Change search
Refine search result
1234567 151 - 200 of 3856
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 151.
    Akhter, Naveed
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Strategies and Markets Department, ESSCA School of Management, Angers, France.
    Sieger, Philipp
    Department of Management and Entrepreneurship, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). EGADE Business School, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico.
    If we can't have it, then no one should: Shutting down versus selling in family business portfolios2016In: Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal, ISSN 1932-4391, E-ISSN 1932-443X, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 371-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How does a business family manage its business portfolio in times of declining performance to sustain the portfolio's long-term endurance? Drawing on social identity theory and six family business portfolios from Pakistan, we find that business families may prefer to shut down a satellite business rather than sell it, which is primarily driven by identity considerations. In addition, the family's goal to recycle the assets, the aim to restart the business later, and the increasing decline in performance are important contingency factors. This study contributes to the literature on portfolio entrepreneurship, business exit, and the enduring entrepreneurship of family firms.

  • 152.
    Akhter, Naveed
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Xavier, Lesage
    ESSCA School of Management, France.
    Should I Stay or Should I Leave: Founders Emotional Hangover and Exit Delay2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 153.
    Al natur, Firas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Acikbas, Canberk
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    The Effect of Corporate Entrepreneurship on Software Development Process in the Automotive Industry2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In this study we connected corporate entrepreneurship with new product development (NPD) process in the automotive industry.Purpose: Our purpose in this thesis is to look in-depth on how corporate entrepreneurship effect the developing process of new software in the automotive industryMethod: This thesis was conducted interviews with Innovation and Digital Services Department which belongs to Volvo Cars. With the help of theoretical framework, we could connect our findings correlated with theoretical framework.Conclusion: The corporate entrepreneurship has indeed a big effect on the software development process, where it changes the internal structure entirely.

  • 154.
    Alabdullatif, Talal
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    SABIC Green Logistics Systems & Profitability: To explore chemical industries green logistics and contribution to profitability with a particular case of SABIC2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Logistics is paramount in the business operations as it ensures transit of goods from one point to the other. Green logistics are measures in the logistics systems that are put in place to minimize the environmental implication of logistics operations while at the same time saving on cost. Thus, green logistics is adopted as it conveys a competitive merit which enhances performance of a company. Saudi Basic Industries (SABIC) is one of the biggest petrochemicals in Saudi Arabia and holds the fifth position in the world among the leading producers of petrochemicals. The company already has green logistics in place.

    Purpose: To explore chemical industries green logistics practices and profitability with a particular case study of SABIC. The goal of this paper was achieved by investigating how has SABIC incorporated green practices into supply chain operations to remain profitable. The study answers “how has chemical industries incorporated green practices into supply chain operations to stay profitable?’ And “how do logistic managers recognize green logistics and to what level do chemical industries apply green logistics? Investigating a chemical industry green logistics is important as it contributes to literature since no single study has been carried out in this area. Suggestions from this study are crucial to SABIC, other chemical industry besides any other industry since in one way or the other companies do logistics.

    Method: The study utilized interpretivism. This study was a case study type of thesis focusing merely on SABIC, and it employed induction approach as well as the qualitative method of collecting data.  Interviews were used to explore the experiences, beliefs, motivations and views of individual participants. Using non-probability sampling method, five members in SABIC supply chain department were selected.

    Conclusion: The results show that SABIC or chemical industries utilize most of the green logistics activities (fuel efficiency, route optimization package optimization and calculating carbon emission). However, it was found out that fuel efficiency, route optimizations, and packaging optimization were most common activities. It was also discovered that one major objective of chemical industries going green was to cut cost which contributes positively to its profitability. However, reverse logistics was not familiar because of its nature; it cannot be sufficient on its own.

  • 155.
    Alban, Lucas Carlos
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Wieneck, Michael
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Let Them Brand This Town: A Qualitative Study of How Major Cities Manage User-Generated Content in Their Branding Strategies2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Ongoing urbanization and increased visits to urban areas make cities around the globe compete with each other. As places increasingly aim to attract visitors, residents, businesses or investments, place branding becomes a new discipline within the field of marketing and city branding arises as a means to differentiate a city in the global marketplace. In order to communicate with their potential audience, the digital space allows brands to address potential customers through two-way-communication. In this context, user-generated content (UGC) becomes an interesting alternative to interact with audiences, offering marketing professionals the opportunity to effectively engage stakeholders in the branding process and co-create the city brand.

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to gain a broader understanding of how, within the place branding context, major city brands manage UGC in their social media strategies.

    Method: The study relied on a qualitative methodology and was conducted with an abductive approach. Primary data was gathered through email-based interviews with a sample of eleven representatives from valuable major city brands, as well as with one independent professional in the field of place branding consultancy.

    Conclusion: In the city branding context, UGC was found to be an effective tool to engage with stakeholders and build a strong brand in order to differentiate it among its competitors. Four categories of potential issues connected to the application of UGC were uncovered: Control, Credibility, Motivation as well as Features of UGC. Finally, a model of UGC facilitating the participatory approach to city branding was proposed by the authors.

  • 156.
    Aleem, Majid
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Islam, Md. Shariful
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Successful Succession in Family Businesses: Individual Level Factors and Succession Planning Models.2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Individual level factors related to the successor have a central role to play in the succession process of the business. When these factors are viewed in relation to succession planning models, these factors have a direct relation to the succession models in terms of success or failure of the succession process. The major contributing factor to the success or failure of the succession process is that of the leadership provided to the organization by the predecessor. These leadership qualities change from one form to another during different phases of the succession planning models.

  • 157.
    Algotsson, Frida
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Johansson, Christoffer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Lindskog, Amanda
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Talent Retention: A case study of two companies' Trainee Programmes2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Talent Management is a topic gaining more attention among businesses and it is one of the most

    important challenges faced by companies worldwide; therefore it should be a top priority for

    managers. Literature states that many organisations are not aware of the issue of Talent Retention

    and that it is the high performers who are the ones end up leaving. Due to that the generation

    Millennials are considered to be a generation with talent and the education needed to take over

    and become the next generation of leaders, it is important to take advantage of them as

    opportunities and factors for success.

    One opportunity for companies to both attract talents and thereafter retain them is through

    conducting trainee programmes, however, to successfully execute these programmes, resources in

    terms of money, time and efforts are required. Therefore, in order to achieve the best possible

    return on the resources invested is it crucial to be able to retain the talents after them finishing

    the trainee programme. In order to answer our research question and fulfil our purpose we have

    done a multiple case study and conducted in-depth interviews to gather qualitative data. Our

    sample group consisted of eight representatives, two managers and six trainees, working at the

    two companies sampled. Consequently, our findings show that even without having an outlined

    retention plan, companies can be successful within Talent Retention. Moreover, this research

    acknowledge that good leadership, presence of Psychological Ownership and opportunities for

    challenges and development are the most important factors leading to talents wanting to stay

    within the company, after participating in the company’s trainee programme.

  • 158.
    Alibegovic, Sandra
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Hawkins, Andrew
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Parmar, Mitesh
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Empowerment, Contextual Performance & Job Satisfaction -      A Case Study of the Scandic Hotels in Jönköping -2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between job satisfaction among hotel employees as well as the relationship between employee empowerment and contextual performance behaviours.

    Background: Most managers and scholars emphasize that an organization’s most important tool for gaining a competitive advantage is its people and; in order for the firm to attain success employees must be involved and active. It has been argued that success within the hotel industry lies with customer satisfaction, of which is the result of overall job satisfaction of the employee. Most hotels strive to empower their employees in order to deliver better quality service. In addition, contextual performance behaviours are also common practice in such places where employees have a broad range of duties and tasks. Both empowerment and contextual performance behaviours are thus seen to provide overall job satisfaction.

    Method: The research approach used was that of a single case study, using a survey instrument to collect data on facets empowerment and contextual performance behaviours. The Scandic Hotels of Jonkoping were used for this purpose. The data collected were then analysed by way of factor analysis and multiple regression methods to validate the hypotheses formed in the theoretical framework.

    Findings and

    Conclusions: Based on the results of the analysis, the majority of the hypotheses were supported.  Training and rewards showed a significant relationship with overall job satisfaction. Job dedication behaviours also showed similar results. In addition, information sharing and trust and training and rewards proved to have interrelationships as facets of empowerment.  Interpersonal facilitation and job dedication behaviours were also proved to be distinct behaviours within contextual performance.

  • 159.
    Alizada, Zekria
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Clarin, Oscar
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    The Impact of Loss Aversion Bias on Herding Behavior of Young Swedish Retail Investors: A Behavioral Perspective on Young Swedish Retail Investors' Decision Making in the Stock Market2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Kahneman and Tversky (1974, 1979 & 1992) argue that individuals are bound to numerous behavioral biases that may lead to the emergence of different irrational behaviors. This is often observed with even a higher degree among participants of financial and stock markets as agents such as investors are frequently exposed to significant level of risk and uncertainty (Kahneman, 2013; Kahneman, Knetsch & Thaler, 1991; Kahneman & Tversky, 1974, 1979, 1992). Also, empirical studies indicate that a significant level of herding exists among investors when they are exposed to a high degree of risk and uncertainty such as those in financial crises (Galariotis, Rong & Spyrou, 2014; Litimi, 2017; Hott, 2009).

    Purpose: the main purpose of this thesis is to explore if the loss aversion bias has a significant causal impact on forming herding behavior among young Swedish retail investors.

    Method: an online analytical questionnaire including eight questions has been conducted to collect primary data, with 77 Swedish retail investors under the age of 35 participating in the study. Furthermore, a multiple regression analysis has been implemented to analyze and interpret the data.

    Conclusion: it can be concluded that there is not a significant correlation between the degree of loss aversion and the degree of herding behavior within the sample group of young Swedish retail investors. Hence, loss aversion bias cannot be considered as one of the major contributors of herding within the target population.

  • 160.
    Allen, Ann Marie
    et al.
    INSEAD Humanitarian Research Group.
    Kovács, Gyöngyi
    Hanken School of Economics.
    Masini, Andrea
    Operations Management & Information Technology, HEC Paris.
    Vaillancourt, Alain
    Hanken School of Economics.
    Van Wassenhove, Luk
    INSEAD Humanitarian Research Group.
    Exploring the link between the humanitarian logistician and training needs2013In: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, ISSN 2042-6747, E-ISSN 2042-6755, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 129-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The aim of this paper is to evaluate job profiles in humanitarian logistics, and assess current task priorities in light of further training and educational needs.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper presents findings from a survey among humanitarian logistics practitioners and compares these to other studies in this area. It uses econometric models to evaluate the impact of managerial responsibilities in training needs, usage of time and previous training.

    Findings – The results show that the skills required in humanitarian logistics seem to follow the T-shaped skills model from Mangan and Christopher when looking at training wanted and time usage.

    Research limitations/implications – Survey respondents being members of the Humanitarian Logistics Association (HLA) may be more interested in developing the humanitarian logistics profession than other populations.

    Originality/value – This paper offers an insight in the specific skill requirements of humanitarian logisticians from members of the HLA and allows to understand which type of skills are linked to managerial responsibilities. The paper also establishes a link between logistics skill models and career progressions overall.

  • 161. Al-Majali, Khaled
    Social media in B2B Marketing: The case of Söderberg & Haak AB in Agriculture and construction equipment industry2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 162.
    Almedal, Carina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Zheng, Yong
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Come, give us taste of your quality: The Interaction Process between Swedish buyers and Chinese suppliers2007Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Magister), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    China as country and phenomenon is a topic of great impact to the entire world society. As many as 154 Swedish companies have established business activities either within manufacturing, sourcing or sales in China since the beginning of 2003. The small and mediumsized companies are now following the larger MNEs to China.

    The purpose of this thesis is to study and analyse which criteria are used in the selection of suppliers or partners in China. The purpose is further to study the interaction process in between the Swedish buyer and the Chinese supplier regarding quality issues and -problems related to the manufacturing process and product as well as the delivery of the products. Defining quality is not easy as quality no longer relies only on objective and functional statistics, but should be incorporated into the business processes. More subjective parameters related to the perceptions of the customers and their needs and expectations are involved and of importance. Such perceptions and needs can be difficult to transfer in between the buyer and the supplier. The interaction in between is far from a straightforward process and as such it depends and relies a lot on the people involved in the process.

    Representing a total of five different cases a number of companies and respondents directly involved in the interaction process with the Chinese suppliers were purposefully selected and interviewed. The sampling aimed at companies repre-senting heterogeneity regarding the three factors of products, experience of deal-ing with China and size of the company.

    From the analysis of the empirical findings it is clear that it is all a question about communication. There is no evidence of any low or bad quality in any of the cases. The buyer will be delivered what he asks the supplier to deliver. The cul-tural web including communication and language differs between Sweden and China. In order to develop good relations with the suppliers the presence is of great importance. It is important for the Swedish company to continuously repeat their specifications, demands and needs over and over again in order to maintain a high level of quality on their products. What is taken for granted by Swedish buyers is not taken for granted by the Chinese suppliers and it is important for the buyer to be very clear in both communication and specification, though without risking the Chinese supplier to loose face. Adapting an ability to read between the lines is necessary for the buyer as Chinese suppliers are referred to as not being as outspoken as Swedish suppliers.

  • 163.
    Almen, Tomas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Efrem, Pierre
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Wilen, Patrik
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    How an acquisition affects the relation between the labour union and the company: A case study of Volvo Cars and IF Metall2007Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Background:

    Between 1991 and 2001 the number of firms acquired by other firms tripled (Johnson & Scholes, 2005). This trend has led to a huge increase in cross-border acquisitions, where Sweden is no exception. Statistics show that companies with U.S. origin are the ones that acquire most Swedish companies (Nutek, 2007). Hence, acquisitions made by U.S. businesses will presumably influence managerial issues in Sweden in different ways.

    Problem and purpose:

    An industry that is characterized by many merger and acquisitions is the car industry. Ford Motor Company’s acquisition of Volvo Cars is of particular interest to address. Several conditions within the company changed due to the acquisition process, including the type of management. This might have affected Volvo Car’s relation with its labour union IF Metall to some extent, and thus, creating an interesting area of research.

    The purpose with this thesis is to investigate how the relation between a labour union and a company is affected when U.S. and Swedish types of management are mixed as a result of an acquisition.

    Method:

    In order to fulfill the purpose of this thesis a qualitative case study approach is used. The primary data is collected through interviews with people connected to Volvo Cars and IF Metall. In addition to this the authors incorporated secondary data which is based on literature, articles and academic publications.

    Conclusions:

    When a U.S. company acquire a Swedish company the relation between the labour union and the acquired company are affected in several ways. The labour union and the members can expect to have less influence in the decision making process, there will be less resources devoted to work related training programs, the competence level of the members will decrease and the working conditions will become worse.

  • 164.
    Almqvist, Roland
    et al.
    Mälardalen university.
    Backlund, Andreas
    Mälardalen university.
    Sjöblom, Arne
    Mälardalen university.
    Rimmel, Gunnar
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Law.
    Swedish Examples on Management Control Health2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 165.
    Almér, Erik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Franzén Leibnitz, Ida
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Eriksson, Gustav
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    The Paradox of CSR Marketing in Sweden: A comparative analysis of Corporate Social Resposibility marketing between Swedish and American FMCG retailers with a corporate identity perspective2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the deceptive paradox of communicating Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). CSR is becoming increasingly important for corporations to engage in so as to be perceived as a socially responsible and respectable organization. While companies are encouraged to engage in CSR activities, they are at the same time discouraged to communicate these activities. The Reputational Institutes survey of the Swedish public in regards to CSR communication also displays that Swedes are more hesitant to welcome CSR communications from companies than compared to the American public. Through a comparative study on fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) retailers operating in Sweden and the U.S, and an in-depth interview with one Swedish FMCG retailer, the stated CSR activities in each company’s sustainability report were compared to the communication of CSR activities on each company’s Facebook page for the year 2015. Our findings show support for this hesitation towards CSR communication, particularly in Sweden, and that there exist support for the use of the “expert- and endorsed CSR communication process” in Sweden. We also found that the Swedish and the American companies’ sustainability reports contained similar content, yet were communicated in different ways; Swedish companies marketed Strategic CSR activities to a higher extent whilst American companies marketed Promotional CSR activities. 

  • 166.
    AlSharif, Ebrahim
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Al Haj Omar, Dalia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    The Influence of Psychic Distance on Internationalization: A Multiple Case Study of Swedish SMEs within the Service Industry2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: SMEs represent 97% of Swedish companies that have an increase in the Swedish export by 16% in 2017. Furthermore, Sweden is eager to support its companies to lead the service revolution abroad. This expansion creates the need for overcoming international risks of inconstant psychic distance in terms of culture, economy and geography.

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the psychic distance and its influence on internationalization.

    Method: The current study was based on qualitative research to fulfill the purpose, to answer its three research questions and to fit its time frame using semi-structured interviews of a multiple case study with Swedish SMEs within the service industry. The interviews took place with top managers who have broad knowledge and experiences related to this study.

    Conclusion: Psychic distance is changing in terms of culture, economy and geography as all SMEs have been exposed to its distances differently. A further outcome shows the relevance of business practices, theoretical methods, and models, although none of the interviewed SMEs have used any of these models. This result might show how those models could have solved various issues the interviewees faced. Cultural distance is a permanent distance that exists in all markets. However, economic distance constitutes a challenging factor to face economic costs and institutional differences but simultaneously gaining profits abroad could certify to meet this challenge. Geographic distance is mostly not considered an issue in the service industry. The psychic distance may decrease within the service industry due to international managerial skills and technology.

    Managerial Contribution: It is hoped that this study will assist SMEs to gain a clear idea about overcoming the psychic distance during internationalization, for instance, by learning from outcomes of the study from meta-analysis or by using relevant theories and models.

  • 167.
    Alsos, Gry
    et al.
    Nordland Research Institute, Norway.
    Carter, SaraHunter Centre for Entrepreneurship, University of Strathclyde Business School, UK.Ljunggren, ElisabetNordland Research Institute, Norway.Welter, FriederikeJönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Handbook of Research on Entrepreneurship in Agriculture and Rural Development2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 168. Altinkurt, Esra
    et al.
    Vassanelli, Federico
    Momentum Strategies: Empirical evidence from the US stock market2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 169.
    Altås, Sofia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Björnberg, Sanna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Fridholm, Stina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    An Analysis of an Employee CompetenceDevelopment Processand its Fundamental Factors - A Case Study of IKEA and Volvo2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 170.
    Alvarsson, Sandra
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Ha, Cheong
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Thams, Sabrina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Student’s Website Usage: -Today’s students, tomorrows consumer.2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this thesis is, looking from a consumer’s perspective, to investigate the influences of students website selection

    Background

    Today’s students are a new generation of consumers. They have been brought up with digi-tal media and have different attitudes towards marketing than their parents. Most market management theories were created before the digital revolution. Students are tomorrow’s high income consumers. It is valuable for companies to understand how these consumers orientate themselves on the internet and how to best reach them.

    Method

    An exploratory/explanatory deductive study to map what websites students use, how the websites are found and why they are used was conducted. The empirical findings were col-lected through group interviews.

    Conclusion

    Students have a very habitual behavior on the internet. They use some of the internet’s largest brands. Each website offers a niche and specialized service, presented in a simple and interactive manner. Students choose one website for each specific service. As the in-ternet is large with a lot of information they have a cluster of chore websites visited on a regular basis. From that base, students use friends and search engines to navigate them-selves to the destinations of their choice. Advertisement offer more trust than enticement to actually visit the sites.

  • 171.
    Alzubaidi, Huda
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Bou Assaf, Aida
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Johansson, Helen
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Sports sponsorship: Brand awareness, brand image and purchase intention of sport audience towards linked and unlinked sponsors2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    purpose: The purpose of this thesis is to research in the two different types of sponsors i.e. linked and unlinked sponsors. An investigation of whether a difference between these two types of sponsors exists. This difference is measured in terms of brand awareness and brand image and how these two affect the purchase intention.

    Background: Sponsorship is today used by companies as a major marketing tool. A long existence of sponsorship has throughout the years followed the same philosophy, invest for a return. As the rapid growth of sponsorship during the past decades has contributed to a complex measure of its results, this issue has been highlighted by various researchers. A new phenomena of distinguishing between linked and unlinked sponsors has shown to contribute to different result whereas others argue for no difference between these two types of sponsors. Factors have shown to affect the sponsorship deals which are critical to be aware of in order to maximize the effectiveness of sponsorship deals.

    Method: JIK and four of its sponsors are selected as a case study of this investigation. Therefore, both qualitative and quantitative methodologies are applied. Qualitative methodology is used in the form of interviews with the sports club to get a deeper understanding of JIK and its sponsors. Contrary, quantitative methodology is applied in the form of questionnaire to measure the brand awareness, brand image and purchase intention of the audience.

    Conclusion: It is found that the brand awareness and brand image influence the purchase intention positively for both types of sponsors, linked and linked. Interestingly, a difference is proven to be present between the linked and unlinked sponsors. Concluding, the linked sponsors are more effective than unlinked.

  • 172. Amezcua, A.
    et al.
    Bradley, S.
    Wiklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Cutting the Apron Strings of Business Incubation Firms: Is the Liability of Newness...a Liability?2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 173.
    Ampenberger, Markus
    et al.
    Technische Universität, München, Germany.
    Bennedsen, Morten
    INSEAD, Seine-et-Marne, France.
    Zhou, Haoyong
    Department of Economics, Copenhagen Business School, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    The capital structure of family firms2012In: The Oxford handbook of entrepreneurial finance / [ed] Douglas Cumming, New York: Oxford University Press, 2012, p. 167-191Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article has two parts. The first part provides a brief literature review on existing theoretical and empirical research in the capital structure of family firms. It argues that there are several important aspects of being a closely held family firm that have opposing impacts on the optimal choice of debt leverage. One important feature is that families are typically nondiversified investors that not only have most of their wealth tied to the company but also often their human capital. Another salient feature is that families want to have control over their company. This control objective restricts the willingness to raise new capital outside the family and therefore often results in a stronger dependence on banks and various forms of debt instruments. The second part provides an empirical analysis of the leverage structure of family firms in Denmark. Using a unique data set the family can be tracked behind each of the 200,000 Danish firms and the firms categorized into family or nonfamily firms. Three definitions of family firms are used in the analysis: multiple family members owning the firm; a family owner is also CEO; and there has been at least one family succession in the firm.

  • 174.
    Andersdotter, Matilda
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Rosenlöf, Evelina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Correcting Societal Issues Through Business: A Multiple Case Study of Inhibiting Factors for Scaling Social Impact in Sweden2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Considering increased global challenges and societal issues, more and more people are directing skepticism towards governments' and established businesses' abilities to fully address urgent social problems. Social entrepreneurship constitutes a new entrepreneurial movement where societal issues are addressed by a combination of market-based methods and social value creation. Social entrepreneurship generates social and sustainable benefits to society and has thus received growing attention from both researchers and policy makers around the world. Social enterprises may take on varies forms, ranging from non-profit organizations to commercially driven enterprises. To focus on sustainable business models, this thesis has delimited the study to solely focus on for-profit or hybrid organizations.

     

    Purpose:

    The purpose of this study is to describe what inhibiting factors Swedish social enterprises face in scaling processes. Scaling refers to the magnitude a social business maximizes its social impact, primarily, but not limited to, through organizational growth. Furthermore, the thesis aims at explaining how social forces co-shape preconditions and actor decisions connected to scaling.  

     

    Method:

    To fulfil the purpose of the study, a qualitative research methodology was used. The empirical data was primarily collected through semi-structured interviews held with founders, COO’s and CEO’s from seven social enterprises in Sweden. To fully explain inhibiting factors of scaling, an abductive research approach was used with a combination of open and encouraging questions to promote discussion and develop theory.

     

    Conclusion:

    The empirical findings of the study revealed a total of 14 inhibiting factors for scaling social impact in Sweden. From the findings, a development of existent theory resulted in a model illustrating the relationship between inhibiting factors, social forces and scaling social impact.

  • 175.
    Andersen, Alexander
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Brewitz, Ludvig
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Collaboration within Supply Chains: Can conflicts be attributed to the different roles of logistics companies?2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction – Supply chains increase in size and complexity, more actors are becoming involved and an increased collaboration among actors are a necessity. Still, undesired conflicts occurs and are unavoidable in a collaboration. There are ways to reduce the negative effects and improve management of conflicts provided by previous researchers focus on conflicts and conflict management in general. However, this thesis emphazises on investigating what conflicts that occur within different collaboration setups that can be attributed to the type of logistics company involved. Therefore, the following purpose is stated:

    Investigate what types of conflicts occurring during collaboration that can be attributed to the different roles of 3PL and 4PL companies.

    Methodology – To answer the purpose a single case study was conducted which involved a focal firm and its collaboration with two different logistics companies (a 3PL and a 4PL) within the same economical climate. Due to the uniqeness of the case, a multiple methods qualitative study was performed and to strengthen the validity of the data collected both documantary analysis as well as semi-structured interviews were conducted. Respondents were handpicked based on knowledge of both collaboration setups, to ensure quality of the data collected. Gathered data were sumarized and categorized using Mamad and Chahdi (2013) conflict factors, and later analyzed to accurately detect key points to generate a result and answer the research questions.

    Result – To summarize the result, findings of what we discovered through our data analysis generated similarites and differences in conflicts occurred within both collaboration setups. These conflicts are linked to Mamad and Chahdi (2013) conflicts factors regarding collaboration among actors, in order to clarify why and which conflict area these conflicts occurred in.

    Analysis – From the conflicts identified in the result, further analysis were conducted. Where, previous literature regarding logistics companies (3pl and 4PL) were applied in order to enable attribution of conflicts to company types.

    Conclusion – Through the analysis, many conflicts that occured are based on factors such as operational structure, problem solving and company policies which are not affected by the company type. However, three conflicts and problem areas can be connected to be generally more common either with 3PL companies or 4PL companies. The first lies within the commitment area where 3PL companies can generally be seen as less committed. The second area is communication were important information were more often late due to passing through more actors, causing more conflicts when collaborating with a 4PL. The last problem area were within formalization where findings suggests that there are conflicts caused by 4PLs using several carriers which causes problems such as varying regulations and truck dimensions from carriers. 

  • 176.
    Andersen, Axel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Hristov, Emil
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Karimi, Hamid
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Second Life: New opportunity for higher educational institutions2008Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 15 points / 22,5 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Bachelor thesis within Business Administration

    Title: Second Life – New opportunity for higher educational institutions

    Authors: Axel Andersen, Emil Hristov & Hamid Karimi

    Tutor: Olga Sasinovskaya

    Date: May, 2008

    Subject terms: Second Life, virtual worlds, distance learning, marketing, universities, stu-dents, interactions

    Executive summary

    Background: Virtual worlds such as Second Life have been used in the corporate world for a few years now. However, it is only recently that higher educational institutions have seen the marketing and educational potential inside this world. Several hundred universities around the world are currently involved in Second Life and a majority of them give fully accredited academic courses inside SL. As traditional distance learning can sometimes be interpreted as low on interactions, SL represents a new means for interactive distance learn-ing.

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore if, why and to what extent Second Life can be used as a marketing and pedagogical tool within higher educational institutions.

    Method: A mixed qualitative and quantitative method was utilized in this study. For the qualitative side: in-depth interviews with SL teachers from five universities around the world were held and these were complemented by observations at educational institutions inside SL. For the quantitative side: a questionnaire was designed and sent out to 50 SL-students. This primary data have been combined with appropriate secondary data concern-ing distance learning and education within SL.

    Theoretical framework: The theoretical framework can be divided into two main sec-tions: a marketing section with primarily service management theories and a pedagogical section where cognitive apprenticeship theory is applied.

    Conclusion: Higher educational institutions can use SL to promote their schools to pro-spective students and to other stakeholders such as new teacher recruits. All of the univer-sities that were under our scrutiny felt SL had strengthened their university’s brand. Fur-thermore, SL represents an opportunity for universities that are looking to increase col-laborations with other international universities and who are interested in enhancing the public image of themselves as pioneering and global universities. Therefore, it is highly ad-visable that a university such as JIBS enters SL, if not on pedagogical reasons then on stra-tegic and marketing reasons. In general, a majority of the students interviewed were satis-fied or very satisfied with the quality of the SL-courses they had taken and an overwhelm-ing majority would recommend SL-courses to other students. The empirical findings showed that the most frequent courses taken within SL are design courses, although no limits were perceived to exist of which courses that can be held within SL. A majority of the students also felt SL aided their learning experience. However, due to some of the cur-rent flaws of SL – such as the slow graphics and the high demands of computer hardware – SL should be viewed mainly as a learning tool that complements, rather than substitutes other current educational forms.

  • 177.
    Andersen, Helena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Finance.
    Selmqvist, Annica
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Finance.
    Revisorers etiska resonemang: En studie av etiskt resonemang hos revisorer utifrån FARs yrkes-2006Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Magister), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Introduction: It has during the latest years occurred several large business scandals both abroad and in Sweden where auditors have been involved. The need for stabile conditions and well functioning professional codes of ethics for companies, especially auditing firms have been growing during the latest years. FAR has seen it as their task to define the meaning of the Swedish term ”god revisorssed”. This is specified through FAR’s nine professional codes of ethics, which came out in a new edition in 2003. The opinions about what is considered as high moral and ethical reasoning often goes apart. In previous studies it has been shown that these opinions have been affected by different factors, such as age, gender and size of the auditing firm. With this background it is interesting to examine auditor’s ethical reasoning with help of the FAR professional codes of ethics.

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine and explain auditors’ ethical reasoning, and also investigate which factors that affect ethical reasoning.

    Method: In this study a quantitative method is used to get a broad study where general connections can be found. The data used is primary data from a survey. The survey consists of three ethical dilemmas which the respondents have to take a standpoint to and grade. The respondents also answered some general short questions about their background. The results are presented with help of mean calculations and other methods of descriptive statistics, and an interpretation of the respondents’ comments.

    Results: From the means that have been calculated for the three dilemmas, it is possible to draw the conclusion that the auditors in this study are relatively ethical. It is not enough to only study the mean values to determine if the auditors are ethical or not. To get a fairer point of view it is better to read the comments given by the respondents. It is by these comments that it is possible to examine how the auditors reason about ethical dilemmas. The results also show that the auditors reason different about the different professional codes of ethics. In comparison with the factors: gender, age, ethical education, experience and size of the firm with ability to ethical reasoning, a statistical connection could not be found.

  • 178. Andersen, P
    et al.
    Anderson, Helén
    Linköping University.
    Halinen, A
    Havila, V
    Tackling Dynamics in Business Networks1994In: Meeting the challenges of new frontiers: 10th IMP annual conference : proceedings : Groningen, 29th September - 1st October 1994, Groningen: University of Groningen, Faculty of Management & Organization , 1994Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 179.
    Anderson, Catrine
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Schüldt, Francesca
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Åstrand, Therese
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Organisational culture’s influence on the integration of sustainability in SMEs: A multiple case study of the Jönköping region2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Existing literature suggests research about sustainability and Small- and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs) to be limited. SMEs tend to have less resources than large companies and as a result of this sustainability integration may be challenging. Despite these resource restrictions, some SMEs still succeed in integrating sustainability. Some literature suggests that organisational culture could influence the integration of sustainability.

    Purpose: The purpose of this thesis is to investigate how organisational culture attributes influence the integration of sustainability in Swedish SMEs.

    Method: To fulfil the purpose of this thesis, a multiple case study consisting of six SMEs in the Jönköping region is performed. Qualitative semi-structured interviews are conducted with the manager and/or head of sustainability. Furthermore, structured interviews are conducted with managers and employees, in an attempt to gain insights into the values and cultural attributes of the organisational culture of the SME.

     

    Main Findings: The results reveal that an organisational culture which emphasises internal relationships, stability and goal-setting and planning seem to facilitate the integration of sustainability. SMEs with the attribute of valuing internal relationships are aided in the integration of sustainability through the existence of tightly knit groups that work together toward the long-term goal of integrating sustainability. The positive influence of stability stems from the fact that the attribute provides structure, economic stability, and a stable employee base. A high focus on goal-setting and planning may enable the integration of sustainability through providing clear missions and objectives which the company strives toward.

     Managerial Implications: This study urges three implications for managers of SMEs; 1. It provide managers with some understanding of how their organisational culture may affect sustainability integration. 2. It provide insight into the challenges companies may face as the result of lacking certain cultural attributes. 3.  It provide indications of which attributes that could be beneficial to develop or incorporate into the organisational culture in order to aid the integration of sustainability.

  • 180.
    Anderson, Helén
    Linköping University.
    A network Illustrated1991In: Paper presented at the 7th IMP Conference in Uppsala, Sweden, September 1991, 1991Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 181.
    Anderson, Helén
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Centaurs and Managers: – stories from two national contexts Bulgarian and the UK.2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 182.
    Anderson, Helén
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Customized Careers: a lattice replacing the traditional ladder2011In: Innovationmanagement.seArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 183.
    Anderson, Helén
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    En produkthistoria!: AB Hägglund & söner 1922-19811994Book (Other academic)
  • 184.
    Anderson, Helén
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Ett industriföretags omvandling: en studie av Hägglunds förändringsprocess 1922-1981 med bas i företagets produkter, relationer och resurser1994Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 185.
    Anderson, Helén
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Learning from Practicing Mass Customization and Open Innovation2011In: innovation management.seArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 186.
    Anderson, Helén
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Reflection on the Critical Role of Stakeholders in Mergers and Acquisitions2013In: Mergers and Acquisitions: The Critical Role of Stakeholders / [ed] Anderson, Helén, Havila, Virpi, Nilsson, Fredrik, New York: Routledge, 2013, p. 269-280Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 187.
    Anderson, Helén
    University College of Östersund.
    Relations between Companies1987In: Paper presented at the RICE-symposium in Karlstad, Sweden, June 1987, 1987Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 188.
    Anderson, Helén
    Linköpings universitet.
    Strategisk förändring i ett industriföretag: omvandling av relationer och kärnkompetens1995In: Paper presenterat vid den Nordiska Företagsekonomiska konferensen i Köpenhamn, 14-18 augusti 1995, 1995Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 189.
    Anderson, Helén
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Studenter och lärare vid Högskoleutbildning i Vaggeryds Kommun2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 190.
    Anderson, Helén
    Linköping University.
    The role of the firm in industrial development: A Network Approach to Compose a Concept1991In: Paper presented at the Workshop on Interorganisational Research in Bergen, Norway, August 1991, 1991Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 191.
    Anderson, Helén
    Linköping University.
    The role of the firm in industrial development: A Network Approach to Compose a Concept (2nd version)1992In: Paper presented at the 2nd Workshop on Interorganisational Research at Yxtaholm, Sweden, August, 1992Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 192.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Alexandersson, A
    Nilevi, H
    Competitiveness as an Interactive Value Creation Process: A Study of Customer Service in the Metal Cutting Industry1998In: Competitive paper presented at the 27th EMAC Conference in Stockholm 20-23 May 1998, 1998Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 193.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Andersen, P
    Network Dynamics and Competition: Positions and Roles in the Exchange and Development of Knowledge1995In: Competitive paper presented at the 11th IMP Conference in Manchester, September 1995, 1995Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 194.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Andersson, P
    Havila, A
    Salmi, A
    Business Network Dynamics and M&As: Structural and Processual Connectedness2000In: 16th IMP-conference, Bath, U.K, September 7-9, 2000, 2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 195.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Andersson, P
    Salmi, A
    Halinen-Kaila, A
    Havila, A
    Holtström, J
    Vaara, E
    M&A Processes in Business Networks: Managing Connectedness2003In: 19th IMP-conference in Lugano, Switzerland in 2003, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 196.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Björkegren, C
    The Paradox of Knowledge Transfer in Managing by Projects: a study of two investment projects in the pulp and paper industry1999In: Paper presented at the 15th EGOS Colloquium in Warwick, July 4-6 1999, 1999Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 197.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Dahlin, Peter
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Havila, Virpi
    Uppsala universitet.
    (What) Do we know about M&As?: A review of Swedish doctoral dissertations about mergers and acquisitions2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 198.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Dahlin, Peter
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Havila, Virpi
    Uppsala universitet.
    Where is the Swedish M&A research?: A review of Swedish doctoral dissertations focusing on mergers and acquisitions2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 199.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Grundström, G
    Sjöström, R
    Networking within an Industry Group in Northern Sweden2005In: Paper presented at the SMU edge Conference in Singapore, 11-13 July 2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 200.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Grundström, G
    Sjöström, R
    Örnsköldsvik Industry Group: its characteristics, its internal networking and some theoretical implications thereof2006In: Presented at the 9th Uddevalla Symposium, 15-17 June, 2006, Fairfax, VA, USA, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
1234567 151 - 200 of 3856
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf