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  • 151.
    Bjuggren, Per-Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Wiberg, Daniel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Ownership, Succession and Entrepreneurship in an Aging Society: Is There a Transition Problem?2009In: Innovation, Agglomeration and Regional Competition / [ed] Charlie Karlsson, Börje Johansson & Roger R. Stough, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar , 2009, p. 57-76Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 152.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    An innovative organization or organi­zing innovatively after a merger?2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the middle of the post-merger integration process voices expressing a need for innova­tion was heard. What was the reason for this change of focus in the organization and why did they use the concept innovation? This paper is based on a study of a merger between a Finnish and a Swedish company. Both companies had historically been family com­panies but one of them was listed on the Stockholm Stock Exchange in 1993 which had changed the business logic in the organization. When talking to the managers after the merger they referred to cultures to explain problematic issues. In this paper, the frame concept is used to analyze organizational cultures, and to compare them with the notion of an innovative organization. It turned out that the two pre-merger organizational cultures had stronger innovative features, compared to the culture in the new, merged company. This is followed by a suggestion that innovation should be seen as a method for integration, rather than a goal for the new organization.

  • 153.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Heterogeneous frames and homogenizing activity: Dualistic tensions in a merger discourse2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper conceptualizes a post-merger integration process as a quest for semantic fit in the process of changing meaning in international business; a study of how meaning is constructed in the creation of a new social setting after a merger. The analysis showed how the integra­tion discourse consisted of dualistic tensions in several dimensions, and how management worked towards homogenization to deal with these tensions, which in itself created a tension in the dimension heterogeneity – homogeneity. The paper is based on a longitudinal field study of post-merger integration meetings in a mangement group.

  • 154.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Standing at the crossroads: Four ways to the metaphor2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    In ethnography there is much focus on fieldwork and the process of writing it down, but less attention have been directed to the techniques of writing it up (Van Maanen, 2006a). In this paper I would like to leave the romantic (?) image of the lonely writer and instead notice the writer as a participant in context. This text is based on the assumption that the best way of working is to engage in presenting and interpreting our social reality based on pluralistic rather than homogeneous ideals. Van Maanen (1995) has been had a leading voice arguing against the homogenization towards an objectivistic approach in social sciences. In the classic book Tales of the Field, Van Maanen (1988) made the reader aware of how reality can be constructed in a variety of ways. The first step was to separate the fieldworker from fieldwork representa¬tions. This means that the researcher moves from being an objective observer of social reality to an active producer of how social reality is represented. The book also gave suggestions on how the writer could make choices in the construction of a text, as well as how the reader could approach a text considering the style. Fine and Martin (1995) demonstrated possibilities of humorous writing in ethnography by displaying how forms like sarcasm, satire and irony was used in Goffman’s texts. Within this style metaphors were used to transform the meaning of what was presented: “Goffman takes the mental hospital and turns it into a university, referring to the “campus” (p. 269) and “campus wheels” (p. 217).” (Fine and Martin, 1995, p. 181-182).

    To this conference I would like to further explore metaphors as a means to build a research text. I will conceptualize four ways to use metaphors: metaphorical creation, metaphorical inspiration, metaphorical reproduction and metaphorical expression. Firstly, metaphorical creation is about highlighting how metaphors appear in theories or how theories are meta¬phors for what they are trying to explain. In this form, the metaphor has gained pseudo-literal status over time. Secondly, metaphorical inspiration is found when the metaphor is consciously used in the creative process to inspire to new insights during the research process. Since one of the basic characteristics of metaphor is that it can change the way we see things, it provides great opportunities to develop ideas and challenge existing beliefs. To talk about metaphorical reproduction is a third way to put focus on how metaphors appear in the empirical setting and how these metaphors can be interpreted and reproduced in a scientific setting. Finally, metaphorical expression, involves the process of writing up research in relation to a reader. Then the metaphor is returned from being a research tool to its original purpose: to be an illustrative device in a text. I end the paper with a summary of the pros and cons of the use of metaphors in social science.

  • 155.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Brundin, Ethel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Florin Samuelsson, Emilia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    The Circle of Trust: Management in Acquiring and Acquired Family Businesses2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The issue of mergers and acquisitions is of growing concern in many industries dominated by family ownership. Nevertheless there are few empirical studies of mergers and acquisitions involving family firms. While the few studies performed deal with how family owned companies respond to takeovers, this study will focus on family businesses as the acquiring firm. The empirical findings demonstrate that the family ownership logic of a family firm has concrete consequences for the acquisition process. Compared to traditional literature on mergers and acquisition, which has a focus on control by exchanging management in the acquired organization, the acquirers in this study worked in an alternative way when acquiring family owned businesses. The basis for their approach was trust in the acquired managers´ ability to manage the company for the long run.

    Sharma (2004) made a call for further efforts to explore the linkages between family business studies and other disciplines in order to propel the family business field toward establishing a niche and identity within the research community. The aim of this study is to enhance knowledge on mergers and acquisitions in family firms, at the same time as we are using the M&A literature to reflect on the specifics of the family firm. The purpose of this study is to explore management of acquired family businesses, with special attention to family ownership logic. Suggestions for further research both regarding mergers and acquisitions within the family business field and the theoretical construct family ownership logic will be discussed.

  • 156.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Brundin, Ethel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Florin Samuelsson, Emilia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    The Circle of Trust: The Logic and Praxis of Acquisitions in the Family Owned Business2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 157.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Bäckvall, Lisa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Family business women in media discourse: the business role and the mother role2011In: Journal of Family Business Management, ISSN 2043-6238, E-ISSN 2043-6246, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 154-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Writings in the media have the potential to influence our standpoint and, thereby, our actions. In this paper, the authors analyze how women in family business are represented in media to understand the frames set by this discourse in terms of women owning and leading family businesses. The aim of the paper is to explore how the counterposed roles of business person and mother are presented in media and what implications this might have for role enactment. Design/methodology/approach - The paper opted for an exploratory study of 308 articles about women in family business over a 15-year period. In the interpretative, qualitative analysis of media texts, the discursive construction of the mother role and the business role are explored. Findings - The paper provides empirical insights into how the mother role is taken for granted while the business role is approached as problematic in portrayals of women in family business. The authors discuss whether the media discourse reinforces traditional roles or stimulates role innovation. Practical implications - Understanding role as something separate from the individual provides a means to critically review expectations of women in business and how these expectations hinder business activities. Originality/value - The study examines data over a 15-year period in the Swedish media setting and describes changes in attitudes about women's roles in family business. Regarding the family business as an arena for performative acts provides a perspective that can highlight the intertwinement of the private and professional arenas in family business.

  • 158.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Bäckvall, Lisa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Family business women in the media discourse: The fairytale heiresses and the down-to-earth tomboys2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An alternative way to study a phenomenon is to explore texts in order to learn about discursive constructions within specific areas on a societal level. One example of such as study is Ahl (2002) who examined how the female entrepreneur was constructed in research texts. She found that even though the texts celebrated women’s entrepreneur­ship, they also recreated women’s secondary position in society. In this paper, the area of study is notions of women in family business and we have examined how Swedish media (re)constructs meanings about women in family business. The empirical material in this study is media texts about women in family businesses over a ten year period (1999-2008). This text departs from the general definition of discourse as ‘a particular way of talking about and under­standing the world (or an aspect of the world) ’ (Phillips and Jørgensen, 2006, p. 1). One contradiction found in the media discourse was the difference between the famous heiresses and the everyday woman working hands-on, often in manufacturing industries. Concerning the heiresses, they were sometimes mentioned in the same article as family business women in other countries, thus adding an international flair to the description. The entrepreneurs were instead noted for excelling in business and prizes/positions received as an outcome of their performance. Different ways to portray business women could have implica­tions for other women facing a situation of becoming a family business owner/manager since role modeling can be an important inspiration for choices made by individuals.

  • 159.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Bäckvall, Lisa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Mediebilden av kompetenta arvtagerskor och drivna företagare2012In: Familjeföretagande: Affärer och känslor / [ed] Brundin, Johansson, Johannisson, Melin och Nordqvist, Stockholm: SNS förlag, 2012, p. 227-250Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 160.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Larsson, Anna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Bridging Types and Frames in the Organizational (Inter)Act: Type Casting of Female Researchers in Academia2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we bridge the concepts type (Schutz) and frame (Goffman) to conceptualize misfits in the social intercourse of the academic everyday experiences. We see the combination of type and frame as a way to further elaborate the role concept. This was done by developing an interactional model that illustrates a combination of type and frame in relation to an organizational setting where the (inter)act takes place. The concept (inter)act is used to stress that although people may participate in the same act; this is not necessarily the same thing as role agreement during interaction. Rather, the lack of agreement is the starting point for this paper; we work with the empirical question “Why were we, and our fellow colleagues, treated as women when we were acting as researchers?”

    The problem we address is how some people in an academic organization confused the idea of woman as a type with the female body, and what consequences this had for everyday social practices. This paper is based on an at-home ethnography (Alvesson, forthcoming), which in our version include both introspection and dialogue around emerging ideas and involves a strong component of re-interpretation.  We suggest that individuals may embrace or reject role-types, connected to a role-frame of expected behavior, in the organizational socialization process. Research as an activity is characterized by both masculine and feminine attributes, but in line with previous writings we see the research organization as gendered; the researcher-type is a man. We have called this type-role the wizard-man, a type that engage in intellectual activity. An alternative type-role is the mother-woman, whose role-frame is in line with key words such as body and caring. In the academic organization studied, there was a blurring between people as abstract (ideal) types and as individuals. In the organizational context, gendering by type casting seemed to be an important aspect of the socialization process. A negative consequence came when doctoral students were equaled to the mother-woman role, since these doctoral students were assumed to take on a role that was not in line with their professional development.

  • 161.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Larsson, Anna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    The yin and yang of organization: Applying Jung's terminology to take a closer look at management of shadows2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    In management and organization research the positive, upward-seeking, producing side (yang) is often described as some kind of best practice that we can get inspired by but as an individual within an organization you also encounter another side that is passive, dark and negative (yin).

    “The yang face of managing, the drama of MSF and the corresponding style of its leader, would seem more representative of how management is practiced today. [ ] The drama, not the daily routine, is what attracts and sells. But most managing is about the daily routine—about trying to establish and sustain excellence. In that respect, we need to pay more attention to the mysteries of yin. If there really are two faces of managing, then we have been neglecting one of them.” (Mintzberg 2001, page 312)

    In this working paper we would like to explore the yin and yang of organization using Jung’s terminology as a metaphor for different aspects of organization. In a modern world where the yang is related to constructs of masculinity and the yin to constructs of femininity, how can Jungs terminology of the subconscious inhabited by shadows and Anima be included in a notion of management – as managing shadows of the organisations? In 1943 Jung e.g. wrote:

    “As a consequence of his identification with the collective psyche he will try to force the demands of his subconscious onto others, because the identification with the collective psyche is followed by a sense of universality (godlikeness) which totally ignores all differences in the personal psyches of fellowmen.” (Jung 1967:42)

    Can the dualism in either yang or yin be rephrased as the collective projection of both yang and of yin on others, creating positive yang at the expense of the negative yin? Is positive yang only the rejection of yin and in that case where does yin go? Of particular interest is a situation where the divide between conscious/subconscious is exceptionally large or grandiose fronts take over the managerial role. What would happen if these collective projections are challenged? What kind of implications can this have for the organization and the people within them? What would it take for yang and yin to meet – possibly in consciousness? Empirical examples in the text are based on a field study of a merger together with the authors’ experience of working in an academic organization.

    Mintzberg, H. (2001): The Yin and the Yang of Managing, Organizational Dynamics, 29(4): 306-312.

    Jung, C. G. (1967): Jaget och det omedvetna (The self and the subconscious), Wahlström & Widstrand, Stockholm.

  • 162.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Förebilder för kvinnor i familjeföretag: var finns de?2011In: Kvinnors företagande: mål eller medel? / [ed] Eva Blomberg, Gun Hedlund och Martin Wottle, Stockholm: SNS Förlag , 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 163.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Kvinnors berättelser om företagaridentitet2012In: Familjeföretagande: Affärer och känslor / [ed] Brundin, E., Johansson, A.W., Johannisson, B., Melin, L. och Nordqvist, M., SNS förlag, 2012, p. 213-226Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 164.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Merging Two Family Businesses by Creating a New Ownership Logic2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    After the merger between two family owned companies, it soon became apparent that the managers had to deal with different family ownership logics (FOL). One reason for this was that the old FOLs were connected to different business models, which created problems for integration based on way of working.

    Mickelson and Worley (2003) made a call for additional research on family businesses involved in international mergers and acquisitions. This study contributes to the under¬standing of the unique features of the family system at work during the integration process in combination with different ways of working depending on family ownership logic.

  • 165.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Proactive and reactive plots: Narratives in entrepreneurial identity construction2011In: International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 1756-6266, E-ISSN 1756-6274, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 218-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to offer a new perspective on entrepreneurial identity as a narrative construction, emerging in stories about entering the family business.

    Design/methodology/approach – The qualitative methodological approach involves an interpretative analysis of transcribed interviews conducted in narrative style with 12 women from Swedish family businesses.

    Findings – By presenting entrepreneurial identity as a combination of two distinct narratives, the “passive” entrance into the family business is highlighted. The “Pippi Longstocking” narrative illustrates conscious choices, drive and motivation based on an entrepreneurial identification: the proactive plot. The “Alice in Wonderland” narrative on the other hand, illustrates women who happen to become entrepreneurs or business persons because the family business was there: the reactive plot. The contrasting and complementing narratives illustrate ambiguities in the identity process.

    Practical implications – The authors identified the following opportunities for women in family business: the family business can offer easy access to a career and on-the-job learning opportunities; education in other areas can be useful when learning how to manage and develop the family business; and the family business offers a generous arena for pursuing a career at different life stages. Implications for education as well as for policy makers are also presented.

    Originality/value – The narratives presented are given metaphorical names with the intention to evoke the reader's reflection and reasoning by analogy, which can lead to new insights. The use of metaphors illustrates multiple layers and ambiguities in identity construction. Metaphors can also create awareness of the researcher as a co-creator of knowledge.

  • 166.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Two-Fold Succession in a Family Business Matriarchy: A Swedish Case2011In: Father-Daughter Succession in Family Business: A Cross-Cultural Perspective / [ed] Halkias, D., Thurman, P., Swiercz, P. Smith, C., & Nason, R. S., London: Gower Publishers , 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 167.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Unwinding organizational culture: A study of a post-merger integration process between two family businesses2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper contributes to the scarce volume of studies of mergers involving family businesses. In the merger described, managers used the culture concept to name problematic aspects of the integration process. In the analysis, we have used the three-circle model to understand the contradictions that emerged in the managers description of organizational culture. To consider the subsystems in the three-circle model: ownership, business and family, means a broadening of the idea that the founder (family) shapes the organizational culture. This could be especially relevant for larger and/or growing family businesses.

  • 168.
    Blombäck, Anna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Family business: a secondary brand in corporate brand management2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Why do firms allude to family involvement in their marketing efforts? How can such references influence marketing outcomes? In view of these questions, the current paper argues that the business format “family business” holds a brand of its own; a brand that can offer distinctiveness to brands on corporate as well as product level. Revisiting theory on secondary brand associations and image transfer, the paper interprets the function of references to family in corporate communications and clarifies their relationship to corporate branding. Potential difficulties involved in the referral to family business are identified. Propositions for further research are proposed.

  • 169.
    Blombäck, Anna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Realizing the value of Family Business Identity as Corporate Brand Element – A Research Model2011Report (Other academic)
  • 170.
    Blombäck, Anna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    The seconding values of family business in corporate branding – a tentative model2010In: Long Term Perspectives on Family Business: theory, practice, policy : IFERA, Lancaster, 2010 : book of proceedings / [ed] Elias Hadjielias, Lancaster: Lancaster University Management School , 2010, p. -23Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Why and under what circumstances can references to family business influence marketing outcomes? This paper suggests we view “family business” as a brand of its own. Through secondary brand associations, this brand can distinguish corporate as well as product brands. Tentative models present the function of family business references in relation to corporate and product communications, and firm performance. Propositions to aid further research are proposed.

  • 171.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Botero, Isabel
    Illinois State University, School of Communication.
    Reputational capital in family firms: Understanding uniqueness from the stakeholder point of view2013In: Handbook of Research on Family Business / [ed] Poutziouris, P. Smyrnios, K. Goel, S., Edward Elgar Publishing, 2013, 2Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the main goals of family business research is to understand how family firms differ from non-family firms and to understand the benefits of family ownership. To date, research exploring these issues has focused on understanding unique resources that are based on intra-organizational features, which derive from the interaction between family and business. In this chapter we argue that an increased understanding of how family firms brand themselves and reference family association can represent a complementary approach to understanding the uniqueness and benefits of these types of firms. Whereas past research has studied family business uniqueness based on their internal characteristics, we believe that brand management offers scholars the opportunity to recognize further unique family business resources; involving the external stakeholders’ views on family businesses. Based on this argument, we introduce family business reputation and reputational capital as an additional and potential basis for the family business’ competitive advantage.

  • 172.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Brundin, Ethel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Handler revisited - mission completed?: An updated review of family business definitions in research publications and among practitioners2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 173.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Brundin, Ethel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    The family business definition among researchers, practitioners and policy makers: Differences, similarities and implications2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 174.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Brundin, Ethel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    The meaning of family business: An investigation of definitions and patterns in family business research2011In: Book of proceedings: Intelligence and Courage – Family firms’ vision in the era of economic turmoil. Theory-Practice-Policy.:   / [ed] Tomaselli, S. and Montemerlo, D, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 175.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Corporate Brand Heritage; Not Always About Family History2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 176.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Corporate identity manifested through historical references2009In: Corporate Communications. An International Journal, ISSN 1356-3289, E-ISSN 1758-6046, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 404-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to focus on how firms draw on historical references in corporate marketing. The paper seeks to analyze the logic behind such efforts from a corporate identity perspective and to propose potential risks and/or benefits of doing so. The paper aims to inspire the understanding of how references to history are used in marketing and the outcome of such use.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper mainly draws on literature relating to corporate marketing and the use of history in organizations. Combining these theories, and pointing at empirical examples, the paper clarifies why references to history can be important mani-festations of corporate identity. The paper comes up with propositions concerning what consequences the reference to history in corporate marketing can have for firms’ marketing strategies and business development.

    Findings – The paper outlines a connection among corporate identity, organizational identity, and image through corporate communications. It suggests that among the range of corporate characteristics, historical references can be particular valuable for corporate communications thanks to the reliability age can provide (as opposed to liabilities of newness). Still, elaborations suggest that the planned use of historical references has both pros and cons in terms of business development.

    Originality/value – Despite the notion that history, as an inevitable and distinctive firm feature, can play an important role in corporate marketing, research on the topic is quite scarce. This paper offers some remedy to this gap by elaborating on the internal and external rationales for applying historical references and how these can be explained in connections between corporate identity and history.

  • 177.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Corporate identity of family firms: How family businesses refer to family and company history in their marketing efforts2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 178.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Family and Business Heritage Entwined: How Family Businesses Rely on Heritage to Compose Corporate Identity2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 179.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Identifying the Role of Heritage Communication: A Stakeholder-Function Framework2016In: International Studies of Management and Organization, ISSN 0020-8825, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 256-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article uses the case of family business to distinguish the range of potential aims and outcomes of corporate heritage communication. In family businesses, the challenges of heritage communication are particularly salient as the past of the firm is simultaneously that of the controlling family. Based on a study of 55 websites of Swedish and German family-owned firms, we classify aims and outcomes of heritage communication with reference to different stakeholders. Our findings elucidate the need to consider various stakeholders when planning heritage communications, and the value of such communication for different corporate functions, such as marketing, management and governance. To aid decision-making we offer a framework to map aims and stakeholders of heritage communication related to a company’s functions.   

  • 180.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    The dual opening to brand heritage in family businesses2013In: Corporate Communications. An International Journal, ISSN 1356-3289, E-ISSN 1758-6046, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 327-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: We seek to uncover why and how the combination of family and company history in family businesses implies idiosyncratic opportunities in the process to uncover, activate, and nurture heritage-based corporate identities and brands.  

    Findings: Based on the construct of brand heritage, we clarify why the entwinement of family and business provides fertile ground for brand heritage. The presentation of a typology of ways to communicate family, firm and family firm history respectively further reveals the varying openings and practices of family businesses in this area. 

    Design/methodology/approach: Our discussion is specifically informed by the literatures on brand heritage, family business, and the notion of hybrid identities. To illustrate our typology of history communication in family businesses we rely on website observations in Sweden and German-based family businesses.

    Research limitations/implications: The paper primarily takes an external marketing orientation and is conceptual. 

    Practical implications: The distinction of two sources of brand heritage in family businesses and the typology of approaches to reflect history in corporate communications should be of interest for practitioners. The findings can serve as eye-opener and instrument in the planning of strategic marketing.   

    Originality/value: We focus on brand heritage and heritage branding from a family business perspective. Being hybrid identity organizations, characterized by entwinement of family and company history, family businesses offer particular perspectives to the heritage brand discussion.

    Key words: Brand heritage, Branding, Corporate communication, Corporate identity, Family Business, History

  • 181.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Brunninge, Olof
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Melander, Anders
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Bridging generations – A study of corporate value statements in family firms2011Report (Other academic)
  • 182.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Melander, Anders
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Corporate value statements – a means for family-controlled firms to monitor the agent?2011Report (Other academic)
  • 183.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Swedish School of Textiles, Borås.
    Melander, Anders
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Executive interventions in the corporate value process2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 184.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Melander, Anders
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Formally stated Corporate Values in Listed Family Firms2010In: The 6th Workshop on Family Firms Management Research: Culture and Values, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 185.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Melander, Anders
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Imprints, Self-reinforcement and Active Reinforcement: The Case of Corporate Value Statements2013In: Self-Reinforcing Processes in and Among Organizations / [ed] Jörg Sydow & Georg Schreyögg, Hondmills Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, p. 162-182Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 186.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Craig, Justin
    Bond University, Gold Coast, Australia.
    Marketing from a family business perspective2013In: The SAGE handbook of family business / [ed] Leif Melin, Mattias Nordqvist, and Pramodita Sharma, London: Sage Publications, 2013, p. 423-442Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter adds to the discourse focused on better understanding how the idiosyncrasies of family businesses can be leveraged through marketing. We first present an overview of the essence of contemporary marketing and then review this from a distinctive family business perspective. We evaluate existing literature and relevant family business characteristics to propose how marketing can leverage ‘familiness’. As an output, we distill opportunities for further conceptual and empirical research studies.

  • 187.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Ramirez-Pasillas, Marcela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Exploring the logics of corporate brand identity formation2012In: Corporate Communications. An International Journal, ISSN 1356-3289, E-ISSN 1758-6046, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 7-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore and analyze the logics at work when companies decide what corporate features to communicate; which eventually also accounts for their corporate brands identities.  

    Design/methodology/approach: As a case in point, we focus on the concept “family business” and investigate the rationale among companies to make particular reference to being such a company on their websites – a decision we interpret as part of the corporate brand identity formation. Interviews are made with 14 CEOs in 12 small and medium-sized family enterprises in a Swedish context. We employ a discourse analysis to distinguish patterns of corporate feature selection. 

    Findings: Our results highlight how decisions that define corporate brand identity are not necessarily a consequence of rigorous marketing planning, but are sometimes made without concern for marketing matters. We identify three logics for the selection and formation of corporate brand identity features; the habit, organic and intended logics. On account of these findings, we develop a three logics model of corporate brand identity formation; proposing differences between intuitive, emergent and strategic processes. In the intuitive process, managers construct brand identity based on tradition, instinctive beliefs and self perception. In the emergent process, the decision surfaces from active interplay between self-perception among managers and the company’s identity. In the strategic process, the decision is a product of an explicit brand strategy with focus on corporate communications.

    Research limitations/implications: The sample size is small. No large firms are included. We focus on one corporate feature, namely, being family business. 

    Originality/value: Research on corporate brand identity is still largely conceptual. Drawing on empirical findings, this paper contributes to available theory and to practical insight. 

    Key words: Corporate brand management, corporate brand identity, marketing communications, family business.

  • 188.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Ramirez-Pasillas, Marcela
    EGADE Zona Centro at Tecnológico de Monterrey.
    Family as part of the corporate brand: spotting the ambiguous, emergent and strategic forms of identity creation2009In: Global Perspectives on Family Business Developments: Theory, Practice, Policy / [ed] Putziouris, P. & Hadjielias, E., Nicosia, Cyprus: International Family Enterprise Research Academy , 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 189.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Scandelius, Christina
    Brunel University, London, UK.
    Corporate Heritage in CSR Communication: A means to responsible brand image?2013In: Corporate Communications. An International Journal, ISSN 1356-3289, E-ISSN 1758-6046, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 362-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This paper explores whether corporate heritage as a component in planned communications can be important to foster a responsible corporate brand image among consumers. 

    Design/methodology/approach: A research model with three hypotheses was created and tested through linear multiple regression analysis, including 199 brands. The dependent variable, responsible brand image, was obtained from a Swedish consumer survey (n=8015). The independent variables were measured through content analyses of the brands' webpages.  

    Findings: The findings support that presence of corporate heritage in CSR communication is positively related to responsible brand image with consumers. It is notable that the results indicate that corporate heritage identity on its own does not influence positive consumer perception on responsibility, unless it is linked to CSR communication.

    Research limitations/implications: Previous research has indicated the significance of cultural context on what constitutes effective CSR communication. As this study is limited to a Swedish consumer sample, we therefore recommend further research including a wider national context in order to validate the findings.

    Practical implications: Our study and findings can inspire and inform companies how corporate heritage can be utilised in brand communications to facilitate CSR credibility among consumers.

    Originality/value: By introducing history and heritage as a perspective on CSR communication and responsible brand image, we add to the growing literature on corporate heritage identity and branding. The findings also add to the CSR communication literature calling for more knowledge on elements that build effective CSR communication.

    Key words: Brand image, Consumer perception, CSR, CSR communication, Corporate heritage identity, History, Heritage

  • 190.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Wigren, Caroline
    Lunds universitet.
    What if it is not family that makes a difference? Reinterpreting findings on family business and CSR2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 191.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Wigren-Kristoferson, Caroline
    Lund university, CIRCLE.
    Corporate community responsibility as an outcome of individual embeddedness2014In: Social Responsibility Journal, ISSN 1747-1117, E-ISSN 1758-857X, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 297-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to improve our understanding of the nature of social responsibility in actual practices and, specifically, the influence of individuals on these processes. 

    Design/methodology/approach: An abductive approach is applied (Alvesson and Sköldberg 1994), i.e. theory is developed by moving between theory and four empirical cases. The storeis highlight the importance of the individual and closeness to local stakeholders and the presence of overlapping rationales.

    Findings: The individuals’ simultaneous roles – as owners, managers, and community members – influence how they are held or see themselves as accountable and how they account for the firms’ engagement in the community. The activities are conducted in the name of the firm but originate from private as well as business-oriented concerns. Our conclusions encourage an extension of the CSR construct to approach it as an entangled phenomenon resulting from the firm and the individual embeddedness in internal and external cultures.

    Originality/value: This study brings the individual managers and owner-managers into focus and how their interplay with the surrounding context can create additional dimensions of accountability, which impact on the decisions taken in regard to CSR. A micro-perspective is applied. Corporate community responsibility, particularly in smaller and rural communities, contributes to recognize and understand how individuals influence, and are influenced by CSR.

  • 192.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Wigren-Kristoferson, Caroline
    Lund university, CIRCLE.
    Corporate responsibility practices among Swedish retailers: A resource-based view on differences between chain stores and independent stores2012In: Nordic Retail Research – Emerging diversity / [ed] J. Hagberg, U. Holmberg, M. Sundström & L. Walter, Göteborg: Bokförlaget BAS, 2012Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 193.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Wigren-Kristoferson, Caroline
    Lund university, CIRCLE.
    Corporate responsibility practices in Swedish retail – identifying differences between independent stores and chain stores.2011Report (Other academic)
  • 194.
    Boers, Börje
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Corporate history shapes organizational identity? A case study of a German family controlled media company2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 195.
    Boers, Börje
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Heteronormativity and the family firm: Will we ever see a queer family business?2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 196.
    Boers, Börje
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    New Avenues to Corporate Governance in Family Controlled Firms2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 197.
    Boers, Börje
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Organizational identity construction in family businesses a dualities perspective2013Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation is about organizational identity construction with a dualities perspective. By taking a dualities perspective the focus shifts from assuming that organizational identity actually is in place towards organizational identity construction where identities are socially constructed. A dualities perspective is very suitable for studying family business where family and business are seen as interdependent and interconnected forming a duality. Family business is an identity statement. Family business identities are constructed by stakeholders by managing a set of dualities. Dualities cause tensions because of the dual poles. These tensions need to be balanced in order to draw on both poles and maintain the family business identities.

    In an empirical study of two media organizations dualities of informality/formality, independence-dependence, historic paths-new paths, and commercial-journalistic are used to understand how stakeholders balance the tensions in these dualities and thereby construct organizational identities. The study reveals the central role of owning family members in organizational identity construction. It is important to balance interests between owning family members and generations. Otherwise it is possible that tensions develop between owners which can endanger the organization.

    The dualities perspective broadens studies on organizational identity construction as it accounts for the peculiarities of family businesses. I argue that these dualities are basis for constructing organizational identities that require stakeholders to work with managing the inherent tensions in the dualities. This means that owning family members and organizational members are continuously involved in constructing organizational identities when managing the dualities.

    For the organizational identity literature, the study offers a focus on the processes of organizational identity construction in the most common business organization, i.e. family businesses. Owning families play an eminent role in processes of organizational identity construction which future research should consider. Owning family members can initiate or trigger organizational identity construction processes because they are considered as role models by other stakeholders.

    Based on my findings I recommend owning families to consider that being a family business is an identity statement implying that other stakeholders will consider them as role model whether they like it or not. Therefore owning family members should devote attention to manage dualities and balance inherent tensions. Then being a family business can be advantageous because they can draw on both family and business dimensions.

  • 198.
    Boers, Börje
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Organizational identity in context(s)2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 199.
    Boers, Börje
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    The family as the metagovernor: A complementary framework for understanding corporate governance in family firms2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 200.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Pre identities and founding identities: How references to the early stages of firm formation are used in organizational identity construction2010Conference paper (Other academic)
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