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  • 151.
    Agndal, Henrik
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Internationalisation as a process of strategy and change: A study of 16 Swedish industrial SMEs2004Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis reports a study of the internationalisation processes of 16 industrial SMEs located in the county of Jönköping (Sweden). More specifically, it identifies changes in international strategies, identifies reasons why changes are undertaken and discusses how these changes can be understood when placed in the context of the internationalisation process.

    The findings show that industrial SME managers tend to stress the importance of foreign sales but are often much more reluctant to buy products abroad. This means that while changes in foreign sales market strategy occur frequently in many firms, the process of foreign sourcing market expansion unfolds more slowly, involving fewer markets. The findings also indicate preferences for a low degree of complexity in foreign sales and purchasing. Therefore, industrial SMEs typically become involved in more complex ventures like foreign subsidiaries only when this is perceived as necessary, for example when there is risk of losing a foreign market.

    Mostly, changes in industrial SMEs’ international strategies are undertaken as responses to external opportunities, such as unsolicited orders. Changes much less frequently find their origin in internal initiatives. This pattern appears to pervade throughout the internationalisation process, even if a more critical attitude towards potential changes arises with increasing experience.

  • 152.
    Agndal, Henrik
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Jensen, Leif-Magnus
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Pereseina, Veronika
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Cui, Lianguang
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Market innovation in the transport and heavy vehicle market2015In: Proceedings of the 27th Annual NOFOMA-Conference, Molde, 3-5 June, 2015., 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to generate a greater understanding of the interrelatedness of new business models in the truck market and developments in the road transport sector.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Based on a three year research project in cooperation with a European heavy vehicle manufacturer, we present short case descriptions showing some of the main developments in the European trucking and transport markets. 

    Findings

    New business models emerge both in the heavy vehicle and transportation markets, in complex ways involving multiple actors.  The impetus for the models can come from several direction but the final impact must be negotiated and cannot be planned by a single actor.

    Research limitations/implications

    The research looks at a selection of cases and business models to demonstrate changes and the relations between the markets, and does not claim to be exhaustive in terms of the different business models in the European market. 

    Practical implications

    There is a distinct trend to greater specialization and the need for innovation to survive given the strong pressures in the commoditized transport market. Our findings show conflicting trends in terms of social implications, with improved ecological impact but the risk of worse conditions for driver. 

    Original/value

    The paper considers the development of new business models and implications on the market from the point of view of the firms actually using the business models.  This shows how different business models can co-exist and involve different types of rationalities.

  • 153.
    Agndal, Henrik
    et al.
    Gothenburg University.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Pereseina, Veronika
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    From product through service and solution to performance: Value propositions, interaction patterns and capabilities2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper explores differences in inter- and intra-organizational interaction patterns depending on the nature of customer value propositions. It also discusses capabilities related to these value propositions.

    Design/Methodology/Approach – We perform a case study of the evolving value propositions of a Swedish truck manufacturer. Interviews are conducted with key representatives of the manufacturer, dealers, customers, and customers’ customers. We draw on literature in the business marketing and purchasing area.

    Findings – The manufacturer makes four types of value propositions (cf. Anderson et al., 2006) associated with different interaction patterns. (1) A first type involves a basic product, i.e. a vehicle along with basic services, such as a warranty. The sales process represents a short dealer-customer negotiation to determine truck customization and price and is a general solution to a general problem. Interaction remains simple throughout the truck’s operating cycle; feedback to the product development and manufacturing function comes mainly from the manufacturer’s service organization. (2) A second type of value proposition involves optional add-on services that support the use of the product, such as repairs and maintenance, tire replacement, financing, and insurance. Although each service component is standardized, the package of services is selected by the buyer based on its needs. Interaction in regard to purchase and use is therefore more complex and ongoing. (3) In a third type, the customer buys truck(s) and services as an integrated solution to its specific sourcing problem. This requires a deeper understanding of how the customer uses trucks. Such an analysis relies on interaction between the manufacturer’s sales representatives and various functions at the customer. As the truck is used, interaction between manufacturer and customer is continuous. E.g., driving patterns can be analyzed and driving training be tailored to the needs of the customer; service needs are monitored, etc. (4) A fourth type involves not only a solution to a sourcing problem, but a co-created solution to support the customer’s value-creation. The customer buys solution performance that supports its revenue generation, not just its efforts to reduce costs. A deep understanding of the customer’s business is required with a focus on how the customer uses trucks to support its customers’ value creation. As payment is based on uptime (or other form of utilization), knowledge of truck usage is also needed by the manufacturer to determine price per km and to set service level agreement. Interaction is continuous and complex, with the manufacturer’s service organization taking over part of fleet management from the customer. These value propositions exist simultaneously and place very different demands on capabilities, which increase in number and particularity with more complex value propositions.

    Originality/value – We empirically identify four distinct value propositions that rely on different inter- and intra-organizational interaction patterns and require different capabilities.

  • 154.
    Agu, Onyekachi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Hertzberg, Alexander
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    A Theoretical Investigation into the Pricing of Credit Default Swaps: The Role of Reflexivity and the Impact of Asymmetry2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Mathematical and quantitative sophistication provide financial institutions with scientific methods to price (over the counter) derivative products by the use of historical data and inputs. These inputs attempt to reflect the underlying reality within a company or economy quantitatively. This paper attempts to show how human perceptions based on input metrics that are used to help determine reality do not always offer reliable reflections of the underlying true picture. As a result of these misconceptions within derivative modelling we argue that risk managers must be able to overcome aspects of hidden risk in order to reduce large asymmetric losses within financial institutions.

  • 155.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    A Foucauldian framework for discourse analysis2007In: Handbook of qualitative research methods in entrepreneurship, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar , 2007, p. 216-250Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 156.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    A narrative analysis of gender in entrepreneurship stories2004In: Paper presented at the The Greiff Symposium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 157.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Entrepreneurship and Gender2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 158.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Företagandets särskilda nytta2004In: Det oavsedda entreprenörskapet, Lund: Academia Adacta , 2004, p. 108-122Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 159.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    How an entrepreneurship teaching case constructs gender and how students learn other things than intended2007In: Nordic Education Research Association, Turku, Finland, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 160.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Interorganizational learning: A case study of a systems supplier network2004In: Paper presented at the Nordic Education Research Association, Reykjavik, Iceland., 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 161.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Introduction: Nordic perspectives on human resource management2018In: Human resource management: A Nordic perspective / [ed] Helene Ahl, Ingela Bergmo Prvulovic & Karin Kilhammar, London, UK: Routledge, 2018, p. 1-13Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Nordic countries consistently rank in top positions of the best places to live and work in the world. They have resilient economies, a well-educated workforce, high labour market participation, job security, and encompassing welfare systems and are facilitated by an institutional context characterised by trust and transparency. Nordic HR practices are embedded in a tradition of workplace democracy, flat organisations, low power distance, open and informal communication, codetermination, and close cooperation between management and labour unions. But the Nordic countries are also embedded in the global economy. This book offers insights into how Nordic HRM responds to global challenges, such as demographic changes, migration, or skills shortages that necessitate inclusionary HR strategies focussed on workforce development.

  • 162.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Learning in an inter-organizational project: A case study2005In: Paper presented at the Scandinavian Academy of Management, Aarhus, Denmark , 2005Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 163.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Motivation theory as power in disguise2008In: Foucault and Lifelong Learning: governing the subject, London: Routledge , 2008, p. 151-162Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 164.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Motivationsteori som verktyg för styrning och kontroll2007In: Studies in Educational Policy and Educational Philosophy Discourse, ISSN 1652-2729, no 2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 165.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Narrating the entrepreneur in an entrepreneurship teaching case2006In: Paper presented at the 1:st Conference on Rhetoric and Narrative in Management Research, ESADE, Barcelona, Spain, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 166.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Oavsiktliga lektioner i kön: Hur ett praktikfall i entreprenörskap konstruerar kön och hur studenter lär sig annat än vad som var avsett2007In: Didaktisk Tidskrift, ISSN 1101-7686, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 185-206Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Föreliggande artikel är en narrativ analys av ett praktikfall som används ientreprenörskapsundervisning. Analysen utgår från ett post-strukturalistisktfeministiskt perspektiv, där kön ses som socialt konstruerat. Analysen finner attpraktikfallet reproducerar en könsordning där kvinnor, och kvinnligt, systematisktnedvärderas. Praktikfallet avser att lära studenterna hur det kan gå till att starta ettföretag, men det lär samtidigt kvinnor att de inte hör hemma i affärslivet. Män lärsig att entreprenörskap är till för dem, samtidigt som de lär sig att kvinnor är tillför att gifta sig med och föda deras barn. De lär sig också att behandla kvinnorrespektlöst. För att förändra detta föreslås praktikfall med huvudpersoner som ärkvinnor, ett könsneutralt språk, samt berättelser som medvetet utmanartraditionella könsordningar. För att ytterligare berika lärandet från praktikfallföreslås vidare att studenter och lärare själva gör narrativa analyser av praktikfall.

  • 167.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Sex business in the toy store: A narrative analysis of a teaching case2007In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 673-693Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is a narrative analysis of an entrepreneurship case performed from a post-structuralist feminist perspective. Acknowledging the social construction of reality, gender is conceptualized as performed rather than as an essential quality attached to male and female bodies. The analysis finds that the case reproduces discriminatory gender relations. While using such cases in entrepreneurship training may teach pragmatic lessons, they also teach women that there is no place for them in business. Suggestions for improvement include cases with female protagonists, gender-inclusive language, stories that challenge received entrepreneurship ideas, and the introduction of narrative analysis to enrich students' learning opportunities.

  • 168.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    The desperate search for a difference in gender research2007In: Presented at “Doing and undoing gender in entrepreneurship research”, HEC/Advanzia, Paris, France, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 169.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    The making of the female entrepreneur2003In: Edamba journal: 1st thesis competition, Vol. 1, p. 69-74Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 170.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    The problematic relationship between social capital theory and gender research2008In: Women, entrepreneurship and social capital: A dialogue and construction, Copenhagen: Copenhagen Business School Press , 2008, p. 167-189Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 171.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    The scientific reproduction of gender inequality in entrepreneurship texts2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 172.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Why research on women entrepreneurs needs new directions2008In: Small business and entrepreneurship / [ed] Robert A. Blackburn and Candida G. Brush, Thoasand Oaks: Sage , 2008Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 173.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Why research on women entrepreneurs needs new directions2006In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 595-621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research articles on women's entrepreneurship reveal, in spite of intentions to the contrary and in spite of inconclusive research results, a tendency to recreate the idea of women as being secondary to men and of women's businesses being of less significance or, at best, as being a complement. Based on a discourse analysis, this article discusses what research practices cause these results. It suggests new research directions that do not reproduce women's subordination but capture more and richer aspects of women's entrepreneurship.

  • 174.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Women and entrepreneurship: Contemporary classics2006In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 661-664Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 175.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Women and humanities: Allies or enemies?2006In: Management Education and Humanites, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar , 2006, p. 45-66Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 176.
    Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Berglund, K.
    Pettersson, K.
    Sköld, B.
    Tillmar, M.
    Entrepreneurship in rural areas: The role of women?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 177.
    Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University.
    Pettersson, Katarina
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Tillmar, Malin
    Linköping University.
    Can governments support both women and entrepreneurship?  2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Feminism in Sweden as well as in the other Scandinavian countries was largely formulated as state feminism. The women’s movement has cooperated with feminists in the state, resulting in societies that count as the most gender equal in the world. The Scandinavian countries are consistently ranked in the top position on international gender equality indices. The state has provided a large publicly financed welfare sector that both employs many women, and makes it possible to combine work and family through family friendly policies. The last decade has seen a political change influenced by neoliberal thought, in which politicians hand over welfare state responsibilities to the market, and instead encourage entrepreneurship, not least among women. The Swedish government has since 20 years back programs and policies to promote women’s entrepreneurship. The Swedish state has during the same period shrunk the public sector and privatized many operations in services and care, which traditionally employ many women. Instead, women are encouraged to start businesses in former public sectors. Empirical studies suggest however, that all of the increase of women’s entrepreneurship in these sectors is within low-paid, micro service businesses, typically child minding.

    Traditional state feminism has also changed character. Instead of public regulations, market solutions are advocated. In this paper we ask how to theorize this change from a feminist theory perspective; we ask what the implications for feminist action are, and we ask what consequences for women’s position in society are. We use research literature and policy texts as our empirical material and conduct a critical literature analysis. We conclude that the entrepreneurship discourse challenges, and possibly weakens state feminism and feminist action as we have known it in the Scandinavian countries, but may also offer new forms of feminist resistance, on market terms. 

  • 178.
    Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholms universitet.
    Pettersson, Katarina
    Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet.
    Tillmar, Malin
    Linköpings universitet.
    Entrepreneurship for Equality?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 179.
    Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Berglund, Karin
    Pettersson, Katarina
    Tillmar, Malin
    Women’s entrepreneurship in rural areas: A literature review2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 180.
    Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Bergmo-Prvulovic, IngelaJönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.Kilhammar, KarinJönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Human resource management: A Nordic perspective2018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 181.
    Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Czarniawska, Barbara
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Many words about tea2010In: ENTER: Entrepreneurial Narrative Theory Ethnomethodology and Reflexivity: An Issue about The Republic of Tea / [ed] William B. Gartner, Clemson University Digital Press , 2010, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 191-210Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 182.
    Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Florin Samuelsson, Emilia
    Networking through empowerment and empowerment through networking: results from a practical experiment using networking through empowerment to enhance women's entrepreneurship2000Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 183.
    Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Florin Samuelsson, Emilia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Testing networking strategies for nascent women entrepreneurs2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 184.
    Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Florin Samuelsson, Emilia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Walking a tightrope: Women entrepreneurs on the pricing decision as a delicate act of balancing inner and outer forces1999In: Sailing the Entrepreneurial Wave into the 21st Century: proceedings for the USASBE Entrepreneurship Conference in January 1999 / [ed] Scott William Kunkel, San Diego: University of San Diego , 1999Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a pilot study on the rationales for pricing decisions among a group of female entrepreneurs. For the purpose of avoiding pre-determined categories and allowing novel ideas and concerns to emerge, a focus group methodology was employed. Unlike the dominating literature on the subject which sees pricing as a rational decision based on costs, customer value and competition, this study suggests that both contextual factors and psychological factors are important. Important contextual factors were culture, regional characteristics and gender. Important psychological factors were sense of fairness, morals, identity, self-image, need for confirmation and self-confidence.

  • 185.
    Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Hedegaard, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Golding, B.
    Federation University Australia.
    How the Men’s Shed idea travels to Scandinavia2017In: Australian Journal of Adult Learning, ISSN 1443-1394, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 316-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Australia has around 1,000 Men’s Sheds – informal communitybased workshops offering men beyond paid work somewhere to go, something to do and someone to talk to. They have proven to be of great benefit for older men’s learning, health and wellbeing, social integration, and for developing a positive male identity focusing on community responsibility and care. A Men’s Shed is typically selforganized and ‘bottom-up’, which is also a key success factor, since it provides participants with a sense of ownership and empowerment. Men’s Sheds are now spreading rapidly internationally, but the uptake of the idea varies with the local and national context, and so too may the consequences. Our paper describes how the Men’s Shed travelled to Denmark, a country with considerably more ‘social engineering’ than in Australia, where Sheds were opened in 2015, via a ‘top-down’ initiative sponsored by the Danish Ministry of Health. Using data from the study of the web pages of the Danish ‘Shed’ organizations, from interviews with the central organizer, and from visits and interviews with participants and local organizers at two Danish Men’s sheds, we describe how the idea of the Men’s Shed on the Australian model was interpreted and translated at central and local levels. Preliminary data indicate that similar positive benefits as exist in Australia may result, provided that local ownership is emphasized.

  • 186.
    Ahl, Helene J.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    The Making of the Female Entrepreneur: A Discourse Analysis of Research Texts on Women’s Entrepreneurship2002Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Departing from a social constructionist understanding of gender, this thesis examines how the female entrepreneur is constructed in research articles about women’s entrepreneurship. It finds that even if the texts celebrate women’s entrepreneurship, they do it in such a way as to recreate women’s secondary position in society.

    Building on Foucault’s theory of discourse, the thesis analyzes the discursive practices by which this result was achieved. These practices include certain assumptions that are taken for granted about women, men, business, work, and family. One of these assumptions is that men and women must be different. Despite research results to the contrary, many texts insist that the genders are different and construct three kinds of arguments in support of this. One is making a mountain out of a molehill, i.e. stressing small differences while ignoring similarities. Another is the self-selected woman, which proclaims women entrepreneurs as unusual women. The third is called the good mother and consists of molding an alternative, feminine model of entrepreneurship while leaving the dominant model intact. These arguments reproduce the idea of essential gender differences and the idea of the woman as the weaker sex.

    The discursive practices also include certain ontological and epistemological assumptions, which are questioned in the thesis. In addition, they contain disciplinary regulations as well as writing and publishing practices that reinforce the discourse. The practices and the ensuing research results are moreover dependent on the particular context in which the articles are produced. This means that their results and conclusions cannot be transferred to other contexts uncritically.

    By discussing these practices, the thesis opens the way for alternative ways of theorizing and researching women’s entrepreneurship. Suggestions for alternative research practices include the addition of institutional aspects to the research agenda, such as labor market structure, family policy, and legislation. The thesis also suggests a shift in epistemological position – from gender as something that is given, to gender as something that is produced.

  • 187.
    Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Marlow, S.
    Gendering entrepreneurship: have the sisters done for themselves?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 188.
    Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Marlow, S.
    Postfeminist times: New opportunities or business as usual?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 189.
    Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Marlow, Susan
    Haydn Green Institution of Enterprise and Innovation, University of Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Analysing entrepreneurial activity through a postfeminist perspective: A brave new world or the same old story?2018In: Postfeminism and organization / [ed] P. Lewis, Y. Benschop, & R. Simpson, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 141-159Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A critical component of the contemporary neoliberal turn has been the rise of entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial behaviours (Campbell and Pedersen, 2001). In developed nations, this era has been exemplified by a marked increase in entrepreneurship and new venture creation; entrepreneurial activity has also been integrated into the corporate environment encouraging individualised employee agency to generate innovative problem solving (Dannreuther and Perren, 2012) At a micro-level, we have seen the emergence of the ‘enterprising self’ and society where individuals assume responsibility for their own lives managing social welfare provisions previously provided by the state (du Gay, 1994; Down and Warren, 2008; Ahl and Nelson, 2015). These shifting expectations have been made possible by enabling legislative and institutional changes such as de-regulation, the decline of trade unions, privatisation of state services and liberalised markets (Perren and Dannreuther, 2012). Contemporaneously, the populist cultural promotion of entrepreneurship through various media has positioned it as a desirable career option with increasing status and social worth (Swail, Down, and Kautonen, 2013). 

  • 190.
    Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Marlow, Susan
    University of Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Can sisters do it for themselves? Critiquing the possibilities of entrepreneurship through a postfeminist perspective2017In: 2017 Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2017, Academy of Management , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 191.
    Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Marlow, Susan
    Entrepreneurship and the postfeminist turn: Women’s final emancipation or the same old story?2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 192.
    Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Marlow, Susan
    University of Nottingham, UK.
    Exploring the dynamics of gender, feminism and entrepreneurship: advancing debate to escape a dead end?2012In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 543-562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contrary to the neo-liberal thesis that entrepreneuring is an open and accessible endeavour where personal effort alone determines reward and status, it has been demonstrated that there is a persistent, but occluded, gender bias within the entrepreneurial discourse. Accordingly, women are positioned as lacking and incomplete men; however, despite calls to employ feminist theory as an analytical frame to demonstrate the reproduction of such subordination, there is scant evidence this has emerged. Within this article, we respond to this call by demonstrating how post structural feminist analysis reveals the gendered assumptions informing entrepreneurship theory that embed prevailing hetero-normative assumptions. These assumptions limit the epistemological scope of contemporary research which positions women as failed or reluctant entrepreneurial subjects; as such, in the absence of feminist theorizing these analyses remain descriptive rather than explanatory. Accordingly, the current entrepreneurial research agenda is in danger of reaching an epistemological dead end in the absence of a reflexive critical perspective to inform the idea of who can be and what might be an entrepreneur. Finally, we draw upon these arguments to reflect upon current approaches to theorizing within the broader field of entrepreneurial enquiry.

  • 193.
    Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Marlow, Susan
    University of Birmingham, United Kingdom.
    Exploring the false promise of entrepreneurship through a postfeminist critique of the enterprise policy discourse in Sweden and the UK2019In: Human Relations, ISSN 0018-7267, E-ISSN 1741-282XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary theories of neoliberalism and entrepreneurship are entwined; both hinge upon the use of agency within free markets to realize individual potential, enhance status and attain material rewards. Postfeminism, as a discrete but related discourse, suggests this context is conducive to encouraging women to draw upon their agency, skills and personal profile to enhance achievements and returns. We draw from these related, but discrete discourses, when critically analysing how postfeminist assumptions shape Swedish and UK government policies aimed at expanding women’s entrepreneurship. Despite differing historical antecedents regarding state engagement with equality and welfare regimes, we illustrate how postfeminist assumptions have infiltrated policy initiatives in both cases. This infiltration has, we suggest, suppressed criticisms that in a context of persistent structural discrimination, lack of welfare benefits and contrived aspirational role models, entrepreneurship constitutes a poor career choice for many women. Consequently, we challenge the value of contemporary policy initiatives encouraging more women to enter entrepreneurship.

  • 194.
    Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Nelson, TeresaSimmons College, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
    Special Issue: Institutional perspectives on gender and entrepreneurship2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 195.
    Ahlberg, Heléne
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Andersson, Linn
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    How do Banks Manage the Credit Assessment to Small Businesses and What Is the Effect of Basel III?: An implementation of smaller and larger banks in Sweden2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Small businesses are considered as a valuable source for the society and the economic growth and bank loan is the main source of finance for them. Small businesses are commonly seen as riskier than larger businesses it is thus noteworthy to examine banks’ credit assessment for small businesses. The implementation of the Basel III Accord will start in 2013 with the aim to generate further protection of financial stability and promote sustainable economic growth, and the main idea underlying Basel III is to increase the capital basis of banks.

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe how larger and smaller banks in Sweden are managing credit assessment of small businesses, and if this process differs according to the size of the bank. The authors further want to investigate how expectations of new capital regulations, in form of Basel III, affect the credit assessment and if it is affecting the ability of small businesses to receive loans.

    Method: In order to meet the purpose of the thesis a mixed model approach is used. The authors conducted semi-structured interviews with representatives from three smaller and three larger banks. Additional, statistics were computed in order to examine the economic state of the Swedish market, where also an archival research with 10 allocated banks operating with corporate services was executed.

    Conclusions: The banks have a well-developed credit process where building a mutual trust relationship with the customer is crucial. If the lender has a good relationship with the customer, it will ease the collection of credible information and thus enhance the process of making right decision. The research examined minor differences between smaller and larger banks in their credit assessment. Currently, the banks do not see any problems with adjusting to the new regulation and thus do not see specific effects for small businesses and their ability to receive loans. The effects that can be identified by the expectations of Basel III are the banks’ concern of charging the right price for the right risk and the demand of holding more capital when lending to businesses. The banks have come a long way on the adjustment to Basel III, which has pros and cons, thus it implies that banks are already charging customers for the effect of the regulations that will not be 100 percent implemented until 2019. The difference that was identified between larger and smaller banks is that larger banks seem to have more established strategies when working on the implementation of Basel III.

  • 196.
    Ahlberg, Jakob
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Successful Methods of Viral Marketing2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 197.
    Ahlden, Oscar
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Kollberg, Felix
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Female directors relationship to financial performance.: A study of female directors impact on financial performance and the presence of "glass cliff" in Sweden.2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Gender diversity within the boardroom is an important theme in the research of corporate governance. The lack of female directors during recent years have raised attention where the prejudice against women have been a central theme. Especially, in a gender egalitarian country as Sweden. The purpose of the study is to examine the relationship between female directors and financial performance, but also the presence of the “glass cliff” theory. The study is based on companies listed on Large Cap in Sweden, where data are collected from annual reports and a database. The collected data are analyzed by several statistical methods. The findings show that female directors do have a positive impact on a company’s financial performance, in terms of accounting-based measurements. However, the market-based measurement does not a provide a significant relationship to female directors, indicating that the Swedish stock market does neither positively or negatively react to a more gender diverse board. As no differences in performance are seen preceding the appointments of females compared to males, no evidence for the “glass cliff” is found. The findings suggest that female directors may enhance the performance of a company and disproves the prejudice against women. Further, the findings indicate that the Swedish boards are becoming more diverse, where precarious situations are not the reason for women to be appointed to the board. 

  • 198.
    Ahlin, Nathalie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Holmquist, Maria
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Reasons to Budget Throughout the Life Cycles of Swedish IT Companies2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The budget is shown to be the most prioritized management accounting tool for companies with scarce resources, while at the same time it is criticized for being time consuming and ineffective. This study uses life cycle theory as a framework to investigate how the budgets can be used in a more efficient and effective way, depending on what life cycle stage the company is in.

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how commonly budgets are used throughout the life cycle stages of IT companies in Sweden, and whether there is a difference in what reasons to budget are considered the most important in different stages.

    By using previous research made on life cycle theory and the reasons to budget as a foundation, this study collects the data using a quantitative method where a survey is sent to a sample of IT companies in Sweden.

    The answers to the survey lead to results about the budget use, what life cycle stage the respondents consider their company to be in, and how important ten different reasons to budget within the areas control, planning and evaluation are to the individual companies. The results show that there is a low budget use among companies in the birth stage, and that the budget use is high for companies in the growth, maturity and revival stages. The increasing budget use follows the increasing number of employees through the stages. The study finds that in general there are no major differences through the stages in what budget reasons are chosen to be most important; control is overall the most important purpose that the budget fulfills. Furthermore, there are some reasons to budget that have been assigned low values of importance across all the stages. Staff evaluation and encouraging innovative behavior are not considered important by the responding companies.

  • 199.
    Ahlstrand, Tobias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Selin, Joseph
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    What happens with control when fundamentals change?: A study of how an ERP implementation may affect management control by causing changes among supporting roles and activities2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As the society becomes more internationalized and companies spread operations to multiple locations in different countries, there is a growing need for systems that can link information between different company departments and make it available for users at any time. Over the years, companies have used several information systems for different business activities and purposes, but due to complexity and high costs, a need for an integrated platform has emerged. A system that can connect different business functions within a company, and at the same time link systems owned by customers and suppliers through modern technology is an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system.

    Today, management control may be regarded as an information intensive company process where managers can improve control by working with relevant and accurate information. An ERP system represents a natural bearer of that information, and because of that, it becomes interesting to analyze the effects on management control when its fundamentals (the ERP system) change. As previous publications mostly have examined organizational changes and effects of ERP implementations from a more general perspective, the authors realize a need for addressing ERP systems in relation to management control. Though prior research indicates that implementation of ERP systems have affect on management control, there is still uncertainty how it may be affected. The aim for this study is therefore to create understanding of how a major change such as an ERP implementation may affect management control by causing changes among supporting roles and activities.

    In order to achieve the purpose for this work, the authors have exemplified an ERP implementation through a case study of a manufacturing company implementing Electronic Invoice Processing (EIP) as a part of a larger ERP change. By using a scientific research approach characterized by an iterative process that moves between theory and empiricism, some valuable outcomes can be drawn from the analyzed case material. These outcomes become in the end target for a broad interpretation of roles, activities, and how changes among them may affect management control on a more generalized ERP level.

    Analyzing the case, the authors have been able to identify three distinctive roles that may be affected by an ERP implementation; the Executor, the Supervisor, and the Supporter. These three roles have been found to carry out five prime activities; Information Assembling, Information Verification, Information Registration, Information Presentation, and Information Storing. Finally, the changes and altering of focus between these roles and activities were found to potentially affect management control positively through five prime aspects; Timeliness, Accuracy, Accessibility, Richness, and Control.

  • 200.
    Ahlén, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Benjaminsson, Erik
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Hedegärd, Jesper
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Improving the Order Receiving Process: Case Study: Ekmans AB2010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of the thesis is to identify problems cooperating departments suffer from, create solutions and discover ways to successfully implement the changes. A case study of Ekmans AB has been conducted to accomplish this.

    Background

    In today’s business world competition is fiercer than ever. New companies enter the market and new technologies and working methods are introduced which requires the companies to work proactivelyto foresee opportunities. But even if the companies are aware of all these external factors, they also need to look internally to see what they can improve and make more efficient in order to stay competitive. Therefore, it is important for companies to be ready to change both structure and culture to be more efficient.

    Method

    The method is based on a qualitative approach with semi-structuredi nterviews. A total of 20 interviews were conducted. The interviewees possess different positions within the company, ranging from the top management down through the organizational hierarchy.

    Conclusion

    The study shows that problems can arise from miscommunication, outdated ways of handling order receiving and a poorly chosen organizational structure. To solve these problems companies has to realize the importance of change. When modification the organizationa company has to take the organizational culture into consideration. It is important that the employees feel that they are a part of the change instead of just seeing it from sideline. Moreover, the management has to make sure they are thoroughly in their work regarding change; they have to follow up each alteration to make sure that it is actually implemented. Moreover, standardization is the key for organizations wishing improve and become more efficient. The result of the study showed that it is first when these criterions are fulfilled that the company can expect to successfully implement changes.

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