: pilot applications for the evaluation of new driver training technologies.2005Inngår i: Traffic and transport psychology: theory and application : proceedings of the ICTTP 2004, Amsterdam, London: Elsevier , 2005, s. 141-156Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 177. Nilsson, L
    et al.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering.
    Samuelsson, S
    Drivers' ability to acquire in-car information presented in the peripheral field of view without fixating: a simulator study1999Inngår i: Vision in Vehicles VII, Amsterdam: Elsevier Science , 1999, s. 83-91Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 178.
    Ordqvist, Anna
    et al.
    Rehabilitation Medicine Department of Medicine and Health Sciences Linköping University and Pain and Rehabilitation Centre Linköping, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Parsons, Richard
    Shipping and Marine Technology Human Factors Chalmers University of Technology Göteborg, Sweden.
    Leung, Denise
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Department of Education, Municipality Council of Norrköping.
    Dahlman, Joakim
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation.
    Fleischer, Håkan
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, Skolnära forskning, Språk-, litteratur- och mediedidaktik. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work Curtin University, Australia Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. La Trobe University School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Information and repetition change children's visual strategies when viewing magic tricks with and without gaze cues2013Inngår i: Perceptual and Motor Skills, ISSN 0031-5125, E-ISSN 1558-688X, Vol. 116, nr 1, s. 144-162Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Gaze cues and direct gaze attract visual attention. However, few studies have explored visual cues in children within realistic contexts. The effect of information and repetitive stimulus presentation has not been thoroughly studied with dynamic stimuli. The aim of the present study was to investigate how information affects the visual strategies of children measured by the number of fixations on certain areas of interest and their durations. Furthermore, this study examined the effect of gaze cues and direct gaze. In two consecutive experiments, children’s visual strategies when viewing magic tricks were measured by an eye tracker. Gaze cues were only present in Experiment 1.The results showed that repetitive stimulus presentation and information caused children to change their visual strategies when viewing magic tricks with and without gaze cues. However, the effect was larger when the gaze cues were not present. These findings in children were similar to those in adults.

  • 179.
    Palmer, Kristy
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Ciccarelli, Marina
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Parsons, Richard
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Associations between exposure to Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and reported discomfort among adolescents2014Inngår i: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 48, nr 2, s. 165-173Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) are common among adolescents in their daily activities. Exposure to ICT has been associated with discomfort and musculoskeletal disorders in adults, with growing concern about the potential risks to children and adolescents' physical health. OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this study were to (i) quantify self-reported discomfort and exposure to ICT among adolescents; and (ii) determine if associations exist between discomfort and levels of exposure. PARTICIPANTS: The participant group comprised 33 Australian adolescents aged 12-15 years. METHODS: The study used self-reports by participants for a one week period. Intensity and location of discomfort was reported via a written discomfort log. ICT exposure and physical activity were reported through an electronic time-use diary. RESULTS: The most common ICT types reported by participants were television, mobile phones and desktop and laptop computers. Discomfort was reported by 86% of participants. The most frequently reported areas were the legs, head/neck, back and shoulders. There was no statistical association found between ICT exposure and discomfort. The majority of participants exceeded the recommended 60 minutes per day of moderate to vigorous physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: High exposure to ICT and high prevalence of low level discomfort was reported by the participants. Participating in regular physical activity may have some protective effect against ICT-related discomfort.

  • 180. Panou, M.
    et al.
    Bekiaris, E.
    Dols, J. F
    Knoll, C.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Novice drivers' training in ADAS HMI: the TRAINER results.2003Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 181.
    Parsons, Dave
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Cordier, Reinie
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Lee, Hoe
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    A randomised controlled trial of an information communication technology delivered intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder living in regional Australia2019Inngår i: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 49, nr 2, s. 569-581Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This exploratory randomised controlled trial tested the effectiveness of a tablet-based information communication technology early intervention application to augment existing therapy with the aim of improving visual motor, imitation, language and social skills in young children with ASD who reside in regional areas. Fifty-nine participants were recruited and randomised to either a therapy-as-usual group or intervention group. With the exception of the expressive language subscale on the Mullen Scales of Early Learning, no significant between-group differences were recorded for visual motor, imitation, receptive language and social skills of participants between baseline and post-intervention. When all participants were pooled and measured over time, improvements were shown in receptive and pragmatic language and social skills; these gains were maintained, thus suggesting skill acquisition. 

  • 182.
    Parsons, Dave
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Cordier, Reinie
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Lee, Hoe
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Stress, coping, and quality of life in families with a child with ASD living regionally2019Inngår i: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The present study aimed to explore whether regionality is associated with differing stress levels, coping, QOL and daily routines for parents and families of a child with ASD (aged 2–18 years) in Western Australia using validated outcome measures and compare the stress levels and QOL of this group to population norms.

    Methods: A sample of 278 families living in Western Australia who have a child or adolescent (2–18 years old) with a clinical diagnosis of ASD participated in a cross-sectional survey. Multivariate logistic regression modelling was conducted to determine key factors associated between regionality and demographic variables, quality of life, coping styles, time use, and stress levels.

    Results: Parents living in low densely populated areas were more likely to adopt avoidant coping mechanisms, compared to those living in densely populated areas. Fathers with children on the autism spectrum were less likely to be educated above diploma level in regional and remote areas. Stress, QOL or daily routines did not differ by regionality; however, the total sample (i.e., parents from both LDP and DP areas) experienced significantly higher levels of stress and lower QOL when compared to the general population.

    Conclusions: The findings suggest that despite having higher levels of stress and lower QOL compared to the general population, residing in a geographically LDP area in Western Australia has a small association on preferred coping style preference and has no association on stress levels, QOL or daily routines for parents who have a child with ASD.

  • 183. Peters, B
    et al.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Bekiaris, A
    Sommer, S
    Stankus, S
    Varoneckas, G
    Consensus networking for assessment of fitness to drive for drivers with disabilities in the European Union2004Inngår i: Sveikatos mokslai, ISSN 1392-6373, Vol. 6, nr 37, s. 19-23Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 184. Petzäll, J
    et al.
    Albertsson, P
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering.
    Björnstig, U
    Wind Forces and Aerodynamics: Contributing Factors to Compromise Bus and Coach Safety2005Inngår i: International Journal of Crashworthiness, ISSN 1358-8265, E-ISSN 1754-2111, Vol. 10, nr 5, s. 435-444Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 185. Petzäll, J
    et al.
    Torlund, P-Å
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Kvalitetsförbättringar, innovationer och ledarskap inom vård och socialt arbete.
    Albertsson, P
    Björnstig, U
    Aerodynamic design of high-sided coaches to reduce cross-wind sensitivity, based on wind tunnel tests2008Inngår i: International Journal of Crashworthiness, ISSN 1358-8265, E-ISSN 1754-2111, Vol. 13, nr 2, s. 185-194Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 186.
    Rezae, Mortaza
    et al.
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism, Brisbane, Australia.
    McMeekin, David
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism, Brisbane, Australia.
    Tan, Tele
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism, Brisbane, Australia.
    Krishna, Aneesh
    School of Electrical Engineering, Computing and Mathematical Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Lee, Hoe
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism, Brisbane, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism, Brisbane, Australia.
    Public transport planning tool for users on the autism spectrum: from concept to prototype2019Inngår i: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This research explored the challenges of public transport use for individuals on the autism spectrum. It, subsequently, proposed a mobile application solution, coproduced by individuals on the autism spectrum, to facilitate public transport use.

    Methods: We, first, conducted a review of the literature to highlight the challenges people on the autism spectrum face when utilizing public transport. We, then, designed a list of mobile application functionalities that address the identified problems. To validate these functionalities, 27 young autistic adults and 19 families of autistic individuals were employed. Finally, based on the findings, we designed a mobile application that helps facilitate public transport use for those on the autism spectrum.

    Results: We found that the most prevalent concerns, in public transport use, amongst autistic individuals and their families are safety and spatial awareness. Specific problems include finding one’s way to the bus stop, boarding the correct service and disembarking at the correct stop. Interestingly, anxiety about unexpected events was also a barrier. Sensory sensitivity, similarly, was found to be an obstacle.

    Conclusions: This study defined the challenges of public transport use for autistic individuals and proposed a technological solution. The findings can also inform innovators, public transport providers and policymakers to improve public transport accessibility.

    Implications for rehabilitation:

    • People on the autism spectrum heavily rely on other individuals, namely family and friends, for their transportation needs. This dependence results in immobility for the autistic individuals and significant time and economical sacrifice for the person responsible for the transportation.
    • Public transport, a cheap and widely available form of transportation, has not yet been clearly studied with individuals on the autism spectrum.
    • We clearly define the challenges of using public transport and put forward a trip planner mobile application, coproduced by autistic individuals, that facilitate it.
    • In the long term, this enhanced travel independence can lead to greater education and employment opportunities and an overall improved quality of life. 
  • 187.
    Rogerson, Jessica M.
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia.
    Cuomo, Belinda M.
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia.
    Whitehouse, Andrew Jo
    Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia.
    Granich, Joanna
    Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia.
    Parental experiences using the Therapy Outcomes by You (TOBY) application to deliver early intervention to their child with autism2019Inngår i: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 22, nr 4, s. 219-227Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSEAs computer-based interventions become commonplace for parents of children with neurodevelopmental disorders, this study sought to understand the experience of using a parent-delivered supplementary early intervention therapy for children with autism spectrum disorder grounded in a variety of behavioral, sensory, developmental, and relationship-based approaches and delivered via a tablet device.

    METHODSParental experiences using the 'Therapy Outcomes by You' (TOBY) application were collected through semi-structured interviews with 17 parents.

    RESULTSParents reported TOBY facilitated parent-child engagement, provided ideas for therapeutic activities, created feelings of empowerment, and positively impacted their child's development. Barriers to use included preparation time, execution of the intervention, and individual strengths and weaknesses of their child.

    CONCLUSIONThe overall parental experience of TOBY was positive when use of the application aligned with parental proficiency, opportunities for use, and importantly, the needs of the child.

  • 188.
    Scott, Melissa
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Girdler, Sonya
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Evaluating the effectiveness of an autism-specific workplace tool for employers: A randomised controlled trial2018Inngår i: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 48, nr 10, s. 3377-3392Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A randomised controlled trial evaluated the effectiveness of the Integrated Employment Success Tool (IEST™) in improving employers’ self-efficacy in modifying the workplace for individuals on the autism spectrum. Employers (N = 84) were randomised to the IEST™ or support as usual groups. Measurements of self-efficacy, knowledge and attitudes towards disability in the workplace were obtained at baseline and post-test. Results revealed a significant improvement in self-efficacy within the IEST™ group between baseline and post-test (p = 0.016). At post-test, there were no significant differences between groups in relation to self-efficacy in implementing autism-specific workplace modifications and employer attitudes towards disability in the workplace. Given the lack of significant outcomes, further research is needed to determine the effectiveness of the IEST™ for employers. Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry #ACTRN12614000771651, registered 21/7/2014. Trial URLhttps://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=366699. 

  • 189.
    Scott, Melissa
    et al.
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Jacob, Andrew
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Hendrie, Delia
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Parsons, Richard
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Benefits and costs of employing an adult with Autism Spectrum Disorder2017Inngår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 190.
    Selander, Helena
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Åldrande - livsvillkor och hälsa.
    Bolin, Ingrid
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Åldrande - livsvillkor och hälsa.
    Does Automatic Transmission Improve Driving Behavior in Older Drivers?2012Inngår i: Gerontology, ISSN 0304-324X, E-ISSN 1423-0003, Vol. 58, nr 2, s. 181-187Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Most older drivers continue to drive as they age. To maintain safe and independent transport, mobility is important for all individuals, but especially for older drivers.

    Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate whether automatic transmission, compared with manual transmission, may improve the driving behavior of older drivers.

    Method: In total, 31 older drivers (mean age 75.2 years) and 32 younger drivers – used as a control group (mean age 39.2 years) – were assessed twice on the same fixed route; once in a car with manual transmission and once in a car with automatic transmission. The cars were otherwise identical. The driving behavior was assessed with the Ryd On-Road Assessment driving protocol. Time to completion of left turns (right-hand side driving) and the impact of a distraction task were measured.

    Results: The older group had more driving errors than the younger group, in both the manual and the automatic transmission car. However, and contrary to the younger drivers, automatic transmission improved the older participants’ driving behavior as demonstrated by safer speed adjustment in urban areas, greater maneuvering skills, safer lane position and driving in accordance with the speed regulations.

    Conclusion: Switching to automatic transmission may be recommended for older drivers as a means to maintain safe driving and thereby the quality of their transport mobility.

  • 191. Selander, Helena
    et al.
    Johansson, Kurt
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Catarina
    Karolinska University Hospital, Traffic Medicine Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Åldrande - livsvillkor och hälsa.
    The Nordic Stroke Driver Screening Assessment as predictor for the outcome of an on-road test.2010Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 17, nr 1, s. 10-17Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of the cognitive test battery Nordic Stroke Driver Screening Assessment (NorSDSA) has increased, sometimes as a stand-alone test to evaluate fitness to drive, also for non-stroke patients such as patients suffering from cognitive deficits/dementia, approaches that may be questioned. The objective of the study was to determine whether the NorSDSA could predict an on-road test result, for large sets of stroke ( n=74) and cognitive deficits/dementia participants ( n=116), respectively. The percentage of correctly classified was 62% for the stroke group and 50% for the cognitive deficits/dementia group. A discriminant analysis with pass/fail on the on-road test as grouping variable could classify 62% of the stroke participants and the cognitive deficit/dementia participants. Hence, the NorSDSA could not predict the outcome of the on-road test. Therefore, NorSDSA should not be used as a stand-alone test to determine the fitness to drive of individual participants. Also, its use with participants suffering from cognitive deficits/dementia appears to be less successful than for clients with stroke.

  • 192.
    Selander, Helena
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Åldrande - livsvillkor och hälsa.
    Lee, Hoe
    Johansson, Kurt
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Åldrande - livsvillkor och hälsa.
    Older drivers: On-road and off-road test results2011Inngår i: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 43, nr 4, s. 1348-1354Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Eighty-five volunteer drivers, 65–85 years old, without cognitive impairments impacting on their driving were examined, in order to investigate driving errors characteristic for older drivers. In addition, any relationships between cognitive off-road and on-road tests results, the latter being the gold standard, were identified. Performance measurements included Trail Making Test (TMT), Nordic Stroke Driver Screening Assessment (NorSDSA), Useful Field of View (UFOV), self-rating driving performance and the two on-road protocols P-Drive and ROA. Some of the older drivers displayed questionable driving behaviour. In total, 21% of the participants failed the on-road assessment. Some of the specific errors were more serious than others. The most common driving errors embraced speed; exceeding the speed limit or not controlling the speed. Correlations with the P-Drive protocol were established for NorSDSA total score (weak), UFOV subtest 2 (weak), and UFOV subtest 3 (moderate). Correlations with the ROA protocol were established for UFOV subtest 2 (weak) and UFOV subtest 3 (weak). P-Drive and self ratings correlated weakly, whereas no correlation between self ratings and the ROA protocol was found. The results suggest that specific problems or errors seen in an older person's driving can actually be “normal driving behaviours”.

  • 193.
    Sim, Angela
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Cordier, Reinie
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Perth, Western Australia, Australia and La Trobe University, Australia and Linköping University, Sweden.
    Relationship Satisfaction and Dyadic Coping in Couples with a Child with Autism Spectrum Disorder2017Inngår i: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 47, nr 11, s. 3562-3573Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Dyadic coping strategies may play a pivotal role in relationship satisfaction and explain why some couples adapt positively to the challenges associated with raising a child with ASD and others do not. Survey data from 127 caregivers of a child with ASD were used in generalized estimating equation analyses to investigate the factors associated with relationship satisfaction, including socio-demographics, parenting stress and dyadic coping. Results showed that over two-thirds of the sample reported satisfaction, which was associated with low parenting stress, increased use of positive and decreased use of negative dyadic coping strategies. Positive dyadic coping was found to have a greater influence than negative dyadic coping, supporting a strengths-based approach to interventions promoting family resilience.

  • 194.
    Sim, Angela
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Cordier, Reinie
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Relationship satisfaction in couples raising a child with autism spectrum disorder: A systematic review of the literature2016Inngår i: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 31, s. 30-52Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Couples raising a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) face challenges that may impact on their relationship. The purpose of this review was to compare relationship satisfaction in couples raising children with and without ASD and to identify factors associated with satisfaction in couples with a child with ASD.

    Methods Thirteen databases were searched and studies were systematically screened against predetermined inclusion criteria. Twenty six articles, ranging from good to strong methodological quality, met the criteria for inclusion. Of these, seven were included in a meta-analysis comparing relationship satisfaction in couples raising a child with ASD with couples raising children without disabilities.

    Results The meta-analysis showed that couples raising a child with ASD were found to experience less relationship satisfaction than couples raising a child without a disability (Hedges's g = 0.41, p < 0.001); however, evidence from the narrative synthesis was mixed when compared with couples raising children with other disabilities. The most consistent evidence implicated challenging child behaviours, parental stress and poor psychological wellbeing as risk factors, and positive cognitive appraisal and social support as protective factors.

    Conclusion Findings demonstrate that couples raising a child with ASD would benefit from support to assist them in maintaining satisfaction in their relationship with their partner. However, further studies are needed to gain a greater understanding of the risk and protective factors and how these co-vary with relationship satisfaction over time. A theoretical framework has been developed to scaffold future research. 

  • 195.
    Sim, Angela
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Cordier, Reinie
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    “We are in this together”: Experiences of relationship satisfaction in couples raising a child with autism spectrum disorder2019Inngår i: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 58, s. 39-51Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Couple relationships play an integral role in family adjustment when a child has autism spectrum disorder (ASD), yet, it is unclear what factors contribute to the maintenance of relationship satisfaction in these couples.

    Method: Using phenomenology, data from eleven couple interviews were analysed to gain an understanding of the lived experiences of relationship satisfaction when raising a child with ASD.

    Results: The overall essence of “We are in this together” reflected the attitude that a strong partnership was beneficial in maintaining relationship satisfaction. This essence was captured in three main themes: 1) Shared beliefs, 2) Teamwork and 3) Shared experiences which closely paralleled the Walsh family resilience framework.

    Conclusions: Couples can be supported in these key areas to strengthen their relationship to serve as a source of resilience for families with a child with ASD. 

  • 196.
    Sim, Angela
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Cordier, Reinie
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Netto, Julie
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Perth, Western Australia, Australia and La Trobe University, Australia and Linköping University, Sweden.
    Factors associated with negative co-parenting experiences in families of a child with autism spectrum disorder2017Inngår i: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 20, nr 2, s. 83-91Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify key factors associated with negative co-parenting experiences in parents raising a child with autism spectrum disorder. Methods: Questionnaires were sent to families with one or more children with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder. Parents of 142 children with autism spectrum disorder indicated that the diagnosis had a very negative impact on their co-parent relationship. A multivariate logistic regression model was run to analyze the association of these experiences with various demographic, family and community factors. Results: Three factors were associated with negative co-parenting relationships: (1) family stress due to the child’s diagnosis, (2) effects of the diagnosis on parents’ relationship with their other children and (3) distance travelled to the nearest medical facility. Conclusions: Findings highlight the need to further explore family dynamics, particularly the relationships between the co-parenting alliance, other family members and the extra-familial environment.

  • 197.
    Sim, Angela
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Cordier, Reinie
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Kuzminski, Rebecca
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Viewpoints on what is important to maintain relationship satisfaction in couples raising a child with autism spectrum disorder2019Inngår i: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 65, s. 1-13Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Despite the challenges associated with raising a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), many couples maintain satisfying relationships. However, it is not clear which factors couples prioritise as most important to this positive adaptation. Methods This study used Q-methodology to explore the viewpoints on factors most important to maintaining relationship satisfaction from the perspective of those experiencing it. Data from 43 caregivers raising a child with ASD were analysed using by-person varimax rotation factor analysis. Results Two key viewpoints were identified: 1) Building effective communication through openness, honesty and conflict resolution, and 2) Building a strong partnership by sharing parenting responsibilities. Conclusion Couples should be supported to strengthen communication processes and work in partnership to raise their child with ASD through family-centred interventions aimed at promoting relationship satisfaction.

  • 198.
    Sim, Angela
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Cordier, Reinie
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Joosten, Annette
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Parsons, Dave
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Smith, Cally
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Perth, Western Australia, Australia and La Trobe University, Australia and Linköping University, Sweden.
    Factors associated with stress in families of children with autism spectrum disorder2018Inngår i: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 21, nr 3, s. 155-165Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify key factors associated with severe stress in families raising a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Methods: Questionnaires were mailed to families with one or more children with a diagnosis of ASD. Data from 543 surveys were analyzed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results: Forty-four percent (n = 241) of the caregivers reported severe family stress related to raising a child with ASD. Severe family stress was associated with (1) reduced ability to socialize; (2) not having accessed individual therapy; (3) negative co-parent relationships; and (4) high out of pockets costs due to the child’s ASD. The specific ASD diagnosis, comorbid conditions, socio-demographic variables, and social support were not associated with severe family stress. Conclusion: The findings of the current study highlight the importance of a systemic approach to family stress, whereby individual, family, and ecological factors are investigated.

  • 199.
    Sjödin, Linda
    et al.
    Paediatric Clinic, Landstinget Kronoberg, SE, Ljungby, Sweden.
    Buchanan, Angus
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Mundt, Beate
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering.
    Karlsson, Emelie
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Do vehicle grants and vehicle adaptations grants promote transport mobility and community access for children with disabilities in Sweden?2012Inngår i: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, ISSN 0045-0766, E-ISSN 1440-1630, Vol. 59, nr 1, s. 10-16Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/AIM: A vast majority of the journeys made by children with disabilities in Sweden are in the family car, which usually is bought and adapted for the child with governmental subsidies. Despite the important philosophical views about accessible vehicles, little is known about the impact of vehicle adaptations on families' lives. The aim of the study was to investigate parent views about the impact of vehicle grants and vehicle adaptation grants on their children's transport mobility and community access.

    METHODS: In total, 434 parents of children with disabilities in Sweden who had received vehicle grants and/or vehicle adaptation grants between 1998-2007 responded to a questionnaire comprising questions with both pre-selected and open-ended answers. A non-responder analysis was performed.

    RESULTS: Children with disabilities were found to increase their transport mobility and community access in society as vehicle grants and/or vehicle adaptation grants were given to their parents. Their travel patterns and their travel priorities with their family car indicated that family friends and relatives and leisure activities were frequently visited and prioritised destinations. The grants were linked to access to social and family activities, provided environmental gains and led to increased experienced security. The results also showed that the potential to make spontaneous trips had increased substantially and that families experienced feelings of freedom and enhanced community access. The non-responder analysis confirmed these results.

    CONCLUSIONS: According to parents, vehicle grants and vehicle adaptation grants for children with disabilities have a positive impact on the children's transport mobility and community access.

  • 200. Sjörs, Anna
    et al.
    Larsson, Britt
    Dahlman, Joakim
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Physiological responses to low-force work and psychosocial stress in women with chronic trapezius myalgia.2009Inngår i: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 10, s. 63-78Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
12345 151 - 200 of 238
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf