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  • 101. Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Steenson, A-L
    Roll-Petterson, L
    Sundin, M
    Kylén, A
    Elever med flera funktionsnedsättning i särskolan: Utbildningens effekter och effektivitet1999Book (Other academic)
  • 102.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Stéenson, A-L
    Styrning genom fortbildning: Fortbildning av personer som ger indirekt service till barn med funktionshinder1999In: Elever med flera funktionsnedsättningar i särskolan: Utbildningens effekter och effektivitet, Stockholm: Stiftelsen ALA & Skolverket , 1999, p. 383-472Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 103.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Wilder, Jenny
    Mälardalen University.
    Ylvén, Regina
    AAC Interventions for Children in a Family Environment: Implementing Evidence in Practise2008In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 207-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interventions that focus on implementing augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) strategies and methods have been available to children in need of AAC and their families for at least 30 years. To date, most of the research that has considered AAC in family settings has been focused on gathering evidence of the effects of AAC interventions, rather than on implementing evidence-based strategies in everyday practice to improve outcomes. The purpose of this article is to discuss the research that has focused on parents as AAC interventionists, the family as a context for AAC intervention, and the effects of AAC interventions on children and other family members. The discussion is framed within the four steps associated with the process of knowledge translation: (a) deciding on desired outcomes of interventions, (b) evaluating evidence of the effectiveness of different AAC methods to obtain the desired outcomes, (c) translating the research evidence into everyday practice, and (d) implementing knowledge in practice.

     

  • 104.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Mälardalens högskola, Institutionen för samhälls- och beteendevetenskap.
    Eriksson, Lilly
    Mälardalens högskola, Institutionen för samhälls- och beteendevetenskap.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalens högskola, Institutionen för samhälls- och beteendevetenskap.
    Luttropp, Agneta
    Mälardalens högskola, Institutionen för samhälls- och beteendevetenskap.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Delaktighet: Sammanfattning av ett forskningsprojekt2003Report (Other academic)
  • 105.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Sandell, C
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Ekokulturell intervju: en pilotstudie1998Report (Other academic)
  • 106.
    Hammarström, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research.
    Utvärdering av grundskollärarlinjen vid Högskolan i Jönköping: Del 1, Att utvärdera grundskollärarutbildning : utvärderings- och uppföljningsprogram1991Report (Other academic)
  • 107. Hultegård, Å
    et al.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research.
    Manual för skattning av Tidig Social Kommunikation1997Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 108.
    Ibragimova, Nina
    et al.
    Department for Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, Västeras, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Field trial of the ICF version for children and youth (ICF-CY) in Sweden: Logical coherence, developmental issues and clinical use2009In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 3-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: For ICF-CY to be used in clinical practice several issues have to be resolved concerning the logical coherence in the model, developmental and functional issues as well as clinical feasibility. Purpose: The aim is to investigate feasibility of ICF-CY as expressed by ICF-CY questionnaires in assessment prior to intervention. Methods: One hundred and thirty-nine professionals working with intervention for children with disabilities used ICF-CY questionnaires in assessment. The professionals rated and commented on the feasibility of ICF-CY and ICF-CY questionnaire. Logical coherence, developmental issues and clinical use were investigated. Results: The logical coherence on component level was good (KMO = 0.126, p < 0.005). To investigate developmental and functional issues in the model children, four age groups were compared with the help of one-way ANOVA. Significant differences were found between children younger than 3 and children 3-6 and 7-12 in four chapters in the component Activities/Participation. Professionals consider that ICF-CY is feasible in intervention but experience difficulties when using the components and qualifiers in the ICF-CY and suggest changes. Discussion: ICF-CY as expressed in ICF-CY questionnaires is a feasible tool in assessment and intervention. However, several issues can be developed and discussed to facilitate implementation of ICF-CY in clinical practice.

  • 109.
    Karlsson, Maria
    et al.
    School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Changing services to children with disabilities and their families through in-service training: is the organisation affected?2008In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 207-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Professional development in family‐centred services was given to professionals supporting children with disabilities and their families with the purpose to influence ways to perform working tasks. Is it possible to change ways of working through in‐service training? In order to find answers to that question perceptions of in‐service training at different organisational levels were collected by interviews. Ways to perform working tasks were investigated by self‐reported ratings on questionnaires. What kind of change the teams experienced was analysed through written assignments at the end of professional development. The study builds on a longitudinal design. Watzlawick and co‐workers identified orders of change to analyse perceptions of, and changes following, professional development. The findings reveal that participants at different levels of the organisation have similar perceptions of the in‐service training. They are described more in depth by participants within the organisation, rather than the ones outside (parents and managers), who describe the consequences of the professional development rather than the professional development process. After professional development, the family approach has been adopted among most professionals; for example, are assessment tools and model for habilitation plans which were presented in the professional development used afterwards in everyday work? This implies a second‐order change. However, some professionals do claim that the family‐centred way of working is nothing new to them, which corresponds to a first‐order change. Professional development in conjunction with resources for implementing change after professional development are therefore seen as factors that facilitate second‐order change.

  • 110.
    Klang Ibragimova, Nina
    et al.
    School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen university.
    Pless, Mia
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala universitet.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Using content analysis to link texts on assessment and intervention to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - version for Children and Youth (ICF-CY)2011In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 728-733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore how content analysis can be used together with linking rules to link texts on assessment and intervention to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health – version for children and youth (ICF-CY).

    Methods: Individual habilitation plans containing texts on assessment and intervention for children with disabilities and their families were linked to the ICF-CY using content analysis. Texts were first divided into meaning units in order to extract meaningful concepts. Meaningful concepts that were difficult to link to ICF-CY codes were grouped, and coding schemes with critical attributes were developed. Meaningful concepts that could not be linked to the ICF-CY were assigned to the categories “not-definable” and “not-covered”, using coding schemes with mutually exclusive categories.

    Results: The size of the meaning units selected resulted in different numbers and contents of meaningful concepts. Coding schemes with critical attributes of ICF-CY codes facilitated the linking of meaningful concepts to the most appropriate ICF-CY codes. Coding schemes with mutually exclusive categories facilitated the classification of meaningful concepts that could or could not be linked to the ICF-CY.

    Conclusion: Content analysis techniques can be applied togetherwith linking rules in order to link texts on assessmentand intervention to the ICF-CY.

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  • 111.
    Kyriazopoulou, Mary
    et al.
    European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education.
    Bartolo, PaulEuropean Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education.Björck-Åkesson, EvaJönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.Giné, ClimentUniversitat Ramon Llull, Barcelona, Spain.Bellour, Flora
    Inclusive Early Childhood Education Environment: New Insights and Tools - Contributions from a European Study2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
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    Fulltext
  • 112. Lenardi, Mathilde
    et al.
    Chatterji, Somnath
    Ayuso-Mateos, Jose Luis
    Hollenweger, Judith
    Ustun, Bedirhan
    Kostanjek, Nenad Friedrich Ivan
    Newton, Alistair
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Francescutti, Carlo
    Alonso, Jordi
    Matucci, Marina
    Samoilescu, Adriana
    Good, Anne
    Cieza, Alarcos
    Svestkova, Olga
    Bullinger, Monica
    Marincek, Crt
    Burger, Helena
    Raggi, Alberto
    Bickenbach, Jerome Edmond
    From functioning and disability measurement to policy development: The experience of the EU-MHADIE Project (Measuring Health and Disability inEurope: supporting policy development)2010In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, ISSN ISSN 0963-8288, Vol. 32, no S1, p. 139-147Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 113.
    Leonardi, Matilde
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Neurology, Public Health and Disability Unit, Neurological Institute C. Besta IRRCS Foundation, Milan, Italy.
    Chatterji, Somnath
    Department of Health Statistics and Informatics, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Ayuso-Mateos, José Luís
    Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Hollenweger, Judith
    National Disability Authority, Dublin, Ireland.
    Üstün, Bedirhan
    Department of Health Statistics and Informatics, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Kostanjsek, Nenad Friedrich Ivan
    Department of Health Statistics and Informatics, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Newton, Alistair
    European Federation of Neurological Association, Brussels, Belgium.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication.
    Francescutti, Carlo
    Italian WHO Collaborating Centre for the Family of International Classifications, Friuli Venezia Giulia Region, Udine, Italy.
    Alonso, Jordi
    Health Services Research Unit, IMIM-Hospital del Mar, Barcelona, Spain.
    Matucci, Marina
    Regione Lombardia, Direzione Generale Famiglia e Solidarietà Sociale.
    Samoilescu, Adriana
    National Authority for the Persons with Handicap, Bucharest, Romania.
    Good, Anne
    National Disability Authority, Dublin, Ireland.
    Cieza, Alarcos
    Institute for Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany.
    Svestkova, Olga
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Bullinger, Monika
    Department for Medical Psychology, University Clinic of Hamburg-Eppendorf , Hamburg, Germany.
    Marincek, Crt
    Institute for Rehabilitation, Republic of Slovenia, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Burger, Helena
    Institute for Rehabilitation, Republic of Slovenia, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Raggi, Alberto
    Neurology, Public Health and Disability Unit, Neurological Institute C. Besta IRRCS Foundation, Milan, Italy.
    Bickenbach, Jerome Edmond
    Swiss Paraplegic Research (SPF), ICF Research Branch of the World Health Organization' Family of International Classifications Collaborating Center in Germany.
    Integrating research into policy planning: MHADIE policy recommendations2010In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 32, no S1, p. 139-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    MHADIE project (Measuring Health and Disability in Europe: Supporting policy development) aimed at developing realistic, evidence-based and effective national policies for persons with disabilities. A preliminary step towards this goal was the demonstration on the feasibility of employing the ICF in clinical, educational and statistical fields, which corresponds to the recognised need to enhance the European Union's capacity of analysis of disability, as highlighted in its Disability Action Plan 2006–2007. The ultimate outcome of the project is the production of 13 policy recommendations, dealing with statistics clinical and educational areas, and four general policy recommendations focusing on: (a) the need of coordinating and integrating disability conceptualisation at all policy levels and across sectors; (b) the need of conducing longitudinal cohort studies which include children aged 0–6; (c) the need of reviewing transportation policies in light of the requirements of persons with disabilities; (d) the need of reviewing all disability policies to emphasise and support the role of the family, which is a consistent and substantial environmental facilitator in the lives of persons with disabilities.

  • 114.
    Lillvist, Anne
    et al.
    School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Anette
    School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    The construct of social competence: how preschool teachers define social competence in young children2009In: International Journal of Early Childhood, ISSN 0020-7187, E-ISSN 1878-4658, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 51-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preschool teachers share their environment with young children on a daily basis and interventions promoting social competence are generally carried out in the preschool setting. The aim was to find out if and how preschool teachers' definitions of social competence are related to factors in the preschool environment like: a) the number of children having problems related to social competence; b) the support provided to the children; and c) the preschool environment and current research definitions. Method: 481 preschools from 22 municipalities in Sweden participated. Data was analyzed using a mixed methods design in which a qualitative content analysis was followed by group comparisons using quantitative methods. Results: Preschool teachers defined social competence mainly as intrapersonal skills, or as interpersonal relations. The definitions of social competence were not related to the numbers of children having problems related to social skills or social competence in units, the amount of the support provided to the children or the preschool environment. Conclusion: Preschool teachers' definitions of social competence are partly multidimensional, which implies that the interventions aimed at promoting children's social skills and social competence also should be multidimensional. Preschool teachers' definitions of social competence have little relevance to environmental factors, which indicate that social competence, as a construct is more dependent upon perceptions of the individual than on contextual factors.

  • 115.
    Nilholm, Claes
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Other School Based Research.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Inledning2007In: Reflektioner kring specialpedagogik: sex professorer om forskningsområdet och forskningsfronterna / [ed] Claes Nilholm och Eva Björck-Åkesson, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2007, p. 7-16Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 116.
    Nilholm, Claes
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Other School Based Research. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, EvaJönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Reflektioner kring specialpedagogik: Sex professorer om forskningsområdet och forskningsfronterna2007Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 117.
    Pinto, Ana I
    et al.
    Porto University , Porto , Portugal.
    Grande, Catarina
    Porto University , Porto , Portugal.
    Coelho, Vera
    Porto University , Porto , Portugal.
    Castro, Susana
    University of Roehampton , London , UK.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Beyond diagnosis: the relevance of social interactions for participation in inclusive preschool settings2018In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 390-399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: This study aims to explore the role of three specific factors within the child-environment interaction process - engagement, independence and social interactions - in influencing development and learning of children with disabilities in inclusive preschool settings. The main question is whether children can be categorised in homogenous groups based on engagement, independence and social interactions (proximal variables within a biopsychosocial framework of human development). The study also examined whether children with the same diagnosis would group together or separately, when trying to identify clusters of engagement, independence and social interactions, and additionally whether such clusters vary as a function of individual child characteristics, and/or as a function of structural and process characteristics of preschool environment.

    METHODS: Data was taken from an intervention study conducted in mainstream preschools in Portugal. A person-centered cluster analysis was conducted to explore group membership of children with various diagnoses, based on their engagement, independence and social interaction profiles.

    RESULTS: Results show that children clustered based on similarity of engagement, independence and social interaction patterns, rather than on diagnosis. Besides, it was found that quality of peer interaction was the only predictor of cluster membership.

    CONCLUSION: These findings support the argument that participation profiles may be more informative for intervention purposes than diagnostic categories, and that preschool process quality, namely peer interaction, is crucial for children's participation.

  • 118. Pless, Mia
    et al.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Om evidens för ICF2011In: Handbok i att använda ICF och ICF-CY / [ed] Mia Pless & Mats Granlund, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2011, 1:1, p. 185-195Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 119.
    Pless, Mia
    et al.
    Uppsala university, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ibragimova, Nina
    Mälardalen university, School of Education, Culture, and Communication.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Evaluation of in-service training in using the ICF and ICF version for children and youth2009In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 451-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To study the effects of in-service training on staff's self-reported knowledge, understanding use of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and ICF Children and Youth version (ICF-CY).

    DESIGN:

    Quasi-experimental with a questionnaire prior to training and another one year after training.

    METHODS:

    Intervention was in-service training in using the ICF and ICF-CY. Subjects were 113 professionals working in habilitation services. Two subgroups were compared: (i) subjects who reported one year after the training that they had used the ICF and ICF-CY in daily practice; and (ii) subjects who had not used these frameworks.

    RESULTS:

    The gender, age, and years of work experience of the members in the subgroups were similar. The professionals who used what they learnt from the training, and who already had knowledge about and a positive attitude to the ICF/ICF-CY prior to the training, were found to benefit most from the training. They also increased their ability to apply it to statements about everyday work. These professionals should focus on increasing their understanding and use of the ICF/ICF-CY in their everyday work and in assessment, while those who have limited prior knowledge of the ICF/ICF-CY should focus on gaining knowledge and understanding the purpose, terms and components of the framework.

    CONCLUSION:

    It is recommended that in-service training in using the ICF and ICF-CY is tailored to different groups of professionals depending on their degree of knowledge of the ICF/ICF-CY.

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    Evaluation of in-service training in using the ICF and ICF version for children and youth
  • 120.
    Raghavendra, Pammi
    et al.
    Novita Children’s Services, Flinders University, and University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.
    Bornman, Juan
    University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    The World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health: implications for clinical and research practice in the field of augmentative and alternative communication2007In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 349-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2001, the World Health Organization (WHO) ratified and published a new classification system, the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). There has been a varying amount of discussion and debate across the health and disability fields about what the ICF means and what it has to offer. However, there has been little discussion of its use and value in the field of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). This article describes the earlier International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities, and Handicaps (ICIDH), upon which the current ICF was based; and outlines the ICF and the preliminary, derived Child and Youth version of the ICF (ICF-CY). The article also proposes what the ICF has to offer the AAC field, from both a clinical and research perspective; and concludes with a discussion of the advantages and challenges of using the ICF.

  • 121. Sandberg, A
    et al.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Disabilities and the Play Environment: A Study of adults with Visual Disability, Motor Disability, and Asberger Syndrome Play Experiences from Childhood2003In: Mental Health and Mental Retardation: A lifespan Multidisciplinary Approach: Abstract Book from the 4th European Congress, 17 – 20th September 2003, Italy, Rome, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 122.
    Sandberg, Anette
    et al.
    Department of Social Sciences, Mälardalens University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Play in retrospection: play experiences from childhood in adults with visual disability, motor disability and Asperger syndrome2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 111-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to analyze and describe how adults with visual disability, motor disability and Asperger syndrome retrospectively identify and experience play in their childhood. Fifteen adults, aged 25 to 76 years, were interviewed about their play experiences. A qualitative approach was adopted with the aim to describe qualitatively different experiences of play. The findings indicate that play experiences merge like mirror images with participation and exclusion as two divergent sides of play. The data suggest that niches for play experiences include three components related to participation and exclusion: a personal component, a social component and an environmental component. Type of disability is one of many aspects making up the three components without being a central feature within any of the components. Type of disability affects personal characteristics and preferences, form of social interaction and the environmental requirements for participating in play but not the experience of play per se. Unique to this study is the importance assigned to the concept of niche. Perceived niches are based on memories and also influence the construction of memories. Thus, they function as a link between perceptions of experiences of play from childhood to adulthood.

  • 123.
    Sandberg, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Institutionen för samhälls- och beteendevetenskap.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Mälardalens högskola, Institutionen för samhälls- och beteendevetenskap.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Mälardalens högskola, Institutionen för samhälls- och beteendevetenskap.
    Eriksson, Lilly
    Mälardalens högskola, Institutionen för samhälls- och beteendevetenskap.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Mälardalens högskola, Institutionen för samhälls- och beteendevetenskap.
    Hur definieras barn i behov av särskilt stöd?2005In: Excellence in Special Education - Time to move on, Mälardalens högskola, 26-27 sep, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 124.
    Sandberg, Anette
    et al.
    School of Education, Culture and Communication, The Research Program CHILD , Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Lillvist, Anne
    School of Education, Culture and Communication, The Research Program CHILD , Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Lilly
    Institute of Public Health, Östersund, Sweden.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    "Special support" in preschools in Sweden: Preschool staff's definition of the construct2010In: International journal of disability, development and education, ISSN 1034-912X, E-ISSN 1465-346X, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 43-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the definitions of the construct “young children in need of special support” given by preschool staff in Sweden in 540 preschool units. The study has a mixed‐methods design based on qualitative analysis of an open‐ended question and quantitative analysis of questionnaire responses. The results reveal two general perspectives in definitions of the construct, a child perspective and an organisational perspective. Units with a child perspective had a higher proportion of children in need of special support, especially girls. The study highlights that the term “children in need of special support” is partially socially constructed and is partially based on perceived child characteristics. The perceptions of what is considered to be a child in need of special support held by staff in a unit may impact on the services provided to children in need of special support.

  • 125.
    Simeonsson, R. J.
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Leonardi, M
    Lollar, D
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Hollenweger, J
    International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF): Toward a universal classification of disability in childhood2002In: Social Science and Medicine: Special IssueArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 126.
    Simeonsson, Rune J.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Leonardi, Mathilde
    Italian National Neurological Institute ‘‘Carlo Besta’’, Milan, Italy, and the World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Lollar, Don
    National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Hollenweger, Judith
    Pädagogische Hochschule Zürich, Department of Research and Development, Zürich, Switzerland.
    Martinuzzi, Andrea
    Medea, Conegliano Research Centre, Conegliano, Italy.
    Applying the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to measure childhood disability2003In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 25, no 11-12, p. 602-610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health-ICF addresses the broad need for a common language and classification of functioning and disability. A parallel need is appropriate measures compatible with the content of the ICF to document the nature and impact of limitations of function, activities and participation. The interaction of developmental characteristics and disability among children represent special challenges for classification as well as measurement. Demographic trends emphasize the need for universal measures that encompass the components of the ICF and can be used in surveillance, screening and evaluation. This paper identifies issues related to application of the ICF to measure disability in childhood; reviews approaches and tools to assess childhood disability and identifies priorities for the development of measures of functioning and disability in children based on the ICF. The development of measures should be framed within a framework of children's rights and application of the biopsychosocial model to document profiles of functioning and disability of children.

  • 127.
    Simeonsson, Rune
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Lollar, Donald J.
    Communication, Disability, and the ICF-CY2012In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 3-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The child’s interactions with persons in the proximal environment constitute the context for development of communication. Within early close relationships, the child acquires communication skills; developmental outcomes are defined by the continuous dynamic interactions of the child, the experiences provided by the family and close environment, and the use of different means of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Communication problems manifest in a variety of ways and at different levels of severity. The nature of problems differs as a function of the child’s age and diagnosed condition, the communication skills of interaction partners, and the availability of communication aids. The focus for assessment and intervention may be the child, the family, the close environment and/or the interactions between them. Clarifying these varied functions and environmental factors is crucial for appropriate assessment and provision of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) interventions. This paper reviews issues in assessment and intervention for children in need of AAC and presents the World Health Organizations’ (WHO) International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health version for Children and Youth (ICF-CY) as a tool to enhance assessment and intervention in the AAC field. Read 

  • 128.
    Simeonsson, Rune
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Classifying mental retardation: impairment, disability, handicap, limitations or restrictions?2002In: What is mental retardation?: Ideas for an evolving disability, Washington DC.: American Association on Mental retardation , 2002, p. 309-329Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 129.
    Simeonsson, Rune
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    The Concept and Classification of Mental Retardation2006In: What is mental retardation?: Ideas for an evolviong Disability in the 21st Century, Washington D.C.: American Association on Mental Retardation , 2006, p. 245-264Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 130.
    Simeonsson, Rune J.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Lopes-dos-Santos, Pedro
    International Collaboration - Added Value2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In line with the primary purpose of ISEI, to provide a framework and forum for professionals from around the world to communicate about advances in the field of early intervention, this symposium aims to discuss and raise issues related to the added value of international collaboration in early childhood intervention research and education today and in the future. It is informed by experiences of the EU-US Transatlantic Consortium on Early Intervention (EU-US Atlantis Programme, Excellence Mobility Project 2001-2013) and from collaboration in ISEI. Building on multilateral collaboration and agreements between universities and funding agencies, based on equal standards for quality we can share and learn from each other. By developing joint priorities building on the strengths in individual countries a common theoretical framework for research and education related to early intervention has been created guiding policy and practice.

  • 131.
    Simeonsson, Rune J.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Lollar, Don
    Public Health & Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR, USA.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Brown, Scott C.
    Westat, Washington, DC, USA.
    Zhuoying, Qiu
    Rehabilitation Institute, Beijing, China.
    Gray, David
    Occupational Therapy & Neurology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USA.
    Pan, Yi
    FPG Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
    ICF and ICF-CY lessons learned: Pandora’s box of personal factors2014In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 36, no 25, p. 2187-2194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this article is to examine the component of “personal factors” described as a contextual factor in the ICF and ICF-CY.

    Methods: A critical examination of the construct of “personal factors” and description of the component was made with reference to conceptual and taxonomic criteria.

    Results: The “personal factors” component in the ICF/ICF-CY is not defined, there is no taxonomy of codes, there is no explicit purpose stated for its use and no guidelines are provided for its application. In spite of these constraints, the component of “personal factors” is being applied as part of the classifications. Such uncontrolled applications constitute significant risks for the status of ICF/ICF-CY as the WHO reference classification in that: (a) the component is accepted for use by default simply by being applied; (b) component content is expanded with idiosyncratic exemplars by users; and (c) there is potential misuse of “personal factors” in documenting personal attributes, including “blaming the victim”.

    Conclusion: In the absence of formal codes, any application of the component of “personal factors” lacks the legitimacy that documentation with a scientific taxonomy should provide. Given the growing use of the ICF/ICF-CY globally, a priority for the revision process should be to determine if there is in fact need for “personal” or any other factors in the ICF/ICF-CY.

  • 132.
    Simeonsson, Rune J.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Sauer-Lee, Andrea
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Developmental and Health Assessment in Rehabilitation with the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth2010In: Rehabilitation and Health Assessment: Applying ICF Guidelines / [ed] Elias Mpofu and Thomas Oakland, New York: Springer , 2010, p. 27-46Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 133. Sinker, M
    et al.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research.
    Brodin, J
    Fagundes, V
    Kim, F
    Hellberg, G
    Lindberg, M
    Trieschmann, M
    Childrens' concept of play: A study in four countries1993Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 134.
    Wilder, Jenny
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education and Communication, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Cooperación entre professionales y familias de niños con pluridiscapacidad2012In: Pluridiscapacidad y contextos de intervención / [ed] Emili Soro-Camats, Carme Basil, Carme Rosell, Barcelona: Institut de Ciències de l'Educació (ICE) , 2012, p. 149-162Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 135.
    Ylvén, Regina
    et al.
    Department of Social Sciences, Mälardalen University, Västerås.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Literature review of positive functioning in families with children with a disability2006In: Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, ISSN 1741-1122, E-ISSN 1741-1130, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 253-270Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 136. Zachrisson, Gerd
    et al.
    Rydeman, Bitte
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Gemensam problemlösning vid alternativ och kompletterande kommunikation (AAK)2002Report (Other academic)
  • 137.
    Åström, Frida
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Sjöman, Madeleine
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Everyday environments and activities of children and teachers in Swedish preschools2020In: Early Child Development and Care, ISSN 0300-4430, E-ISSN 1476-8275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How preschool teachers and children spend their time in preschool sets the stage for child engagement and learning. To describe characteristics of environments and activities and to compare child engagement in indoor and outdoor free play, systematic observations of children and teachers were performed in 78 Swedish preschool units. Results showed that indoor and outdoor free play were the main activity settings. Children interacted as much with other children as with teachers. The content focus was dominated by non-pretend play, construction, art and music, followed by pretend play and academic contents. Child engagement was significantly higher in free play indoors compared to outdoors. Teachers engaged in varied tasks, but their central task was managing. Teachers were typically in proximity to small groups of children, or by themselves, and mostly talked to or listened to a single child. Findings are discussed in relation to the preschool curriculum and future research needs.

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