Change search
Refine search result
1234567 151 - 200 of 1849
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 151.
    Baboukardos, Diogenis
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Rimmel, Gunnar
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Den positiva redovisningsteorin2016In: Redovisningsteorier: Viktiga begrepp och teoretiska perspektiv inom redovisning / [ed] Gunnar Rimmel, Kristina Jonäll, Stockholm: Sanoma Utbildning , 2016, p. 63-76Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 152.
    Baboukardos, Diogenis
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Rimmel, Gunnar
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Positiv redovisningsteori2014Report (Other academic)
  • 153.
    Baboukardos, Diogenis
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Rimmel, Gunnar
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Value relevance of accounting information under an integrated reporting approach: A research note2016In: Journal of Accounting and Public Policy, ISSN 0278-4254, E-ISSN 1873-2070, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 437-452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research note aims to enrich our understanding regarding the market valuation implications of financial reporting under an Integrated Reporting (IR) approach. In order to do so, we focus on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) and we examine whether the value relevance of summary accounting information (i.e., book value of equity and earnings) of firms listed on the JSE has enhanced after the mandatory adoption of an IR approach under the King III Report. Our study can be seen as a response to the recent calls for a closer investigation of the usefulness of the new reporting trend for investors. More specifically, our study can be seen as a response to the stance taken by the International Integrated Reporting Council (IIRC) Framework that the adoption of an IR approach improves the usefulness of financial reporting for investors. For our empirical tests we utilize a sample of 954. firm-year observations and employ a linear price-level model which associates a firm's market value of equity with its book value of equity and earnings. In line with the IIRC Framework's expectations, we find strong evidence of a sharp increase of the earnings' valuation coefficient. However, contrary to the Framework's stance, our results indicate a decline in the value relevance of net assets. Such a decline may be imputed to risks and/or unbooked liabilities that are revealed or measured more reliably after the introduction of an IR approach on the JSE. It should be noted, however, that despite its cause, the decline in the value relevance of net assets can be seen as a further argument in favor of the IIRC stance to assign equal importance to a wide range of "capitals," such as human, social and natural capital. We believe that our findings are of particular interest to a wide range of regulators, standards setters, practitioners, and academics but first and foremost to the JSE and IIRC.

  • 154.
    Baboukardos, Diogenis
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Rimmel, Gunnar
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Jonäll, Kristina
    Integrating Financial and Non-Financial Information: The Impact of South Africa's King III Report on The Value Relevance of Accounting Numbers2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 155.
    Backlund, Oscar
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Stark, Emelie
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Ekelin, Simon
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Value Creation in Cross-Sector Collaborations: A comparative case study of Swedish collaborations2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Achieving an environmentally, socially, and economically sustainable development is today a key aspect in many businesses. Accordingly, cross-sector collaborations between businesses and NPOs have on an increasing scale been considered a powerful and unavoidable tool for creating environmental, social, and economical value simultaneously.

     

    Problem

    Relatively little is known about how the underlying dynamics of cross-sector collaborations relate to enhanced value creation. Furthermore, the terminology in previous documentation of cross-sector collaborations has been spread out and inconsistent.

     

    Purpose

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate how business-NPO collaborations increase the potential for enhanced value creation.

     

    Method

    The study has been conducted through a comparative case study of three Swedish cross-sector collaborations. Qualitative data has mainly been obtained through interviews.

     

    Conclusions

    The analysis showed that the potential for enhanced value creation increases as collaboration moves from sole-creation of value toward co-creation of value. The study found that achieving co-creation of value is facilitated by (1) an issue-salient approach to stakeholder engagement, (2) achieving mutual dependency, and (3) having sustainability itself as a central aspect of a business’ purpose, strategy, and operations.

  • 156.
    Backteman, Richard
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Habbari, Samia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Inter-firm collaboration for innovations: Evidence from the Swedish telecommunications sector2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Innovative companies in technologically advanced environments have to deal with the consequences of choosing between a resource based strategy and possibly missing out on the benefits of cooperative knowledge, or collaborating with their network of suppliers, customers and even competitors and risk diluting their competitive advantage.

    This thesis is concerned with the cooperative aspect within intricate networks of technologically innovative firms. To gain a better understanding of this phenomena, the most innovative sector in Sweden has been chosen for a case study.

    The purpose of this thesis is to explore the dynamics of innovation within the telecom sector in Sweden, and determine the level of cooperation within the telecom sector, in terms of the flows of information and embeddedness.

    The method chosen to fulfil this purpose was via a qualitative approach, and in the form of a case study. Relevant data was collected through five interviews with key personnel within the two companies of interest (Ericsson & TeliaSonera), and triangulated with secondary quantitative and qualitative data.

    Results indicate that the Swedish telecom sector benefits from a fertile environment that fosters innovative activity, and to that reason it has claimed leadership in the worldwide telecommunications industry. Additionally, this same environment promotes collaboration between the different actors in the sector. A closer examination of the cooperation between TeliaSonera and Ericsson in the 4G network roll-out, indicates that the cooperation, albeit being successful, could be ameliorated further through an increased embeddedness of the partnership.

  • 157.
    Bai, Xuze
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Koirala, Kapil
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    The Influence of Culture in the International Business Decision-making Process2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Organizational culture and organisational political behaviours are the unavoidable part of a company which has a direct impact on its decision making. The purpose of this paper aims to understand the influence of culture and organisational political behaviour in making a decision on going internationalisation of the Chinese company. Through reviewing the cultural literature, the researcher found the interrelation between culture and political behaviour in an organization. The authors then focus on three factors of political behaviour – investment, alternatives and trust – to study their influence in the decision-making process. We used qualitative research approach under which we made in-depth interview to collect the empirical data. These empirical data were analysed using content analysis method. Our findings show that both organisational culture and organisational political behaviour have a direct influence on the decision making of the company. Specifically, political factors like investment, alternatives and trust influence in the decision making of a company. The firm should consider those factors seriously to have a positive influence in its decision-making process.

  • 158.
    Bakker, Rene
    et al.
    Queensland University of Technology.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    Shepard, D.
    Indiana University.
    When to “pull the plug” and when to “take the plunge”: the timing of strategic decisions towards new ventures2014In: Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research Exchange Conference 2014, 4-7 February 2014, Sydney, Australia: Conference Proceedings / [ed] Per Davidsson, Brisbane: Queensland University of Technology , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Firms face opposing incentives regarding when to take strategic decisions towards their exploration ventures. On the one hand, postponing can reduce uncertainty, but on the other, moving quickly allows capitalizing on a potential competitive advantage. Drawing on theories of entrepreneurship and real options reasoning, we suggest that firms resolve the competing tensions for acceleration and deceleration through an assessment of their venture portfolio and environment. An empirical study of the timing of termination and exploitation decisions taken with regard to 3,272 exploration ventures in Australia’s mining industry over the years 2002-2011 provides an insight into the drivers of decision timing. We find that venture portfolio composition is an important driver of timing— but only with regard to exploitation decisions. Higher levels of market uncertainty increase the time to venture termination but not exploitation, and a positive market trajectory increases the time to venture termination, yet decreases the time to exploitation. Finally, we find support for interaction effects between the portfolio and market. The overall pattern of findings sheds new light on the tension between deceleration and acceleration in entrepreneurial strategic decision making and highlights the importance of distinguishing between the timing of different types of decisions.

  • 159.
    Bakker, Rene
    et al.
    Queensland University of Technology.
    Shepard, Dean A.
    Indiana University.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    When to pull the plug and when to take the plunge: timing strategic decisions about new ventures2014In: The Academy of Management Annual Meeting Proceedings 2014 / [ed] Humphreys, J., Brisbane: Queensland University of Technology , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Firms face opposing incentives regarding when to make strategic decisions about their exploration ventures. On the one hand, postponing a decision can reduce uncertainty, while on the other hand, moving quickly allows one to capitalize on favorable market conditions. Drawing on theories of entrepreneurship, real options reasoning, and decision speed, we suggest that firms resolve competing tensions between acceleration and deceleration through an assessment of their venture portfolio and environment. An empirical study of the timing of termination and exploitation decisions regarding 3,272 exploration ventures in Australia’s mining industry over the years 2002–2011 provides insights into the drivers of decision timing. We find that venture portfolio composition is an important driver of timing but only with regard to exploitation decisions. Higher levels of market uncertainty increase the time to venture termination but not exploitation, and a positive market trajectory increases the time to venture termination yet decreases the time to venture exploitation. We also find support for an interaction effect between the portfolio and market characteristics. This pattern of findings sheds light on the tension between acceleration and deceleration in strategic decision making and highlights the importance of distinguishing between the timing of different types of decisions.

  • 160.
    Bakmanis, Martins
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Stevenazzi, Marco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Supporters evaluation of brand extensions: The case of ice hockey team HV712015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 161.
    Balabanov, Hristo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    George, Annie Mary
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Institutional adaptation of Western companies operating in China: A case study on Husqvarna Group2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: In our globalized world companies that want to internationalize and go to a new market should consider different factors, if they want to be successful. Institutional adaptation is a vital part of success or failure of the globalization process. The market entry process of western Multinational Companies (MNCs) into China, shows different adapting processes, compared to when entering western country markets. Establishing an MNC in China is more time consuming, as a lot of social and non-business actors, and activities will be involved in the process.

    Purpose - The purpose of this study is to explore the process of adaptation of western MNCs to eastern institutional environment, with a focus on China. How does western MNCs operating in China adapt to the eastern institutional environment of China?  

    Method - This is a qualitative single case study with three interviews as primary sources of data.

    Findings – Government mandates are key factors to any organization whether local or otherwise. Merging with a local company helps to adapt better to the new environment. General cultural norms have a higher impact into the adaptation process.

    Conclusion - The research conducted shows how having knowledge of the different aspects of the environment and knowing how to adapt to these differences is crucial for the success of a firm. Husqvarna Group adapts to the host environment by means of their code of conduct, adaptation of a foreign organizational structure and accepting stricter mandates put forth by the government along with stricter channels of communication.

  • 162.
    Balkow, Jenny
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    In the middle: on sourcing from China and the role of the intermediary2012Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past three decades China’s rapid transition from a closed economy to become the factory of the world has astonished economists all over the world. Surveys among sourcing practitioners show that China is the most interesting market for sourcing and research points to lower costs as the main reason.

    This dissertation is an exploratory study of the role of the intermediary for Swedish small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) that source from China. Three questions are discussed. The first question concerns why Swedish SMEs choose to source from China. Although costs are a major factor for the companies, it is usually other triggers that cause the change in strategy, such as management interest or pressure from a large customer. The second research question concerns how Swedish SMEs choose to source from China and how the role of the intermediary is related to this process. The study shows that finding a good supplier is not difficult. The companies use informal channels, references and sometimes unorthodox methods such as following the supplier of the raw material to find suppliers that deliver high quality goods. The problem is however to maintain a steady quality and on time delivery which is why intermediaries are introduced late in the relationship. The cases in this study show example of five different intermediated strategies; Direct, Service,Traditional, RepO and FICE/WFOE. The traditional intermediated strategy is the only strategy where there is little or no relation between buyer and supplier, whereas the other four strategies involve different degrees of interaction between all three actors in the dyad; the buyer, the supplier and the intermediary.

    The third research question concerned the role of the intermediary. The study shows that the respondents are influenced by their structural view on what role the different forms of intermediaries may take. Although the respondents discuss the importance of having a long-term view on the relationship with the supplier they continuously allow intermediaries to enter the relationship on a short-term basis for quality control. These quality control centers (QC) commonly work on a fixed commission based on services that has to be specified. When the buyers are trying to change their strategy to look for an intermediary with higher involvement they usually turn to internal intermediaries (i.e. subsidiaries). When deciding on a long term intermediary the buyer usually looks for competences that supplement their own knowledge – that is Chinese language, good knowledge of the Chinese market but also technological competence. What the western owned intermediaries in China stresses however is the need to find intermediaries to supplement the suppliers’ competences, so that they are able to translate the needs of the buyer’s customer and becomes a physical reminder that they are sent from the buyer. The case of QC, shows that if a company let the relationship with the intermediary develop through interaction they can become just as involved.

    The study is based on interviews with key informants at Swedish SMEs andat different types of intermediaries in China. The empirical data are presented infive themes developed through an iterative process of theoretical studies anddata collection. The first two themes are directly related to the first tworesearch questions. The third theme focuses on the sourcing process andactivities of four small Swedish design companies. The fourth theme displayshow the intermediaries in China discuss their role. Finally, the fifth theme pictures the supply chain of one focal company at five points in time when they are in the process of changing their supply chain to increase transparency.

  • 163.
    BALLAND, Julien
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    SOBHI, Neda Angela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Humanitarian Relief Organizations and Its Relationship with Logistics Service Providers: A case study of UNICEF during the Mozambique flood disaster 20132013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nowadays, humanitarian relief organizations are more and more present in people’s lives due to the number of recorded natural disasters increasing over the last 30 years. Although there are several actors involved in humanitarian aid, the need to integrate logistics service providers into humanitarian relief operations has been recognized. Howev- er, the literature lacks particular attention concerning the coordination roles and objectives between humanitarian relief organizations and LSPs during disaster relief operations.

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between UNICEF and its LSP(s) during disaster relief operations. More specifically, this study aims to understand the elements that drive, facilitate, constrain and affect the relationship UNICEF has with its LSPs.

    Method: A qualitative, exploratory research approach was used, using a real-context case study as the research design. The empirical data was collected through in-depth semi- structured interviews with four respondents representing both UNICEF and its LSPs.

    Conclusion: The researchers present a revised version of the conceptual framework used to conduct this research. One additional component was added to the list of compo- nents affecting the effectiveness of a relationship. In addition, some other influencers were discussed. This conceptual framework can be used to formulate an effective relationship between two humanitarian actors within disaster relief operations. Finally, forming a rela- tionship between UNICEF and its LSPs is nothing new. Recommendations for future re- search include investigating implementation efforts once a relationship is built, in order to improve disaster relief operations and save more lives. 

  • 164.
    Bankova, Martina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Burkle, Abigail
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Vu, Hai Ly
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Airline Service Failures: A study on relationships between lack of control, emotions, and negative word-of-mouth2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Service failure within the airline industry has been a prominent topic within the media. Each story of a failure features a disgruntled passenger. Emotions are already high during the consumption of any airline service, and a service failure will bring on а slew of unwanted emotions. The purpose of this paper is then to understand what type of relationship do these negative emotions and feelings of lack of control have after a service failure, and do any of those given emotions lead to negative word-of-mouth (NWOM).

    The method used to accomplish this is correlation hypothesis testing of survey results in relation to the specified negative emotions and the causal attribution theory of control, as well as analysis between the same emotions and NWOM, again using correlation tests. This aim will be achieved by breaking service failure down into five negative incidents that are referred to as service failure scenarios, namely: luggage handling, delayed/cancelled flight, missed flight due to factors beyond customers’ control, negative customer service at the airport, and negative service experience during the flight. The five scenarios are studied against six specified emotions which are anger, frustration, helplessness, nervousness, worry, and panic. The relationship between these emotions and lack of control is tested, then these same emotions are tested in regards to NWOM.

    The findings express a weak to moderate positive relationship between at least one of the emotions and lack of control in three of the scenarios, leading to the conclusion that customers’ lack of control over the situation increases the intensity of the emotions. In the findings for emotions and NWOM, four out of the six tested negative emotions lead to NWOM, which are anger, frustration, helplessness, and worry. This discovery proves that different emotions in different scenarios make people react in a different manner, and this leads to the conclusion that emotions should be tested separately and scenarios should be created to research the real intensity of the emotions in different situations, without grouping them into one.

  • 165.
    Bargman, Daniil
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Hansmann, Lisa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    IFRS Implementation in Germany and the UK: And its Effects on the Quality of Accounting Information from an Investor Perspective2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis investigates whether IFRS adoption has led to an increase in the relevance of accounting information for investment decisions. Furthermore, the effects of IFRS are implicitly compared across accounting traditions. As such,  the effects of IFRS on the “quality” of financial reporting are measured based on the cases of listed firms in Germany and listed firms in the UK.

    This study approaches the effects of IFRS on the quality of financial reporting from two angles. First a review of the academic literature is done to determine whether there has been a general consensus about the effects of IFRS adoption on financial reporting of listed firms in Germany and the UK. As a result of this literature study, a number of propositions are deduced about the effects of IFRS.

    Subsequently, the investigation of the effects of IFRS takes a statistical perspective. Financial and accounting data are obtained for two samples, one of German listed firms and another of UK listed firms. A number of empirical models are used to determine the quality of financial reporting, including the earnings-returns association (Lev ,1989; Lev & Zarowin, 1999), asymmetric sensitivity of earnings and asymmetric persistence of earnings (Basu, 1997), and the market-to-book ratios (Roychowdhury & Watts, 2003). Additionally, a new tool is introduced for a joint interpretation of the econometric test results, leading potentially to a new method of financial report analysis under dynamic regulatory conditions.

    Significant statistical evidence is found suggesting a drastic reduction (to the point of complete elimination) in income smoothing in Germany corresponding to the transition from the German national GAAP to IFRS. Additionally, with the introduction of IFRS, the information content of accounting earnings in German firms appears to have increased substantially, while market-to-book ratios have converged towards “1”. On the other hand, the introduction of IFRS in the UK corresponds to statistical evidence consistent with a shift from asymmetric timeliness of earnings under UK GAAP to a significant downward bias in earnings under IFRS.

    The study also shows significant inter-industry differences in the effects of IFRS that suggest that the inconsistencies in the results of previous studies may have been due to the significant noise created by diverse samples, or due to biased industry representations in the data.

  • 166. Barry, D.
    et al.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Caccamo, Marta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Past digital, post-digital2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 167.
    Barry, Daved
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Design sweets, C-Suites, and the Candy Man factor2017In: Journal of Marketing Management, ISSN 0267-257X, E-ISSN 1472-1376, Vol. 33, no 3-4, p. 305-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designerly design, e.g. design as taught in professional design schools, is becoming a mainstay within the world’s executive suites, where it is being used to form organisational structures, strategy, change, policy and more. The speed and extent of its uptake have come as quite a surprise to the traditional, analytically driven design disciplines within business studies; as is sometimes said of earthquakes, no one saw it coming. A watershed moment was when the American Broadcasting Corporation aired its ‘Deep Dive’ documentary on IDEO in 1999. The programme’s implication that design was ideal for innovation, that it could be applied to anything and the sometimes evangelical tide of design thinking literature that followed created a tectonic pull within business practice and education. I argue that this was due in part to a ‘Candy Man’ effect, where executives longing for easy, sure-fired innovation saw ABC’s sunny depiction of design, read the popular press articles and books on design thinking and swarmed in – often with unrealistic expectations and subsequent disappointment. I further suggest that we treat design thinking’s mixed reception as a call to reconsider where and how it might be applied to strategic level concerns, perhaps thinking of it as we might high end desserts and less like fields of candy canes for mass consumption.

  • 168.
    Barry, Daved
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Caccamo, Marta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Ots, Mart
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Markowska, Magdalena
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Alterities and Innovation: Conjectures from Haute Cuisine2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 169.
    Batamuriza, Florance
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Berg, Tobias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Hatami, Tony
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Strategic understanding: A qualitative study on similarities and differences in perceptions of strategy2006Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s society, strategy becomes more important because of the ever fast changing environment. Companies all around the world set strategies, in order to grow and earn a profit, and wish for them to be implemented the way they were intended to be. Therefore, we believe it is important to investigate individuals’ perceptions of firm strategy.

    The purpose of this thesis is therefore to investigate individuals’ perception and understanding of firm strategy, and to see how these perceptions show similarities and differences. Our aim is also to see how cognitive mapping in relation to a strategic model can be helpful both for practitioners and researchers.

    Collection of primary data was done by interviewing five employees on different hierarchical levels in Company X that is active in multiple different business areas both in Sweden and abroad. The interviews were later analysed with the help of theories such as cognitive structures and maps, and Whittington’s (2001) generic perspective of strategy. This model recognizes four approaches to strategizing, namely Classical, Evolutionary, Systemic and Processual. The two former ones have a Profit-maximizing outcome, while the latter two are Pluralistic in outcome.

    During the analysis we found some similarities and differences. It was found that not all employees, individually or together, could be categorised under one specific approach. It is hypothesized that this could be because of the fact that they are at different levels and positions in the company, but they had similar perception on long-term planning as a firm strategy.

    The interviewees in Company X have shown different perceptions when relating to strategy. We come to the conclusion that it is important for managers and strategic decision makers that they understand and take the differences and similarities under consideration when delegating and injecting new strategies into a company. We think this could then help them to enhance an understanding of their own strategic organisation.

    Although case studies tend to be subjective, this is pointed out as the main limitation of the methodology. The researchers’ interpretation of the interviews lay as the foundation of the analysis and conclusion, and in order to make the study as objective as possible, clear and relevant selection of theories and literature was used to support the claims made in the thesis.

  • 170.
    Bau, Massimo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Block, Joern H.
    Univ Trier, Dept Management, Trier, Germany.
    Cruz, Allan Discua
    Univ Lancaster, Sch Management, Dept Entrepreneurship Strategy & Innovat, Lancaster, England.
    Naldi, Lucia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Locality and internationalization of family firms2017In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 29, no 5-6, p. 570-574Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 171.
    Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Baboukardos, Diogenis
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Voluntary Adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards and the Role of Family Ownership2014In: Co-operation Within and Amongst Family Businesses: Conference Proceedings: IFERA 2014 Annual Conference June 24-27, 2014, Lappeenranta, Finland, The International Family Enterprise Research Academy (IFERA) , 2014, p. 79-79Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 172.
    Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Hoskisson, Robert E.
    Rice University, USA.
    Pathak, Seemantini Madhukar
    University of Missouri, USA.
    Acquisition and Divestitures in Family and Non-Family Firms2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Combining the core-periphery model with family firm literature, we find that family firms exhibit unique acquisition and divestiture behaviors. Analyzing a sample of Swedish privately held limited companies we find that family firms acquire and divest distant, unrelated and larger but fewer businesses. In addition to economic objectives, family firms pursuing non-economic objectives prefer to buy and sell unrelated businesses at longer geographic distances to lower impact on their core business from their restructuring activities.

  • 173.
    Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Hoskisson, Robert E.
    Rice University, USA.
    Pathak, Seemantini Madhukar
    University of Missouri, USA.
    Portfolio Restructuring in Family and Non-Family-Controlled Firms2016In: Academy of Management Proceedings, January 2016 (Meeting Abstract Supplement) 12016 / [ed] John Humphreys, Academy of Management , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Are family firms’ corporate restructuring behaviors distinct from those of non-family firms? Although the corporate restructuring literature has drawn on economic motives for restructuring, recent developments in the family business literature suggest that both economic and noneconomic motives may result in distinct restructuring behaviors between family and non-family firms. We use Swedish Census data and draw on a sample of privately held family and non-family Swedish firms for the period between 2004 and 2007. Applying the core- periphery model to the family-firm corporate-restructuring context, we posit that family firms undertake restructuring at the periphery of their business to lower the impact on their core business. Our results support our arguments and show that compared with non-family firms, family firms acquire and divest more geographically distant, unrelated and larger but fewer businesses.

  • 174.
    Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Zahra, Shaker
    Carlson School of Management.
    Self-Employment Or Employment After Exit: The Effect Of An Entrepreneur’s Age And Gender2013In: Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research 2013 : Proceedings of the Thirty-third Annual Entrepreneurship Research Conference / [ed] Andrew Zacharakis, Boston: Babson College , 2013, Vol. 33, article id 1Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building on career literature, we predict that an entrepreneur’s age at the time of re-entry has a unique and complex non-linear effect on the choice to become self-employed versus employed after an exit. Based on a database covering the whole Swedish population, we studied 79,356 entrepreneurs who experienced exit in a five year window (2000-2004) and we examined their career choice as self-employed versus employed. Our results show an inverted S-shaped curve which follows the career lifecycle stages (early, middle, and late). Also, we demonstrate that gender (man vs. woman) moderate the entrepreneur’s age/re-entry relationship.

  • 175.
    Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Eddleston, Kimberly A.
    D'Amore-McKim School of Business, Northeastern University, USA.
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Becoming manager in a family firm: A gendered path2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women in business have been often described as invisible (Allen & Langowitz, 2003) resulting in calls for research to investigate women’s contributions to family firms (FF) (Martinez Jimenez, 2009). Female employees can legitimately accuse the existence of “glass ceiling” that prevent their advancement in the managerial ranks (Powell, 1999). Compared with male employees in equivalent positions, female employees may find that their perspectives are overlooked and their contributions devalued (Ridgeway et al., 2009).

    Our interest is in better understanding this discrimination and possible ways to change it. How do education, job tenure, job category and industry knowledge impact on the probability of being promoted to managerial positions in FF and non FF? How does gender moderate this probability?

    To answer these questions we employee a mixed method approach. In the quantitative part, we adopt a longitudinal dataset produced by Statistics Sweden with annual observations on all Swedish privately held firms, Swedish inhabitants, and family ties. This allow us to reconstruct the career path of all the employees that received a promotion to a managerial position in a Swedish company in the last 10 years. Our unique dataset allows us to match their salaries and career development recognizing the existence of gender discrimination. These results will be illustrated through a qualitative part, with interesting cases offering an in-depth understanding of the phenomenon.

    Our results confirm the existence of gender discrimination, for example in the salary paid by Swedish companies. Understanding the impact of educational choices, job categories and family choices on career paths for men and women, offers fundamental insights for managers, HR specialists, and policy makers. Moreover, it provides a unique opportunity for this interactive workshop to discuss the family business values, and how to develop a stronger family business responsibility against gender discriminations.

  • 176.
    Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Eddleston, Kimberly
    Northeastern University.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Lucia, Naldi
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Parental Altruism. Special Treatment for Offspring in Business?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 177.
    Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Hellerstedt, Karin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Wennberg, Karl
    Succession in Family Firms2013In: The Landscape of Family Business / [ed] Ritch L. Sorenson, Andy Yu, Keith H. Brigham and G. T. Lumpkin, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2013, p. 167-197Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The process of succession in family firms is often both lengthy and complex, and is influenced by factors such as the personal goals of the owner-manager, family structure, ability and ambitions of potential successors, and legal and financial issues (Le BretonMiller, Miller, & Steier, 2004). Scholars of family business tend to emphasize what determines successful ownership and management succession involving family members and non-family stakeholders, alongside the general characteristics of effective succession (Handler, 1994; Le Breton-Miller et al., 2004; Sharma, Chrisman, & Chua, 2003a). A majority of privately held firms in many developed countries are likely to shift ownership as the owners approach retirement. Thus, from a public policy perspective, there is a need to study the conditions surrounding successful succession of family firms and the implications of these successions in the socio-economic context. This chapter presents a comprehensive review of the scholarly literature on ownership transition and management succession in family firms. We found that most of the literature on succession is conceptual or relies on a small number of cases and/or surveys based on convenience samples. For instance, 71 percent of the work published since the mid-1970s consists of descriptive investigations based on aggregated data or micro studies of firm succession based on small samples or a small number of illustrative cases. We see a need for more studies about the effects of succession on long-term development in privately held firms and how succession affects economic outcomes at different levels of analysis (Yu, Lumpkin, Sorenson, & Brigham, 2012).* We conducted a literature review based upon a cluster analysis that identifies four levels of analysis that dominate the current literature on succession. These levels are important for understanding transition processes and allow us to identify three main areas that offer particular interesting avenues for future research. First, succession involves, among other things, the goals and options of several actors: The individual owners and managers, the family members, the economic environment, and the potential successors, to varying degrees, who may influence the transition process. We discuss this multilevel perspective within the context of the conceptual literature. Although it is adopted in some qualitative studies, multilevel quantitative research is generally scarce. Because succession is an inherently multilevel phenomenon, we argue that empirical research must also adopt a multilevel perspective. Second, we note that succession research focuses primarily on management transitions. In contrast, ownership transfer has received much less attention. For many small- and medium-sized enterprises (including family businesses), these two transitions go hand in hand (Handler, 1994).1 Yet, there are reasons to single out and more closely examine ownership transition that involves not only financial issues and asset valuation, but also emotional issues such as perceived fairness among involved actors, which may represent the most critical part of a succession. Third, our review shows that suitable analytical techniques and representative sampling methods are lacking. There is an increased need for generalizable empirical evidence that can be used to test the limits and boundary conditions of different theoretical models, and to generate insights for owners, managers, and policy-makers. The chapter is organized as follows. In section two, we describe the methodology. Section three reviews the extant research and discusses a selection of articles represented within the categories identified in the cluster analysis. Section four uses these insights to highlight some avenues for future research that would help to fill some of the research gaps identified by our review and analysis. We highlight areas worthy of future inquiry and discuss some of the methodological issues that need to be addressed to further the research in this area. Section five provides a brief conclusion.

  • 178.
    Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Pittino, Daniel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Backman, Mikaela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Roots to grow: Family firms and local embeddedness in rural and urban contexts2018In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 179.
    Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Pittino, Daniel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Sieger, Philipp
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Eddleston, Kimberly
    Northeastern University, Boston, MA, United States.
    Special Issue: “Career issues in family business: Understanding career ladders and glass ceilings” call for papers2016In: The Journal of Family Business Strategy, ISSN 1877-8585, E-ISSN 1877-8593, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 272-273Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 180.
    Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Sieger, Philipp
    University of St. Gallen & University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Eddleston, Kimberly A.
    D'Amore-McKim School of Business, Northeastern University, USA.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Fail but try again? The effects of age, gender, and multiple-owner experience on failed entrepreneurs’ reentry2017In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 909-941Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate what leads failed entrepreneurs to reenter entrepreneurship by taking a developmental career perspective. Specifically, we hypothesize that the age of failed entrepreneurs has a non-linear relationship with the likelihood of reentering entrepreneurship that follows different career stages (early, middle, and late). The gender of failed entrepreneurs and multiple-owner experience in the failed firm are hypothesized to be moderators of this relationship. We test our hypotheses using a database consisting of the Swedish population, including 4,761 entrepreneurs who failed between 2000 and 2004. Analyzing their career paths over the years following their failure offers support for our theoretical expectations.

  • 181.
    Beckmann, Malin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Noll, Florentine
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Cause-related Marketing: A qualitative study into Millennials’ perception2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Consumers in today’s market place request companies to take on responsibility and to act as good citizens. In this sense, cause-related marketing (CM) is a campaign format whereby a company promises to donate a specific amount to a non-profit organization (NPO) or cause in response to every CM-labeled product purchased by the consumer. Throughout the last 30 years CM has proven a successful campaign format that resonates well with consumers but also provides benefits for companies and NPOs. While scholars focused on the assessment of attitudes and behavioral responses towards CM, the specific Millennial age cohort and the study of consumers’ perception have been limited. Considering Millennials’ peculiar and unique characteristics, it was worth to investigate how Millennials view CM and to evaluate if a different set- up, management and communication of CM campaigns is required to best resonate with this age cohort. Better understanding Millennials is especially valuable because of the age cohorts’ spending power and future importance in the market place. 

    Purpose:

    The purpose of this thesis was to explore Millennials’ perception of CM by focusing on different stimulus factors associated with CM and individual factors related to the consumer. 

    Method:

    To attain the purpose, a systematic literature review was conducted to identify relevant stimulus factors and individual factors influencing perception of CM. Based on the factors identified three research questions were made central to semi-structured in-depth interviews as the main method of primary data collection. A total of twelve interviews were held with Millennial participants. The qualitative research approach chosen for this thesis allowed for rich data and deep insights into the perceptual process and Millennials’ interpretation of CM factors. 

    Conclusion:

    The findings indicate that Millennial participants processed CM campaign stimuli in a highly individual top-down approach, implying that individual beliefs, knowledge and experiences guided perception. Moreover, it became apparent that participants had a high need for transparency and required framing of different stimuli to resonate with this need. Regarding individual factors the findings of the thesis suggest that especially familiarity with the CM campaign format, personal identification with and perceived relevance of the supported cause as well as skepticism influenced participants’ perception of CM. 

  • 182. Beckmann, Malin
    et al.
    Noll, Florentine
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Cause-Related Marketing (CM): The Perspective of Millennials (Abstract)2017In: Creating Marketing Magic and Innovative Future Marketing Trends: Proceedings of the 2016 Academy of Marketing Science (AMS) Annual Conference / [ed] Maximilian Stieler, Springer, 2017, p. 999-1000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 183.
    Beddig, Theresa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Mäkinen, Niklas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    The influence of owner's chronic illness on family firm's adaptation: A study of small family businesses and entrepreneurial couples in Finland and Germany2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Organisation’s adaptation to owner’s chronic illness is an important theme for all businesses, but it is especially valuable for small family businesses as well as entrepreneurial couples due to their strong interrelation between family and business. So far family business research has not looked into family businesses’ process of adapting to the disruption caused by the occurence of owner’s severe chronic illness. The purpose of this thesis was to look at what impact an owner’s severe chronic illness has on the organisation’s adaptation. To fulfil the purpose, this study combines family science, and family business research and theories in an interdisciplinary manner, applying family science theory to family business research. Our approach is directed by the Double ABCX Model of Family Stress and the FAAR Model to explore the adaptation process of family businesses and to identify demands and resources connected to the disruption.

    This multiple case study, utilising semi-structured interviews, observations and secondary data was conducted in a Finnish and German context. The collected qualitative data is presented as narrative case summaries, and analysed by applying in- and cross-case analysis. The findings add to the theoretical understanding of the adaptation process by identifying preconditions, which affect organisations’ adaptation process. Moreover, we identified demands that a chronic illness causes for both the business and the family as well as resources that are used to respond to the new demands. A model illustrating the adaptation process and its dimensions is presented. The findings of the study do not only serve family businesses coping with a chronic illness but provide more implications for businesses in general. Organisations can use the study’s findings to prepare and make their business fit for disruptions of different nature. In addition, organisations in the particular situation researched can benefit by better understanding how they could further improve to stay resilient for possible future disruptions.

  • 184.
    Beek, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Schwarzkopf, Svenja
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    The ‘silver spoon’ in family firms: Gaining credibility as a young professional family member in a new leading position in a family firm2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    It is supposed that many managers in an organization are ineffective because the task of managing a new team is underestimated.  The leaders, as well as the organization, too often take this task for granted and are not aware of how difficult the situation can be. Especially in family firms one might ignore the lack of skills and the weaknesses of a family member who shall be appointed for a new leading position.

    Through four case studies, including semi-structured interviews with a family and non-family member respectively, we gave answers to our research question how to gain credibility as a young professional family member in a new leading position in a family firm. Further, we investigated how the ‘silver spoon’ influences the credibility of the new leader as a family member.

    It was found that the most important factors influencing the credibility of the young professional family member are experience, commitment, individual factor, relationship to family and non-family members. A young professional’s work experience can help to gain respect and credibility from the employees. A high level of commitment to the firm and being willing to work hard helps to overcome the prejudices of the ‘silver spoon’ and shows that they have earned the right to be in the current position.

    Furthermore, it was found that the new leaders struggle most with the incumbent, relationship to family members and relationships to non-family members. It is an obstacle that the newcomer is compared to the incumbent and sometimes still treated as a child. An additional problem is that the family pressures the newcomer into responsible positions, which the new leader does not feel prepared for. By giving the newcomer the possibility to gain work experience, through a mentorship program and through the incumbent stepping back and trusting the newcomer, companies can support the young professional family members.

  • 185.
    Beik, Nima
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Bergqvist, Kim
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Karam, Jihane
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Marketing in e-Commerce through the Implementation of the Service Perspective: A Case Study of the Start-Up Firm - EarnBidWin.com2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This Thesis will begin by highlighting the significance of social media networks and e-Commerce in today’s business environment. The purpose of this paper is to develop an external marketing strategy that can be employed by start-up firms operating in the e-Commerce of reverse auction sites.

     

    The paper will particularly focus on the company EarnBidWin.com and the marketing strategy will be based on the Service Perspective. EarnBidWin.com is an online reverse auction site that is new and unique compared to other existing models of reverse auction. EarnBidWin.com is a web-based advertising and networking platform that features e-Campaigns (performance-based advertising) and reverse auctions. EarnBidWin.com’s unique business model within a social-business network offers a win-win situation for all parties concerned.

     

    A qualitative research method is conducted by using a case study. The data is gathered through the primary source of interviews with the CEO of the company, along with the secondary source of extensive academic literature. Finally, the results are presented in a discussion of a proposed marketing strategy based on the combination of the Service Perspective and the Critical Success Factors of high growth start-up firms in the e-Commerce arena.

  • 186.
    Beik, Nima
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Galbraith, James
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Fan identification and the perception of the sponsor-team fit: The case of Emirates Airlines and Arsenal FC2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Sponsorship has become an important factor in determining the success and competitiveness of a sports team. While previous sports sponsorship literature has been substantial, the fans and their perceptions of the sponsor(s) has often not been focused upon. A fans’ identification or connection with a sports team can differ amongst fans, as it influences their engagement with the team and their respective sponsor. Previous literature regarding the perceived fit between a team and a sponsor has been limited to the use of hypothetical sponsors. This research therefore focuses on how different levels of fan identification influence their perceptions of the sponsor-team fit, with a specific focus on the sponsor Emirates Airlines and the football team Arsenal FC.

    The purpose of this research is to establish an insight into how different levels (high and low) of identified Arsenal FC fans perceive the sponsor-team fit with Emirates Airlines. The research questions have been divided into two sub questions; one focusing on high- identified Arsenal FC fans and the other on low-identified Arsenal FC fans. In order to fulfil the purpose of this thesis, existing literature was used to create an identification survey that was completed by over 100 Arsenal FC fans residing in Sweden. The survey identified a number of high-identified and low-identified fans, of which five high-identified and five low-identified fans were chosen to participate in interviews.

    The empirical findings reveal that the identification of a sports fan with their sports team does impact their perception of the sponsor-team fit. High-identified fans were more receptive of the sponsor due to their financial support, contributing to a more successful team. Low-identified fans were more receptive of the sponsor due to the duration of the sponsorship, and described this as the main reason to their positive perception of the sponsor-team fit. 

  • 187.
    Bejnarowicz, Adrianna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Aderum, Tilda
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Employees’ Participation in a Company’s CSR: How do formal and informal cultural systems affect employees’ participation in a company’s CSR activities2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract 

     Purpose: This paper aims to investigate how formal and informal cultural systems within an organization, affect the CSR related actions employees are taking at their workplace on a daily basis. The purpose is to explore how the systemsaffect employees’ participation in a company's CSR.

     

    Problem:  There is a need for improvements in CSR activities. This improvement could be carried out by creating deeper employee engagement in CRS development and implementation. Gapsbetween externally communicated CSR and internally implemented CSR exists. Researchers have emphasized the importance of culture as a significant factor for successful CSR as well that many organizations are struggling with the integration of sustainability into the cultures and climates. 

     

    Method:The study is conducted through qualitative research and a case study method. The case study consisted of semi-structured interviews, the sample consisted of seven employees. The research in this thesis was conducted through an inductive approach. 

     

    Findings: Findings show that the formal cultural systems affected actions related to only one of the CSR aims of the company. The informal cultural systems did not affect employees to take specific actions but rather their mindset. Moreover, findings suggest that employees took CSR related actions without being fully aware of the company’s CSR. The findings also indicated a low awareness of formal documents andidentified factors beyond formal and informal systems that drove and hindered employees to take CSR related actions. 

  • 188.
    Belcheva, Violeta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Technology Acceptance in Developing Countries: Testing established model in new context2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 189.
    Bellfors, Therese
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Swedish banks' Regulations and Risk Management - Is it a stricter process of granting credit?2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this thesis is to analyze whether the Swedish big banks have changed their lending standards as a result of the Global Financial Crisis in 2008. According to the picture of how the Swedish real estate economy is highlighted in media, the way households are allowed to consume, are to many incomprehensible and is something that further needs to be analyzed. To be able to fulfill the purpose, the Swedish banks Handelsbanken, Swedbank and SEB are interviewed about their risk management, regulations controlling them and their credit granting process. An important conclusion is that banks are taking a much greater responsibility today compared to what they did before 2008. The Basel III regulation means that banks have to hold larger buffers of capital and the Basel III is much of the reason that banks have changed their lending standards and become a lot stricter today. It is not only the credit granting process that has become stricter since the Global Financial Crisis. The financial sector experienced a severe lack of information leading to people bought assets without being aware of the risk level of these assets, many lost money they never could have dreamt of as a consequence. After this, the Swedish Financial Supervisory Authority implemented a regulation meaning that every contract between bank and customer must be carefully documented in order for the customer to know the level of risk they take.

  • 190.
    Bema, Judith
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Lundgren, Kristina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Malmsten, Ewa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Does the Winner Take it All?: A Case Study on Entrepreneurs' Motivation in an Innovation Competition2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Confronted with an increasing diversity of social and global challenges, innovation competitions become an increasingly important tool to spur innovation amongst entrepreneurs.

    Based on a case study on three finalists of the Wendy Schmidt Oil Clean-Up XChallenge, this thesis aims to investigate what factors motivate entrepreneurs to take part in an innovation competition. Due to the fact that four years after the closure of the challenge nine out of ten finalists were still actively in the oil clean-up business, the authors further investigate on what the main motivational factors for continuing business after participation in an innovation competition are.

    Data was collected via in-depth interviews and analysed by applying the model of entrepreneurial motivation by Naffiziger, Hornsby and Kuratko (1994) as well as Gimeno, Folta, Cooper and Woo’s (1997) threshold model. Further, the authors conducted a case study on the finalists of the Wendy Schmidt Oil Clean-Up XChallenge, which was an innovation competition, initiated by the XPrize Foundation in 2010. The competition was a reaction to the BP oil spill disaster in the Gulf of Mexico in April 2010 and aimed for finding better and more efficient oil clean-up solutions. Ten finalists were selected to test their inventions at one of the world’s largest testing facilities for oil spill clean-up technology.

    The findings suggest that the motivators for participation in an innovation competition include a desire for increased publicity and reputation, as well as the opportunity to test the technology. It was also found that factors such as the goal of the organisation and the perception of one’s product and business idea play key roles in the decision to participate in an innovation competition. Furthermore, the research shows that the business environment and a need for achievement influence the decision to partake.

    With regards to the motivational factors that encourage sustained entrepreneurship after participating in an innovation competition, it was found that the correlation between expectations, both regarding the outcome and the implementation process, upon entering the competition and the actual outcome, does not have a large impact upon whether operations are continued after the innovation competition has ended. Instead, it was found that the main motives for continuing operations are a strong psychic attachment to the business, as well as high costs of switching to another area of commerce.

  • 191.
    Bengtsberg, Viking
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Bergström, Anders
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Fäldt, Jonas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Swedish SMEs' Export Experience: What did they learn and how did they use it in China2008Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The authors have noticed that during the last couple of years the interest about China has grown not only as an attractive market for production but also as a consumer market. A limited amount of books and articles have been written about SMEs entering the Chinese consumer market and even fewer articles have been written about Swedish SMEs entering China to sell their products. This is what caught the author’s attention of writing this thesis.

    Sweden has for a long time been good at exporting to other countries. Now when the Chi-nese market has opened up to western companies there are a lot of potential on this market that is estimated to be one of the largest in the world. There are still differences between China and other market not at least the culture. But as time and globalisation goes on the Chinese people learn how to react to the new world of companies from the west that tries to get its share of the highly attractive Chinese market.

    The purpose of this thesis was to investigate how previous experience and knowledge af-fected the long-term establishment on the Chinese market for the selected Swedish SMEs. Also the knowledge that was obtained when entered China that made the establishment possible was investigated.

    By interviewing four Swedish small and medium sized companies that have managed to export their products to China and also managed to stay there the authors have gotten to a better understanding of the process of export and the different knowledge's that the com-panies gets in this process of internationalisation. By also interviewing a consultant with a long experience of Chinese-Swedish relations and doing business with China the authors have got a good picture of the issues of today’s SMEs trying to export to China.

    The analysis revealed that the single most important aspect of making a successful long-term establishment on the Chinese market is the commitment the company can give. It is crucial in order to gain crucial connections and to provide the necessary service that is de-manded by the Chinese customers.

  • 192.
    Bengtsson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Wallström, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Accounting and disclosure of football player registrations: Do they present a true and fair view of the financial statements?: A study of Top European Football Clubs2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The game of football has transformed from just being a game into a huge economic market attracting investors from all over the world. As clubs spend more and more money on player acquisitions, player registrations (considered intangible assets) now represent a significant part of the total assets of major European football clubs. Due to this, treatment of player registrations has become a significant accounting issue.

    The purpose is to analyze and compare from the perspective of an investor, how a sample of European football clubs account and disclose values of player registrations. The purpose aim to answer the questions how and what kind of information each club discloses on their financial statements. Also, are current accounting procedures and disclosure harmonized, and do they present a true and fair view of top European clubs financial status.

    A descriptive case study was the most appropriate as it aims to answer the questions “how” and “why”. A sample selection filter was set in the beginning of the process together with the research questions. The final sample was set to be: Arsenal FC, Manchester United, Borussia Dortmund, Juventus FC and FC Porto. The purpose of the selection filter was to get a study both fair on economical as well as competitive sports level. Primary data consist of information from annual financial reports, and in order to enhance validity, interviews with professionals have been conducted and used. 

    Findings show similarities as well as differences in disclosure and treatment of football player registrations. All clubs meet the minimum requirements from IAS 38 and UEFA. However, how and what kind of information each clubs disclose differ substantially and due to lack of valuation models and the possibility to capitalize home-grown players and free agents, the value of player registrations is not presented in a true and fair view.

  • 193.
    Bengtsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Nagel, Ron
    JIBS, Accounting and Finance.
    Nguyen, An
    JIBS, Accounting and Finance.
    Value Creation in Buyouts: Value-enhancement practices of private equity firms with a hands-on approach2008Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract:

    Swedish private equity firms have demonstrated a historical success in the buyout industry. However, current trends in the industry such as institutional changes, phenomenon of capital overhang and an influx of new entrants have intensified competition among buyout firms. To maintain the expected high gains, private equity firms must actively create values for their portfolio companies. The purpose of this study is to describe and analyze how private equity firms with a hands-on approach add value to the companies under management.

    A literature review on value-creation by private equity firms was conducted. The valuecreation methods were classified by the authors under the four themes: governance engineering, financial engineering, operational engineering, and strategic redirections. In order to collect the empirical data, the authors chose an inductive approach, used semi-structured interviews with representatives from five private equity firms.

    The results show that the studied firms undertake to a large extent similar actions when it comes to corporate governance and financial engineering. With governance engineering, the firms attempt to strengthen the portfolio companies’ governance system through proper

    due diligence, the appointment of a competent and independent board of directors, an appropriate and deep management incentive program, establishment of a close relationship with management, and periodic management reports. The key to efficient governance is to give the portfolio firms 100% focus on operational and strategic issues in the board meetings. All but one firm use significant debt to lever the buyouts as it is evident that the pressure of debt repayment incentivizes management to better handle scarce capital.

    Operational engineering and strategic redirection are the two themes in which the firms mainly distinguish themselves. Operational engineering largely concerns running operation more efficiently through a combination of cost-cuttings (divestment of non-profitable

    product and customer, outsourcing, centralizing purchases) and higher revenue growth (finding new markets, providing more after-sale service, extending product range). Strategic redirection incorporates the focus on core competences, making strategic decisions about investments, divestments, and add-on acquisitions.

    There have been differences in actions taken by the studied firms. Factors that could affect the behavior of private equity firms are the type of companies acquired, the firm size, their perception of risk and reward regarding a particular action, as well as years of experiences in the industry. There is no common timeframe for actions taken by the studied firms. Nevertheless, all firms emphasize the importance of implementing fundamental changes in the early years of the investments.

  • 194.
    Beniamin, Agnes
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Kadic, Selma
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    A study of CEO bonus transparency among leading banks in EU2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 195.
    Bergendorff, Ida
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Osbäck, Maria
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Banking soundness in the European Union: - The impact of the capital requirements regulation2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Purpose – The purpose of the report is to investigate the impact of the capital requirements launched by the European Commission in the CRD IV package, using accounting proxies for the CAMELS rating system. By using financial ratios as proxies for the CAMELS variables (capital, assets, management, earnings, liquidity and sensitivity), changes in the financial soundness in Europe can be detected and the impact of the new capital requirements can be understood. Research design – The study is a quantitative research, as the data was collected from the European Union’s 30 largest banks’ annual reports and it is therefore secondary data. The data was used in order to construct financial ratios to act as accounting proxies for the CAMEL variables, which have been used in order to construct a rating of the banks. These ratios were calculated for a five-year period, 2011-2015, in order to detect changes and give an indication of how the banks state and stability have developed during the timeframe. Findings – The findings show that there has been clear changes in the banking sector during the observe time span. The findings indicate a clear increase in capital ratios in the banks, due to the new capital requirements. The findings also show how profitability and liquidity is still too low to indicate a fully sound banking sector, but still may be attributable to the recent recession. Contribution – The authors found indications that while the trend and over all well-being in the banking sector is good there is still room for further improvement in both leverage and liquidity ratios as well as profitability. Value – The sample shows that the have been improvements in the soundness in the banking sector, but the results also indicated that capital requirements by itself is not enough to create stability and increased well-being for the banking sector. Several areas of importance to bank stability are still in need of improvement. 

  • 196.
    Berggren, Coralis
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Wikström, Sarah
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Barriers Online: Exploring Consumers' Resistance to E-groceries2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Since the dawn of internet shopping there has always been consumers who show resistance. Researchers have identified several relevant barriers which inhibit these consumers from shopping online. Now that e-commerce has developed to the point that it could be regarded as mainstream, the resistance that remains is most evident in certain industries, such as the e-grocery industry.       

    Purpose: To identify which general e-commerce barriers are also applicable to the industry of e-groceries, and to understand the resistance shown towards the sector. Also, to evaluate how countermeasures could impact these barriers.                   

    Method: A qualitative and abductive approach was used in the study to analyze which barriers are relevant and which are irrelevant. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants located in the south of Sweden who have distinct opinions about e‑groceries and show resistance to embracing their services.        

    Conclusion: Six of the original ten e-commerce barriers were deemed irrelevant to e-groceries. The other four were relevant and impacted the embrace of e-grocery services for potential customers. Two new barriers specifically linked to e-groceries were discovered. Countermeasures have to a certain degree influenced how customers have managed to overcome certain barriers.

  • 197.
    Berggren, Jennie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Engström, Carina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Defensive Tactics: In hostile takeovers2006Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Magister), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
  • 198.
    Berggren, Robin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Eriksson, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Tage Rejmes bil AB: A case study of the company's budget process2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 199.
    Bergkuist, Fredrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Andersson, Andreas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Glovéus, Sebastian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Capital and Knowledge  Constraints: Swedish SMEs’ Internationalization to China2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    SMEs are established as an important cornerstone for the Swedish economy, due to the amount of people they employ and the economic activity they present. Due to a changing world SMEs are faced with new competition from foreign firms. In order to counter the new environment, an option for the firms is to move abroad, to internationalize. Furthermore China is established as an attractive country for SMEs to expand into, due to the major economic growth. During internationalization the Swedish agency for regional and economic growth identified SMEs to experience a lack of knowledge and capital, which hinders them in their expansion. The paper observes how four different Swedish SMEs, with activity in China moved abroad and how the mentioned lack of capital and knowledge was bridged.

    A theoretical framework is acquired through established research questions which are meant to analyze the problem description. The firms are identified as Swedish SMEs. In order to acquire empirical data, face to face interviews are conducted with the identified Swedish SMEs. Through the interview the empirical data is gathered, at which point, the paper analyzes the empirical data using the problem statement and the theories previously derived.

    The paper establishes that the experiential knowledge is the major influence on the resources committed by the firm. The amount of resources committed influences the type of entry mode as well as the accompanied advantages. In affect all firms have limited knowledge and ergo their resources committed are limited. This paper draws the conclusion that due to this, the firms were all able to finance their internationalization and no capital gap was experienced. The firms which were interviewed held experiential knowledge within the firm except one case where it was bridged with the assistance of a consultant. The experiential knowledge is held by individuals and has had a deep impact on the manner of the internationalization. It is identified that the personal relationships between individuals is shown to be of great importance to the firm. The knowledge constraints were bridged by the individuals’ experiential knowledge.

  • 200.
    Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Ots, Mart
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    What is Sustainable Journalism?: An introduction2017In: What Is Sustainable Journalism?: Integrating the Environmental, Social, and Economic Challenges of Journalism, Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2017, p. 11-26Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This edited volume, which elaborates on the idea and concept of sustainable journalism, is the result of a perceived lack of integral research approaches to journalism and sustainable development. Thirty years ago, in 1987, Our Common Future, the report from the UN World Commission on Environment and Development (also known as the Brundtland Report), pointed out economic growth, environmental protection and social equality as the three main pillars of a sustainable development. These pillars are intertwined, interdependent, and need to be balanced and reconciled. Economic growth is in this sense necessary for a developing world, but a one-sided focus on economy will eventually lead to a world that is both socially and environmentally poorer. Obviously, the issue of sustainability has not been absent from the field of journalism research; on the contrary, there is plenty of research focusing on journalism and environmental sustainability (e.g., climate change, fracking, renewables, etc.), social sustainability (e.g., democratic and political participation, poverty, inequality), and economic sustainability (e.g., ownership, commercialization, business models). However, where journalism studies traditionally treat these three aspects of sustainability disjointedly, this book attempts to pull them closer together and integrally approach sustainable development in its environmental, social and economic sense.

    The book departs from the premise that journalism has a role to play in global sustainable development—to inform, investigate and to educate in ways that reconcile the three pillars. It also raises questions about the internal sustainability of journalism itself, asking how its rampant need for economically sustainable business models can possibly be negotiated with its social and environmental obligations and impacts. In this way, the concept of sustainable journalism interlinks two current sustainability challenges that are of great theoretical relevance and in urgent need of empirical research.

1234567 151 - 200 of 1849
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf