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  • 151.
    Virta, Sari
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). University of Tampere, Finland.
    Lowe, Gregory Ferrell
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Managing Dependencies and Tensions in Value Networks Development: Case Mediapolis in Finland2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Media organisations face growing demands for co-operation. Achieving innovation that is vital requires collaborative arrangements based on creative interaction. Collaboration is often realized in networked operations between media organisations (e.g. Baumann, 2013), media clusters as one example. At the same time, competition in the media field intensifies. It is here that the concept and theory of value networks becomes useful (e.g. de Man, Berends, Lammers, van Raaij & van Weele 2008; Bathelt, Malmberg & Maskell, 2004). Also, the intensity, i.e. the frequency and range of interactions in clusters of media companies becomes a central factor for consideration (Picard, 2008). In this reality, managerial challenges, especially, in relation to interaction, collaboration and co-opetition are considerable, and respective competences need to be developed and utilized for success.

    Collaborative production is typical for innovation-intensive industries (Nohria & Eccles, 1992), and media firms are no different in this respect. However, the configuration of collaborative relationships in and between media organisations in networks is a complex managerial task, especially in the rapidly changing environment of diminishing resources. Media managers must be competent in handling various dependencies in value networks for shared value creation (e.g. Bilton, 2007), and especially the related tensions. To be useful, co-operative relationships need to be created and built, and the network development happens in stages (Büchel & Raub, 2002).

    The empirical case of the paper is Mediapolis (http://mediapolis.fi/en/) in Tampere, Finland. It is a new media centre and a cluster, an ecosystem and a network for content production and digital industries with a vision ”Mediapolis is a centre for storytelling and digital industries, where interdisciplinary innovations are born”. The Mediapolis campus was launched in the autumn 2014, although the planning started some years before. It is an interesting case for analysis, because its viability depends on the creation and management of a creative value network.

    Mediapolis development illustrates challenges and tensions of simultaneous collaboration and competition, i.e. co-opetition in a value network aiming for innovation. Especially, the managerial challenges in creating and developing the Mediapolis operational model have been significant, and continue to be so. The paper explores the first years of Mediapolis, providing a unique access to the forming stage of a creative media cluster development and its management. Thus, the paper contributes directly to the conference theme by developing understanding about creative collaboration and coopetition aiming at achieving media innovation, especially focusing on the complexity of interactions and tensions between Mediapolis partners.

    The empirical research material consists of semi-structured interviews, including the main Mediapolis partners’ management representatives as interviewees. The interviews have been conducted in different stages of Mediapolis development, e.g. in the early stages of planning and after the campus launch. Also, Mediapolis documentation has been collected from open sources (e.g. websites) and acquired from partner organisations. The study utilizes a qualitative case study approach (Stake, 1995), suitable for analysing unique cases in detail to create understanding about a phenomenon. Document analysis (Bowen, 2009) and qualitative thematic coding with ‘factual’ approach (e.g. Patton, 2002; Alastalo & Åkerman, 2010) are used as methodological approaches, and Atlas.ti software is utilized for analysis.

    In conclusion, the purpose of the paper is to discuss and elaborate on the various managerial and organisational dependencies and tensions in creating Mediapolis. Further, a central focus will be on the managerial competences required to deal with the new realities of value networks successfully in the media industry. The methodological approach is qualitative, with the aim of creating new knowledge on the scholarly field of media management for both academic and practical purposes. In media management, value networks have been scarcely researched, but the topic is highly timely and worthy of scholarly attention.

  • 152.
    Virta, Sari
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics. University of Tampere, Finland.
    Maijanen-Kyläheiko, Päivi
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland.
    Managing Exploration and Exploitation in a Media Organisation: A Capability Approach to Ambidexterity2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research question and theoretical approach

    Currently, media managers face extensive challenges in combining the constant demands for operational and organisational change, innovation and creative development with the requirements for higher efficiency and refinements for greater streamlining of the on-going production. In attempts to understand this complex phenomenon, this paper offers a strategic management approach by applying the concepts of ambidexterity and organizational capabilities.

    Ambidexterity refers to an ability to simultaneously exploit current assets and mature markets profitably as well as to explore developmental possibilities for competing in new technologies and markets, utilizing environmental changes and organizational resources to capture new opportunities (O’Reilly & Tushman, 2011; O’Reilly & Tushman 2013; see also March 1991). Achieving both at the same time, i.e. being truly ambidextrous in practice, should enable continuous successful development, but achieving that is difficult and inevitably leads to various tensions and paradoxes on different organisational levels (O’Reilly & Tushman, 2004; Andriopoulos & Lewis, 2009; Raisch, Birkinshaw, Probst & Tushman, 2009). This presents a challenge for media managers aiming at adapting their organisations to both optimize and to innovate (see Küng, 2007). However, there is a lack of theoretical understanding about how the conscious management of ambidexterity actually happens in organisations (O’Reilly & Tushman, 2008; O’Reilly & Tushman, 2011). Media organizations are exceptionally relevant and fruitful cases for discussing ambidexterity, because they do not traditionally separate on-going production, understood as exploitation, and innovative development, approached as exploration, but aim at achieving both simultaneously and effectively.

    The concept of organizational capabilities offers an insightful way to analyse ambidextrous tensions during strategic change. As applied in strategy research, capabilities can be divided hierarchically into operational and dynamic capabilities (Zollo & Winter, 2002; Hine, Parker, Pregelj &Verreynne, 2013). Operational capabilities exploit the existing resources for incremental innovations whereas so called higher-order dynamic capabilities explore new technologies and other resources for radical innovations. In our study, dynamic capabilities are defined as organization’s capacity to sense and seize new opportunities and reconfigure its resource base to address the changing environment (Teece, Pisano & Shuen, 1997; Helfat, Finkelstein, Mitchell, Peteraf, Singh, Teece & Winter, 2007; Teece, 2007). The senior management abilities and competence are crucial in relation to resource allocation and in orchestrating “the complex trade-offs that the simultaneous pursuit of exploration and exploitation requires” (O’Reilly & Tushman, 2011, p. 6). The development of capabilities and managing the inherent tensions is a central, but at the same time a complex executive leadership responsibility in ambidextrous organizations (O’Reilly & Tushman, 2008; O’Reilly & Tushman, 2011).

    Research design

    Empirically, the paper analyses what is characteristic to ambidextrous tensions and their management (prerequisites and requirements) in relation to organizational capabilities on the basis of an empirical case from Yle, the public service broadcaster of Finland. The empirical research material consists of 20 semi-structured in-depth interviews conducted with Yle senior management during winter 2013/14. At the time Yle was taking strategic actions in relation to digitalization of its content production, structures and customer relationship.

    In the interviews, managers were asked about the difficulties, challenges and tensions they have faced during the change process. They were also asked about how they understand the need for change, how they scan the changing media market and make decisions. The analysis approach is qualitative, and the transcribed interviews are analysed according to a thematic analysis and coding method (e.g. Patton, 2002; Miles, Huberman, & Saldaña, 2014) using Atlas.ti data analysis software. The preliminary analysis shows that managers are continuously balancing between exploitation and exploration. Also, ambidextrous tensions seem to underlie strategic thinking and managerial processes and practices on an everyday basis.

    Contributions and managerial implications

    The reasonably new research area around ambidexterity is evolving and growing (e.g. Raisch & Birkinshaw, 2008; Lavie, Stettner & Tushman, 2010). However, in relation to media organisations or media management it has hardly been applied (for a rare example, see Järventie-Thesleff, Moisander & Villi, 2014). The operationalization of ambidexterity with operational and dynamic capabilities offers a fresh and insightful approach for analysing media management in the face of digitalization. The theoretical approach will provide media managers with new insights and practical understanding of e.g. how managing change relates to capabilities and competencies that either exploit and support continuity or explore and create discontinuity, and especially of the ways to tackle the related ambidextrous tensions between exploitation and exploration.

  • 153.
    Væver Kronborg, Katja
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    The Stockholm Terror Attack 2017: How Domestic and International Online News Media Framed the Act and Empowered Involved Actors2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this comparative study has been to identify similarities and differences in Swedish and British media’s framing and empowerment of actors in relation to the 2017 Stockholm terror attack. Theories on the risk society, framing, power and CDA have been used to create a framework that gives a deeper understanding of media’s role in framing actors and events, and how this can potentially affect the public. Moreover, to determine how media use their power to dis- tribute power among the actors and objects that are part of such an attack.

    A critical discourse analysis has been carried out on excerpts from a total of 15 articles, seven and six from Sweden and Britain respectively. In this analysis, both framing and power issues were identified, which was used to conduct a discussion on the findings in relation to the the- oretical framework used.

    It was found that while Sweden and Britain are part of the same culture and therefore largely covered the terror attack the same way, there was a significant difference in the portrayal of the perpetrator. Swedish media had a tendency to use othering and describe the perpetrator as one of “them” as opposed to the “we”. British media, on the other hand, made use of other- ing as well, but would also offer descriptions that could make the “we” relate to him. This difference can potentially be due to the fact that Swedes have been more emotional about the attack, as it happened in their own country.

    The distribution of power between actors were done similarly in both countries. Two power- plays were identified: the police vs. the perpetrator, and the act (the truck) vs. the public. In order to avoid giving the perpetrator credit for the act, when the act was portrayed, the truck would be described as the powerful actor. Thus, even though it is common sense that the truck did not drive into people on itself, the perpetrator’s actions has not been acknowledged in the media. Instead, when describing the perpetrator, it has been done in relation to the police, who were described as the powerful actors – they caught the perpetrator, i.e. he did not have the power to avoid them or escape.

    Thus, while Swedish and British media largely have covered the act the same way and with the same means, the Swedish media have used emotional means to further othering.

  • 154.
    Windborg, Eddie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Fagrell, Louise
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Välkommen till Dumburken: Politiska reklamfilmer i den svenska televisionen2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate what the content of political TV ads look like in Sweden when the politicians themselves have control over how they want to be portrayed in the medium. The point of origin for this study was the policy of Swedish mediatization and the theory of priming. The research value was that TV advertising was a new arena for political communication for the parliamentary elections in 2010, and no studies had been done on the content of political TV-commercials.

    A qualitative analysis was done by examining the content of the commercials from the AIDA model and with a rhetorical analysis. The results were then compared to the respective party programs and deduced by the theory of priming and the theory of mediatization.

    The results showed that the political commercials have adapted their message to awaken interest and to retain the viewer. The films used rhetorical means to create recognition and arouse sympathy for the parties. Commercials are structured in a similar way regardless of which party is the sender. All parties choose to highlight contemporary issues but they were still based one way or another on the parties' ideologies.

  • 155.
    Yngfors, Jonathan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Sandkvist, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Från skärm till perception: En studie om påverkan. Relationen mellan nyhetsvåld och oro bland studenter på Jönköping University.2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna studie undersöker relationen mellan konsumtion av nyheter och oro för våldsbrott i Jönköping. Vi utgår från kultivationsteorin som undersöker de långsiktiga effekterna av tv-tittande och som påstår att ju mer tid människor tittar på tv ju mer tenderar dessa att tro på den realitet som porträtteras i tv. Som metod använder vi oss av en enkät som vi distribuerat till studenter på två förstaårsprogram inom varje fackhögskola. Totalt fick cirka 400 studenter tillgång till enkäten. Svarsfrekvensen var låg, endast 127 personer svarade, flest var kvinnor.

    Vårt resultat visar inget samband mellan nyhetskonsumtion och oro/rädsla för våldsbrott. Den data vi inhämtade var inte signifikant så vi kan inte dra några generella slutsatser. Det vi såg bland de som svarade på undersökningen var att kvinnor är mer oroliga för våldsbrott än män. 

  • 156.
    Çevik, Müge
    et al.
    Sabancı Üniversitesi, İstanbul, Turkey.
    Özturkcan, Selcen
    İstanbul Bilgi Üniversitesi, İstanbul, Turkey.
    Kasap, Nihat
    Sabancı Üniversitesi, İstanbul, Turkey.
    Sosyal Medya Analitiği [Social Media Analytics]: Twitter için Büyük Veri Yaklaşımı [Big Data Approach for Twitter]2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [tr]

    Bu çalışma, büyük veri analizini sosyal medya araştırmalarında kullanımı için yöntem önerisinde bulunmaktadır. Büyük veri araştırmalarında, tümden gelim ya da tüme varım yerine alternatif olarak “abduction” yaklaşımı kullanılabilir (Kitchin, 2014). Bu yaklaşımda veri, en iyi açıklamanın çıkarılması açısından araştırmanın başlangıcından sonuçlanmasına kadar geçen her aşamada dikkat edilmesi gereken önemli bir unsurdur. Sosyal medya araştırmalarında veri hacmi büyüklüğü ve verinin oluşum hızının yüksekliği sebebiyle, büyük veri analizi benimsenen yöntemler arasında öne çıkmaktadır (Jacob, 2009). Bu bağlamda, sosyal medya araştırmalarında analitik ve yapısal bir yöntemin takip edilmesi, araştırmaların ve çıktılarının bilimsel niteliğinin korunması açısından önem taşımaktadır. Çalışmamızın amacı, sosyal medya analitiğine örnek oluşturmak ve özellikle Twitter analizi için büyük veri analizine dayanan bir araştırma yöntemi önerisinde bulunmaktır.

  • 157.
    Özturkcan, Selcen
    et al.
    Faculty of Communication, Bahçeşehir Üniversitesi, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Kasap, N.
    School of Management, Sabanci University, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Cevik, M.
    School of Management, Sabanci University, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Zaman, T.
    School of Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, United States.
    An analysis of the Gezi Park social movement tweets2017In: Aslib Journal of Information Management, ISSN 2050-3806, E-ISSN 2050-3814, Vol. 69, no 4, p. 426-440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Twitter usage during Gezi Park Protests, a significant large-scale connective action, is analyzed to reveal meaningful findings on individual and group tweeting characteristics. Subsequent to the Arab Spring in terms of its timing, the Gezi Park Protests began by the spread of news on construction plans to build a shopping mall at a public park in Taksim Square in Istanbul on May 26, 2013. Though started as a small-scale local protest, it emerged into a series of multi-regional social protests, also known as the Gezi Park demonstrations. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach: The authors sought answers to three important research questions: whether Twitter usage is reflective of real life events, what Twitter is actually used for, and is Twitter usage contagious? The authors have collected streamed data from Twitter. As a research methodology, the authors followed social media analytics framework proposed by Fan and Gordon (2014), which included three consecutive processes; capturing, understanding, and presenting. An analysis of 54 million publicly available tweets and 3.5 million foursquare check-ins, which account to randomly selected 1 percent of all tweets and check-ins posted from Istanbul, Turkey between March and September 2013 are presented. Findings: A perceived lack of sufficient media coverage on events taking place on the streets is believed to result in Turkish protestors’ use of Twitter as a medium to share and get information on ongoing and planned demonstrations, to learn the recent news, to participate in the debate, and to create local and global awareness. Research limitations/implications: Data collection via streamed tweets comes with certain limitations. Twitter restricts data collection on publicly available tweets and only allows randomly selected 1 percent of all tweets posted from a specific region. Therefore, the authors’ data include only tweets of publicly available Twitter profiles. The generalizability of the findings should be regarded with concerning this limitation. Practical implications: The authors conclude that Twitter was used mainly as a platform to exchange information to organize street demonstrations. Originality/value: The authors conclude that Twitter usage reflected Street movements on a chronological level. Finally, the authors present that Twitter usage is contagious whereas tweeting is not necessarily.

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