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  • 151.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Berggren, U
    Carlsson, S G
    A 10-year follow-up of patients treated for dental fear.1990In: Scandinavian Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0029-845X, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 53-59Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 152.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Berggren, U
    Carlsson, S G
    Prevalence of dental anxiety in an adult population in a major urban area in Sweden.1992In: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, E-ISSN 1600-0528, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 97-101Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 153.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Berggren, U
    Carlsson, S G
    Gröndahl, H G
    Long-term effects on dental care behavior and dental health after treatments for dental fear.1993In: Anesthesia Progress, ISSN 0003-3006, E-ISSN 1878-7177, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 72-77Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 154.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Berggren, U
    Carlsson, S G
    Gustafsson, J E
    Repeated measurements of mood during psychologic treatment of dental fear.1997In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 55, no 6, p. 378-383Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 155.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Berggren, U
    Gröndahl, H G
    A radiographic study of dental health in adult patients with dental anxiety.1993In: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, E-ISSN 1600-0528, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 27-30Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 156.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Berggren, U
    Hägglin, C
    Ahlqwist, M
    Reported burning mouth symptoms among middle-aged and elderly women.1997In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 105, no 6, p. 539-543Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 157.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Cunha, Luciette
    Dental anxiety and pain related to dental hygienist treatment2008In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 66, no 6, p. 374-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate different groups of patients' self-reported assessments of dental anxiety and pain related to various routine dental hygienist treatment procedures, and to investigate the relationship between anxiety concerning dental and dental hygienist treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A consecutive sample of 393 patients participated in the study (59.7% F, age range 20 to 85 years, mean 47.6 years). Periodontology (PC), oral medicine (OM), student and general practice (GP) clinics were included. Each patient was asked to answer a questionnaire which included different demographic information, self-reported levels of dental anxiety, and experience of pain in relation to different dental hygienist treatments. RESULTS: Higher dental anxiety was found in relation to gender (women), dentist treatment, and PC and OM patients. Experiences of high or extreme pain were reported by between 7.1% and 9.7% of participants for all dental hygienist procedures except polishing (0.8%). There were significant correlations between dental hygienist fear levels and reported extreme pain experiences among all five treatment procedures. Patients treated at the PC clinic scored significantly higher on pain compared with patients at the other clinics, with the exception of the OM clinic. CONCLUSIONS: Patients reported higher dental anxiety levels for dentist treatment as compared with dental hygienist treatment. Moreover, dental anxiety was significantly associated with perceived pain related to different dental hygienist treatment procedures.

  • 158.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Dernevik, L
    Gatzinsky, P
    Eklöf, C
    Kennergren, C
    Jontell, M
    The significance of oral health and dental treatment for the postoperative outcome of heart valve surgery.1999In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 5-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 159.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Gustafsson, J E
    Berggren, U
    Carlsson, S G
    Multivariate analysis of fears in dental phobic patients according to a reduced FSS-II scale.1995In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 103, no 5, p. 339-344Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 160.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Hallberg, Lillemor R-M
    Berggren, Ulf
    Burning mouth syndrome: experiences from the perspective of female patients.2003In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 111, no 4, p. 305-311Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 161.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Heidari, E
    Norinder, M
    Berggren, U
    A Swedish version of the Dental Visit Satisfaction Scale.2000In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 19-24Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 162.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Hägglin, C
    Berggren, U
    Carlsson, S G
    Structural relationships of dental anxiety, mood, and general anxiety.2001In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 59, no 2, p. 99-103Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 163.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Klingberg, G
    Noren, J G
    Berggren, U
    Swedish dentists' perceptions of their patients.1992In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 245-252Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 164.
    Hakkararinen, Caroline
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Benjaminsson, Linda
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Förekomst av xerostomi hos studenter på Hälsohögskolan i Jönköping: En enkätstudie2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Xerostomia is the subjective feeling of dry mouth and the state is because of its multifactorial character often limited to treating the symptoms that occurs instead of the causal factors. Xerostomia is a state which may affect both the oral and general health and can therefore have a negative impact on the individuals quality of life. Xerostomia was earlier defined as a state that affected old or sick people but investigations have lately showed that xerostomia also is prevalent in young healthy subjects. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of xerostomia and potential risk factors in students at School of Health Sciences in Jönköping. Methods: Students from four education programs at School of Health Sciences was asked to participate and fill out a questionnaire including background variables, standard questions of dry mouth and Xerostomia Inventory. Result: Xerostomia was found in 20% of the subjects. These had higher scores on Xerostomia Inventory compared to the subjects without xerostomia. The difference was statistically significant (p≤0,05). Conclusion: Xerostomia is a state that is prevalent in young, healthy subjects and though the state is idiopathic further investigation about its prevalence and the causal factors are needed.

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  • 165.
    Halitaj, Erjona
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Vilket vetenskapligt stöd finns för att använda beteendepåverkande metoder inom tandvården?: En Systematisk Litteraturstudie2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: En beteendeförändring kan vara ett långt och komplext förlopp. Det finns olika beteendepåverkande metoder att ta till stöd vid en process till beteendeförändring där de har gemensamt att strategiskt arbeta med en patients beteendeförändring. Syfte: att studera vilket vetenskapligt stöd det finns för att användning av beteendepåverkande metoder inom tandvården ger resultat till förbättrade munhygienbeteenden och oral hälsa hos patienter. Metod: En systematisk litteraturstudie utfördes och vetenskapliga artiklar söktes i databaserna Dentistry & Oral Sciences Source, PubMed, CINAHL with fulltext samt PsycINFO. Resultat: Beteendepåverkande metoder som återfanns i litteraturstudien var health belief model, transteoretiska modellen, health action process approach, utbildningsprogram baserat på kognitiva beteendeprinciper på individ- samt gruppnivå, social kognitiva teorin, theory of planned behavior och theory of reasoned action. Begrepp som återfanns var känsla av sammanhang [KASAM], locus of control samt self-efficacy. Self-efficacy visade sig vara ett viktigt begrepp. Resultaten var motstridiga, det fanns både stödjande och icke stödjande resultat till förbättrade munhygienbeteenden samt gingivala förhållanden. Slutsats: Beteendepåverkande metoder i syfte att förbättra munhygienbeteende kan vara användbart i arbete med beteendeförändring. Self-efficacy är ett viktigt begrepp att beakta. Det finns behov av mer forskning som visar på evidens att beteendepåverkande metoder är effektiva inom tandvården.

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  • 166. Hallonsten, A L
    et al.
    Wendt, Lill-Kari
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Mejàre, I
    Birkhed, D
    Håkansson, C
    Lindvall, A M
    Edwardsson, S
    Koch, G
    Dental caries and prolonged breast-feeding in 18-month-old Swedish children.1995In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 149-155Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 167. Hammarstrand, G
    et al.
    Berggren, U
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Psychophysiological therapy vs. hypnotherapy in the treatment of patients with dental phobia.1995In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 103, no 6, p. 399-404Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 168.
    Hansson, Marie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Skripac, Sanela
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Tandborstning på förskolan: "Tillsammans mot tandtrollen"2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Ett sätt för tandvården att nå de nationella och internationella mål som ska uppfyllas för att främja god oral hälsa och minska kariesprevalensen hos barn är att samverka med andra yrkeskategorier. 

    Syfte: Att studera tandborstningsrutinerna på förskolan och i hemmet i Region Jönköpings län.

    Metod: Kvantitativ tvärsnittsstudie genomfördes med två olika enkäter till personal och föräldrar. En till föräldrar med 2 slutna frågor om tandborstvanor och en till förskolepersonal med 17 slutna frågor om bakgrund, tandborstning, utbildning och munhälsans betydelse. Resultatet redovisades deskriptivt i text, tabeller och figurer med absoluta (n) och relativa (%) frekvenser. Chi-2 och Fisher’s exakta test användes för att undersöka eventuella skillnader mellan yrkeskategorier i inställning till tandborstning.

     Resultat: Studien visade att barnen på dessa förskolor (97,2 %) fick borsta sina tänder med fluortandkräm efter frukost eller lunch. Ingen signifikant skillnad fanns gällande personalens utbildningsnivå och inställning till tandborstning på förskolan. De allra flesta barn (87,8 %) fick hjälp med tandborstning två gånger dagligen i hemmet.

    Slutsats: Studien visade att det fanns en god följsamhet till projektet ”Tillsammans mot tandtrollen” på förskolorna. En majoritet av föräldrar borstade sina barns tänder två gånger dagligen i hemmet.

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  • 169.
    Hansson, Stina
    et al.
    Department of Orthodontics, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Örebro, Sweden; Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Josefsson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Department of Orthodontics, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lindsten, Rune
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Department of Orthodontics, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bazargani, Farhan
    Department of Orthodontics, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Örebro, Sweden; Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Pain and discomfort during the first week of maxillary expansion using two different expanders: patient-reported outcomes in a randomized controlled trial2023In: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 271-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Quad Helix (QH) is the appliance most preferred by orthodontists to correct unilateral posterior crossbite in the early mixed dentition while other orthodontists suggest rapid maxillary expansion (RME) on deciduous teeth in these patients.

    Objectives

    To evaluate and compare perceived pain intensity, discomfort, functional jaw impairment, and analgesic consumption during the first week of treatment with either RME or QH appliances.

    Trial design

    Two-arm parallel group, two-centre, randomized controlled trial.

    Material and methods

    Seventy-two patients, mean age 9.5 (SD +/- 0.8) years, with unilateral posterior crossbite requiring maxillary expansion were randomly allocated to either the RME (22 boys, 14 girls) or QH (22 boys, 14 girls) group. Validated questionnaires were used to assess pain intensity, discomfort, jaw function impairment, and analgesic consumption, on the first, fourth, and seventh days after appliance insertion and activation.

    Blinding

    Due to clinical limitations, only the outcome assessors were blinded to the groups to which the patients were allocated.

    Results

    Seventy patients completed the questionnaires. Pain from the tongue and chafe from the appliance were significantly higher in the QH group on the first day of treatment (P = 0.003 and P = 0.000, respectively). On the fourth day, the chafe from the appliance was still significantly higher in the QH group (P = 0.007). Speech was affected in both groups on day 1; this impairment continued and was significantly higher in the RME group days 4 and 7. No significant difference in analgesic consumption was found between the groups at any time. The analgesic consumption was highest at day 1 of treatment.

    Harms

    No harm was observed in any patient.

    Limitations

    Double blinding was not possible due to the clinical limitations.

    Conclusion

    During the initial 4 days of treatment, pain from the tongue and chafe from the appliance caused the most reported inconvenience in the patients in the QH group. A majority of reported visual analogue scale values were in the lower mid-range, suggesting low to moderate pain and discomfort in both groups.

  • 170.
    Hatem, Ula
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Obed, Hiba
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Oral hälsa hos individer med Parkinsons sjukdom: en litteraturöversikt2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Bakground:Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disease that may limit humans and reduce their ability for normal function in their daily life. Among individuals diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, there is a risk that oral health will be poor and not prioritized. As a consequence, the need of assistance and dental care increases.   

    Aim: Describe the state of knowledge concerning the impact of Parkinson's disease on the incidence of periodontal disease, caries,  hyposalivation and xerostomia.   

    Method: The study design was a literature review. Scientific articles were searched in the databases DOSS, MEDLINE and Pubmed. Relevant keywords and inclusion and exclusion criteria were used to find essential scientific articles.  The scientific articles were quality reviewed using a modified quality review template.  

    Results: AA total of 19 scientific articles were included. The result showed that individuals with Parkinson’s disease have poor oral health. Several of these studies showed high prevalence of periodontal disease. The result also showed a high prevalence of caries, hyposalivation and xerostomia in these individuals. 

    Conclusion: Individuals diagnosed with Parkinson's disease have an increased risk to develop periodontal diseases, caries, hyposalivation and xerostomia.  These can be caused by different factors, medication, motor and non-motor symptoms and the disease duration.

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  • 171.
    Havsed, Kristian
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Helkimo, Anna N.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Kjær, Inger
    Institute of Odontology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    The etiology behind a complicated case with arrested root formation: More questions than answers2018In: Dental Hypotheses, E-ISSN 2155-8213, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 25-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This case focuses on dental deviations in a girl now 14 years of age. It is questioned in the article if an accident caused by the girl's fall into a cactus at the age 1 year and 2 months could possibly result in local dental disorders in the permanent dentition. The disorders were the short roots and small crowns. It is discussed in this paper if it is the pins from the cactus or the many medical and operative procedures for the removal of the pins that caused the disorders. Nine questions concerning etiology are raised and discussed and only partly answered. This case gives new information concerning the normal eruption and resorption processes. It demonstrates how the teeth without roots or with short roots can erupt normally and even earlier than the contralateral teeth. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that a second premolar with short root is able to resorb the overlying primary molar. In this dentition with severely malformed teeth, the treatment plan scheduled for the girl still takes into account these normal developmental conditions.

  • 172.
    Havsed, Kristian
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Inst Postgrad Dent Educ, Dept Pediat Dent, Jonkoping, Sweden.; Fac Odontol, Sect Oral Biol & Pathol, Malmo, Sweden..
    Stensson, Malin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Jansson, Henrik
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Carda-Dieguez, Miguel
    Fdn Promot Hlth & Biomed Res FISABIO Fdn, Dept Hlth & Genom, Valencia, Spain..
    Pedersen, Anders
    Univ Gothenburg, Swedish NMR Ctr, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Neilands, Jessica
    Malmo Univ, Fac Odontol, Sect Oral Biol & Pathol, Malmo, Sweden.;Malmo Univ, Biofilms Res Ctr Biointerfaces, Malmo, Sweden..
    Svensäter, Gunnel
    Malmo Univ, Fac Odontol, Sect Oral Biol & Pathol, Malmo, Sweden.;Malmo Univ, Biofilms Res Ctr Biointerfaces, Malmo, Sweden..
    Mira, Alex
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Department of Health & Genomics, Foundation for the Promotion of Health and Biomedical Research (FISABIO) Foundation, Valencia, Spain.
    Bacterial Composition and Metabolomics of Dental Plaque From Adolescents2021In: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, E-ISSN 2235-2988, Vol. 11, article id 716493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Supragingival dental plaque samples were collected from 40 Swedish adolescents, including 20 with caries lesions (CAR) and 20 caries-free (CF). Fresh plaque samples were subjected to an ex vivo acid tolerance (AT) test where the proportion of bacteria resistant to an acid shock was evaluated through confocal microscopy and live/dead staining, and the metabolites produced were quantified by H-1 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (H-1 NMR). In addition, DNA was extracted and the 16S rRNA gene was sequenced by Illumina sequencing, in order to characterize bacterial composition in the same samples. There were no significant differences in AT scores between CAR and CF individuals. However, 7 out of the 10 individuals with highest AT scores belonged to the CAR group. Regarding bacterial composition, Abiotrophia, Prevotela and Veilonela were found at significantly higher levels in CAR individuals (p=0.0085, 0.026 and 0.04 respectively) and Rothia and Corynebacterium at significantly higher levels in CF individuals (p=0.026 and 0.003). The caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans was found at low frequencies and was absent in 60% of CAR individuals. Random-forest predictive models indicate that at least 4 bacterial species or 9 genera are needed to distinguish CAR from CF adolescents. The metabolomic profile obtained by NMR showed a significant clustering of organic acids with specific bacteria in CAR and/or high AT individuals, being Scardovia wiggsiae the species with strongest associations. A significant clustering of ethanol and isopropanol with health-associated bacteria such as Rothia or Corynebacterium was also found. Accordingly, several relationships involving these compounds like the Ethanol : Lactate or Succinate : Lactate ratios were significantly associated to acid tolerance and could be of predictive value for caries risk. We therefore propose that future caries risk studies would benefit from considering not only the use of multiple organisms as potential microbial biomarkers, but also their functional adaptation and metabolic output.

  • 173.
    Hedmo, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Lindsten, Rune
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Josefsson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Laypeople and dental professionals' perception of the aesthetic outcome of two treatments for missing lateral incisors2022In: Clinical and Experimental Dental Research, E-ISSN 2057-4347, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 262-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate laypeople and dental professionals' opinions of the aesthetic outcome from implant therapy (IT) and orthodontic space closure (SC) for missing maxillary lateral incisors.

    Material and methods: Evaluation was performed by three groups: laypeople 20–30 years of age (n = 26), laypeople 50–70 years of age (n = 26) and orthodontists (n = 25). The assessors viewed photographs of 44 different cases treated with IT or SC, and made an evaluation of the aesthetics.

    Results: The gingival color adjacent to the replaced tooth was rated as having better aesthetics in the SC cases (p = 0.000). The orthodontists preferred the aesthetics of the dentition in the SC cases (p = 0.042). The young laypeople, compared to the older laypeople and orthodontists, were more dissatisfied with the color of the tooth replacing the missing lateral incisor in SC cases (p = 0.043).

    Conclusion: The color of the gingiva adjacent to the implant-supported crowns had a lower aesthetic rating than the SC group. Laypeople rated both treatments as equally good. The orthodontists had a slight preference for the aesthetics in the SC cases.

  • 174.
    Hedmo, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Lindsten, Rune
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Josefsson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Davidson, Thomas
    Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    A cost analysis of orthodontic space closure and implant treatment in patients missing maxillary lateral incisors with a long-term perspective2023In: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 468-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Few studies within orthodontics present both economic and clinical findings. Missing maxillary lateral incisors is a frequently occurring anomaly. The treatment alternatives most used are orthodontic space closure and prosthetic replacement of the missing tooth. Our aim is to compare the total societal costs of orthodontic space closure (SC) and implant therapy (IT) in patients missing maxillary lateral incisors.

    Methods

    Records of 32 patients treated with SC (n = 18) or IT (n = 14) due to missing maxillary lateral incisors were retrieved from the archives. Direct costs and indirect costs in the short- and long-term were analysed using a cost analysis with a societal perspective up of to 12 years post-treatment.

    Results

    Comparing cases treated with SC and IT, the difference in direct short-term costs for treatment is euro735.54, whereas SC is the least costly. There is no difference between SC and IT in short-term parent loss of productivity, long-term loss of productivity, costs for transportation, or direct long-term costs. A difference was found between SC and IT-in favour of SC-when comparing patients' loss of productivity (P = 0.007), short-term societal costs (P < 0.001), long-term societal costs (P = 0.037), and total societal costs (P < 0.001).

    Limitations

    There is a limited number of patient records. Local factors such as subsidies, urban versus rural areas, taxes, etc. can influence monetary variables, so the transferability to other settings may be limited.

    Conclusion

    Patients treated with SC have a lower total societal cost compared to patients treated with IT. There was a difference in productivity loss for patients between SC and IT; however, concerning other indirect parameters and direct long-term costs, there was no difference between the two treatments.

  • 175. Hellqvist, L
    et al.
    Rolandsson, M
    Birkhed, D
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Tobacco use in relation to socioeconomic factors and dental care habits among Swedish individuals 15-70 years of age, 1983-20032009In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 62-70Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 176.
    Hossaini, Farahnaz
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Joling, Emelie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Muskuloskeletala besvär hos tandhygienister: En enkätstudie inom privat sektor2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The purpose of the study was to investigate the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs)among dental hygienists. Method: It was a cross-sectional study with a quantitative approach with aweb-based survey as a measuring instrument. The sample consisted of licensed dental hygienists in the private sector in Skåne County that could be identified via the clinic’s websites. There were 92 dental clinics that were contacted and a total of 159 possible participants. Results: The number of dental hygienists who answered the survey was 30 and of these, 23 (77%) of the participants had MSDs or had it before. The results showed no statistically significant correlation between the variables age, working years as a dental hygienist and the amount of exercise regarding the prevalence of MSDs. It showed that MSDs increased when the individual got older, more specific from the age of 43. Most participants developed MSDs after eight years as working dental hygienists. Conclusion: MSDs was common among the participants in the study. Further research with a larger population is required to be able to ensure if there is a relationship between the variable age, occupational year as a working dental hygienist, amount of exercise and the prevalence of MSDs. 

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  • 177.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Dental caries in relation to smoking and the use of Swedish snus: epidemiological studies covering 20 years (1983-2003)2012In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 70, no 4, p. 289-296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate some intra-oral caries-associated variables and tobacco use on dental caries. Materials and methods. The participants were randomly recruited from three cross-sectional studies in Jönköping, Sweden, in 1983, 1993 and 2003. Each study consisted of 130 individuals in each of the 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70-year age groups. Of these, 550, 552 and 523 dentate individuals attended respective year of examination. They were all examined both clinically and radiographically. A questionnaire was completed in conjunction with the examination. In the studies, 345 were smokers, 104 snus users and 1142 non-tobacco users, in total 1591 individuals. Results. In 1983 and 1993, there were no significant differences in mean DFS between non-users and smokers, but a statistically significantly higher mean DFS in comparison with snus users. In 2003, there was no statistically significant difference in mean DFS between the groups. Multiple regressions showed that, after adjusting for age, gender and socio-demographic variables, there was a statistically significant association between DFS and smoking in 1983 (smoking excluded in favour of lactobacilli when further analysed) and DFS and plaque index (PLI) in 1993. In 2003, there was no association, apart from buffer capacity (Power rising) between DFS and the examined intra-oral caries-associated variables and tobacco use. Conclusions. The results of these epidemiological studies, performed in 1993 and 2003, indicate that daily smoking or snus use does not increase the risk of dental caries.

  • 178.
    Hugoson, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Ekfeldt, A
    Koch, G
    Hallonsten, A L
    Incisal and occlusal tooth wear in children and adolescents in a Swedish population.1996In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 263-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The material consisted of 527 randomly selected children and adolescents from the community of Jönköping, Sweden, who in 1983 reached the age of 3, 5, 10, 15, or 20 years. The degree of incisal or occlusal tooth wear was evaluated for each single tooth in accordance with the following criteria: score 0 = no wear or negligible wear of enamel; score 1 = obvious wear of enamel or wear through the enamel to the dentin in single spots; score 2 = wear of the dentin up to one-third of the crown height; and score 3 = wear of the dentin more than one-third of the crown height. In the age groups 3 and 5 years the primary dentition was studied, and in the age groups 10, 15, and 20 years the permanent dentition. In the 3-year-old children 63% and in the 5-year-olds 19% had no or slight incisal or occlusal wear in the primary dentition. In the permanent dentition the corresponding figures for the 10-, 15-, and 20-year-olds were 78%, 51%, and 35%, respectively. The 5-year-olds had the highest percentage of primary teeth with incisal or occlusal wear related to existing teeth in accordance with criteria 1-3 (32.2%), and the 10-year-olds had the lowest score for permanent teeth (2.5%). There were small or no differences in tooth wear between the sexes in these age groups. Eighteen children (17%) among the 5-year-olds had one or more teeth with wear scored 2 in the primary dentition, and one individual had 4 primary teeth scored 3. The corresponding figures for the 3-, 10-, 15-, and 20 year-olds were 2%, 1%, 7% and 6%, respectively. No permanent teeth with wear scored 3 were found in these age groups. The number of teeth with incisal or occlusal wear increased with age both in the primary and in the permanent dentition.

  • 179.
    Hugoson, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Hellqvist, Lena
    Boström, Anita
    Lingström, Peter
    Rolandsson, Margot
    Birkhed, Dowen
    Effect of nicotine-free and nicotine-containing snus on plaque pH in vivo2012In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 187-194Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 180.
    Hugoson, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Koch, G
    Bergendal, T
    Hallonsten, A L
    Slotte, C
    Thorstensson, B
    Thorstensson, H
    Oral health of individuals aged 3-80 years in Jönköping, Sweden in 1973, 1983, and 1993: I. Review of findings on dental care habits and knowledge of oral health1995In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 225-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to compare data on dental care habits and knowledge of oral health in three cross-sectional studies carried out in 1973, 1983, and 1993. The 1973 study constituted a random sample of 1000 individuals evenly distributed in the age groups 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 years. The same age groups with addition of a group of 80-year-olds were included in the 1983 and 1993 studies which comprised 1104 and 1078 individuals, respectively. A questionnaire (23-101 questions) about dental care habits and knowledge of oral health was used in connection with a clinical and radiographic examination. The same questions were used in all the three studies. An addition to the 1993 investigation was questions concerning ethnographic background. In 1993 approximately 95% of all individuals were visiting the dentist on a regular basis every or every second year. The 30-year-olds, however, did not visit a dentist as regularly in 1993 as in 1983. The 70- and 80-year-olds visited a dentist more regularly in 1993 than in 1983. An increased number of adults in all age groups, except for the 70-year-olds, received their dental care in the Public Dental Service in 1993 compared to 1983 and 1973. Most 40-year-olds and older, however, received their dental care by private practitioners. About 80% of all adults in 1993 were enrolled in a recall system on the dentist's initiative while in 1973 most appointments were based on the patient's own initiative. The number of individuals who felt discomfort at the prospect of an appointment with the dentist was more or less the same in 1973, 1983, and 1993. The knowledge of the etiology of dental diseases has not changed much between 1973 and 1993. The frequency of toothbrushing has increased since 1973 and in 1993 more than 95% of all individuals brushed their teeth daily. The use of dental floss and toothpicks as well as disclosing tablets decreased in 1993 compared to 1983. Almost all individuals in 1993 used fluoride toothpaste. The use of topical fluorides and fluoride tablets in children had decreased considerably in 1993 compared to 1983.

  • 181.
    Hugoson, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Koch, G
    Bergendal, T
    Hallonsten, A L
    Slotte, C
    Thorstensson, B
    Thorstensson, H
    Oral health of individuals aged 3-80 years in Jönköping, Sweden in 1973, 1983, and 1993: II. Review of clinical and radiographic findings1995In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 243-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this epidemiological study was to analyse various clinical and radiographic data on oral health and compare the results to those of two cross-sectional studies carried out in 1973 and 1983. In 1973, 1983, and 1993 a random sample of 1000, 1104, and 1078 individuals, respectively were studied. The individuals were evenly distributed in the age groups 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 years. In 1983 and 1993 80-year-olds were also included. All subjects were inhabitants of the community of Jönköping, Sweden. The clinical and radiographic examination assessed edentulousness, removable dentures, implants, number of teeth, caries, restorations and overhangs, oral hygiene, calculus, periodontal status, endodontic treatment, and periapical status. The number of edentulous individuals was reduced by half from 1973 to 1993 and is now 8% in the age groups 40-70 years. The mean number of teeth has increased and up to the age of 50 years the individuals had more or less complete dentitions. During the 20-year period there was generally decreasing number of carious lesions and restorations. In the 15- and 20-year-olds, however, there was an increasing number of decayed/filled tooth surfaces in 1993 compared to 1983. Furthermore, after the age of 50 there was an increase in number of restored tooth surfaces. As regards secondary caries there was an increase for the 10- and 15-year-olds between 1983 and 1993. For all other age groups there were only minor differences. Generally restorations exhibited a high quality and 85-90% had no proximal overhangs. In 1973 this figure was about 60%. Concerning the frequency of tooth surfaces exhibiting plaque and gingival inflammation there was a considerable decrease from 1973 to 1983, but during the period from 1983 to 1993 there seems to be no improvement. In some age groups there was even a significant increase in plaque (15-year-olds) and gingivitis (3-, 5-, 15-, 20-, and 60-year-olds). The frequency of individuals with one or more periodontal pockets (> 4 mm) increased with age. In 1993 the bone level at the age of 40 years corresponded to the bone level at the age of 20 years in 1973. The percentage of endodontically treated teeth was lower in 1993 in all age groups than in 1973 and 1983. The percentage of endodontically treated teeth with periapical or juxtaradicular destructions was unchanged in all three studies. The comparison of the three studies from 1973, 1983, and 1993 shows that there has been a great improvement in oral health over this 20-year period. In 1993, however, the increasing number of decayed/filled tooth surfaces in the 15- and 20-year-olds and an increase in plaque and gingivitis in some younger age groups calls for special attention.

  • 182.
    Hugoson, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Koch, G
    Hallonsten, A L
    Norderyd, J
    Aberg, A
    Caries prevalence and distribution in 3-20-year-olds in Jönköping, Sweden, in 1973, 1978, 1983, and 1993.2000In: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, E-ISSN 1600-0528, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 83-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four cross-sectional studies were carried out in 1973, 1978, 1983, and 1993 to collect clinical and radiographic epidemiological data on the dental health status of the inhabitants of Jönköping, Sweden. The aim of the present paper was to use these data to analyze trends in the development of caries among children and adolescents between 1973 and 1993. Approximately 500 randomly selected individuals evenly distributed among the age groups 3, 5, 10, 15, and 20 years participated in each study. The main results show that the numbers of caries-free individuals increased in all age groups. In 1993, the mean number of decayed and filled tooth surfaces in the primary (dfs) and the permanent (DFS) dentition in all age groups was less than half of that found in 1973. Most of this decrease took place during the first 5 years, i.e., between 1973 and 1978. Between 1978 and 1983, only minor changes were observed. There was a further reduction of approximately 30%-50% in dfs/DFS between 1983 and 1993 in 3-, 5-, 10-, and 20-year-olds. The frequency distributions of dfs/DFS for 5- and 15-year-olds revealed an increasing skewness over time: in 1993, a large majority of the children and adolescents had a low or moderate caries severity while only a small group had high scores of dfs/DFS.

  • 183.
    Hugoson, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Koch, G
    Slotte, C
    Bergendal, T
    Thorstensson, B
    Thorstensson, H
    Caries prevalence and distribution in 20-80-year-olds in Jönköping, Sweden, in 1973, 1983, and 19932000In: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, E-ISSN 1600-0528, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 90-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1973, a cross-sectional study on oral health status was performed on 1000 individuals in the age groups 3-70 years in Jönköping, Sweden. In 1983 and 1993, new cross-sectional studies were carried out in the age groups 3-80 years. The aim of the present study was to analyze caries prevalence and distribution in the three investigations 1973, 1983, and 1993 in the age groups 20-80 years. In the younger age groups (20-40 years), a larger proportion of individuals with good oral health was found in 1993 than in 1973 or 1983. A steady increase in the number of teeth in the age groups 40-80 years could be found, which was also reflected in the increasing number of decayed and filled tooth surfaces (DFS) in the same age groups. A marked decrease in proximal DFS in 20-50-year-olds in 1993 compared to 1973 and 1983 was found. However, a rather large and unchanging group of individuals suffering from severe caries was also observed. This situation demands an individualized caries treatment strategy based on risk assessment.

  • 184.
    Hugoson, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Koch, Göran
    Thirty year trends in the prevalence and distribution of dental caries in Swedish adults (1973-2003)2008In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 57-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present investigation is to report on the trends in the prevalence and severity of dental caries and dental status in an adult Swedish population over a 30-year period (1973-2003). Four cross-sectional epidemiological studies in 1973, 1983, 1993, and 2003 were performed in Jönköping, Sweden.A random sample of individuals aged 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, and 80 years were examined clinically and radiographically, a total of 2521 individals. Diagnostic variables were edentulousness, number of teeth, initial and manifest caries lesions, restorations, fissure sealants, and quality of restorations (secondary caries and overhangs). The percentage of edentulous 40- to 70-year-old individuals decreased during the 30-year period from 16% to 1%. The distribution of individuals by DFS in the age groups 20-50 years showed a gradual shift towards a positively skewed distribution between the years 1973 to 2003. There was a steady decrease in mean number of DFS in the age groups 20-50 years. In the 20-year-olds the mean number of DFS decreased by 72% and for 50-year-olds, by 37%. In conclusion there has been a marked decrease in DFS in adults up to middle age and a marked reduction in edentulousness over a thirty year period. This shows that the decrease in caries levels in children and adolescents is also occurring among adults.

  • 185.
    Hugoson, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Koch, Göran
    Göthberg, Catharina
    Helkimo, Anna Nydell
    Lundin, Sven-Ake
    Norderyd, Ola
    Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sjödin, Bengt
    Sjödin, Katarina
    Oral health of individuals aged 3-80 years in Jönköping, Sweden during 30 years (1973-2003): II. Review of clinical and radiographic findings2005In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 139-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this epidemiological study was to analyze various clinical and radiographic data on oral health and compare the results to those of three cross-sectional studies carried out in 1973 and 1983, and 1993. In 1973, 1983, 1993, and 2003 a random sample of 1,000; 1,104; 1,078; and 987 individuals, respectively, were studied. The individuals were evenly distributed in the age groups 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, and 80 years. In 1973 80-year-olds were not included. All subjects were inhabitants of the City of Jönköping, Sweden. The clinical and radiographic examination assessed edentulousness, removable dentures, implants, number of teeth, caries, restorations and overhangs, oral hygiene, calculus, periodontal status, endodontic treatment, and periapical status. The number of edentulous individuals in the age groups 40-70 years was reduced from 16 per cent in 1973 to 8 per cent in 1993, and to 1 per cent in 2003. The mean number of teeth increased, and up to the age of 60 years, individuals had more or less complete dentitions. During the 30-year period,the number of carious lesions and restorations decreased in general. In the 15-year-olds the decrease in number of restored tooth surfaces was 900 per cent and the corresponding figure for 30-year-olds was 79 per cent. The age groups 60-800 years showed an increase in number of restored tooth surfaces and had as a mean 50 filled tooth surfaces. The oral health among 3-5-year-olds improved markedly between 1973 and 1993. In 2003, however, there was no further improvement in 3- and 5-year-olds compared to 1993. Generally, restorations in 2003 exhibited a high quality and 90-95 per cent had no proximal overhangs. In 1973 this figure was about 60 per cent. In the age groups 20-50 years there were continuously fewer teeth fitted with crowns or bridges during the 30-year period. In 1973 the 50-year-olds had a mean of 24.5 per cent of the teeth crowned and in 2003 6.8 percent. Compared to data from 1973 there was a reduction by half concerning occurrence of plaque and gingivitis in 2003. The frequency of individuals with one or more periodontal pockets (> or = 4 mm) increased with age. In 2003 the bone level at the age of 60 years corresponded to the bone level at the age of 40 years in 1973. The percentage of endodontically treated teeth was lower in 2003 in all age groups compared to 1973, 1983, and 1993. The percentage of endodontically treated teeth with periapical orjuxtaradicular destructions was generally lower in 2003 than in the earlier surveys, about 20 per cent in 2003 compared to 25-30 per cent in 1973,1983, and 1993. The comparison of the four studies shows that there has been a great overall improvement in oral health over this 30-year period.

  • 186.
    Hugoson, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Koch, Göran
    Göthberg, Catharina
    Helkimo, Anna Nydell
    Lundin, Sven-Ake
    Norderyd, Ola
    Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sjödin, Bengt
    Sondell, Katarina
    Oral health of individuals aged 3-80 years in Jönköping, Sweden during 30 years (1973-2003): I. Review of findings on dental care habits and knowledge of oral health2005In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 125-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to compare data on dental care habits and knowledge of oral health in four cross-sectional epidemiological studies carried out in 1973,1983,1993, and 2003. The 1973 study constituted a random sample of 1,000 individuals evenly distributed in the age groups 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 years. The same age groups with addition of a group of 80-year-olds were included in the 1983, 1993 and 2003 studies, which comprised 1,104, 1,078, and 987 individuals, respectively. A questionnaire about dental care habits and knowledge of oral health was used in connection with a clinical and radiographic examination. The same questions were used in all the four studies. An addition to the 1993 and 2003 investigations were questions concerning ethnic background. In 2003 approximately 90-95 per cent of all individuals were visiting the dentist on a regular basis every or every second year. The 30- and 40-yea r-olds, however, did not visit a dentist as regularly in 2003 as in 1993. In these age groups 21-24 per cent of the individuals, respectively, reported that they had not visited a dentist in the last 2 years. Almost all children 3-15 years old received their dental care within the Public Dental Service (PDS). During the period 1973-2003 an increase in percentage of individuals aged 20-50 years treated by the PDS was seen compared to private practice, while among 60-80 year-olds there were only minor changes. Most so-year-olds and older received their dental care by private practitioners. About 70-80 per cent of all adults in 2003 were enrolled in a recall system on the dentist's initiative while in 1973 most appointments were based on the patient's own initiative. The number of individuals who were frightened, 5-17 per cent, or felt discomfort at the prospect of an appointment with the dentist was more or less the same during the whole period. The knowledge of the etiology of dental diseases did not changed much between 1973 and 2003. The frequency of toothbrushing increased since 1973 and in 2003 more than 90 per cent of all individuals brushed their teeth twice or once a day. The use of dental floss and toothpicks decreased in 2003 compared to 1983 and 1993. Almost all individuals in 2003 used fluoride toothpaste. It was obvious that the dental team constituted the main source of dental health information. For the age groups 20 and 30 years information from friends and relatives was also important. In the age groups 3-20 years up to 45 per cent of the individuals were consuming soft drinks every day or several times a week.

  • 187.
    Hugoson, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Koch, Göran
    Helkimo, Anna Nydell
    Lundin, Sven-Ake
    Caries prevalence and distribution in individuals aged 3-20 years in Jönköping, Sweden, over a 30-year period (1973-2003)2008In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 18-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Oral health status of individuals aged 3-80 years in the city of Jönköping, Sweden, has been assessed in a series of epidemiological studies over a 30-year period. AIM: To analyse the changes in caries prevalence and caries distribution in child population sample groups, based on studies performed in 1973, 1978, 1983, 1993, and 2003. DESIGN: Each time point included 500 randomly sampled individuals, divided into age groups of 3, 5, 10, 15, and 20 years. Results. Thirty-five per cent of 3-year-olds were caries free in 1973, compared with 69% 30 years later. Decayed and filled primary (dfs) and permanent surfaces (DFS) were reduced by 50-80% between 1973 and 2003. Adolescents aged 10 and 15 years exhibited the most pronounced reduction in DFS on the occlusal surfaces. By 2003, 90% of the proximal carious lesions in 15-year-olds were initial carious lesions. In 2003, about 60% of 15-year-olds had a DFS of < or = 5, while about 7% exhibited a DFS of > or = 26. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the dramatic decline in the prevalence of caries, caries remains a health problem among children, particularly those of preschool age. Continuous epidemiological studies are recommended to evaluate preventive measures.

  • 188.
    Hugoson, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Koch, Göran
    Odontologiska Institutionen i Jönköping.
    Norderyd, Ola
    Odontologiska Institutionen.
    Sondell, Katarina
    Odontologiska Institutionen.
    Jönköpingsundersökningarna: unika och omtalade2008In: Tandläkartidningen, ISSN 0039-6982, Vol. 100, no 15, p. 50-54Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I slutet av 1960-talet och början av 1970-talet skapade den odontologiska forskningen en bättre förståelse för de stora tandsjukdomarnas etiologi, prevention och behandling. Forsknignens framsteg ökade intresset för förebyggande åtgärder, bättre dignostik och förbättrad kvalitet i det rastaurativa arbetet. Samtidigt fanns en brist på både allmäntandläkare och specialister. Jönköpingsundersökningarna är i första hand exempel på tvärsnittsstudier som fångar upp de förändringar som sker inte bara inom tandvåden utan i hela samhället.

  • 189.
    Hugoson, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Laurell, L
    Lundgren, D
    Frequency distribution of individuals aged 20-70 years according to severity of periodontal disease experience in 1973 and 1983.1992In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 227-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to compare changes in periodontal status of a Swedish population over a 10-year period expressed as frequency distributions of individuals according to severity of periodontal disease experience. The study involved 600 randomly selected individuals evenly distributed into age groups 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70 years, examined in 1973 and another randomly selected group of 597 individuals similarly age distributed and examined in 1983. Based on clinical data and full mouth intraoral radiographs all individuals were classified into 5 groups according to severity of periodontal disease experience. In 1983, 23% of the individuals were classified as having healthy periodontal tissues, group 1, compared to 8% in 1973. The changes were most pronounced in the age groups 20 and 30 years, among whom 58% and 35%, respectively, were registered as having healthy periodontium in 1983. The prevalence of individuals with gingivitis without signs of lowered periodontal bone level, group 2, was 22% in 1983 compared to 41% in 1973. In all, 49% of the dentate population in 1973 and 45% in 1983 showed no marginal alveolar bone loss. Moderate periodontal bone loss, group 3, was found in 41% of the population in 1983 compared to 47% in 1973. Among 30-, 40-, and 50-year-olds, there were more, and among 60- and 70-year-olds, fewer individuals in this group in 1983 compared to 1973. 96% of the dentate population were classified as belonging to groups 1, 2 or 3 in 1973 compared to 86% in 1983.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  • 190.
    Hugoson, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Ljungquist, B
    Breivik, T
    The relationship of some negative events and psychological factors to periodontal disease in an adult Swedish population 50 to 80 years of age2002In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 247-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Clinical observations and epidemiological studies suggest that experiences of negative life events, especially those manifested as depression, may contribute to an increased susceptibility to periodontal disease. OBJECTIVE: In the present study, the prevalence of some negative life events and psychological factors and their relation to periodontal disease were investigated. The sample consisted of individuals 50-80 years of age from an extensive cross-sectional epidemiological study performed in 1993 in the city of Jönköping, Sweden. METHOD: 298 dentate individuals from the Jönköping study were randomly selected. Clinical and radiographic examinations included registration of the number of existing teeth, plaque index, gingival index, pocket depth, and alveolar bone loss. In addition, a questionnaire about socioeconomic status, life events, and psychological and stress-related factors was used. RESULTS: The results revealed that, in addition to the well-documented periodontal disease risk factors such as increased age, oral hygiene status, and smoking, the loss of a spouse (being a widow or widower) and the personality trait of exercising extreme external control were also associated with severe periodontal disease. CONCLUSION: The findings support recent studies suggesting that traumatic life events such as the loss of a spouse may increase the risk for periodontal disease. Above all, the present results indicate that an individual's ability to cope with stressful stimuli (coping behavior), as measured by the beliefs of locus of control of reinforcements may play a role in the progression of periodontal disease.

  • 191.
    Hugoson, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Lundgren, Dan
    Asklöw, Barbro
    Borgklint, Gun
    Effect of three different dental health preventive programmes on young adult individuals: a randomized, blinded, parallel group, controlled evaluation of oral hygiene behaviour on plaque and gingivitis.2007In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 407-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To evaluate, in young adults, the effect of different preventive programmes on oral hygiene and to determine whether the variables investigated are predictors of gingival health. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This randomized, blinded, parallel, controlled clinical study examined the effectiveness of three dental health programmes. Four hundred subjects aged 20-27 years, 211 males and 189 females, participated in the study. They were recruited from a Public Dental Service clinic and from a private dental practice in Jönköping, Sweden. The effect of the programmes on plaque and gingivitis was evaluated over a 3-year period. The programmes included activities that were adapted for individuals as well as for groups. The plaque indices (PLI) and gingival indices (GI) were used to evaluate the programmes. RESULTS: All programmes resulted in a decrease in PLI and GI. The greatest decrease was found in the group that was followed-up every 2 months. Professional tooth cleaning was non-significant for the clinical result. Gingival health at baseline, participation in any of the test programmes, and knowledge of the dental diseases caries, gingivitis or periodontitis were significant predictors of good gingival health. CONCLUSIONS: The study confirms the efficacy of three different preventive programmes in reducing supragingival plaque and gingival inflammation. Professional tooth cleaning provided no clinical benefit beyond that derived from individual and group-based health education.

  • 192.
    Hugoson, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Lundgren, Dan
    Asklöw, Barbro
    Borgklint, Gun
    The effect of different dental health programmes on young adult individuals: A longitudinal evaluation of knowledge and behaviour including cost aspects2003In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 115-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of this study was to report the long-term effect of different dental health programmes on young adult individuals' knowledge and behaviour relative to oral health. Over a 3 years period, the effect of three different dental health programmes on caries, gingivitis/periodontitis, and knowledge and behaviour concerning oral health in 400 Swedish young adults was evaluated. During the following 2 years, additional prophylactic measures--now based on the individual's symptoms and the prophylaxis previously received--were conducted and evaluated. Five years later still one follow-up was made. The evaluations were based on clinical and radiographic examinations and on a questionnaire survey whose purpose was to study the short- and long-term effects of the different preventive measures, including cost aspects. At the end of the 3 years period, the three test groups exhibited better knowledge and significantly improved behaviour compared with the control group concerning approximal cleaning, from approximately 50% of the individuals at the baseline examination to approximately 90% at the end of the period. Improvement was observed as early as the first year. There were no differences between the test groups. The intensified, individual-related prophylaxis carried out in the following 2 years did not significantly increase knowledge in the test groups; a significant increase in approximal cleaning, however, was found in the control group during this time. At the 10-year follow-up, the individuals' knowledge was undiminished while behaviour concerning approximal cleaning had sunk from 90% to approximately 70% of the individuals. A slight behavioural change concerning number of snacks was found in the course of the study with a shift towards fewer snacks per day. In conclusion, it can be said that simple prophylactic models have an effect on and maintain young adult individuals' knowledge and behaviour concerning oral health and that new knowledge is remembered for long periods of time while changes in behaviour are maintained less well. Moreover, it was found that the scope of the prophylactic programme measured in time and cost had little effect on the long-term result.

  • 193.
    Hugoson, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Norderyd, O
    Slotte, C
    Thorstensson, H
    Distribution of periodontal disease in a Swedish adult population 1973, 1983 and 1993.1998In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 542-548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to compare changes in periodontal status in a Swedish population over a period of 20 years. Cross-sectional studies were carried out in Jönköping County in 1973, 1983, and 1993. Individuals were randomly selected from the following age groups: 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 years. A total of 600 individuals were examined in 1973, 597 in 1983, and 584 in 1993. The number of dentate individuals was 537 in 1973, 550 in 1983, and 552 in 1993. Based on clinical data and full mouth intra-oral radiographs, all individuals were classified into 5 groups according to the severity of the periodontal disease experience. Individuals were classified as having a healthy periodontium (group 1), gingivitis without signs of alveolar bone loss (group 2), moderate alveolar bone loss not exceeding 1/3 of the normal alveolar bone height (group 3), severe alveolar bone loss ranging between 1/3 and 2/3 of the normal alveolar bone height (group 4), or alveolar bone loss exceeding 2/3 of the normal bone height and angular bony defects and/or furcation defects (group 5). During these 20 years, the number of individuals in groups 1 and 2 increased from 49% in 1973 to 60% in 1993. In addition, there was a decrease in the number of individuals in group 3, the group with moderate periodontal bone loss. Groups 4 and 5 comprised 13% of the population and showed no change in general between 1983 and 1993. The individuals comprising these groups in 1993, however, had more teeth than those who comprised these groups in 1983; on the average, the individuals in disease group 4 had 4 more teeth and those in disease group 5, 2 more teeth per subject. In 1973, these 2 groups were considerably smaller, probably because of wider indications for tooth extractions and fewer possibilities for periodontal care which meant that many of these individuals had become edentulous and were not placed in a group. Individuals in groups 3, 4, and 5 were subdivided according to the number of surfaces (%) with gingivitis and periodontal pockets (> or =4 mm). In 1993, 20%, 42%. and 67% of the individuals in groups 3, 4, and 5 respectively were classified as diseased and in need of periodontal therapy with >20% bleeding sites and >10% sites with periodontal pockets > or =4 mm. In conclusion, an increase in the number of individuals with no marginal bone loss and a decrease in the number of individuals with moderate alveolar bone loss can be seen. The prevalence of individuals in the severe periodontal disease groups (4, 5) was unchanged during the last 10 years; however, the number of teeth per subject increased.

  • 194.
    Hugoson, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Norderyd, O
    Slotte, C
    Thorstensson, H
    Oral hygiene and gingivitis in a Swedish adult population 1973, 1983 and 1993.1998In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 25, no 10, p. 807-812Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The periodontal condition of the inhabitants of Jönköping County, Sweden was followed for 20 years by means of 3 cross-sectional investigations performed in 1973, 1983, and 1993. The study comprised individuals in the age groups 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 years. The number of dentate individuals was 537 in 1973, 550 in 1983, and 552 in 1993. All individuals participating in the studies were examined clinically and radiographically. They also filled out a questionnaire about dental care habits, socio-economic status, and general health. A clear reduction in the plaque score was seen between 1973 and 1983 in all age groups. With one exception, no further significant change in plaque levels was found between 1983 and 1993: the increase in plaque among the 20-year-olds was significant. In 1993 the mean % of surfaces with plaque was between 30% and 40% in all age groups. Gingivitis values corresponded well with the values of dental plaque; the same pattern with a clear reduction in gingivitis score was seen in all age groups between 1973 and 1983, and an increase in the mean frequency of gingival inflammation between 1983 and 1993 was seen in the 20-year age group. 30% of the individuals in this age group had more than 50% gingivitis in 1993 compared with 9% of the individuals in 1983. The 20-year-olds were further analyzed in a linear regression model using gingivitis as a dependent variable against some socio-economic, general health, and dental care variables associated with poor oral hygiene and gingivitis. In 1993, the most important explanatory variable was gender: significantly more males than females had higher gingivitis scores. The second most important explanatory variable was toothbrushing habits. Together they explained 10.9% of the variance. The multivariate analysis did not reveal approximal cleaning habits to be significant, probably due to their strong connection to gender and toothbrushing habits. In the 1983 sample, no significant explanatory variables were found. It was concluded from this data that it is important not only to renew but also to direct preventive guidelines more towards young adults who have no previous extensive experience of oral disease so that they will not be excluded from dental care and their dental health thereby jeopardised. In addition to preventive programmes aimed at the population as a whole, individual programmes based on risk targeting are also necessary to reduce the number of people developing dental disease and to increase the quality of dental care.

  • 195.
    Hugoson, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Norderyd, Ola
    The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education Jönköping, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Has the prevalence of periodontitis changed during the last 30 years?2008In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 35, no 8 Suppl., p. 338-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This paper reviews global trends in the change in prevalence of periodontitis over the last 30 years.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: The epidemiology of periodontal disease is briefly reviewed together with the current classification system and the clinical and radiographic diagnostic methodology in periodontal disease.

    RESULTS: This review identifies the very limited number of studies that provide prevalence data over time, and this data is discussed in comparison with those stemming from a few corresponding studies from countries outside Europe.

    CONCLUSIONS: The data indicate a possible trend of a lower prevalence of periodontitis in recent years.

  • 196.
    Hugoson, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Ravald, N
    Fornell, J
    Johard, G
    Teiwik, A
    Gottlow, J
    Treatment of class II furcation involvements in humans with bioresorbable and nonresorbable guided tissue regeneration barriers: A randomized multi-center study1995In: Journal of Periodontology, ISSN 0022-3492, E-ISSN 1943-3670, Vol. 66, no 7, p. 624-634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this multi-center study 38 patients with contralateral molar Class II furcation defects were treated with GTR therapy using a bioresorbable matrix barrier (test) and a nonresorbable expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) barrier (control). Following flap elevation, scaling, root planing, and removal of granulation tissue, each device was adjusted to cover the furcation defect. The flaps were repositioned and sutured to complete coverage of the barriers. A second surgical procedure was performed at control sites after 4 to 6 weeks to remove the nonresorbable barrier. Before treatment and 12 months postsurgery all patients were examined and probing depths, clinical attachment levels, and position of the gingival margin were recorded. The primary response variable was the change in clinical attachment level in a horizontal direction (CAL-H change). Both treatment procedures reduced the probing depths (P < or = 0.001). Statistically significant gain of clinical attachment level in both horizontal and vertical direction was found at the test sites. At control sites gain of attachment in horizontal direction was statistically significant. The gain of CAL-H was 2.2 mm at test sites compared to 1.4 mm at control sites (P < or = 0.05). At test sites, the gingival margin was maintained close to the pre-surgical level (0.3 mm), whereas at control sites gingival recession was evident (0.9 mm), the difference being statistically significant (P < or = 0.01). Postsurgical complications, such as swelling and pain were more frequent following the control treatment (P < or = 0.05).

  • 197.
    Hugoson, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Rolandsson, Margot
    Periodontal disease in relation to smoking and the use of swedish snus: epidemiological studies covering 20 years (1983-2033)2011In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 38, no 9, p. 809-816Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT: Aim: The aim of the present study was to examine how deleterious current smoking and the use of Swedish moist snuff (snus) is for periodontal health compared with non-tobacco users. Materials and Methods: The studies comprised three epidemiological cross-sectional studies, in 1983, 1993 and 2003, of stratified random samples aged 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70 years. The numbers of dentate participants were 550, 552 and 523, respectively. The participants were examined clinically and radiographically. Diagnostic criteria were the number of teeth, plaque, gingival status, probing pocket depth (PPD)4 mm, height of the alveolar bone level and classification by periodontal disease experience. In addition, participants were asked about their tobacco habits. Results: Multiple logistic regression shows, after adjusting for age, gender and sociodemographic variables, that relative to non-tobacco users, cigarette smokers had statistically significant less gingivitis, a higher frequency of PPD4 mm and a higher incidence of severe periodontitis. There was no significant association between gingivitis, frequency of PPD4 mm and periodontal disease experience and snus use. Conclusions: Cigarette smokers were found to have a statistically significant higher risk of severe periodontitis than non-tobacco users and users of snus. Using snus did not seem to be a risk factor for periodontitis.

  • 198.
    Hugoson, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Sjödin, Bengt
    Norderyd, Ola
    The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Trends over 30 years, 1973-2003, in the prevalence and severity of periodontal disease2008In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 405-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The present investigation presents findings of the prevalence and distribution of gingivitis and periodontitis in a Swedish population over the 30 years 1973-2003. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Four cross-sectional epidemiological studies in 1973, 1983, 1993, and 2003 were performed in Jönköping, Sweden. Random samples of individuals aged 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, and 80 years were examined clinically and radiographically. Diagnostic criteria were edentulousness, number of teeth, plaque, gingival status, probing pocket depth, gingival recession, alveolar bone level, and classification according to periodontal disease status. RESULTS: In all age groups, the number of edentulous individuals decreased dramatically and the number of teeth increased. Oral hygiene improved considerably. Over the 30 years, the proportion of periodontally healthy individuals increased from 8% in 1973 to 44% in 2003 and the proportion of individuals with gingivitis and moderate periodontitis decreased. There was a non-significant trend for the proportion of individuals with severe periodontal disease experience (Group 4) to decrease, while the proportion of individuals with advanced periodontitis (Group 5) remained unchanged. CONCLUSION: Oral hygiene and periodontal health improved significantly in the 20-80-year age groups over the 30 years 1973-2003.

  • 199. Hägglin, C
    et al.
    Berggren, U
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Ahlqwist, M
    Dental anxiety among middle-aged and elderly women in Sweden: A study of oral state, utilisation of dental services and concomitant factors.1996In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 25-34Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 200. Hägglin, C
    et al.
    Berggren, U
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Hällstrom, T
    Bengtsson, C
    Variations in dental anxiety among middle-aged and elderly women in Sweden: a longitudinal study between 1968 and 1996.1999In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 78, no 10, p. 1655-1661Article in journal (Refereed)
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