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  • 151.
    Bokenberger, Kathleen
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Ström, Peter
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden and Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden and University of Southern California, USA.
    Shift work and cognitive aging: A longitudinal study2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 485-493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The few studies of shift work and late life cognitive functioning have yielded mixed findings. The aim of the present study is to estimate the association between shift-work experience and change in cognitive performance before and after retirement age among older adults who were gainfully employed.

    Methods Five hundred and ninety five participants with no dementia were followed up for a mean of 17.6 standard deviation (SD) 8.8 years from a Swedish population-based sample. Participants had self-reported information on any type of shift-work experience (ever/never) in 1984 and measures of cognitive performance (verbal, spatial, memory, processing speed, and general cognitive ability) from up to 9 waves of cognitive assessments during 1986–2012. Night work history (ever/never) from 1998–2002 was available from a subsample (N=320). Early adult cognitive test scores were available for 77 men.

    Results In latent growth curve modeling, there were no main effects of "any-type" or night shift work on the mean scores or rate of change in any of the cognitive domains. An interaction effect between any-type shift work and education on cognitive performance at retirement was noted. Lower-educated shift workers performed better on cognitive tests than lower-educated day workers at retirement. Sensitivity analyses, however, indicated that the interactions appeared to be driven by selection effects. Lower-educated day workers demonstrated poorer cognitive ability in early adulthood than lower-educated shift workers, who may have selected jobs entailing higher cognitive demand.

    Conclusion There was no difference in late-life cognitive aging between individuals with a history of working shifts compared to those who had typical day work schedules during midlife.

  • 152.
    Boström, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Ernsth-Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Lundgren, Dan
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Promoting sense of security in old-age care2013In: Health, ISSN 1949-4998, E-ISSN 1949-5005, Vol. 5, no 6A2, p. 56-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The concept of security is related to the experience of health but has ever so often been argued from a risk perspective rather than from a promotional perspective. The experience of older persons’ sense of security in private homes and in nursing homes seems to be missing when it comes to promote aging well throughout the life span. This study aimed to describe and analyze factors related to the sense of security of older persons receiving care in nursing homes in Sweden. Design and Methods: The study was based on a questionnaire from a total of 495 persons aged ≥ 65 in private homes (n = 350) or nursing homes (n = 145) in Sweden. Results: Secure relationships, sense of control, and perceived health were significantly related to the subjects’ sense of security. No significant relationships were found between sense of security and having a personal emergency response alarm. Implications: Experience of sense of security from the older person perspective differs depending on the context. To promote the sense of security within the care of older persons, methods on how to establish secure relations as well as the sense of control and knowledge need to be further tested, developed and analyzed together with older persons.

  • 153.
    Boström, Martina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Inte alltid trygg med trygghetslarm2014In: Äldre i Centrum, ISSN 1401-5110, no 3, p. 8-11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 154.
    Boström, Martina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Så skapas trygghet vid flytt hemifrån2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 155.
    Boström, Martina
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Teknik och åldrande.2011In: Äldre och åldrande.: Grundbok i gerontologi. / [ed] Marie Ernsth Bravell, Stockholm: Gothia Förlag AB , 2011, p. 330-347Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 156.
    Boström, Martina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Trygghet utifrån den äldres perspektiv2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 157.
    Boström, Martina
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Vad finns det för aktörer och vad gör de för äldre i Jönköpings län?: En kartläggning på uppdrag av Regionförbundet Jönköpings län med fokus på kommersiella företag, offentliga resurser, allmännyttiga, ideella och trossamfund samt utbildning i länet.2008Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
  • 158.
    Boström, Martina
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    What do old persons think about the first generation of security systems?2010In: Gerontechnology / [ed] Sixsmith, A & Gutman, G, 2010, p. 266-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Older people don’t always know what new technology can do, so it may be difficult to outline needs, constraints and specifications. The marketing functions, the demand for technology and the supply of technology therefore needs to be strengthened. Though many older persons rely on various assistive technologies in their daily life and therefore represent a large group of consumers with the experience of existing technology, their influence over the technology they have access to as well as their involvement in design processes and product development is also very small.

    Aim: This study has two objectives; the first is to describe older people's experiences about using their existing security systems. The second is to highlight and make the older peoples thoughts and wishes available in further development and innovations of the second generation of context-aware distributed assistive systems, like wireless sensor network (WSN).

    Method: Five focus group interviews including 7-10 persons were conducted. Totally, 45 community living men and females (75-85 years of age) without home help and who had not been diagnosed with dementia participated. Data were analyzed by content analysis and selected into six themes.

    Result: The preliminary results show that the old persons feel dissatisfied as well as unsafe with their present security alarms. They feel limited when security alarms are only fit in their own apartment, and therefore they feel insecure and restricted in their freedom. They are experiencing a need to compensate the lack of safety with other products or persons. They also report that they have received poor information, which affect their sense of security. The elderly seem to have specific needs with their alarm systems that might be useful in further development of context-aware distributed assistive systems as well as ethical issues also has arisen in the discussion about enlarged alarm systems.

  • 159.
    Boström, Martina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Ekberg, Kristina
    Enheten för projektledning och verksamhetsutveckling i Jönköpings Kommun.
    Ernsth-Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Ågren, Helena
    Jönköpings kommun.
    Stärka tryggheten i flytt till särskilt boende2016In: 10 förbättringar från DIALOGEN: En långsiktig strategi för att utveckla en innovativ, sammanhållen och hållbar socialtjänst / [ed] Stefan Österström, Jönköping: Jönköpings kommun, socialtjänsten , 2016, p. 133-150Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    De flesta kan kanske känna igen sig i en situation då flytt till särskilt boende blir aktuellt, oavsett om det gäller en nära anhörigs flytt eller sin egen. Våra skäl och orsaker till flytten kan variera men behovet av vård och omsorg är ofta detsamma. I en tid av livet då skörheten gör sig påmind och behovet av hjälp och stöd ökar, kan flytten bli ett känslosamt möte mellan det förflutna och en oviss framtid. Att arbeta för att få den äldre personen att känna trygghet under hela flyttprocessen och även under den första tiden på det särskilda boendet blir därför viktigt. Socialtjänsten och Hälsohögskolan har sedan 2013 genomfört ett samverkansprojekt i syfte att fördjupa kunskapen om äldres upplevelse av trygghet i flyttprocessen, för att på så vis förbättra och stärka den.

  • 160.
    Boström, Martina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Ernsth Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Sexualitet och åldrande.2011In: Äldre och åldrande.: Grundbok i gerontologi. / [ed] Marie Ernsth Bravell, Stockholm: Gothia Förlag AB , 2011, p. 221-240Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 161.
    Boström, Martina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Ernsth Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    How older people perceive and experience sense of security when moving into and living in a nursing home: [Hur äldre personer uppfattar och erfar trygghet i flytt till och boende i särskilt boende för äldre. En fallstudie]2017In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 697-710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sense of security is important throughout the lifespan not at least in advanced age with increased risks of functional declines and decreased social capital. Despite this, knowledge concerning older person’s perceptions and experiences of sense of security when moving into nursing homes is scarce. This study is a longitudinal, descriptive, exploratory case study with in-depth interviews and observations of three older persons in the age of 87, 88, and 91 years in a mid-sized municipality in the south of Sweden, in order to highlight how sense of security is experienced when moving into and living in a nursing home. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis, which resulted in one main theme and four categories. The main theme, ‘Adaptation and sense of security’, indicates older persons’ need to adapt to the new context of the nursing home, and how this relates to their sense of security. The categories – ‘Control’, ‘Struggling for understanding’, ‘Lack of influence’, and ‘Grasping’ – suggest that older persons’ sense of security is reduced when they must adjust to routines without sufficient management and understanding. When able to maintain control over daily routines, and felt as a part of the new context, they perceived a sense of security.

  • 162.
    Boström, Martina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Kjellström, Sofia
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Older persons have ambivalent feelings about the use of monitoring technologies2013In: Information Technology and Disabilities, ISSN 1073-5127, E-ISSN 1073-5127, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 117-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: As they age, older persons prefer to continue to live in their own homes. Sensors in the environment and/or bodily worn systems that monitor people might contribute to an increased sense of safety and security at home, but also raise concerns about the loss of privacy by surveillance. Little is known about how older persons, living at home independently and stating good health, perceive monitoring technology in terms of personal privacy.

    OBJECTIVE: to identify and describe how older persons, perceive monitoring technology in terms of personal privacy.

    METHOD: A qualitative study based on five focus group interviews was used. Concepts of "freedom" and "surveillance" were used as content areas in the data analysis.

    RESULTS: The results comprised three categories of ambivalence; "independence vs. security", "privacy vs. intrusion", and "in the best interest of me vs. in the best interest of others". These three categories merged into the overarching theme "maintaining a sense of self" which illustrates a desire to maintain control of one's life as long as possible.

    CONCLUSIONS: Older persons generally have positive feelings and attitudes toward technology and strive to maintaining a sense of self as long as possible, by having control. They stated high value to privacy, but valued being watched over if it ensured security. To feel good and bad about monitoring technologies, rather than good or does not necessarily lead to feelings of conflict.

  • 163. Braungart Fauth, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Zarit, Steven H
    Malmberg, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Mediating relationships within the Disablement Process model: a cross-sectional study of the oldest-old2008In: European Journal of Ageing, ISSN 1613-9372, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 161-179Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 164. Braungart Fauth, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Zarit, Steven H.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Johansson, Boo
    Physical, Cognitive, and Psychosocial Variables From the Disablement Process Model Predict Patterns of Independence and the Transition Into Disability for the Oldest-Old2007In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 613-624Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 165.
    Brismar, Kerstin
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Nilsson, Sven E
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Interrelations and associations of serum levels of steroids and pituitary hormones with markers of insulin resistance, inflammatory activity, and renal function in men and women aged >70 years in an 8-year longitudinal study of opposite-sex twins.2009In: Gender Medicine, ISSN 1550-8579, Vol. 6, no Suppl 1, p. 123-136Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 166.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Department of Cardiology and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Ulander, Martin
    Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter
    Department of Cardiology and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Sex-Specific Associations Between Self-reported Sleep Duration, Cardiovascular Disease, Hypertension, and Mortality in an Elderly Population2018In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 422-428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Both short and long sleep durations have been associated to increased mortality. Knowledge about sex-specific differences among elderly regarding associations between sleep duration, cardiovascular health, and mortality is sparse.

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study are to examine the association between self-reported sleep duration and mortality and to investigate whether this association is sex specific and/or moderated by cardiovascular morbidity, and also to explore potential mediators of sleep duration effects on mortality.

    METHODS: A population-based, observational, cross-sectional design with 6-year follow-up with mortality as primary outcome was conducted. Self-rated sleep duration, clinical examinations, echocardiography, and blood samples (N-terminal fragment of proBNP) were collected. A total of 675 persons (50% women; mean age, 78 years) were divided into short sleepers (≤6 hours; n = 231), normal sleepers (7-8 hours; n = 338), and long sleepers (≥9 hours; n = 61). Data were subjected to principal component analyses. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and hypertension factors were extracted and used as moderators and as mediators in the regression analyses.

    RESULTS: During follow-up, 55 short sleepers (24%), 68 normal sleepers (20%), and 21 long sleepers (34%) died. Mediator analyses showed that long sleep was associated with mortality in men (hazard ratio [HR], 1.8; P = .049), independently of CVD and hypertension. In men with short sleep, CVD acted as a moderator of the association with mortality (HR, 4.1; P = .025). However, when using N-terminal fragment of proBNP, this effect became nonsignificant (HR, 3.1; P = .06). In woman, a trend to moderation involving the hypertension factor and short sleep was found (HR, 4.6; P = .09).

    CONCLUSION: Short and long sleep duration may be seen as risk markers, particularly among older men with cardiovascular morbidity.

  • 167.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Department of Cardiology and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ulander, Martin
    Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter
    Department of Cardiology and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sex-specific associations between self-reported sleep duration, depression, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness in an older community-dwelling population2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, no 1, p. 290-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore whether associations between self-reported sleep duration, depressive symptoms, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness differed in older community-dwelling men and women. Design: Cross-sectional.

    Methods: A community-dwelling sample of 675 older men and women (mean age 77.7 years, SD 3.8 years) was used. All participants underwent a clinical examination by a cardiologist. Validated questionnaires were used to investigate sleep duration, depressive symptoms, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness. Subjects were divided into short sleepers (≤6 hours), n = 231; normal sleepers (7-8 hours), n = 338; and long sleepers (≥9 hours), n = 61. ancovas were used to explore sex-specific effects.

    Results: Depressive symptoms were associated with short sleep in men, but not in women. Fatigue was associated with both short and long sleep duration in men. No sex-specific associations of sleep duration with daytime sleepiness or anxiety were found.

    Conclusion: Nurses investigating sleep duration and its correlates, or effects, in clinical practice need to take sex into account, as some associations may be sex specific. Depressive symptoms and fatigue can be used as indicators to identify older men with sleep complaints.

  • 168.
    Brundell, Sara
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Anhörigkonsulentens arbete, uppgifter och förutsättningar: En uppsats om anhörigkonsulenter som stödjer anhöriga som vårdar närstående 65 år och äldre i Stockholms stad2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 169.
    Bäckström, Caroline A.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. University of Skövde, School of Health and Education, Skövde, Sweden.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Aging Research Center, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thorstensson, Stina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education, Skövde, Sweden.
    Golsäter, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Mårtensson, Lena B.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education, Skövde, Sweden.
    Quality of couple relationship among first-time mothers and partners, during pregnancy and the first six months of parenthood2018In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 17, p. 56-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Highlights

    • Social support is associated with first-time mothers’ and partners’ perceived quality of couple relationship six months after birth.
    • Sense of Coherence is associated with first-time mothers’ perceived quality of couple relationship six months after birth.
    • First-time mothers’ and partners’ Sense of Coherence increase between pregnancy and six months after birth.
    • Partners’ feelings for parenthood is associated with first-time mothers’ perception of quality of couple relationship six months after birth.
    • First-time mothers’ and partners’ perceived quality of couple relationship is decreasing after childbirth.
  • 170.
    Bålhede, Jennie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Andersson, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Lev livet: Äldre människor berättar2007Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
  • 171.
    Bülow, Pia H.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Bülow, Per
    Region Jönköpings län.
    Wilińska, Monika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Torgé, Cristina Joy
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Ernsth-Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Jegermalm, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work.
    Care and living conditions for older people with severe mental illness in a Swedish municipality2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 172.
    Bülow, Pia H.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Bülow, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Department of Psychiatry, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Wilińska, Monika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Torgé, Cristina Joy
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Ernsth-Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Jegermalm, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    The meaning of illness, times and spaces: Stories about severe mental illness from a life course perspective2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 173. Carlsson, M
    et al.
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Wenestam, C-G
    The oldest old: Patterns of adjustment and dependence1991In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 93-100Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 174.
    Carlsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Wenestam, C-G
    Family patterns of the oldest old1992In: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 1594-0667, E-ISSN 1720-8319, Vol. 4, p. 293-300Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 175.
    Carlsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Wenestam, C-G
    Hur upplever och anpassar sig äldre till sitt åldrande1988Report (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 176.
    Carlsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Wenestam, C-G
    The daily life of the oldest old1992In: Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare, ISSN 0191-5096, E-ISSN 1949-7652, Vol. 19, p. 109-124Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 177.
    Carlsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Wenestam, C-G
    The oldest old: Patterns of adjustment and life experiences1991In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 203-210Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 178. Castiello, Mayte
    et al.
    del Barrio, Élena
    Castejon, Penélope
    Tortosa, Maria
    Sundström, Gerdt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Johansson, Lennarth
    Family care for elders in Europe: Policies and practices.2008In: Caregiving Contexts: Cultural, familial and societal implications., New York: Springer , 2008, p. 235-267Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 179.
    Chang, Milan
    et al.
    Faculty of Health Promotion, Sports and Leisure Studies, School of Education, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Geirsdottir, Olof G.
    The Icelandic Gerontological Research Institute, National University Hospital of Iceland & Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Sigurdarsdottir, Sigurveig H.
    School of Social Science, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Ramel, Alfons
    The Icelandic Gerontological Research Institute, National University Hospital of Iceland & Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Associations between education and need for care among community dwelling older adults in Iceland2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Older adults in Iceland have good access to social services that support them in maintaining an independent life, although receiving informal care is common for community living older adults in Iceland. The aim of this study was to examine whether the need for care as well as receiving formal and informal care is associated with education among older adults in Iceland.

    METHODS: Among a national sample of 782 Icelandic community dwelling old adults (mean age 76.9 ± 7.4 years, 55% women), a telephone survey was conducted. The survey included questions on: socioeconomic status, social network, health status, activities of daily living and formal/informal care.

    RESULTS: A full data set was available for 720 subjects and among these, 349 (48.5%) had no need for care, 197 (27.4%) received informal care only, 31 (4.3%) received formal care only, and 143 (19.9%) received both type of care. Participants with higher education were significantly less likely to need care (OR 0.67, 95% CI, 0.47-0.97, p = 0.031) when compared with those who had primary education. Categorisation by age showed that this difference was only significant in participants younger than 80 years. Education was not related to formal care, but adults with higher education were less likely to receive informal care compared with older adults who had primary education (OR: 0.65, 95%CI: 0.46, 0.93, p = 0.018).

    CONCLUSIONS: People with higher education were significantly less likely to need care and this association was mainly present among those aged below 80 years. Further, in participants that needed care, the likelihood of receiving informal care was lower in highly educated participants, but no differences in formal care were observed between educational levels.

  • 180.
    Dahl, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Body mass index, cognitive ability, and dementia: prospective associations and methodological issues in late life2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of the present study were to investigate the association between overweight and cognitive ability and dementia, and to evaluate the usefulness of self-reported body mass index (BMI) in late life and various data sources commonly used in epidemiological studies to identify persons with dementia. Data were drawn from three population-based studies: the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging (SATSA), Aging in Women and Men: A Longitudinal Study of Gender Differences in Health Behaviour and Health among Elderly (the Gender Study), and the Finnish Lieto Study. In Study I, the agreement between self-reported and measured BMI over time was evaluated among 774 men and women, ages 40 to 88 years at baseline (mean age 63.9) participating in both the questionnaire phase and in-person testing of SATSA. Latent growth curve (LGC) modeling showed a small but significant increase between self-reported and measured BMI (0.02 kg/m2/y) over time, which would probably not affect the results if self-reported BMI were used as a continuous variable in longitudinal research. In Study II, the agreement between dementia diagnoses from various sources and dementia diagnoses set at a consensus conference was evaluated. Among the 498 elderly people ages 70 to 81 at baseline (mean age 74.5) enrolled in the Gender Study, 87 were diagnosed with dementia during an eight-year period. Review of medical records and nurse evaluations yielded the highest sensitivity (0.83 and 0.80, respectively) and a high specificity (0.98 and 0.96), indicating that these sources might be good proxies of dementia, while data extraction from the Swedish Inpatient Discharge Registry underestimated the prevalence of dementia (sensitivity 0.26). In Study III, the association between being overweight in midlife and cognitive ability in late life was examined in SATSA. The 781 participants ages 25 to 63 at baseline (mean age 41.6) in 1963 or 1973 self-reported their height and weight. From 1986 until 2002, they were assessed five times using a cognitive test battery. LGC models showed that people with higher midlife BMI scores had significantly lower cognitive ability and a significantly steeper decline than their thinner counterparts, an association that persisted when those who developed dementia during the study period were excluded from the analysis. This finding indicates that being overweight might affect cognitive ability independently of dementia. In Study IV, the association between BMI and dementia risk in older persons was described among 605 persons without dementia and ages 65 to 92 at baseline (mean age 70.8) in the Lieto Study. Among these, 86 persons were diagnosed with dementia during eight years of follow-up. Cox regression analyses indicated that for each unit increase in BMI score, the risk of dementia decreased 8% (hazard ratio = 0.92, 95% confidence interval = 0.87–0.97) and the association remained significant when individuals who developed dementia during the first four years of follow-up were excluded from the analyses. This result suggests that low BMI scores are present almost a decade before clinical dementia onset.

  • 181.
    Dahl, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Kan man undvika demens genom en sund och aktiv livsstil?2008In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, Vol. 3, p. 22-26Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En vanlig föreställning om åldrandet är att de flesta äldre för eller senare blir glömska. Även om hög ålder är en av de största riskfaktorerna för sämre minnesfunktioner, så har merparten av den åldrande befolkningen väl fungerande minne och andra intellektuella funktioner. Faktum kvarstår dock att det finns stora individuella skillnader, en del äldre har mycket gott minne, medan andra inte minns namnen på sina barn eller ens att de har barn. Hur kommer det sig? Beror det på gener, livsstil, eller är det slumpen som avgör vem som drabbas av glömska på ålderns höst?

  • 182.
    Dahl, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Psykologiskt åldrande.2011In: Äldre och åldrande.: Grundbok i gerontologi. / [ed] Marie Ernsth Bravell, Stockholm: Gothia Förlag AB , 2011, p. 168-189Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 183.
    Dahl, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Response letter to Dr. Hazzard2009In: Journal of The American Geriatrics Society, ISSN 0002-8614, E-ISSN 1532-5415, Vol. 57, no 7, p. 1316-1317Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 184.
    Dahl, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Does Swedish health care recognize and clinically evaluate cognitive impairments?2007In: Advances in health care science research, Stockholm, 7-8 nov, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 185.
    Dahl, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Nilsson, Sven
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Health factors and cognitive functioning in old age2006In: 18. Nordiska Kongressen i Gerontologi, Jyväskylä, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 186.
    Dahl, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Nilsson, Sven
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Identification of dementia in epidemiological research: A study on the usefulness of various data sources2007In: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 1594-0667, E-ISSN 1720-8319, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 381-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: Prevalence and incidence ratios of dementia in epidemiological studies vary according to the data source used. Medical records, cognitive tests, and registry information are sources frequently used to differentiate dementia from normal aging. The aim of the present study was to compare the identification of dementia from these different sources with that from consensus diagnosis. 

    Methods: 498 elderly people (age range 70–81 at baseline) enrolled in a Swedish population-based longitudinal twin study (Gender) were evaluated on physical and mental health and interviewed for their socio-demographic background three times during an eight-year period. Reviews of medical records and the Swedish Discharge Registry (DR) were conducted. The 10th percentile was used to differentiate between dementia and non-dementia in all cognitive tests. Scores of 24 or below on the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) (range 1–30) indicated dementia. A consensus conference diagnosed dementia on the basis of total information. The consensus diagnosis was used as the gold standard. 

    Results: MMSE scores (sensitivity 64%, specificity 96%, kappa 0.65) and the review of medical records (sensitivity 57%, specificity 99%, kappa 0.65) were good sources for dementia identification. The precision of medical records increased when recordings of cognitive impairment were included (sensitivity 83%, specificity 98%, kappa 0.84). The discharge registry had low sensitivity (26%) and kappa coefficient (0.31). 

    Conclusions: The present study shows that both review of medical records and MMSE scores are good although not perfect identifiers of dementia. The discharge registry is an uncertain source of dementia identification.

  • 187.
    Dahl, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Fauth, Elizabeth
    Department of Family, Consumer, and Human Development, Utah State University, Logan, Utah.
    Ernsth-Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Hassing, Linda
    University of Gothenburg.
    Ram, Nilam
    Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennysylvania.
    Gerstorf, Denis
    Department of Psychology, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
    Body Mass Index, Change in Body Mass Index, and Survival in Old and Very Old Persons2013In: Journal of The American Geriatrics Society, ISSN 0002-8614, E-ISSN 1532-5415, Vol. 61, no 4, p. 512-518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Current recommendations from the World Health Organization (WHO) are that individuals should seek to maintain a body mass index (BMI) between 18.5-25 kg/m2, independent of age. However, there is an ongoing discussion whether the WHO recommendations apply to old (70 ≥ 80 years) and very old persons (80+ years). In the present study we examine how BMI status and change in BMI are associated with mortality among old and very old individuals.

    Design: Pooled data from three multidisciplinary prospective population-based studies OCTO-twin, GENDER, and NONA.

    Setting: Sweden.

    Participants: 882 individuals aged 70 to 95 years.

    Measurements: Body Mass Index was calculated from measured height and weight as kg/m2. Information about survival status and time of death was obtained from Swedish Civil Registration System

    Results: Mortality hazard was 20% lower for the overweight group relative to the normal/underweight group (RR = 0.80, p < .05), and the mortality hazard for the obese group did not differ significantly from the normal/underweight group (RR = 0.93, > .10), independent of age, education, and multimorbidity. Furthermore, mortality hazard was 141% higher for the BMI loss group relative to the BMI stable group (RR = 1.65, p < .05); and 178% higher for the BMI gain group relative to BMI stable group (RR = 1.53, p < .05).  However, the BMI change differences were moderated by age, i.e. the higher mortality risks associated with both loss in BMI and BMI gain were less severe in very old age.

    Conclusion: Old persons who were overweight had a decreased mortality risk compared to old persons having a BMI below 25, even after controlling for weight change and multimorbidity. Compared to persons who had a stable BMI those who increased or decreased in BMI had a higher mortality risk, particularly among people aged 70 to 80. This study lends further support for the opinion that the WHO guidelines are overly restrictive in old age.

  • 188.
    Dahl, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Hassing, Linda
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Obesity and cognitive aging2013In: Epidemiologic reviews, ISSN 0193-936X, E-ISSN 1478-6729, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 22-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Obesity is a health problem that has reached epidemic proportions. Given the high prevalence of obesity, even a small adverse impact of obesity on cognitive aging might have a serious effect on public health. The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the relation between obesity and cognitive function in late life among persons not diagnosed with dementia and to evaluate the evidence for a causal association. Medline was used to search for the following terms: obesity, overweight, cognition, cognitive, age, and aged. To be included, studies must have had a population-based, dementia-free sample and a 5-year minimum interval between measurement of the predictor and the outcome. Only 11 studies met the criteria. Of these, 7 studies assessed obesity in midlife and cognitive function in later life, and 4 studies assessed obesity and cognitive function in late life. The reviewed studies showed clear evidence that midlife obesity was associated with cognitive aging, whereas this association was weaker in late life; thus, no firm conclusions could be drawn. The findings of this review suggest that, although there is evidence for an association between midlife obesity and low cognitive abilities in late life, the direction of the association and the causality remain to be clarified.

  • 189.
    Dahl, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Hassing, Linda B.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Berg, Stig
    Reynolds, Chandra A.
    Gatz, Margrete
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Being overweight in midlife is associated with lower cognitive ability and steeper cognitive decline in late life2010In: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, ISSN 1079-5006, E-ISSN 1758-535X, Vol. 65A, no 1, p. 57-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Although an increasing body of evidence links being overweight in midlife with an increased risk for dementia in late life, no studies have examined the association between being overweight in midlife and cognitive ability in late life. Our aim was to examine the association between being overweight in midlife as measured by body mass index (BMI) and cognitive ability assessed over time. METHODS: Participants in the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study Aging were derived from a population-based sample. The participants completed baseline surveys in 1963 or 1973 (mean age 41.6 years, range 25-63 years). The surveys included questions about height, weight, diseases, and lifestyle factors. Beginning in 1986, the same individuals were assessed on neuropsychological tests every 3 years (except in 1995) until 2002. During the study period, 781 individuals who were 50 years and older (60% women) had at least one complete neuropsychological assessment. A composite score of general cognitive ability was derived from the cognitive test battery for each measurement occasion. RESULTS: Latent growth curve models adjusted for twinness showed that persons with higher midlife BMI scores had significantly lower general cognitive ability and significantly steeper longitudinal decline than their thinner counterparts. The association did not change substantially when persons who developed dementia during the study period were excluded from the analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Higher midlife BMI scores precede lower general cognitive ability and steeper cognitive decline in both men and women. The association does not seem to be mediated by an increased risk for dementia

  • 190.
    Dahl, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Hassing, Linda
    Göteborgs Universitet, Psykologiska institutionen.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Gatz, Margaret
    University of Southern California.
    Reynolds, Chandra
    University of California Riverside.
    Pedersen, Nancy
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Midlife body mass index and late life cognitive functioning: findings from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging2008In: Conference of Life History Research Society, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 191.
    Dahl, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Hassing, Linda
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Margaret, Gatz
    Reynolds, Chandra
    Pedersen, Nancy
    Body mass index across midlife and cognitive change in late life2013In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 296-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: High midlife body mass index (BMI) has been linked to a greater risk of dementia in late life, but few have studied the effect of BMI across midlife on cognitive abilities and cognitive change in a dementia-free sample.

    Methods: We investigated the association between BMI, measured twice across midlife (mean age 40 and 61 years, respectively), and cognitive change in four domains across two decades in the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging.

    Results: Latent growth curve models fitted to data from 657 non-demented participants showed that persons who were overweight/obese in early midlife had significantly lower cognitive performance across domains in late life and significantly steeper decline in perceptual speed, adjusting for cardio-metabolic factors. Both underweight and overweight/obesity in late midlife were associated with lower cognitive abilities in late life. However, the association between underweight and low cognitive abilities did not remain significant when weight decline between early and late midlife was controlled for.

    Conclusion: There is a negative effect on cognitive abilities later in life related to being overweight/obese across midlife. Moreover, weight decline across midlife rather than low weight in late midlife per se was associated with low cognitive abilities. Weight patterns across midlife may be prodromal markers of late life cognitive health.

  • 192.
    Dahl, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Hassing, Linda
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Pedersen, Nancy
    Agreement between self-reported and measured height, weight and body mass index in old age: a longitudinal study with 20 years of follow-up2010In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 445-451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: self-reported body mass index (BMI) based on self-reported height and weight is a widely used measure of adiposity in epidemiological research. Knowledge about the accuracy of these measures in late life is scarce.

    Objective: the study aimed to evaluate the accuracy and changes in accuracy of self-reported height, weight and BMI calculated from self-reported height and weight in late life.

    Design: a longitudinal population-based study with five times of follow-up was conducted.

    Participants: seven hundred seventy-four community-living men and women, aged 40–88 at baseline (mean age 63.9), included in The Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging.

    Methods: participants self-reported their height and weight in a questionnaire, and height and weight were measured by experienced research nurses at an in-person testing five times during a 20-year period. BMI was calculated as weight (kilogramme)/height (metre)2.

    Results: latent growth curve modelling showed an increase in the mean difference between self-reported and measured values over time for height (0.038 cm/year) and BMI (0.016 kg/m2/year), but not for weight.

    Conclusions: there is a very small increase in the mean difference between self-reported and measured BMI with ageing, which probably would not affect the results when self-reported BMI is used as a continuous variable in longitudinal studies.

  • 193.
    Dahl, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Hassing, Linda
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Pedersen, Nancy
    Is self-reported Body Mass Index a valid and reliable measure in old age?: Findings from the Longitudinal Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging2009In: 62nd Annual Scientific Meeting of Gerontological Society of America, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 194.
    Dahl, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Hassing, Linda
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Reynolds, Chandra
    Gatz, Margaret
    Pedersen, Nancy
    Body Mass Index across midlife and cognitive change in late life: delayed and cumulative effects2011In: 64th Annual Scientific Meeting of Gerontological Society of America, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 195.
    Dahl, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Hassing, Linda
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Reynolds, Chandra
    Gatz, Margaret
    Pedersen, Nancy
    Midlife Body Mass Index and Longitudinal Trajectories of Cognitive Change in Late Life: findings from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging2009In: 62nd Annual Scientific Meeting of Gerontological Society of America, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 196.
    Dahl, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Hassing, Linda
    Löppönen, Minna
    Isoaho, Raimo
    Sirkka-Liisa, Kivelä
    Gatz, Margaret
    Johansson, Boo
    Pedersen, Nancy
    Overweight and dementia: a time-varying effect2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The negative effects of overweight on cardiometabolic health is well-known. An increasing body of evidence extends the negative effects of midlife overweight to dementia. However, a different picture emerge when overweight is assessed in late life. The time-varying effect of weight status on dementia was evaluated in two prospective Nordic population-based studies.

    Methods: The participants included in the Swedish Twin Registry self-reported their height and weight in 1963 (mean age 52.5 years). About 25 years later these twins were either included in the SATSA study (50 years and older) or the OCTO-Twin study (80 years and older). Dementia was consequently screened for and diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) criteria presently used at the time of diagnoses. The participants weight and height was assessed at baseline of the Finnish Lieto Study (mean age 70.8) and dementia was screened for and diagnosed according to the DSM-IV criteria eight years later.

    Results: Logistic regression analyses indicated that midlife overweight was associated with a greater risk of all cause dementia, odds ratio 1.55 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.18-2.04), when demographic and cardiometabolic risk factors and diseases were controlled for. However, Cox regression analyses indicated that for each unit increase in BMI score in late life, the risk of dementia decreased 8% (hazard ratio = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.87–0.97), when demographic and cardiometabolic risk factors and diseases were controlled for. The association remained significant when individuals who developed dementia during the first four years of follow-up were excluded from the analyses.

    Conclusions: Our results indicate there might be a time-varying effect of weight status on dementia. Preclinical dementia might blur the association between weight status and dementia in late life. This needs to be further analysed in studies following the same sample over the life course.

  • 197.
    Dahl, Anna K
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Hassing, Linda B
    Fransson, Eleonor I
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Pedersen, Nancy L
    Is Self-reported Body Mass Index Less Reliable in Late Life?  2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Self-reported Body Mass Index (BMI) based on self-reported height and weight is a widely used measure of adiposity in epidemiological research. Knowledge about the accuracy of these measures in late life is scarce, and especially if there is intra-individual changes over time.

    Methods: Seven hundred seventy-four men and women, aged 40 to 88 at baseline (mean age 63.9), in The Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging self-reported and had their height and weight measured by experienced research nurses five times during a twenty year period. BMI was calculated as weight (kilos)/height (meter)2.

    Results: There was significant correlation between self-reported and measured height (0.97-0.98), weight (0.97-0.98), and BMI (0.93-0.95) at each measurement occasion, and substantial agreement for BMI as a categorical variable (Kappa coefficient 0.72-0.81). Latent growth curve modeling showed an increase in the mean difference between self-reported and measured values over time for height (0.04 cm/year) and BMI (0.02 kg/m2/year), but not for weight.

    Conclusions: There is a very small significant increase in the mean difference between self-reported and measured BMI with aging, mainly due to unawareness of changes in height, which probably would not affect the results when self-reported BMI is used as a continuous variable in longitudinal studies.

  • 198.
    Dahl, Anna K.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Karolinska Institutet.
    Starr, J. M.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Allerhand, M.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Deary, I. J.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Acceptance of bodily appearance in young-old and old age - Prevalence and predictors2015In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 55, p. 355-355Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 199.
    Dahl, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Löppönen, Minna
    Isoaho, Raimo
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Kivelä, Sirkka-Liisa
    Overweight and obesity in old age is not associated with increased risk of dementia2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 200.
    Dahl, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Löppönen, Minna
    Åbo University.
    Isoaho, Raimo
    Åbo University.
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Kivelä, Sirkka-Lisa
    Åbo University.
    Overweight and obesity in old age are not associated with greater dementia risk2008In: Journal of The American Geriatrics Society, ISSN 0002-8614, E-ISSN 1532-5415, Vol. 56, no 12, p. 2261-2266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the association between body mass index (BMI) and dementia risk in older persons.

    DESIGN: Prospective population‐based study, with 8 years of follow‐up.

    SETTING: The municipality of Lieto, Finland, 1990/91 and 1998/99.

    PARTICIPANTS: Six hundred five men and women without dementia aged 65 to 92 at baseline (mean age 70.8).

    MEASUREMENTS: Weight and height were measured at baseline and at the 8‐year follow‐up. Dementia was clinically assessed according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, criteria.

    RESULTS: Eighty‐six persons were diagnosed with dementia. Cox regression analyses, adjusted for age, sex, education, cardiovascular diseases, smoking, and alcohol use, indicated that, for each unit increase in BMI score, the risk of dementia decreased 8% (hazard ratio (HR)=0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.87–0.97). This association remained significant when individuals who developed dementia early during the first 4 years of follow‐up were excluded from the analyses (HR=0.93, 95% CI=0.86–0.99). Women with high BMI scores had a lower dementia risk (HR=0.90, 95% CI=0.84–0.96). Men with high BMI scores also tended to have a lower dementia risk, although the association did not reach significance (HR=0.95, 95% CI=0.84–1.07).

    CONCLUSION: Older persons with higher BMI scores have less dementia risk than their counterparts with lower BMI scores. High BMI scores in late life should not necessarily be considered to be a risk factor for dementia.

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